Report to/Rapport au :

 

Corporate Services and Economic Development Committee

Comité des services organisationnels et du développement économique

 

and Council / et au Conseil

 

29 November 2005/29 novembre 2005

 

Submitted by/Soumis par: Greg Geddes, Chief Corporate Services Officer /

chef des Services généraux, Corporate Services/Services généraux 

 

Contact/Personne ressource: Stephen Finnamore, Director, Real Property Asset Management/Directeur, Gestion des actifs et des biens immobiliers

580-2424, ext. 28859, Stephen.Finnamore@ottawa.ca

 

 

 

                  Ref N°: ACS2005-CRS-RPM-0046

 

 

SUBJECT:

 

2006 CITY OF OTTAWA MUNICIPAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN

 

OBJET :

 

PLAN D’ACCESSIBILITÉ MUNICIPAL 2006 DE LA VILLE D’OTTAWA

 

REPORT RECOMMENDATIONS

 

That the Corporate Services and Economic Development Committee recommend that City Council approve:

 

1.                  Subject to the 2006 budget process, the 2006 City of Ottawa Municipal Accessibility Plan (COMAP) for implementation, as required by the Province’s Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 (AODA).

 

2.                   Subject to the 2006 budget process, the human resource requirements to support the identification and barrier removal work as required by legislation, by establishing a full time Accessibility Inventory Officer, 1.0 FTE, and a part time Data Entry Clerk, 0.6 FTE, to be located in the Real Property Asset Management Branch (RPAM), Corporate Services Portfolio.

 

RECOMMANDATIONS DU RAPPORT

Que le Comité des services organisationnels et du développement économique recommande au Conseil municipal d’approuver :

 

1. sous réserve du processus budgétaire 2006, le Plan d’accessibilité municipal 2006 de la Ville d’Ottawa pour mise en œuvre, comme l’exige la Loi de 2005 sur l’accessibilité pour les personnes handicapées de l’Ontario.

 

2. sous réserve du processus budgétaire 2006, l’affectation des ressources humaines nécessaires à la détermination et à l’élimination des obstacles, comme la loi l’exige, par l’établissement d’un poste d’agent d’inventaire de l’accessibilité à temps plein (1,0 ÉTP) et d’un poste de commis à la saisie de données à temps partiel (0,6 ÉTP), qui relèveront de la Direction de la gestion des biens immobiliers, portefeuille des Services généraux.

 

 

BACKGROUND

 

On 14 June 2005, Bill 118, the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA), 2005 received Royal Assent in the provincial legislature.  This legislation complements the first accessibility act of 2001, the Ontarians with Disabilities Act, which mandated public sector organizations, i.e. the MUSH group (municipalities, universities, schools and hospitals) to identify barriers to accessibility for persons with disabilities and develop strategies to remove existing barriers and prevent creation of new ones.  Both provincial legislations aim at creating an accessible society where every Ontarian has the opportunity to learn, work, play and participate to their fullest potential.  According to this new legislation, all public and private organizations will have to show an improvement in accessibility by 25% every five years until 2025 when Ontario is to be fully accessible.  Some key highlights of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 are:

 

Ø       Development, implementation and enforcement of mandatory province-wide accessibility standards

Ø       Accessibility standards will apply to both public and private sectors

Ø       Accessibility improvements to be phased in over 20 years, in five year stages

Ø       An accessibility standard may create different classes of businesses or organizations or of buildings, structures or premises

Ø       The City will have to file an annual accessibility report and make it public

Ø       Public education programs will be conducted on the purpose and implementation of the Act and will target schools, colleges, universities, trade or occupational associations and self-governing professions to build accessibility awareness

Ø       Inspectors will conduct accessibility inspections

Ø       A comprehensive review will be conducted by the province every three years to report on the implementation and effectiveness of the Act

 

It is worth noting that the forward thinking and decision making of Ottawa City Council leading up to the AODA has enabled citizens and employees to celebrate accessibility achievements to date and better position the City to address the requirements of the AODA.  This has been demonstrated by City Council’s decisions to approve the creation of a corporate interdepartmental Accessibility Steering Committee, and the establishment of a full-time corporate Accessibility Specialist and Accessible Transit Specialist in the last two years.  The AODA requires that the City of Ottawa continue its progressive path of ensuring accessibility for all citizens, particularly, persons with disabilities.


 

DISCUSSION

 

The City of Ottawa has taken great strides in promoting a barrier-free city for both its employees and residents.  In accordance with Ottawa’s 20/20 vision, the City Corporate Plan, and Council’s direction on promoting accessible services and programs, the City realizes that creating a caring and inclusive environment is an ongoing evolution and remains committed to enhancing the ability of residents and employees to participate fully in everything it has to offer. 

 

Along with its ongoing programming and service delivery commitment to address accessibility issues, the City has publicly promoted a barrier free city through a partnership with CJOH, as well as declaring August 24th as “Accessibility and Inclusion Day” on an annual basis.    On

3 December 2005, the City will be presenting an Accessibility by Design award to an organization that has demonstrated excellence in an innovative architectural, or interior, design that facilitates access for persons with disabilities.  The City will be presenting this award and participating as a sponsor at the awards gala on December 3rd, the United Nations International Day of Disabled Persons.  The City continues to contribute to these and many other public facing events and messages as ways of promoting awareness on accessibility issues. Each department or service area in the City of Ottawa has made significant contributions towards achieving a barrier free city.  The attached 2005 Achievements (Attachment 1) and 2006 Initiatives (Attachment 2) provides a detailed report on the departmental achievements of 2005 and the initiatives to be undertaken in 2006.  Highlights of some major achievements and initiatives are:

 

 

 

 

 


 

CHALLENGES

 

Meeting the sStandards of the nNew lLegislation

 

The AODA is a positive and progressive move towards a fully accessible Ontario. Its implementation will impose new accessible standards that will require increased monetary and human resource commitments for the City of Ottawa over the next 25 years.  . 

The AODA mandates the development of standards in four key areas:  1) built environment 2) communications 3) customer service and 4) transit services.  In the absence of provincial accessibility standards, the City of Ottawa has been researching the adoption of accessibility guidelines for the built environment in order to undertake barrier identification and barrier removal work.  In 2003, the City retained the services of Beyond Ability Inc. to assist in this review and the City continues to seek clarity from the Province on the guidelines to be applied. In the interim, as outlined in the 2004-2005 COMAP, RPAM has employed a combination of Canadian Standards Association and Ontario Building Code accessibility guidelines to address its barrier identification and barrier removal work plan and is conducting further comparative research on these codes and standards as they pertain to individual accessibility features and elements. 

 

It is not possible at this time to accurately estimate the financial or other impacts of the legislation until new standards are developed and announced by the Province.  It is clear, however, that the financial impacts of the legislation must be borne by individual public and private organizations. 

 

Pending the confirmation of provincial targets in identifying and removing barriers, it is expected that the size of the City’s capital program will need to increase to meet the required legislation. The internal and external resources needed to plan and execute accessibility retrofits will also need to be secured.  Therefore, the lack of identified standards at this point makes it difficult for the City of Ottawa to fully quantify its suggested targets for 2006.  Once provincial standards and targets are announced, the City will have to modify its long-range financial plan in response to the fulfillment of these targets.

 

The City is also pursuing the opportunity of participating in the province-wide call to sit on the Standards Development Committees to develop provincial accessibility standards.  Based on the province’s initial focus on the transportation and customer service sectors, qualified City staff will be asked to apply for these committees to represent the City of Ottawa’s interest and provide the technical expertise in each sector.   

 

Resourcing to mMeet the nNew lLegislation 

 

With the passing of the AODA, public and private sector organizations will have to increase access to facilities, transportation, housing and services by 25% every 5 years, until 2025, when Ontario is expected to be fully accessible.  .

 

Resourcing the City’s accessibility initiatives is a critical factor for long-term success in meeting the new legislation. In 2005, the City hired a Corporate Accessibility Specialist to ensure that the annual COMAP remains comprehensive and progressive. It also confirmed the Transit Accessibility Specialist who has been instrumental in the OC Transpo’s accessibility initiatives over the last several years.

 

During the past two years, the City has addressed the human resource requirement for undertaking building accessibility work, both for audits and inventory management, using a combination of permanent, temporary full-time and part-time staff, located in RPAM. Based on the long term and extensive requirement to support barrier identification and barrier removal work in buildings and parks, RPAM is recommending the conversion of the Accessibility Inventory Officer to permanent full-time status and the Data Entry Clerk to continuous part-time status, both of which are currently funded from capital. Once the provincially mandated barrier removal targets are confirmed for the City, RPAM will assess resource requirements and confirm them as part of future City of Ottawa accessibility plans.

 

Planning to mMeet the nNew lLegislation

 

When the accessibility program is adequately resourced, detailed strategic plans will be developed in consultation with the Accessibility Advisory Committee and the Community Coalition, to address the requirements of the legislation. The 2006 COMAP contains a 3-year strategic plan a fro from Community & Protective sServices and five-year, and beyond, work plans for both Public Works & Services and RPAM, that begin to demonstrate the actions required to meet the accessibility requirements as identified top date. Reference Appendices 4,5, & 6 in the COMAP.

 

However, similar to the Long Range Financial Plan developed by the City, these strategies need to be further developed to identify the actions/activities needed to meet the four five-year terms, as prescribed in the legislation for the City to become barrier free by 2025.

 

 

CONSULTATIONS

 

The City of Ottawa participated in a provincial forum on the development of the new accessibility legislation, AODA, during the first quarter of 2005.  Corporate Services is in continuous discussions with the provincial representative from the Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration and the Accessibility Directorate of Ontario to ensure consultation on any provincial developments regarding the legislative requirements. 

 

Continued collaboration with the Ottawa Police Service ensures continued sharing of information and good practices in relation to the COMAP. 

 

Finally, the Accessibility Steering Committee has worked in collaboration with the Accessibility Advisory Committee to develop the 2006 COMAP. 

 

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

 

In most cases, accessibility requirements related to ongoing City services and programs are incorporated into each department’s annual operating budget.  

 

For new capital works, accessibility standards are met as part of the program of requirements and accounted for in each department’s respective capital budgets.

 

All retrofit accessibility work related to the built environment is accounted for in the RPAM capital program, specifically, the “Accessibility (strategic) 2006 Project Number 903875.  To meet the requirements of the Province’s AODA, any additional capital funding authority will be identified in the City’s Long Range Financial Plan.

 

The 2006 capital budget estimates for RPAM include under capital project 903875 (Accessibility) $100,000 to cover the cost of the 1.6 FTEs. Approval of this report will result in a reduction of the capital pay- as- you- go contribution and a subsequent increase in the RPAM operating estimates plus an increase to the RPAM FTE count by 1.6 FTEs for the establishment of the full-time Accessibility Inventory Officer and the part-time Data Entry Clerk.

 

 

SUPPORTING DOCUMENTATION

 

Attachment 1 – 2005 Achievements

Attachment 2 – 2006 Initiatives

 

 

DISPOSITION

 

Corporate Services staff will undertake the coordination of the implementation of the 2006 COMAP. Staff in each City portfolio will ensure that accessibility works are undertaken in their respective areas. The Accessibility Steering Committee will report back annually on the progress made on implementing the 2006 COMAP.

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

2006

CITY OF OTTAWA

MUNICIPAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN

(COMAP)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Submitted by

The Accessibility Steering Committee

In collaboration with

The City of Ottawa Accessibility Advisory Committee

October 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aussi disponible en français

This document is available upon request in a multiple format


 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Section 1: Introduction

Section 2: Objectives

Section 3: Key Achievements

Section 4: Key Challenges

Section 5: Strategic Planning

Section 6: Barrier Identification

Section 7: New and Future Initiatives

Section 8: Consultation

Section 9: Resourcing the City of Ottawa Municipal Accessibility Plan

Section 10: Review and Monitoring Process

Section 11: Communication Strategy

 

APPENDICES:

 

Appendix 1 - Accessibility Steering Committee Membership

 

Appendix 2 - Accessibility Advisory Committee Membership

 

Appendix 3 - Ottawa Statistics - Special Needs

 

Appendix 4 - Public Works & Services 5 year & beyond Work Plan

 

Appendix 5 - Real Property Asset Management 5 year & beyond Work Plan

 

Appendix 6 - Community & Protective Services 3 year Strategic Plan


 

1.      INTRODUCTION

 

The City of Ottawa has taken great strides in promoting a barrier-free city for both its employees and residents.  In accordance with Ottawa’s 20/20 vision, the City Corporate Plan, and Council’s direction on promoting accessible services and programs, the City realizes that creating a caring and inclusive environment is an ongoing evolution and remains committed to enhancing the ability of residents and employees to participate fully in everything it has to offer.  Since the proclamation of the new accessibility legislation, Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA), 2005, the City is even more committed to meeting the legislated requirements as set out by the province.

