Section 6 - Road Network

6.1 Intent
6.2 Arterial Roads

6.3 Collector Roads

6.4 Local Roads

6.1 Intent

The road network is the backbone of Ottawa’s transportation system since it accommodates a full range of transportation forms. The road network is comprised of a hierarchy of road types to ensure that an adequate width for each road type exists to accommodate the intended function. Greely’s road network follows this hierarchy, comprised of arterial, collector and local roads. The intent of the Greely Road Network (Schedule C) is to accommodate all transportation types while keeping safety and accessibility in mind.

Policies

  1. All roads in the Village of Greely must be designed and constructed according to the most current City of Ottawa standards.
  2. The pattern and location of all new roads identified in this CDP are conceptual, as per Section
    8.1.

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Arterial Roads

 

Bank Street, an arterial road, provides a hard edge on the Village’s eastern boundary.
Bank Street, an arterial road, provides a hard edge on the Village’s eastern boundary.

Arterial roads are the major roads of the network that carry large volumes of traffic over the longest distances, the majority of which were formerly identified as Regional Roads. For arterial roads, intersections should be spaced, vehicular access to adjacent properties should be minimized, and corridors should provide a high degree of connectivity. There are three arterial roads that run through Greely: Bank Street along Greely’s eastern boundary; Mitch Owens Road along Greely’s northern boundary; and Stagecoach Road through the middle of Greely.

Policies:

  1. As per the Official Plan, the following right-of-ways for arterial roads shall be protected for within Greely:
    1. Bank Street – Existing Corridor Protection;
    2. Mitch Owens Road – 34.0 metres; and
    3. Stagecoach Road – 30.0 metres.

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6.3 Collector Roads

 

Collector roads, such as Parkway Road, are the key to connecting Greely’s neighbourhoods.
Collector roads, such as Parkway Road, are the key to connecting Greely’s neighbourhoods.

Collector roads connect neighbourhoods and distribute traffic between arterial and local roads. Collector roads tend to be shorter and carry lower volumes of traffic than arterial roads, may have direct access to adjacent properties, and are designed to accommodate the safe and efficient operation of transit services. Parkway Road and Old Prescott Road are both “community” collector roads, running through the Village, while there are several “local” collectors throughout different neighbourhoods within the Village that essentially connect the local roads to the “community” collector road or arterial roads.

Policies:

  1. As per the Official Plan, the following right-of-ways for collector roads shall be protected for within Greely:
    1. Parkway Road – 30.0 metres; and
    2. Old Prescott Road – 30.0 metres.
  2. All collector roads identified on Schedule C internal to future subdivisions must be designed with a maximum 26.0 metre right-of-way.
  3. All new collector roads should have sidewalks on at least one side of the road to provide safe pedestrians connections throughout Greely.
  4. Proposed subdivisions within the Village Developments must incorporate the collector road connections identified on Schedule C into the design of their road pattern.

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6.4 Local Roads

 

An accessible and permeable local road pattern will connect Greely’s neighbourhoods.
An accessible and permeable local road pattern will connect Greely’s neighbourhoods.

Local roads distribute traffic from arterial and collector roads to individual properties, typically over short distances. Some local roads also serve a “collector” function by distributing traffic from local roads to collector and arterial roads. Local roads, as shown on Schedule C, are intended to follow principles of accessibility and permeability.

Policies:

  1. All local streets will be designed with a 20.0 metre right-of-way.
  2. All new local roads will follow a modified grid pattern with connections as per Schedule C. Dead-end streets, cul-de-sacs and long looping streets are discouraged.
  3. Proposed subdivisions that are adjacent to the village boundary consider the local road connections identified on Schedule C during the development review process, and are subject to the requirements of a Traffic Impact Study.

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