Streetside Spots

Streetside spots are small outdoor spaces created by temporarily re-purposing on-street parking from April 1 – Oct 31. Streetside spots contribute to a vibrant and liveable community while sharing the right of way space with pedestrians of all abilities, cyclists and drivers.

Streetside spots can take one of three forms:

  • Streetside parklet – a public space that may contain such elements as seating, shading, bike parking, or games table.
  • Streetside patio – a private space reserved for patrons of a café, restaurant, or bar that does not have an existing patio.
  • Streetside vending stall – an outdoor business space for the sale of merchandise.

For 2016, the Pilot year, each location had to meet the following criteria:

  • On a street with a speed limit of 50 km/h or less.
  • At a location where parking is allowed at all times. The lane cannot be a moving traffic lane at any time of the day.
  • At a location that does not have a ground floor outdoor patio and does not have the opportunity for one.

The applicant is responsible for all costs including, but not limited to, application submission, permits, insurance, licences, construction, installation, maintenance, and removal. See the Submission requirements and Standards . For more information or comments, send a message to neighbourhoods@ottawa.ca

 

2016 Update

Applications were received last winter and reviewed by City staff and a selection committee in March 2016. This year's spots include four parklets – public spaces that contain everything from seating and greenery to games tables and music:

  • The Water Garden at 49 Beechwood – A meeting point, a community gathering space or simply a shelter from the elements, The Water Garden features a canopy designed to channel rainwater to pots of plants, herbs and flowers. The Quartier Vanier Business Improvement Area submitted this design from Carleton University's Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism.
  • Percy Station at 605 Somerset Street West – Percy Station offers rotating programming that includes a coffee house, micro shows, live music, poetry readings and theatre sessions. The design features a seating area that can be configured in a variety of ways. Strip lighting will help animate the structure's form and illuminate it at night for safety.
  • The Nük on the north side of Second Avenue, east of Bank Street – Nük features a seating area and games table, creating a space for people to stay connected through community events. The design features a built-in table and an L-shaped bench that faces Bank Street. It incorporates vegetation and soft ambient lighting. The Glebe Community Association submitted this design from Carleton University's Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism.
  • A parklet on the south side of Third Avenue, west of Bank Street – The intent was to design a space that includes both the parking space and the triangular void that currently exists between the parking space and the "bulb out" at the intersection of Bank Street allowing a slight extension of seating, and importantly, additional space for plantings/greenery that adds to the attractiveness of the space and the street itself. The design was based on input from the Glebe Parks Committee members, and drawn up by a designer who is a resident in the community.

Applications were also approved for seven patios – private spaces reserved for patrons of cafés or restaurants that do not have an existing patio:

  • The WORKS at 326 Richmond Road
  • The Ministry of Coffee at 1013 Wellington Street West
  • Corner Bar and Grill at 344 Richmond Road
  • Blue Cactus Bar and Grill at 2 Byward Street
  • The Cupcake Lounge at 6 Byward Street
  • Asian Alley at 8 Byward Street
  • Zak's Diner at 14-16 Byward Street

The City will gather public feedback as part of the evaluation of this pilot project. A report will be made to Transportation Committee at the end of 2016.

 

For more information or comments, send a message to neighbourhoods@ottawa.ca

 

The Neighbourhood Connection Office

The Neighbourhood Connection Office (NCO) helps residents and community groups work together on small-scale projects that make their neighbourhoods more liveable, vibrant, healthy and beautiful. It could be things like making streets more walkable, revitalizing a park, or artistic initiatives such as street painting.

For great ideas, tools and resources to make your neighbourhood more liveable, be sure to check out our ‘do-it-yourself’ Toolkit.