 

2.      OBJECTIVES

 

The City of Ottawa Municipal Accessibility Plan (COMAP) provides an update of the barriers identified from last year and describes the measures the City will take in 2006 to remove existing barriers and prevent the creation of new ones so that all residents and visitors in our community can use City facilities, programs and services.  This Plan:

 

a)      Provides a status report of efforts to remove and prevent barriers identified from the 2004-2005 Municipal Accessibility Plan;

b)      Lists the facilities, policies, programs, practices, and services that the City will review in the coming year;

c)      Describes the measures the City will take in the coming year to identify, remove and prevent barriers to people with disabilities;

d)      Describes new or future accessibility initiatives for people with disabilities and makes recommendations to implement the plan; and

e)      Describes how the City will make the Plan available to the public.

 

3.      KEY ACHIEVEMENTS AND INITIATIVES

 

The City has made many achievements in the area of accessibility since last year’s Municipal Accessibility Plan was approved in January 2005.  The attached 2005 Achievements and 2006 Initiatives and 2006 Initiatives (Attachment 21 & 2) provide a detailed report on the departmental achievements of 2005and initiatives.  The following is a synopsis of some key achievements of 2005and initiatives listed by department:

 

a.      Community and Protective Services

 

The Community and Protective Services (CPS) Department brings together 11 service areas that touch the lives of Ottawa citizens everyday. The key factor that unites all these service areas is the ultimate goal of helping people and making a difference in the communities. CPS focuses on helping those in need, enabling communities to build capacity to help them and providing opportunities for citizens to maintain or improve their quality of life.

 

Key Achievements and Initiatives:

 

Ø       Opening of the Garry J. Armstrong Long Term Care Centre (replacing Island Lodge)

Ø       Parks & Recreation implemented a 2005 Summer Integration Pilot called “Shared Care” which supports safe integration and inclusion of special needs children/youth into summer day camp programs

Ø       Ottawa Public Library and the CNIB partnered on the VISUNET program to extend services to individuals who are print disabled

Ø       Approval of a harmonized Taxi By-Law to come into effect on 1 January 2006, whereby:

o       all new taxicab plates issued in the future will be for accessible vehicles

o       between 2006 and 2009, 160 new accessible taxicab plates will be issued at the rate of 40 per year

o       effective 2006, all new taxicab drivers must successfully complete both the standard and accessible taxi courses

o       effective March 2008, all accessible taxicabs must be equipped with a GPS (Global Positioning System) system linked to the taxicab broker in order to ensure requests for accessible service are given priority

o       London Black Cabs (accessible vehicles) are permitted to stay in service for 14 years

Ø       A Municipal Evacuation Project Plan has been established through the Office of Emergency Management.  This plan will reflect the response mechanism of all pertinent municipal and external resources in response to the need to move the affected population safely from hazardous areas to areas where their safety and well being will not be at risk.  Various community-based and voluntary organizations will be invited to coordinate their efforts through the Municipal Evacuation Plan.  Accessibility issues will be identified through representatives from Corporate Services.

 

b.      Corporate Services

 

The Corporate Services Department continuously provides supports to operating departments in addressing accessibility issues to residents and visitors of Ottawa.

 

Key Achievements and Initiatives:

 

Ø       Facilitated Accessibility Day at City Hall on 24 August 2005, in partnership with CJOH and Voiceprint Canada

Ø       Employee Services conducted a self-identification survey to Transit employees to determine the representation of designated groups, including persons with disabilities

Ø       Implemented web-casting of Council public meetings

Ø       Expanded and increased functionality of the City of Ottawa’s web site by maintaining level 1 World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) accessibility standards and is currently working towards meeting level 2 requirements

Ø       Launched a multi-jurisdictional government services counter at Ottawa City Hall

Ø       Implemented a new 3-1-1 system to facilitate enhanced access to all non-emergency municipal services

Ø       Through Real Property Asset Management’s (RPAM) capital program on “Building Accessibility” that manages barrier identification and removal work, more than 2000 barriers were removed and close to 150 buildings were audited.  With the kind assistance of MBNA Canada, RPAM salvaged dozens of power door operators from the City’s former Telesat property and reinstalled them in public use facilities throughout the City.

 

c.       Ottawa Police Service

 

Reporting to the Ottawa Police Services Board, the Ottawa Police Service has made accessibility an organizational priority by including “Access and Accessibility” as one of the four key result areas of the organization’s strategic framework for the 2004–2006 Business Plan.  Reports and presentations were tabled with the Police Services Board in March and June 2005.  They have partnered with the Canadian Association of Independent Living Centres (CAILC) to organize the National Safety Symposium:  Crime Prevention and Independent Living in order to build an agenda for crime prevention for persons with disabilities, both locally and nationally.  The first of its kind in Canada, the symposium brought together 210 people with disabilities, volunteers and leaders in the Independent Living Movement to work together with police, fire and paramedic first responders, policy makers, service providers and others.  The symposium was funded primarily by Justice Canada’s National Crime Prevention Partnership Program and in part by the Ottawa Police Service Partnership in Action program. 

 

The Ottawa Police Service is utilizing the findings from the symposium to develop a comprehensive “Framework for Independent Living Services” for implementation throughout the organization beginning in 2006.  The Ottawa Police Service continues to work closely with various city and community partners to plan and implement several immediate accessibility enhancements, as well as develop a longer-term comprehensive framework that will include the organization’s requirements under the COMAP and the recently proclaimed OADA.

 

Key Achievements and Initiatives:

 

Ø       Ottawa Police continuously develops partnerships with groups and organizations for public awareness campaigns

Ø       Accessibility audits were conducted by RPAM and Morrison Hershfield (consultant) for three Ottawa Police buildings including 474 Elgin Street (Headquarters), 4561 Bank Street (Leitrim), and 245 Greenbank Rd. (West Division)

 

d.      Planning and Growth Management

 

As part of the department’s ongoing activities, Planning and Growth Management continues to liaise with the Accessibility Advisory Committee for technical circulations on site plans and raise awareness of the importance of accessibility in our community through information sessions geared towards the development industry.

 

e.      Public Works and Services

 

The Department of Public Works and Services is comprised of six main areas: Surface Operations, Infrastructure Services, Utility Services, Traffic and Parking Operations, Fleet Services and Transit Services.  Public Works and Services are the front line staff that the public sees on the street every day. 

 

Key Achievements and Initiatives:

 

Ø      In 2005, ramping deficiencies at various locations were addressed through the Pedestrian Accessibility Program.  This program will continue in 2006.  Roadway intersection improvements were made as part of the rehabilitation and replacement of infrastructure, including median modification, signal pole relocations and signal timing improvements at 44 intersections.

Ø      To date, 17 new and / or reconstructed intersections have been equipped with audible devices in 2005 as part of the Audible Signal Program.  This program is ongoing with all new or rebuilt signals installed as audible (total of 40-45 signals made audible annually).

Ø      In 2005, 112 new low-floor accessible vehicles were added to the Transit fleet, resulting in a fleet that is 62% accessible.   In addition, the retrofit of non-functioning ramps on 20 Nova low-floor buses was completed.  The accessible route network was expanded to include 10 new routes to bring the accessible route network to 50 routes.

Ø      A total of 350 bus shelters were replaced, all accessible and equipped with accessible benches.

Ø      The Travel Training Program Pilot Project in 2004-2005 involved staff from community agencies teaching disabled clients to take conventional transit, independently or with an attendant. Some of the 300 participants in 2005 were from area high schools, the Royal Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa Rehabilitation Centre and group homes.   In 2006, 500 students from 12 different Ottawa agencies will be trained to use conventional transit. The travel-training program will accompany planned expansion of the accessible fleet, resulting in a fully accessible transit service and associated information and support services by 2015.

Ø      The Customer Accessibility Awareness Campaign involved grade five children from an English and Francophone class.  They were given a presentation about accessible transit and asked to draw posters with a slogan. These illustrations were matched with a picture of a customer with a disability who uses transit, resulting in five highly-visible, colourful posters on buses, designed to raise awareness amongst all transit riders of the special needs of many customers.

Ø      The Terry Fox Station in Kanata was completed and opened for service in 2005 and included many features designed to improve accessibility such as: barrier-free doors, Braille and tactile signage, direct information phone lines, large-print schedules and bus-stop numerals, and tactile curb strips.

Ø      An Ontario Disabilities Support Program (ODSP) Pass pilot project will begin in 2006 which will offer conventional transit passes at approximately 60% discount to low-income people with disabilities. If successful and implemented on a long-term basis, this pricing policy will help increase mobility of people who have few alternatives to transit, and for whom cost is a significant barrier to their use of transit. This subsidized pass also serves the long-term strategy of encouraging people to use conventional transit rather than Para Transpo by increasing their awareness of and access to OC Transpo’s accessible services.

 

4.      KEY CHALLENGES

 

The AODA is a positive and progressive move towards a fully accessible Ontario. Its implementation will impose new accessible standards that will require increased monetary and human resource commitments for the City of Ottawa over the next 25 years. 

 

The AODA mandates the development of standards in four key areas:  1) built environment, 2) communications, 3) customer service and 4) transit services.  In the absence of provincial accessibility standards, the City of Ottawa has been researching the adoption of accessibility guidelines for the built environment in order to undertake barrier identification and barrier removal work.  In 2003, the City retained the services of Beyond Ability Inc. to assist in this review and the City continues to seek clarity from the Province on the guidelines to be applied. In the interim, as outlined in the 2004-2005 COMAP, RPAM has employed a combination of Canadian Standards Association and Ontario Building Code accessibility guidelines to address its barrier identification and barrier removal work plan and is conducting further comparative research on these codes and standards as they pertain to individual accessibility features and elements. 

 

It is not possible at this time to accurately estimate the financial or other impacts of the legislation until new standards are developed and announced by the Province.  It is clear, however, that the financial impacts of the legislation must be borne by individual public and private organizations. 

 

Pending the confirmation of provincial targets in identifying and removing barriers, it is expected that the size of the City’s capital program will need to increase to meet the required legislation. The internal and external resources needed to plan and execute accessibility retrofits will also need to be secured.  Therefore, the lack of identified standards at this point makes it difficult for the City of Ottawa to fully quantify its suggested targets for 2006.  Once provincial standards and targets are announced, the City will have to modify its long-range financial plan in response to the fulfillment of these targets. 

 

Resourcing the City’s accessibility initiatives is a critical factor for long-term success in meeting the new legislation. In 2005, the City hired a Corporate Accessibility Specialist to ensure that the annual COMAP remains comprehensive and progressive. It also confirmed the Transit Accessibility Specialist who has been instrumental in the OC Transpo accessibility initiatives over the last several years.

 

During the past two years, the City has addressed the human resource requirement for undertaking building accessibility work, both for audits and inventory management, using a combination of permanent, temporary full-time and part-time staff located in RPAM. Based on the long term and extensive requirement to support barrier identification and barrier removal work in buildings and parks, RPAM is recommending the conversion of the Accessibility Inventory Officer to permanent full-time status and the Data Entry Clerk to continuous part-time status, both of which are currently funded from capital. Once the provincially mandated barrier removal targets are confirmed for the City, RPAM will assess resource requirements and confirm them as part of future City of Ottawa accessibility plans.

 

 

5.      STRATEGIC PLANNING

This year, the City of Ottawa has developed a City Corporate Plan that outlines priority areas of focus for City services over a four-year period that is aimed at achieving Ottawa’s 20/20 vision.  The City Corporate Plan proposes ten different agendas to guide decision-making, shape partnerships with community groups and involve the people of Ottawa and City Council in building a world-class city.  Highlights of the ten agendas are:

 

a.       Public Safety and Health Agenda

 

b.      Prosperity Agenda

 

c.       Opportunity Agenda

·        Make amendments to City By-laws to facilitate parking for persons with disabilities

·        Develop design guidelines for road and sidewalk construction that aligns with the City of Ottawa Municipal Accessibility Plan

·        Increase job training and placement for social assistance recipients

·        Promote literacy

·        Enhance range of services available to support senior citizens

 

d.      Environmental Agenda

·        Improve water and air quality

 

e.       Smart Growth Agenda

 

f.        Neighbourhood Agenda

 

 

g.       Housing Agenda

·        Implement via Action Ottawa Federal/Provincial Affordable Housing Program with funding for approximately 1,500 new affordable and supportive housing units

·        Provide training to front-line workers in shelters and community agencies to assess capacities and increase skills in the areas of crisis intervention, mental health awareness, and safety

·        Create a mix of housing to meet the needs of citizens

·        Work with community partners and government to create and implement affordable housing development

·        Improve support services for homeless individualsDevelop an inventory of affordable housing and homelessness support services

 

h.       Cultural Agenda


 

i.         Service Agenda

 

j.        Accountability Agenda

·        Develop and implement a framework to ensure that future community funding decisions align with Ottawa 20/20

·        Develop concrete performance measurements that will assist citizens in evaluating the City’s achievements, including performance indicators relating to accessibility

 

 

When the accessibility program is adequately resourced, detailed strategic plans will be developed in consultation with the Accessibility Advisory Committee and the Community Coalition, to address the requirements of the legislation. The 2006 COMAP contains five year and beyond work plans that begin to demonstrate the actions required to meet the accessibility requirements as identified to date. However, similar to the Long Range Financial Plan developed by the City, these strategies need to be further developed to identify the actions/activities needed to meet the four, five year terms, as prescribed in the legislation for the City to become barrier free by 2025.

 

 The City is also pursuing the opportunity of participating in the province-wide call to sit on the Standards Development Committees to develop provincial accessibility standards.  Based on the province’s initial focus on the transportation and customer service sectors, qualified City staff will be asked to apply for these committees to represent the City of Ottawa interest and provide the technical expertise in each sector.   

 

6.      BARRIER IDENTIFICATION

The Accessibility Steering Committee (ASC) representatives facilitated departmental working groups to report on barriers identified in previous years, as well as report on future initiatives.   Each department was tasked to review its list of barriers and confirm that they have been removed.  In many circumstances, barriers that have not been removed due to a variety of challenges have had to be carried over into the 2006 timeframe and budget allocation process.  See Attachment 1 for a detailed report on the City’s 2005 Achievements. 

 

 

 

7.      NEW AND FUTURE INITIATIVES

 

The City of Ottawa has embarked on many new initiatives that will improve accessibility for persons with disabilities.  Some initiatives commenced in 2005 and are ongoing, whereas others are planned for 2006 and beyond.  See Attachment 2 for a detailed report on departmental Initiatives for 2006.  Highlights of key initiatives include:

 

Employment Equity Survey

 

Retrofit Work of Community Services facilities

 

Harmonized Taxi By-law

 

8.      CONSULTATION

 

The ASC has worked in collaboration with the Accessibility Advisory Committee (AAC) to develop the 2006 COMAP.  (Refer to Appendix 1 and 2 for ASC and AAC Memberships).  Consultations throughout the year have also occurred with the provincial representative from the Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration and the liaison from the Accessibility Directorate of Ontario to ensure that the City is informed of the most recent developments in the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005.  In addition, in February 2005, the City participated in a provincial forum on the development of the new Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005.

 

9.      RESOURCING THE 2006 CITY OF OTTAWA MUNICIPAL

      ACCESSIBILITY PLAN

 

With the passing of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act in June of 2005, public and private sector organizations will have to increase access to facilities, transportation, housing and services by 25% every 5 years until 2025 when Ontario is expected to be fully accessible.  These requirements will have cost impacts which the City is addressing on an annual basis.  As part of the 2004-2005 COMAP, City Council approved the hiring of a Corporate Accessibility Specialist and an Accessible Transit Specialist.  In order to accommodate the identification of barrier work, RPAM is recommending the conversion of an Accessibility Inventory Officer to permanent full-time status and a Data Entry Clerk to continuous part-time status.

 

10.  REVIEW AND MONITORING PROCESS

 

The COMAP will be monitored on a quarterly basis and reviewed by the ASC on an annual basis as part of the annual budget cycle.   The review and monitoring process will: 

 

1.      Ensure that the status report is provided on the steps taken to address the list of barriers identified from the previous year;

2.      Ensure that an inventory of new barriers is refreshed annually; and

3.      Evaluate the actions taken on the year’s current plan.

 

The AAC will provide guidance and advice to the ASC on the monitoring process requirements. 

 
11.  COMMUNICATION STRATEGY

 

The 2006 COMAP will be available on the City of Ottawa’s external Website, Ottawa.ca and internal site on Moe (My Ottawa E-Links).  It will also be available at the main library branch, five primary library branches and three of the Client Service Centres at City Hall, Ben Franklin Place and Orleans in standard, large-print and Braille formats.  As well, copies will be distributed to the People with Disabilities: A Community Coalition, Access Now, The United Way of Ottawa, media and the business community.

 


APPENDIX 1

 

2005 - 2006

ACCESSIBILITY STEERING COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP

 

Active Members:

 

Linda Anderson                                   Manager, By-Law Services, Community and Protective

     Services

Michael Brady                                    Past Vice-Chair, Accessibility Advisory Committee

Gerry Champagne Manager, Client Relationship Management,

     Information Technology Services

Gord Diamond Director, Transit Services, Public Works & Services

Leslie Donnelly                                   Manager, Policy Coordination and Outreach,

     City Manager Office

Lois Emburg (2006 Chair) Manager, Human Rights and Employment Equity,

     Corporate Services

Stephen Finnamore (Past Chair) Director, Real Property Asset Management

     (RPAM), Corporate Services

Helen Gault Manager, Transit Service Planning & Development,

     Public Works and Services

Pierre Jolicoeur                                   Manager, Comprehensive Asset Management, RPAM

Peter Mabee                                        Manager, Client Services & Public Information,

                                                                 Corporate Services

John Moser                                         Director, Planning & Infrastructure Approvals,

                                                                 Planning and Growth Management

David Pepper Director of Community Development, Executive

     Services, Ottawa Police Service    

Kelly Robertson (2006 Co-chair) Division Manager, Parks and Recreation, 

    Community and Protective Services

 

 

Advisors:

 

Jeff Willbond                                      People with Disabilities: Community Coalition rep

Grace Sheng A/Project Manager, Client Services and Public

    Information, Corporate Services

 

 


APPENDIX 2

 

2005 - 2006

ACCESSIBILITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP

 

Active Members: Reserve Members:

 

Gwen Bell, Chair Lori Howell

Alf Gunter, Vice Chair James Gagnier

Keith Hobbs, Past Chair

Michael Brady, Past Vice-Chair

Victor Emerson

Terry Gilhen

Yasmine Ismaily

Helen Lenthall-Thivierge

Cathy Moore

Kim Parks

Alan Perks

Rick Sinclair

Anna Sipos

James St. John

Peter Timusk

 

 

Council Liaison/Staff Members:

 

Councillor Herb Kreling (up until October 2005)

Lois Emburg, Manager Human Rights & Employment Equity

Carole Langford, Advisory Committee Coordinator

 


APPENDIX 3

 

OTTAWA STATISTICS - SPECIAL NEEDS

 

Source:  Statistics Canada, Canadian Community Health Survey, 2000/2001

 

·        Population aged 12 and over reporting measures of overall functional health, based on 9 dimensions of functioning (vision, hearing, speech, mobility, dexterity, feelings, cognition, memory and pain).

·        A score of 0.8 to 1.0 is considered to be very good or perfect health; scores below 0.8 are considered to indicate moderate or severe functional health problems.

·        664,036 total respondents, functional health status; 324,851 males; 339,185 females

 

Functional Health

 

·        63,188 or 19.5% of males report moderate or severe functional health problems

·        73,498 or 21.7% of females report moderate or severe functional health problems

 

Activity Limitation

 

·        Population aged 12 and over who report being limited in certain activities on a continuing basis (at least 6 months) because of a physical condition, mental condition or health problem

·        69,913.00 or 215% of males

·        88,211 or 26% of females

 

Source:  Statistics Canada, 1996 Census, Population with Long Term Disabilities (excluding institutional residents)

 

·        11,495 total Ottawa area population with long term disabilities

·        56% male; 44% female

·        Of 11,495 total Ottawa area population with long term disabilities:  50% in former RMOC; 26% in former Ottawa; 8% former Nepean; 7% former Gloucester; 2% former Vanier, Kanata, Cumberland; 1% Osgoode, Rideau, West Carleton, Goulbourn; 0% Rockcliffe Park

·        43% of total Ottawa area population with long term disabilities were aged 35 to 64; 23% aged 65+ yrs; 16% aged 20 – 34 yrs.; 10% aged 10 – 19 yrs; 5% aged 0 – 9 yrs.

·        46% of total Ottawa area population with long term disabilities reported  high income; 26% moderate income; 28% low income

 


OTTAWA STATISTICS - SPECIAL NEEDS (cont’d)

 

Source:  Statistics Canada, 2001, Participation and Activity Limitation Survey, % Total Disabled Population Living Alone by Neighbourhood

 

·        Percentage of Total Disabled Population with Activity Limitation by Neighbourhood of 20.1 – 25%:  Pinecrest Queensway, Copeland, Carlington, Clementine, Ottawa North East, Vanier, Overbrook, Ottawa South East

·        Ottawa neighbourhoods with 30.1- 45% of Total Disabled Population living alone:  Ottawa West, Westboro, Carlington, Dalhousie, Clementine, Lowertown, Sandy Hill, New Edinburgh, Vanier, Ottawa South East

·        Ottawa neighbourhoods with 30.1- 45% of Total Disabled Population living with family members:  Katimavik/Hazeldean, Glen Cairn, Bells Corners, Barrhaven/Longfields, Blossom Park/Windsor Park, Hunt Club East, Cyrville 

 


APPENDIX 4

 

PUBLIC WORKS AND SERVICES

5 YEAR AND BEYOND WORK PLAN

 

 

 

Program Cost

 

Action

Lead Branch

2006

2007

2008

2009

Beyond 2009

Improve the physical well-being of residents by:

·        developing a comprehensive pedestrian plan, along with a network implementation strategy, to promote walking and transit use.

In 2006, the Traffic & Parking Operations Branch (TPO) will

q       Evaluate the current network to assess deficiencies

q       Develop recommendations for short and long term goals to address deficiencies

q       Identify programs, improvements and required enhancements to improve accessibility for pedestrians

 

 

TPO

 

 

$1,100,000

 

 

$1,300,000

 

 

$1,300,000

 

 

$1,300,000

 

 

$6,000,000

Make City infrastructure more accessible by:

·        amending City By-laws to facilitate parking for persons with disabilities.

In 2006, the Traffic & Parking Operations Branch (TPO) will

q       Recommend new parking provisions for inclusion in appropriate City By-laws

q       Undertake stakeholder consultation

q       Finalize disposition in consultation with Planning and Growth Management and By-Law Services

 

 

 

TPO

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Within existing budget

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Within existing budget

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Within existing budget

 

 

 

 

 

Within existing budget

 

 

 

 

Within existing budget

 

Make City infrastructure more accessible by:

·        achieving a complete, accessible, low floor transit bus fleet.

In 2006, the Fleet Services Branch (Fleet) will

q       Replace 69 buses with accessible buses

q       Grow bus fleet with 31 accessible buses

 

·        increasing the percentage of intersections equipped with audible pedestrian signals from 18% to 27%.

In 2006, the Traffic & Parking Operations Branch (TPO) will

q       Install approximately 26 audible signals through a combination of

·         New traffic control signals

·         Rebuilt traffic control signals

·         Additions to existing traffic control signals, as identified and prioritized in consultation with the Accessibility Advisory Committee

 

·        developing design guidelines for road and sidewalk construction that aligns with the City's Accessibility Plan.

In 2006, the Infrastructure Services Branch (ISB) will

q       Finalize review of background documentation and complete workplan for the development of guidelines

q       Conduct internal / external stakeholder consultation

q       Develop guidelines for infrastructure renewal and new construction using a phased approach

 

 

 

FT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TPO

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ISB

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$2,720,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$75,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Within existing budget

 

 

 

 

$3,200,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$75,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Within existing budget

 

 

 

 

$3,120,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$75,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Within existing budget

 

 

 

$2,360,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$75,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Within existing budget

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$2,240,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$75,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Within existing budget

 

 

 

 

 


APPENDIX 5

 

REAL PROPERTY AND ASSET MANAGEMENT

5 YEAR AND BEYOND WORK PLAN

 

 

Program Cost

 

Action

2006

2007

2008

2009

Beyond 2009

Barrier Identification:

(pending confirmation of provincial guidelines)

 

q       Complete detailed analysis of CSA and OBC standards

q       Discussions with building officials about impact of guidelines on permit review

q       Undertake accessibility audits of building portfolio up to 20 facility audits per year (pending conversion of contract position)

q       Maintain up-to-date inventory of barriers (pending conversion of part-time position)

 

 

 

 

Existing budget

 

 

Existing budget

 

 

 

Existing budget

 

 

 

Existing budget

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Existing budget

 

 

 

Existing budget

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Existing budget

 

 

 

Existing budget

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Existing budget

 

 

 

Existing budget

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Existing budget

 

 

 

 

Existing budget

 

Barrier Removal:

 

q       Ensure that design related to complex retrofit work is completed 1 year prior to planned execution

q       Remove barriers

       (minimum 2,000/annum)

 

 

 

 

$50,000

 

 

 

 

 

$800,000

 

 

 

$50,000

 

 

 

 

 

$900,000

 

 

 

$50,000

 

 

 

 

 

$800,000

 

 

 

$100,000

 

 

 

 

 

$1.5M

 

 

 

$1M

 

 

 

 

 

$5-7M

Budgeting and Resourcing:

 

q       Complete conversion of contract position and data entry position

q       Recommend adjustments to LRFP

q       Project management resources for accessibility work

 

 

 

$100,000

 

 

 

 

Existing budget

 

Existing budget

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Existing budget

 

$90,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Existing budget

 

Existing budget

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Existing budget

 

Existing budget

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Existing budget

 

 

$200,000

Policy Development:

 

q       Establish policy for accessibility work

q       Prioritization tool

 

 

 

Existing budget

Existing budget

 

 

 

 

 

 


APPENDIX 6

 

COMMUNITY AND PROTECTIVE SERVICES

3 YEAR STRATEGIC PLAN

 

 

Relationship of Corporate Plan, CPS Three Year Strategic Plan and Business Plan to Proposed CPS Corporate Accessibility Initiatives

 

Children’s Agenda:

·        This project, in collaboration with community agencies, will ensure a continuum of services to support families with children 0 – 12.

·        Issues/gaps in services to families/children with special needs have been identified.  The CPS 2005 Achievements list speaks to injection of funds and some gaps in services in licensed child care that have been addressed.

·        The proposed service delivery model for recreation services to special needs children/families identifies other service gaps/issues, and proposed directions to address these (tentatively scheduled to go to Health, Recreation and Social Service Committee in early 2006).

·        The City’s commitment to increase the accessibility of play structures is reflected in the 2005 Achievements.  Priority is to introduce accessibility features/components into play structures as they are being replaced through lifecycle renewal, especially in neighbourhoods where the need is known.  In addition, communities, through community partnership minor or major capital programs, may accelerate the priority to install accessibility components or replace play structures through cost-sharing with the City.  A similar approach is being suggested with respect to development of wading pool strategy (proposed 2006 initiative).

 

Community and Cultural Investment:

·        This project involves the development and implementation of a framework to ensure that community funding is aligned with Ottawa 20/20 growth priorities and departmental priorities.  This framework is tentatively scheduled to come forth to Committee in early 2006.

·        In 2005, funding was approved to videotape upper level of Watson’s Mill so that those who could not access the second floor, for reason of disability or otherwise, could still view second floor through onsite video display.

·        In developing future recreation service delivery agreements with partners, CPS promotes accessibility and work with community partners to offer training opportunities, integration support, identification/elimination of physical barriers.

 

Emergency Management Program:

·        Need to identify vulnerable populations and plan for services to meet the needs of these populations in the event of an emergency had been identified in the City’s Evacuation Plan (planning commenced in 2005).

 


Housing – Community Capacity Building:

·        The Housing branch will be bringing forth to Committee the Community Action Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness: 2006-2008.  This initiative will identify recommendations for new supportive housing units and enhancing support services for people in private and social housing.

·        The Housing Branch will continue to take a leadership role in ensuring that new affordable housing development includes accessible units.

 

Neighbourhood Planning:

·        As a result of 1996 census and 2001 census/community health survey, there is some information about the residency of special needs clients/families by neighbourhood and their potential needs.

·        This departmental project will develop, through a best practice approach, a methodology to assess a neighbourhood’s strengths and weaknesses and develop strategies to improve social, economic, and physical infrastructure of community, including accessibility issues

·        Two to three demonstration neighbourhoods to be identified against which methodology will be applied.

·        Citizen involvement and the opportunity for citizens to have an active role in determining the future of their neighbourhood is a key facet of this project.

 

Physical Activity Strategy:

·        Continuation of MTI training, researching the feasibility of off peak or discounted membership, increased flexibility of fee assistance are initiatives designed to promote physical activity to special needs clients; latter two are designed to address special needs clients on low income

 

Working City:

·        CPS project to assist Ontario Works participants in securing sustainable employment.  This project will address clients with special needs to the extent that they qualify for Ontario Works.

 

CPS Strategic Direction:

·        Look at service improvements and enhancements, new program development that can occur through partnerships, and achievement of internal efficiencies by working within existing resources.   Exceptions:  child care (licensed), housing, therapeutic recreation to the extent that the Province is willing to provide funding (i.e. francophone day program)

·        For some service areas, emphasis has been on ‘harmonizing services’ i.e. recreation, 12 different approaches to accessibility; emphasis has been on identifying needs, confirming available resources, developing service standards/levels, identifying issues, developing future directions (presentation to AAC took place in September, highlighting proposed service delivery model recreation – senior management has postponed report to Committee till 2006).

·        Incorporate into day-to-day business an ’accessible’ mindset; therefore, achievements/proposed initiatives reflect issues identified to date and proposed actions and strategies to respond to these.  Efforts continue to be made to align corporate, departmental, branch planning process with budget and resources.

·.CPS Strategic Direction:

·Look at service improvements and enhancements, new program development that can occur through partnerships, and achievement of internal efficiencies by working within existing resources.   Exceptions:  child care (licensed), housing, therapeutic recreation to the extent that the Province is willing to provide funding (i.e. francophone day program)

·For some service areas, emphasis has been on ‘harmonizing services’ i.e. recreation, 12 different approaches to accessibility; emphasis has been on identifying needs, confirming available resources, developing service standards/levels, identifying issues, developing future directions (presentation to AAC took place in September, highlighting proposed service delivery model recreation – senior management has postponed report to Committee till 2006).

·Incorporate into day-to-day business an ’accessible’ mindset; therefore, achievements/proposed initiatives reflect issues identified to date and proposed actions and strategies to respond to these.  Efforts continue to be made to align corporate, departmental, branch planning process with budget and resources.

 



 

ATTACHMENT 1

 

 

2006 CITY OF OTTAWA MUNICIPAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN

 

 

2005 ACHIEVEMENTS FOR:

 

COMMUNITY AND PROTECTIVE SERVICES

 

CORPORATE SERVICES

 

OTTAWA POLICE SERVICE

 

PLANNING AND GROWTH MANAGEMENT

 

PUBLIC WORKS AND SERVICES


PARKS AND RECREATION BRANCH

 

Project / Program

Description

Status

Rotary Centennial Playground

·          Partnership Project between City and Rotary Club to develop a regional, accessible play structure at Brewer Park

·          $750,000 project; City contribution $44,000

·          Report to HRSS Sept. 15 to confirm site.  (Approved at HRSS)

Walter Baker Sports Centre – address physical barriers

·          Issue of safe egress for medically fragile clients of the SPIRIT and Variety West Program whose program is based on the second floor  (identified as an issue as a result of mock evacuation)

·          Special Needs programs re-located to accessible, ground floor space

Safe access to programs

·          Require trained paid Integration staff for recreation and childcare programs for high needs children (nurse, intervener)

·          Proposed Parks and Recreation service delivery model for special needs clients being presented to Committee/Council Spring 2006

·          Public Health completed evaluation of 2004 Summer Integration Pilot

·          Shared Care program developed to support safe integration and inclusion of special needs children/youth into summer day camp programs

·          Special Needs program inventory initiated and maintained

Facility demand pressures – Special Needs program development

·          Require program inventory and review of sites with plan to evenly distribute programming throughout the City at more locales/sites

·          Shared Care program (allocation of staff resources to support integration) provided at no additional cost to special needs families at 13 designated sites during summer 2005

·          Space for new therapeutic recreation day program for francophone adults with developmental disabilities secured at Heron Road Multi-Service Facility

Training

·          Staff require sensitivity training from in community centers and in all recreational programs

·          466 front-line Parks and Recreation Staff receive Moving to Inclusion training in advance of summer 2005

·          Train the Trainer program being implemented Fall 2005 to support continued roll-out of training to front-line staff

Physical Activity Strategy

·          Make it easier for persons with disabilities to access facilities

·          Internal branch committee reviewing as part of membership review

·          Branch introduced 10 and 20 visit passes for students, youth and seniors (Fall 2005)

·          Branch piloting Nu Step recumbent exercise equipment at ORC

·          Provision of accessible fitness equipment will be considered in Branch standing offer to equip, maintain City operated fitness studios

Supports for disabled persons

·          Require more supports and accommodations for disabled persons to participate in recreation and leisure opportunities

·          Facility audit and accessibility planning and upgrading needed; consultation to take place with RPAM

·          Funding provided through one-time $5,000 grant, Ministry of Long Term Care

·          Consultations with RPAM ongoing

·          Branch inventorying adaptive, specialized equipment at key City facilities accessed by special needs clients.  Purchases made as funds available

·          Automatic door openers installed pool change rooms ORC

·          Washroom doors replaced and made more accessible, and barrier free faucets installed in washrooms at Michele Heights

·          Supporting wall eliminated to open up space to improve accessibility in women’s pool change room Jack Purcell

·          Link renovation at Jack Purcell improves accessibility to facility entrance from parking lot and provides appropriate waiting area for patrons relying on Para Transpo

·          Women’s and men’s weight room change rooms made more accessible at Jack Purcell

·          New automatic door openers installed on interior doors on all floors and heavy traffic entrance doors at Jack Purcell

·          Jack Purcell washrooms made more accessible

·          Purchased accessible recumbent cross trainer to provide improved fitness and/or rehabilitative options for stroke survivors, patrons with disabilities at Jack Purcell

·          Railings, automatic door openers for washrooms installed upper concourse and Hall F at Nepean Sportsplex

Child Care Service Plan

·          Improved accessibility and supports to children in licensed child care

·          $369,000 Provincial funding; $99,000 City funding

·          Increased program subsidy to 3 special needs programs to eliminate parent fees

·          One full-time behaviour management staff hired through CISS to support preschool children in licensed programs experiencing behaviour issues

·          Funding for one full-time speech and language staff for Headstart programs has been restored

·          OCTC launched new program for francophone special needs children Fall 2005

·          Additional funds to OCTC to increase therapy support to preschool special needs children in licensed programs

·          Increased program assistant support to CISS to assist with the integration of special needs children into licensed programs

New Initiatives Undertaken in 2005

Post Stroke Strategy

·          As part of Ottawa Community Re-Integration Project for Stroke Survivors, Parks and Recreation is participating on community-led work group to address re-integration of approximately 1,000 stroke survivors per year into the community

·          Pilot Post Stroke program offered at Pinecrest Recreation Complex in June 2005

·          Specialized aquafit training session delivered by Rehab Centre staff to Branch staff focusing on stroke rehab (Feb. ’05)

·          Fall program offered on 100% cost recovery basis; limited interest.  Start date deferred until minimum registration targets achieved

Recreation Guide

·          Identification of generally accessible facilities

·          Symbol used to profile ‘generally accessible’ facilities in Fall/Winter Guide

 

 

 

 

EMPLOYMENT AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE BRANCH

 

Project / Program

Description

Status

New Initiatives Undertaken in 2005

EFA Accessibility Awareness Committee

·          New committee established within EFA

·           

Technological solution –disabled clients - address informational/communicative barriers

·          No technological software in Employment Resource Areas (ERAs) for persons who are blind (e.g. dragon dictate) or who cannot use a keyboard due to a physical disability

·          Investigation has been done by staff at EFAC-West

·          EFA researched this software (e.g. cost, functionality, etc.)

·          Recommendations will be brought forward to EFA management team for a decision.

·           

 

 

OTTAWA PUBLIC LIBRARY

 

Project / Program

Description

Status

Visunet Canada

·          Partnership between OPL and CNIB Library for the Blind to provide important library services to individuals who are print disabled due to blindness, visual impairment, physical disability or learning disability

·          Annual VISUNET membership of $5,500 funded in 2005 by Friends of OPL.

·          Services officially launched June 13, 2005

·          Print disabled clients can access thousands of CNIB books, newspapers, magazines, and other materials in a variety of accessible formats at local OPL branch

South Central District Library

·          New, accessible facility to open Winter ‘06

·          Planning, construction phase

 

Main Branch

·          Auditorium level washroom made more accessible

·          Complete

Vanier Branch

·          Re-designed shelving to make more accessible

·          Feasibility study completed to install elevator

·          Concrete repaired front entrance

·          Complete

Hazeldean Branch

·          Issue of snow clearing outside emergency exit resolved.

·          Complete

Adaptive information technology improvements

·          Desktop upgrade included latest version of Zoomtext in 18 branches

·          Various adaptive technology improvements (i.e. Kurzweil software, large print keyboards, scanners, adjustable workstations) at a total cost of $40,000 approved for installation at 7 branches). 

·          $30,000 of cost funded through grant from Crabtree Foundation.

·           

New Initiatives Undertaken in 2005

Bookmobile

·          Second bookmobile, wheelchair accessible, purchased

·          Complete

Accessible collection enhancements

·          DAISY readers purchased for Homebound Services through $4,500 in funding provided by Friends of OPL

·          DAISY readers purchased for Talking Book clients (min. 20)

·          Books on CD added to collection for print disabled and provision made in collection budget for ongoing collection

·          Complete

 

 

HOUSING BRANCH

 

Project / Program

Description

Status

Increase in accessible, affordable housing units

·          Council approved 368 affordable housing units under Action Ottawa; 310 units going forward.

·          19 fully accessible units (6 %) and 186 visitable housing units (60%) to be built 2004-2006

·          “Fully accessible” allows a person with a physical disability to live independently; “visitable” includes 5 elements of universal design

·          7 fully accessible and 76 visitable housing units completed by Sept 2005 including:

·          1142 Richmond Road:  2 fully accessible units opened June 2005

·          Ottawa Community Housing Project (380 Somerset): 60 units, 4 fully accessible units and 60 visitable units (occupancy September 2005)

Projects in Progress:

·          John Howard Society (259 Ste Anne)—26 units, 2 accessible units and 12 visitable (occupancy fall 2005)

·          Nepean Housing 62 units, 4 accessible  (occupancy May 2006)

·          Ottawa Salus Corporation 40 units, 6 fully accessible, 40 visitable  (occupancy 2006)

Survey of Social Housing Portfolio for Accessible Units

·          The housing branch conducted a survey of all social housing providers in the City to identify all units with modification for physical accessibility and the nature of the modifications to:

§         Ensure that all units modified units for  physical accessibility are accurately documented

§         Facilitate better service for people seeking modified units on the Centralized Waiting List  .

·          Complete. 

 

 

CULTURAL SERVICES AND COMMUNITY FUNDING

 

Project / Program

Description

Status

2005-2006 Community Project Funding

·          The Community Project Funding Program provides funding to support innovative and collaborative initiatives that are targeted to meet the needs of low-income residents of the City 

Specific accessibility initiative(s):

·          Project funding provided to Watson’s Mill Museum to prepare video to interpret second floor of museum.  Second floor only accessible by stairs; but interpretation now available to visitors who cannot manoeuvre stairs.

·          As a result of the 2005 budget process, the timelines for the implementation for the Community Project Funding commenced May 2005, and will be completed by June 2006.

 

 

 

 

 

Specific Accessibility Project:

·          Funding provided to Watson’s Mill Museum to develop a video to interpret second floor which is only accessible by staircase.

 

 

Proposed Community Funding Framework

·          The core business of the Community Funding Program is to invest in viable non-profit community-based organisations to sustain a strong community infrastructure that supports equal access to the basics consistent with the CPS Strategic Directions, linking access to the basics to the idea of social inclusion and active participation in civic life as well as poverty reduction 

·          This will include considering the specific needs and contributions of equity-seeking groups designated in the City of Ottawa, Equity and Diversity Policy (visible minorities, aboriginal people, women, people with disabilities and GLBT community), as well as other groups whose inclusion is important to ensure quality of life for the full diversity of citizens (people living on low-income, new immigrants, francophones, and people living in rural communities)

·          The Community Funding Framework report will be presented to the Health, Recreation and Social Services Committee in January 2006.

·          Based on Council approval of this report, implementation of changes in funding priorities will begin to be implemented in 2006

 

Artswell – Creativity and Wellness

·          Workshops targeted for rehabilitation, patients with dementia or adults with learning disabilities, and caregivers to promote wellness

·          Fall 2005 / Winter 2006

 

 

LONG TERM CARE BRANCH

 

Project / Program

Description

Status

New Initiatives Undertaken in 2005

Replacement of Island Lodge with new home Garry J. Armstrong

·          New facility constructed to replace 40-year old Island Lodge

·          Pre-occupancy review done by the MOHLTC to ensure facility is safe and accessible for residents, families, staff and volunteers.  Review examined compliance with all applicable legislation (e.g. building codes, health & safety, MOHLTC Facility Standards)

·          165 residents safely moved to their new home on June 28, 2005.  15 additional residents added for a resident population of 180

·          Issues associated with a new home are closely monitored through a multidisciplinary workplan

Research Project – “The Effect of Environmental Design in Managing Behavioural Problems: Evaluation of Peter D Clark Home Bungalow Design”

·          Study to determine the role of the physical environment as it impacts on behaviours of individuals with dementia

·          Study to be conducted by University of Ottawa, Elisabeth Bruyere Research Institute and Alzheimer Society of Canada

·          Research is funded by the Alzheimer Society of Canada $150,000

·          This study began in April 2005

·          Onsite observation of environment is expected to commence early 2006

Research Project - “Physical Activity of Older Adults in Long-Term Care Facilities: A Consultation with LTC Facilities in the Ottawa Region”

This study includes assessment of :

·          Care givers perceptions of facilitators and challenges in promoting physical activity for seniors in LTC facilities

·          Variability in the physical environment for fall prevention

·          Seniors perception of whether the physical environment either helps or hinders them from being physically active

·          Study to be conducted by University of Ottawa, Elisabeth Bruyere Research Institute

·          Study to commence Fall 2005

International Day of Disabled

·          City of Ottawa continues to celebrate International Day of Disabled (Dec. 3)

 

 

 

BY-LAW SERVICES BRANCH

 

Project / Program

Description

Status

Accessible taxicabs

·          No provisions in former taxi by-laws to ensure provision of accessible taxis

·          Accessible taxi plates were implemented in 2003 however, the following issues have arisen:

·          Too few accessible taxicabs to meet the needs at certain times of the day and days of the week

·          Lack of properly trained taxi drivers regarding disabilities and accessibility

·          A harmonized Taxi By-law is scheduled to be presented to City Council in September 2005, to be implemented in Jan. 2006 which will increase the number of accessible taxicabs and ensure an adequate supply of properly trained drivers

Special events accessibility

·          Need to address accessibility issues of persons with disabilities attending special events, festivals, etc.

·          Conduct ongoing assessment of accessibility needs for persons with disabilities


 

EMPLOYEE SERVICES BRANCH

 

Project / Program

Description

Status

Accessibility day planning

·          Working group established whereby the City of Ottawa, in partnership with AAC, planned its participation on Accessibility Day at City Hall, August 24, 2005

·          Completed successfully

Self identification survey

·          Survey federally regulated employees to determine the representation of designated groups including persons with disabilities

·          Deliver presentation to EMT and SMT regarding survey results

·          Keep EDAC and AAC apprised

·          The survey and follow up for Federally regulated employees (transit staff) continued until February 2005

·          In March, a Workforce Analysis was completed

·          Between April and June 2005, an Employment Systems Review was undertaken

·          The Employment Equity Plan for federally regulated employees was developed in July and August 2005

·          Presentations delivered in September 2005

·          Presentations were made to EDAC and AAC regarding the results of the Equity Survey, workforce analysis, employment systems review and the EE plan

Self identification survey for provincially regulated employees

·          Develop a communications plan outlining activities to ensure stakeholders are aware of the plans for the survey

·          A communications plan was developed and approved. It includes a variety of briefing sessions and presentations to management and unions during the period September to December 2005 to fully inform them of the survey in 2006 and to seek their participation

Accessibility by Design Award

·          Participated with the Accessibility Advisory Committee in the Accessibility Day at City Hall on August 24, 2005

·          On same day, launched the newly established partnership with CJOH to promote the Accessibility by Design Award

·          Initiated consultations with colleges and universities with a view to establishing a student award

·          The award will be presented at City Hall on December 2, 2005

International Day of Disabled Persons (IDDP)

 

To support the annual Celebration of People event organized by Citizen Advocacy of Ottawa

·          The City continued to sponsor the annual event and will be attending the Celebration of People Awards dinner on December 1, 2005 to present its own Accessibility by Design Award

 

Human Rights Training

·          Human Rights and Employment Equity (HREE) Unit continued to deliver the Workplace Harassment Training Program

·          Duty to Accommodate presentation

·          In 2005, nearly 1,000 City employees received training either through the Learning Centre or on-site

 

 

 


CITY CLERK’S BRANCH

 

Project / Program

Description

Status

Persons with audio impairment who call the Councillors are instructed to use the general TTY line

·          Review call volumes to see if necessary to have a dedicated line for calls to Councillors

·          To be determined if demand exists

·          TTY calls have been monitored for the last three years – there are on average two to three TTY requests in total per year for general information

·          It is therefore determined unnecessary to have a TTY line dedicated to Councillors

·          Item should now be removed from plan

 

Public meeting notices and Committee and Council indices do not target all segments of the population (i.e. visually impaired)

 

·          Multiple Formats Policy developed and approved by Council in 2002

·          City-wide public consultation documents provided at 6 libraries and 3 CSCs in Braille and large print

·          Documentation accessible on web site in html and plain text

·          All Council and Committee Agenda indexes automatically released in HTML, Accessible Adobe and TTY line

·          Implemented in Jan. 2003; staff trained and provided toolkit in June/July 2003

 

·          Staff continually reminded of the policy & procedure via e-mails, and telephone calls

 

·          Report Writers Toolkit on line to guide staff on how to write an “accessible” report or document

 

Difficult for some people to attend meetings at City Hall

 

·          Institute videoconferencing

·          Increase contact locations and develop communication strategy to publicize availability

·          Initiative was investigated but the costs of the program and the lack of the sophistication in conference equipment makes it impractical to initiate at this time. 

 

Standing Committee and Council public meetings are not accessible to hearing impaired persons

 

·          Make sign interpretation more available for meetings

·          Investigate feasibility of closed captioning of Council meetings

·          Investigate other technologies to make Council public meetings accessible

·          Sign interpretation provided upon request

·          Closed captioned was investigated however, no new funds to implement

·          Web-casting of Council public meetings is now available; awareness campaign is being developed

 

Inability of disabled persons to participate in public consultation process (receipt of documentation)

 

·          Provide documentation in format requested

·          Provide all documents in English and French, Braille, Text and Large Print

·          Incorporate “inclusiveness” as one key principle of public participation policy

·          Currently implemented; need to ensure Deputy City Managers are implementing the policy in their departments.

 

Inability of disabled persons to serve as members on City advisory committees

 

·          Implement Multiple Formats Policy

·          Provide recruitment forms in multiple formats, upon request

·          Make sign interpretation and other requirements available

 

·          Provide educational/ sensitivity training to staff working with Advisory Committees

·          Attempt to hold meetings in accessible meeting rooms

·          Currently implemented

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

·          Ongoing

 

 

 

·          Ongoing

 

 

 

 

 

CLIENT SERVICE AND PUBLIC INFORMATION BRANCH

Project / Program

Description

Status

Ottawa Counters

·          Ensure accessibility for persons with disabilities at 110 Laurier Government Service Centre

·          Special needs indicator incorporated as part of the queuing system

·          Audible indicator installed

·          Accessibility software installed on all Public Access Terminals (PATs) and self-serve kiosks to assist persons with visual and auditory impairments

 

Accessibility Specialist

·          A full time Accessibility Specialist to coordinate the development of the annual COMAP; implement and monitor progress of COMAP; act as central point of contact regarding accessibility issues for the community, outside agencies and staff; liaise with corporate Employment Equity program; and provide operational support city wide and to coordinate and implement sensitivity and accessibility training to City Staff

·          Accessibility Specialist hired in the Fall of 2005

 

Web Accessibility Policy

·          Web Services to review new projects / technologies / content for adherence to policies

·          ITS Web services to review content to ensure accessibility compliance

·          Ongoing program

 

TTY

·          Consolidate department TTYs to a centralized model to ensure prompt service delivery to citizens

·          TTYs reviewed with plan established to implement in 2006

 

 

REAL PROPERTY ASSET MANAGEMENT BRANCH

Project / Program

Description

Status

City Hall

110 Laurier Ave.

·          Difficult for persons with disabilities to easily access City Hall

·          Power door operators were added to Council Chambers & Festival Plaza

·          Elevators were modified

Kinburn CSC

5670 Carp Road

·          No automatic door in side door entrance

·          Installed automatic door operators at entrance

Orléans CSC

255 Centrum Blvd.

 

·          Power door operators were installed in washrooms

Metcalfe CSC

8243 Victoria

 

·          Signage installed in parking lot for accessible space

 

City Hall CSC,

110 Laurier Ave.,

1st floor

·          Bathroom not accessible

 

·          Public Access Terminals (PATs)  & interview rooms wheelchair accessible

·          Barrier-free public washrooms

·          Display racks are within reach

·          Wheelchair-height form-filling surfaces

·          Every wicket is wheelchair accessible

·          Ramps & generous corridors

·          Extra bright lighting at the counter

·          Some waiting chairs have arms

·          Automatic door openers at staff entrances & interview room doors

·          Foot / cane rails under counters

·          Site directory & wicket identifier include raised letters & Braille labeling

·          Fire alarms include flashing lights

·          TTY devices installed

·          Sans Serif Letters on all signs

·          Contrast countertop colours with surroundings

·          Pathways marked with changes in floor colour and texture

·          Public Access Terminals usable by all including visually impaired

·          Paging system installed to tell visually impaired people to come to the counter

Michelle Heights Community Centre

·          Too high a lip at front doors; no automatic door

·          Lobby water fountain not wheelchair accessible

·          Power operators installed

 

·          Water fountain installed

 

Nepean Sportsplex

·          Second floor washrooms, main washroom for Halls A&B, public washroom beside Aquatic Customer Service not wheelchair accessible

·          Athletic Center not accessible from Entrance #1 due to stairs; similar problem for Entrance #3

·          From Entrance #4, need assistance for wheelchair lift which is not always operational

·          A unisex washroom for Halls A&B is being installed

 

 

 

 

 

·          Handrails installed at various locations including pool area

 

 

 

·          New Lift is being proposed in 2006

Jack Purcell Community Center  - weight room and

change rooms

·          Weight room not accessible on a daily basis.  Disabled persons are unable to shower, use the washrooms and access the sink in the area

·          Modified and completed

Sinks

·          Most sinks need more accessible faucets

·          Long lever faucets have been installed

Community garden

·          Doors into the garden are not accessible due to a lip. The type of door out to the garden is not accessible. The garden was designed to include people in chairs by ensuring raised beds and an accessible path.

·          Power door operators installed

Door access through building

·          Doors throughout the building are accessible however, they require a great deal of strength for participants with disabilities to open. Given the high volume of persons with disabilities the doors need to be redone.

·          New structure with waiting area is under construction

Women’s change room pool area

·          More space required between locker area and washrooms to accommodate wheelchair clients

·          This area has been modified

Parking lot

·          The existing structural set up in the parking lot creates a barrier for people exiting and entering vehicles to access the sidewalk and the front door of the building

·          New curb ramp installed

Walter Baker Sports Centre Facilities hosting special needs programs – safety during an emergency

·          Issue for medically fragile clients of the SPIRIT program whose program is based on the second floor  (identified as an issue as a result of mock evacuation)

·          New accommodation for special needs is being constructed on ground floor

Sandy Hill Community Centre

Washroom

·          Washroom not easily accessible to special needs youth attending 2003 summer camp

·          2004 some washroom upgrades completed

Overbrook Community Centre

·          Washroom not easily accessible to special needs children/youth

·          2004 – Extensive washroom upgrades completed

Play structures

·          Inaccessible play structures in the City

·          Rotary structure being constructed

Carling avenue. and Forward avenue family shelters

·          Barrier identification of family shelters

·          Carling: Power operated doors installed at entrance. Handrail at entrance ramp constructed

·          Accessible washroom is being constructed

City buildings

·          Need for updated accessibility audits on 185 buildings

·          Validation of accessibility status for 185 buildings finalized

 


OTTAWA POLICE SERVICES

 

Goal

Description

Status

·          Improve the delivery of Police Services to groups that are marginalized because of accessibility issues

·          Identify relevant issues through the use of access/accessibility audits of Ottawa Police services and facilities

 

·          A company contracted by the City of Ottawa, Morison Hershfield, has conducted accessibility audits for three Ottawa Police Service buildings including 474 Elgin (Headquarters), 4561 Bank Street (Leitrim), 245 Greenbank (West Division). 

 

·          The audit conducted at police headquarters at 474 Elgin has a total of 124 recommendations dealing with parking, path of travel to building and entrances to building, horizontal path of travel, stairs, ramps, handrails, elevators, protection of barrier-free path of travel, and washrooms, men’s and women’s locker rooms, detention area of staff washrooms, gym area, detention and segregation cell units.

 

·          Ottawa Police is currently working with City of Ottawa RPAM to review the recommendations and prepare an implementation plan.  A few of the recommendations have been incorporated into already planned renovations including accessibility enhancements of the elevator (Braille buttons and auditory features like floor announcements) and improved accessibility parking areas. 

 

·          Work in partnership with groups or individuals, like the City of Ottawa’s Accessibility Advisory Committee and others, who have interests or concerns towards achieving accessibility goals

·          The Ottawa Police Service engages in partnerships with groups and organizations for public awareness campaigns (examples:  Deaf for a Day campaign with Canadian Hearing Society and UN International Day of the Disabled) and training courses for personnel (example:  CNIB partners come in to assist with workshops/presentations and Alzheimer’s Society for missing persons registry and search protocols). 

 

·          In addition, the Director of Community Development is a member of the City of Ottawa Accessibility Steering Committee and makes occasional presentations to the City of Ottawa’s Accessibility Advisory Committee.  

 

·          Work with the Canadian Association of Independent Living Centres (CAILC) in building the 2005 Partnership in Action conference on the theme of accessibility.

 

·          The Ottawa Police Service partnered with CAILC to organize the National Safety Symposium:  Crime Prevention and Independent Living in order to build an agenda for crime prevention for persons with disabilities both locally and nationally.  The first of its kind in Canada, the symposium brought together 210 people with disabilities, volunteers and leaders in the Independent Living Movement to work together with police, fire and paramedic first responders, policy makers, service providers and others.  The symposium was funded primarily by Justice Canada’s National Crime Prevention Partnership Program and in part by the Ottawa Police Service Partnership in Action program


PLANNING AND INFRASTRUCTURE APPROVALS BRANCH

 

Project / Program

Description

Status

Development review process technical circulations

·          Provide the Accessibility Advisory Committee with technical circulations for Subdivision and Site Plan applications based on pre-determined criteria.

·          The Planning and Infrastructure Approvals Branch provides the Accessibility Advisory Committee with technical circulations for subdivisions and site plans when these applications meet the pre-determined criteria identified by the Committee

·          Applications are reviewed in light of the comments provided by the AA

·          Planners review the plan in terms of meeting parking requirements for individuals with physical disabilities, as well as depressed curb cuts

·          The Branch reviews lighting to ensure adequate “way finding” through the site for visually impaired persons

Awareness

·          Information sessions with the private sector (builders and developers)

·          To raise awareness on the importance of accessibility in our community


 


 

PUBLIC WORKS AND SERVICES DEPARTMENT

 

 

Project / Program

Physical Barriers

Description

Status

PHYSICAL

Sidewalks

 

 

 

1)      Too narrow for proper passage and mobility

 

2)      Obstructions in sidewalks,

(utility poles, guy wires, hydrants, etc.)

 

3)       Damaged, cracked, broken sidewalks

 

4)       No sidewalk ramps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harmonized Sidewalk Technical Design guidelines and ongoing rehabilitation program:

1)      Increase minimum design width to 1.8m.

2)      Width will be increased in vicinity of major pedestrian generators such as hospitals, schools, entertainment areas, shopping centres, etc.

3)      Sidewalks on arterial roads are sized based on pedestrian volumes.

4)      Annual sidewalk rehabilitation program.  During which sidewalks are rehabilitated to in accordance to up-to-date design guidelines. Annual program inspection and repair of existing sidewalks.

5)      Annual sidewalk inspection and repair program (for individual sidewalk sections or for sections of 6 bays or less).

6)      Part of the annual sidewalk inspection program to add ramping at intersections and at other requested locations

Ongoing program

 

Infrastructure Services Branch (ISB):

Technical guidelines state 1.8m minimum width, narrower only upon exception basis.

 

Items 1 to 6 are integral part of annual work plan and design considerations.

 

Traffic and Parking Operations (TPO):

Pedestrian Accessibility Program – addresses locations identified with ramping deficiencies.  Various locations were improved in 2005 and excess has been carried over

for 2006.

PHYSICAL

Curb Ramping

 

 

 

 

1)       Driveways too steep due to the proximity of the sidewalk

 

2)       Ramping at roadway intersections may not be accessible

 

Ongoing program where changes are made as part of rehabilitation or replacement of infrastructure:

1)      Sidewalk texturing done in accordance with accessibility guidelines.

2)      New sidewalks are automatically ramped at intersections.

3)      Provision to include a boulevard between the curb and sidewalk to facilitate proper driveway ramping included in Harmonized Sidewalk Technical Design guidelines

4)      Wherever a school crossing guard is stationed, the curbs at the intersection are ramped if not already done.

5)      Program to provide depressed ramps at existing sidewalks.

 

Ongoing program

 

ISB:

Items 1 to 4 are integral part of annual work plan and design considerations.

 

Consultation with advisory committees Jan through May 2005 on new piloted standard, ramp steepness and platform widths.

 

TPO:

Several locations improved in 2005.  Improvements currently being addressed along Robertson Road at bus shelter / stops.  Currently, no funding exists for improvements at bus stops and shelters.  Other new requests received to be carried forward to 2006.

 

 

PHYSICAL

Travel Path Accessibility

 

1)      An annual program to build new sidewalks, pathways and connecting links.

 

2)      Texturing.

 

3)      Removal of obstructions.

4)      A Pedestrian Master Plan is in the process of being developed including issues of accessibility.

Ongoing program

 

ISB:

New sidewalk links coordinated with road rehabilitation projects as required and within budget envelopes provided.

 

 

 

 

PHYSICAL

Roadway Intersections

 

 

 

Pedestrian Accessibility Project where changes are made as part of rehabilitation or replacement of infrastructure:

1)      Central medians that extend into crosswalks (old designs) are modified by removing the median end that encroaches into the crosswalk area, usually involves relocating utility poles at the same time.

 

2)       Signal poles and push buttons are relocated on a requested basis, a pole relocation is based on justification.

 

Ongoing program

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pedestrian crossing at intersections:

 

1)      Insufficient time to cross at roadway intersections

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2)      Pedestrians unable to cross roadways due to traffic volume or frequency

 

 

 

1)      Traffic control signal timing is routinely reviewed to ensure that it is at maximum efficiency - crosswalk timing can be adjusted; i.e., extended, for site specific areas where there may be a larger than normal crossing volume of elderly persons, children, wheel chairs, etc.

 

2)       Annual traffic and pedestrian

Signal program – new installations are recommended that meet warrants.

 

 

 

Signal timing updates have been conducted at 44 intersections

PHYSICAL

Audible Indication at Signaled Traffic

Intersections to facilitate safe crossing of the roadway

Audible Signal Program:

 

1)      All new signals are installed as audible.

2)      All rebuilt signals are audible.

3)      Approx. 15 signals proactively converted annually.

4)      Total of 40-45 signals made audible annually.

Ongoing program

 

To date, 17 new and / or reconstructed intersections have been equipped with audible devices in 2005.

PHYSICAL

Lighting levels on Roadways

Where lighting levels on roadways  make mobility difficult

An annual program exists to install new and maintain existing street lighting for improved safety.

Ongoing program

SITE PLAN

Parking spaces

Parking spaces on  private property not accessible or in low quantity.

The number of disabled parking spaces, size of spaces and signage is mandated by the Traffic and Parking By Law, Part C.

All municipal parking lots comply with the By-Law, all access to stairs and elevators and the markings on the stairs meet the new municipal standards controlled by RPAM.

PHYSICAL/VISUAL

Picnic tables

 

 

Picnic tables shall conform to the design guidelines, for example:

1)      Have an extension of the table surface to make them accessible to persons using wheel chairs

2)      Have a level, firm ground surface extending 2 metres on all sides of the table

3)      Be of contrasting color to their background

4)      Park benches

5)      Swings

Urban parks: Accessible picnic tables replaced as part of life cycle replacement.  A number of park benches rehabbed with arm rests annually.  Have made swings accessible upon individual request.

All new picnic tables (30) purchased in 2005 were accessible to persons using wheel chairs.

PHYSICAL

Accessible Conventional Transit

 

 

 

1)      Steps on transit buses – not all buses are fully accessible

 

2)       Limited number of conventional accessible transit routes

 

3)       Customers unable to travel on conventional transit without assistance

 

4)       Seat provision for customers who cannot stand in a moving vehicle

 

1)       Procurement of low floor buses with retractable ramp, no steps and wheelchair accessible seating compartments; easy access features: grab bars, easy to reach stop request buttons.

 

2)  Expansion of the conventional accessible route network as more low-floor buses are added to the fleet.

 

3)  An Attendant Card program   developed for those who require

assistance where the attendant rides for free.

 

4)       Priority seating is located near the front of all buses and the middle of the O-Train for individuals with difficulty standing on a moving vehicle.

Seats are identified with decals on the window; information bus cards on buses to make customers aware, and priority seating ID cards available as aids to customers.

 

 

1)      112 additional accessible buses (72 replacement and 40 growth) will be added to the fleet in 2005

 

Completed initiative to retrofit non-functioning ramps on 20 Nova low-floor buses.

 

2)      Ongoing program – in 2005 the accessible route network was expanded to include 10 new routes to bring total accessible route network to 50 routes.

 

 

3)      Ongoing program

 

 

 

 

4)      Ongoing program

 

 

PHYSICAL

Light Rail

Ensure light rail cars are fully accessible

All rail cars are fully accessible - have no stairs, and with space for persons using mobility devices

No update from Transit Services.

PHYSICAL

Para Transit

Unable to use conventional, accessible transit service for some or all trips

Provision of a specialized door-to-door transit service (Para Transpo) for those who cannot use conventional transit

Ongoing program

 

Meeting with IT to prepare possible accessible tools enabled with the installtion of Global Positioning System and Mobile Data Terminals in 2004 / 2005..

PHYSICAL

Transit Stations (Certain)

Travel path accessibility

 

1)       Increase obstacle-free travel paths and smooth continuous travel surface

 

2)       Physical assistive devices along ramps

 

3)       Pathway identification

 

4)       Add platform edge warnings

 

5)       Curb cut identification

 

6)       Improve lighting within travel path areas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

1)       Create new or correct existing curb cuts and replace or correct door thresholds of excessive heights

2)       Ensure there are continuous handrails along ramps or walkways with grades > 5%.

3)       Identify inaccessible travel pathways or accessibility constraints

4)       Provide detectable platform edge warning devices

5)       Improve pavement markings at pedestrian crossings

6)       Cover all depressed approach surfaces with colour-contrasting, slip-resistant paint

7)   Review lighting and adjust as needed

Ongoing program

 

Curb cuts at Orleans and Blair Stations to improve accessibility

 

New lighting at Queensway, Tunney’s Pasture, and Westboro Stations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stairway accessibility:

 

1)       Need and increase visibility of stairways (Stairway location identifier and individual stairs)

 

2)       Limitation of some handrails for usage

 

 

 

1)       Provide detectable warning surface at top of each flight of stairs; review and add coloured contrasting stair nosings to individual stairs as required.

2)       Retrofit handrails to meet handrail extension guidelines and profile as required.

Ongoing program

 

Handrails installed on north side of ramp at Bayview Station.

 

Resurfaced stairs at St. Laurent Station with detectable nosing.

Elevator accessibility:

 

1)       Inadequate ingress/egress

 

2)      Inadequate entrance/exit identification

 

3)      Improve elevator operation (control buttons and audio signals)

4)      Need to improve elevator lighting

 

 

 

1)       Review and adjust operation as required.

2)       Review and add colour contrasting strips or tactile edging around elevator openings as required.

3)       Replace hall call and control panel buttons with more visible, tactile and responsive buttons and add audio floor arrival signals.

4)       Enhance ambient lighting as needed.

 

 

 

 

Ongoing maintenance program

 

Replaced control valves on 10 elevators to improve reliability and reduce number of breakdowns..

 

 

 

 

Escalator accessibility:

Ensure escalator stair visibility

Maintain yellow strip on top and side of tread edges

Ongoing program.

 

Parking for disabled persons:

Ensure adequate disabled parking provisions.

 

 

 

Review and confirm directional signage to accessible spaces where location is not clear to approaching car drivers.

 

 

 

Completed

 

 

 

 

Provision of accessible seating:

Excessive distance between resting areas.

Accessible benches to be provided in all waiting areas and appropriate intervals along travel paths.

Ongoing program

Accessible benches provided at Terry Fox Station.

ARCHITECTURAL

Transit Stations (Certain

Door accessibility:

Need to improve entrance / egress provisions.

 

Review the operations and door widths as required.

 

Power operated entrance / exit doors provided at Terry Fox Station.

Public office accessibility:

Height of service counter

 

Review operations to conform to CSA standards

Accessible counter installed at St. Laurent Station.  Completed August 2005

ARCHITECTURAL

Bus Stops and Bus Shelters

Improve accessibility of bus stops and shelters for all users

 

Identification of all barriers at bus stops shelters and retrofit as feasible and necessary.

Completed replacement of 350 shelters, all accessible and all equipped with an accessible bench..

INFORMATIONAL

Transit Stations (Certain)

Information display area accessibility:

Necessity to revise information presentation to meet standards where possible.

 

 

 

Review opportunity to increase minimum standards

 

 

 

Ongoing program

Signage accessibility:

1)      Need to improve station identification signs

 

2)      Need to improve route information signs at bus stops

 

3)      Ensure directional and facility

identification signs

 

1)       Provide advance / approach station ID signs; where required use larger letters on station identification signs.

2)       Provide tactile and high contrast supplementary route information at bus stops. 

3)       Review location and content of internal station signage.

 

 

Ongoing program.

 

 

 

Tactile signs installed at Terry Fox

COMMUNICATIVE

Customer Communications

Emergency call boxes

Identification and ease of use of emergency call boxes

Improve directional signing for emergency call boxes.

Emergency call boxes part of ongoing life cycle replacement program.

Public telephones

Improve accessibility for persons with hearing, visual and mobility disabilities

Confirm operations of public telephones and review directional signage.  Respond where possible to requests for TTY telephones at stations of high demand.

Ongoing program

SITE PLANS

New Rapid Transit Stations and O-Train Stations

Necessity to accommodate all persons with disabilities

New Rapid Transit Stations and O-Train stations to be designed using Transitway Accessibility Guidelines which incorporate both CSA and OBC standards.

Terry Fox Station opened, with strong emphasis on accessibility.

 

Project

Informational / Communicative / Participatory

Description

Status

TECHNOLOGICAL

Telidon accessibility

Ensure readability

 

 

1)      Use new non-glare, high-contrast, high legibility monitors.

2)      Modify software to light letters on dark background and larger typeface.

Ongoing program

 

New Telidons at new Terry Fox Station and replacement at other locations.

INFORMATIONAL

Customer awareness

 

 

 

1)      Aware of accessible transit services.

 

2)      Awareness of general public on the benefits of accessible transit.

Develop a travel training program.  Marketing and educational sessions re:

1)       Accessible bus routes and free fare services for individuals using scooters, wheelchairs and walkers.

2)       Publish information about accessible services and route network.

3)       Marketing of services provided for disabled community and necessity for co-operation of general public.

 

 

 

Introduction of ongoing travel training program in July, 2005, and has expanded to 300 participants.

 

 

Sensitivity / Accessibile Awareness Campaign launched in form of bus cards.

 

Accessible Transit Specialist position for marketing of services provided for disabled and development of travel training program made permanent in May 2005.

 

Completed and expanded the e-mail newsgroup for blind and visually impaired to include all customers who would benefit from text.

 

Access OC Transpo hotline for customers completed.

 

Accessible transit users group created.

 

New destination card for blind and visually impaired customers provided.  Also used by other customers with disabilities (head injury, developmentally delayed, etc.).

 

Displays at community demos and information sessions at various locations to promote accessible transit have been very successful and have involved groups representing a wide variety of disabilities.

 

 

 

 

COMMUNICATIVE

Accessibility of TTY system

 

 

Accessiblity to people with various disabilities, including hearing impairment

Continued use of TTY technology within OC Transpo communication network for accessibility of hearing impaired individuals.

Ongoing program.

 

ATS has a TTY with a dedicated line.

INFORMATIONAL

Overall Access to Web Site

 

 

Overall access to Web Site for individuals with various disabilities.

Continued alterations to web site to increase accessibility for individuals with various disabilities

Update completed in 2005 to include link to text page schedules and information, and a page devoted to accessible information.

COMMUNICATIVE

Employee awareness

 

 

Employee awareness of concerns that persons with a disability have when using transit services

Continuous sensitivity training for all bus operators and staff dealing with persons with a disability and their individual needs

Regional Regulatory Code being re-written to coincide with the City of Ottawa By-Law in regards to service dogs.  Information package in development.

 

Display for bus operator awareness campaign on accessibility at January 2005 operator booking.

 

“Let’s Talk” Operator Group.


 

 

Project / Program

Policy / Educational

Description

Status

POLICY/EDUCATIONAL

Sensitivity / Awareness Training

 

 

No sensitivity / awareness training in place concerning persons with disabilities

 

 

 

 

 

1)       Pilot on Diversity Training tested in June 2003 to managers/supervisors and employees.

 

2)       Implement Visitation Program for Transit Services to promote sensitivity to accessibility for bus operators and garage workers.

 

3)       Conduct visitation programs throughout City of Ottawa to sensitize all staff.

 

4)       Miscellaneous Accessibility Issues.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Display at booking and in the operator lounges at all three garages.

“Let’s Talk” Operator Group

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New initiatives completed in 2005:

Inclusion in the Directory of Ottawa Community Services.

 

Procedure in case of a medical emergency involving a service dog or mobility device.

 

Attendant / Priority Seating Card application updated to comply with confidentiality standards, as well as accepting signatures of “Health Care Professional” to verify information.

 

Procedures to assist customers when there is an elevator out of service.

 

Pilot to put tactile strips on bus stop poles at major transit stations.  (Expansion to be decided in 2006)

 

Accessible Bus Stop Shelters; priority list of where new shelters would have the most benefit.

 

Coordinate large projects such as identify accessible bus stops and approach to those stops.


ATTACHMENT 2

 

 

2006 CITY OF OTTAWA MUNICIPAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN

 

 

 

2006 INITIATIVES FOR:

 

COMMUNITY AND PROTECTIVE SERVICES

 

CORPORATE SERVICES

 

OTTAWA POLICE SERVICE

 

PLANNING AND GROWTH MANAGEMENT

 

PUBLIC WORKS AND SERVICES


COMMUNITY AND PROTECTIVE SERVICES BRANCH

 

Project / Program

Description

Strategy

Accessibility equipment and devices

·          Improve equipment, and adaptive devices to support the participation of special needs clients in recreation, licensed child care programs

·          Include in standing offer to equip City-operated fitness studios, requirement for accessible, adaptive equipment

·          Pursue funding opportunities to expand existing inventory of adaptive, specialized equipment

·          Audit functionality, assess need, and repair/replace/purchase pool lifts

Program development

·          Continue to work with partners to address program/service gaps such as:

·          Aging special needs clients transitioning from licensed child care, education system to recreation

·          Programs for adults with developmental disabilities

·          French language programs

·          Extended recreation programs (i.e. afterschool programs)

·          Shared care for preschool, children, youth, adults, seniors, child care

·          Stroke survivors

·          Specialized programs, geographically decentralized

·          Explore expansion of Shared Care program to support integration of special needs clients into Branch programs

·          Expand therapeutic recreation and specialized programs as funding/capacity permits to address unique or more complex needs of special needs clients

·          Continue to expand French language programs for special needs clients

·          Seek to expand programming/supports to rural special needs clients

·          Work with community partners

 

Training

·          Continued roll-out of “Moving to Inclusion” training to front-line staff

·          Training to be delivered heading into summer

·          Post fall hiring

Intake, registration

·          Internet, touch tone registration can be barrier to special needs clients

·          Many special needs clients do not have credit cards

·          Continue to make improvements to CLASS to support early identification of special needs clients, referrals for assessments

·          Explore enhancements to CLASS which render electronic registration systems more accessible to special needs clients

Physical activity

·          Affordable access to fitness facilities

·          Suggestion of off peak or discounted membership forwarded to Branch membership review committee

·          Fee assistance also under review

Orleans Recreation Complex

·          Concerns about safety of special needs clients travelling from handicapped parking to access main entrance

·          Explore improved drop off/turnaround at front of building, main entrance

Park programs

·          As part of development of wading pool strategy, address access to/from facilities at 2 – 3 sites

·          Identify issues, improve access to and from up to 3 accessible wading pool/splash pad sites frequented by special needs clients

Canterbury Arena

·          Concern about accessibility of stands

·          Explore solutions in consultation with CAM

Le Patro

·          Concern about slipperiness of ramp to Coburg St. entrance

·          Issued identified to CAM

Renovations 370 Catherine St. Office

·          Central EFA office undergoing significant renovations, upgrades

·          Representation of EFA Accessibility Awareness Committee in planning of 370 Catherine renovations

Jack Purcell

·          The pool presently does not have accessible washroom that can accommodate a patron with a disability who has a personal care attendant of the opposite gender.  Although, the pool has a high number of users with disabilities

·          Proposed design completed.  Investigating sources of funding to support implementation ($60,000 required).

EFA Accessibility Awareness Committee

·          New committee established within EFA

·          Committee will develop a schedule for site inspections to review accessibility at their respective sites

Adaptive Technology Improvements – Ottawa Public Library

·          2 workstations with Zoomtext, Kurzeil software, JAWS, large print keyboards, scanners (for Main Library and South Central District Library)

·          Dependent on approval of 2006 budget

South Central District Library

·          To open Winter 2006

·           

Installation of additional automatic door operators at Garry J Armstrong Home and Peter D Clark Home

·          Key doors have been identified for gradual replacement

·          Subject to 2006 budget approval/funding from external sources


EMPLOYEE SERVICES BRANCH

 

Project / Program

Description

Strategy

Self Identification Survey for provincially regulated employees

·          Required to determine if City’s workforce is representative of the community it serves.

·          Supports the Equity and Diversity Policy

·          Continue to Implement communications plan

·          Conduct survey during the 1st quarter of 2006

·          Undertake workforce analysis, employment systems review and prepare recommendations and plan to senior management by December 2006

·          Consult with AAC and EDAC in implementation of survey

Implement Employment Equity Plan for federally regulated employees

·          Employment Equity (EE) Plan developed in 2005 identifying measures to remove barriers resulting from the employment systems review

·          Implement EE plan in consultation with management, unions, employees and designated group members including persons with disabilities.

·          Keep EDAC and AAC informed

Human Rights Training

·          Deliver the Respectful Workplace Training Program to all City employees

·          Continue to offer the human rights training through the Learning Centre

·          Implement the e-learning module of the Respectful Workplace Training Program

 

 

CITY CLERK’S BRANCH

 

Project / Program

Description

Strategy

Members of Council not very familiar with issues of disabilities and accessibility

·          Provide a brief information session in the next orientation package for new Councillors

·          To be implemented in 2006 and incorporated as part of Council Orientation sessions held with new Members of Council

Public meeting notices and Committee and Council indices do not target all segments of the population (i.e. visually impaired)

 

·          Multiple Formats Policy developed and approved by Council in 2002

·          City-wide public consultation documents provided at 6 libraries and 3 CSCs in Braille and large print

·          Documentation accessible on web site in html and plain text

·          All Council and Committee Agenda indexes automatically released in HTML, Accessible Adobe and TTY line

·          Increase the number of documents issued with the tag line: “This document is available in a multiple format upon request.”

·          Continue to promote the policy and program and encourage compliance

·          Continue to monitor the number and types of requests submitted

·          Continue to increase awareness of the policy

·          Ensure City Clerk’s Branch includes a section on Accessibility in its Orientation Manual for new Councillors in 2006

 

 

CLIENT SERVICES AND PUBLIC INFORMATION BRANCH

 

Project

Description

Strategy

TTY

·          Consolidate department TTYs to a centralized model to ensure prompt service delivery to citizens

·          Implementation of the centralized model in 2006

Sensitivity training for staff

·          Provide educational / sensitivity training to staff

·          Train in 2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

REAL PROPERTY ASSET MANAGEMENT

 

Project

Description

Strategy

Accessibility Inventory Officer

·          It is necessary to convert the Accessibility Inventory Officer to permanent full-time status

·          Through the work of its Accessibility Inventory Officer, RPAM will rate the performance of municipal buildings in meeting accessibility guidelines and update its comprehensive database on accessibility barriers

·          Capital funds are available to establish the operating budget baseline to add the equivalent 1.6 FTE and the required adjustment.

·          Reduction to the pay-as-you-go contribution will be made to accomplish this

·          It is recognized that the use of internal resources toward barrier identification work is the most cost-effective way to deliver this service

Data Entry Clerk (Part-time)

·          It is necessary to convert the Data Entry Clerk to continuous part-time

·          Based on the extensive requirement to support barrier identification work, there is a strong need for administrative support to this program

·          As above

Barrier specific removal

·          With regards to barrier removal, RPAM will continue to apply its “barrier specific” approach in 2006.

·          Effort will also be expended to develop master barrier removal standards using information from past projects

·          The internal and external resources needed to plan and execute accessibility retrofits will need to be secured

Barrier removal plan (based on capital funding)

·          Power door operators

·          Exterior Work, i.e.: Pavement markings, Signage, Curb depressions

·          Washroom miscellaneous work

·          Stairs and Railings

·          Doorways

·          Compliance with Bill 118

·          RPAM has a dedicated capital program - Building Accessibility – presented annually within its capital budget submission

Nepean Sportsplex

 

·          New lift at the Nepean Sportsplex

·          There is an anticipated increase in the level of funding toward building accessibility work in 2006

Policy initiatives

·          With regards to policy initiatives, RPAM intends to table for discussion with the Accessibility Advisory Committee a report that examines the impact of RPAM’s policy on life cycle renewal on the building accessibility program

·          Part of RPAM’s Comprehensive Asset Management Strategy

Building accessibility audits

·          185 buildings have been previously audited using CSA and OBC regulations.

·          Approximately 35% of the City’s buildings of a significant size have been audited to date in one form or another and that information has been captured on the “Master Barrier List”

·          It is intended that these same guidelines be used as part of the barrier identification work for the sizeable inventory of City buildings that still need to undergo an audit

·          Based on new Provincial Guidelines we would anticipate the auditing of 30 buildings in 2006 and to have these barriers captured in the “Master Barrier List”

 

 


OTTAWA POLICE SERVICES

 

Project

Description

Strategy

Improve the delivery of Police Services to groups that are marginalized because of accessibility issues

·          Identify relevant issues through the use of access/accessibility audits of Ottawa Police services and facilities

·          Continued implementation of the recommendations

 

·          Work with the Canadian Association of Independent Living Centres (CAILC) in building the 2005 Partnership in Action conference on the theme of accessibility.

·          The Ottawa Police Service is utilizing the findings from the 2005 symposium to develop a comprehensive “Framework for Independent Living Services” for implementation throughout the organization beginning in 2006


PUBLIC WORKS AND SERVICES

 

Project / Program

Physical

Description

Strategy

PHYSICAL

Accessible Conventional Transit

 

 

 

1)       Steps on transit buses – not all buses are fully accessible.

 

 

1)       Procurement of low floor buses with retractable ramp, no steps and wheelchair accessible seating compartments; easy access features: grab bars, easy to reach stop request buttons.

 

 

1)      In 2006, a further 54 accessible buses will be introduced; 33 replacement and 21 growth buses.

 

PHYSICAL

Light Rail

Ensure light rail cars are fully accessible.

All rail cars are fully accessible - have no stairs, and with space for persons using mobility devices.

All future Light Rail vehicles will be fully accessible.

PHYSICAL

Transit Stations (Certain)

Travel path accessibility

 

1)       Increase obstacle-free travel paths and smooth continuous travel surface.

 

 

2)       Add platform edge warnings.

 

 

 

 

1)      Create new or correct existing curb cuts and replace or correct door thresholds of excessive heights.

 

2)      Provide detectable platform edge warning devices.

 

 

 

1)      Priority List

 

 

 

 

2)      Platform ledge treatments at Lycee Claudel and Smyth Stations

 

Elevator accessibility:

 

1)       Inadequate ingress/egress.

 

 

2)       Inadequate entrance/exit identification.

 

 

 

1)       Review and adjust operation as required.

 

2)       Review and add colour contrasting strips or tactile edging around elevator openings as required.

 

 

 

Refurbish / replace elevators as lifecycle determines over two years.

 

Refurbish / Replace elevators as lifecycle determines over 3 years.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Escalator accessibility:

Ensure escalator stair visibility

Maintain yellow strip on top and side of tread edges

Replace escalator at St. Laurent Station

ARCHITECTURAL

Transit Stations (Certain)

Public office accessibility:

Height of service counter

 

Review operations to conform to CSA standards

One additional counter to be added at Rideau Centre

INFORMATIONAL

Transit Stations (Certain)

Signage accessibility:

 

1)       Need to improve station identification signs.

 

2)       Need to improve route information signs at bus stops.

 

3)       Ensure directional and facility

identification signs.

 

 

1)       Provide advance / approach station ID signs; where required use larger letters on station identification signs.

2)       Provide tactile and high contrast supplementary route information at bus stops. 

3)       Review location and content of internal station signage.

 

 

Program to be expanded in 2006

COMMUNICATIVE

Customer communications

Public telephones

Improve accessibility for persons with hearing, visual and mobility disabilities.

Confirm operations of public telephones and review directional signage.  Respond where possible to requests for TTY telephones at stations of high demand.

Emergency call boxes part of ongoing life cycle replacement program.

SITE PLANS

New Rapid Transit Stations and O-Train stations

Necessity to accommodate all persons with disabilities.

New Rapid Transit Stations and O-Train stations to be designed using Transitway Accessibility Guidelines which incorporate both CSA and OBC standards.

Light rail expansion includes accessibility in design

 

 

 

Project / Program

Informational / Communicative / Participatory

Description

Strategy

INFORMATIONAL

Customer Awareness

 

 

 

1)       Aware of accessible transit services.

 

2)       Awareness of general public on the benefits of accessible transit.

Develop a travel training program.  Marketing and educational sessions re:

1)       Accessible bus routes and free fare services for individuals using scooters, wheelchairs and walkers.

2)       Publish information about accessible services and route network.

3)       Marketing of services provided for disabled community, and necessity for co-operation of general public.

 

 

 

Replace free service program with ODSP pass, if accepted.

 

Advertise the change in fare.

 

Continue to update and expand the program.

 

Update the training information and create a training CD / DVD.

 

Update the information display to include a solo banner, DVD video presentation on accessible transit.

 

 

 

COMMUNICATIVE

Employee awareness of concerns

 

 

Employee awareness of concerns that persons with a disability have when using transit services.

Continuous sensitivity training for all bus operators and staff dealing with persons with a disability and their individual needs.

Information on the new Regional Regulatory Code in regards to service dogs will be distributed.

 


 

Project / Program

Policy / Educational

 

Description

 

Strategy

POLICY / EDUCATIONAL

Training

 

 

 

No sensitivity / awareness training in place on persons with disabilities

 

 

1)      Pilot on Diversity Training tested in June 2003 to managers/supervisors and employees

2)      Implement Visitation Program for Transit Services to promote sensitivity to accessibility for bus operators and garage workers.

3)      Conduct visitation programs throughout City to sensitize all staff.

 

Propose that external expertise; e.g., The Rehab Centre be included in Diversity Training Program.

 

“Let’s Talk” operator group

 

Complete the inclusion in the Directory of Ottawa Community Services

 

Complete the procedure in case of a medical emergency involving a service dog or mobility device.

 

Advertise / applications for Attendant / Priority Seating cards to be available on the web site

 

Complete procedure to assist customers when there is an elevator out of service.

 

Expansion of pilot to put tactile strips on bus stop poles at major transit stations.

 

Ongoing program for accessible Bus Stop shelters, with a priority list of where new shelters would have the most benefit.