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Completed Guidelines

The Design and Planning Guidelines contained within this section have completed their public consultation phase and have been approved by City Council for implementation.
 

Environmental Noise Control

Environmental Noise Control Guidelines [ PDF 1.88 MB ]

January 2016

Urban Design Guidelines for Development along Traditional Mainstreets

Urban Design Guidelines for Development along Traditional Mainstreets

[ PDF 1.46 MB ]

May 24, 2006

Outdoor Patio Design Guidelines

Outdoor Patio Design Guideline

[ PDF 4.96 MB ]

Urban Design Guidelines for Drive-Through Facilities

Urban Design Guidelines for Drive-Through Facilities

[ PDF 1.89 MB ]

May 24, 2006

Regional Road Corridor Design Guidelines

Regional Road Corridor Design Guidelines

[ PDF 7.39 MB ]

Urban Design Guidelines for Gas Stations

[ PDF 1.66 MB ]

May 24, 2006

Right-of-Way Lighting Policy

Right-of-Way Lighting Policy

[ PDF 4.22 MB ]

Urban Design Guidelines for Greenfield Neighbourhoods

Urban Design Guidelines for Greenfield Neighbourhoods

[ PDF 3.83 MB ]

Transit-Oriented Development Guidelines

Transit-Oriented Development Guidelines

[ PDF 2.89 MB ]

September 26, 2007

Urban Design Guidelines for Large-Format Retail

Urban Design Guidelines for Large-Format Retail

[ PDF 1.95 MB ]

May 24, 2006

Urban Design Guidelines for Development along Arterial Mainstreets

Urban Design Guidelines for Development along Arterial Mainstreets

[ PDF 1.83 MB ]

May 24, 2006

Urban Design Guidelines for Low-rise Infill Housing

Urban Design Guidelines for Low-rise Infill Housing

[ PDF 2 MB ]

Road Corridor Planning & Design Guidelines

Road Corridor Planning & Design Guidelines

[ PDF 3.7 MB ]

October 2008

Rural Village Design Guidelines

[ PDF 2.66 MB ]

November 2009

Urban Design Guidelines for High-Rise Housing

Urban Design Guidelines for High-Rise Housing

[ PDF 3.25 MB ]

October 2009

Johnston Road concept plan

Johnston Road Concept Plan

[ PDF 70 KB ]

Gateway Design Consolidated Design Guidelines for New Development Application Gateway Features
[ PDF 286 KB ]
 Downtown moves

Downtown moves: Transforming Ottawa’s streets

[ PDF 15.5 MB ]

Park and Pathway Development Manual Park and Pathway Development Manual [ PDF 3.89 MB ]  cover of plan Building Better and Smarter Suburbs: Strategic Directions and Action Plan [ PDF 4.52 MB ]
 photo of street intersection in ottawa

Complete Streets in Ottawa 

   

Building Better and Smarter Suburbs: Strategic Directions and Action Plan

On March 10, 2015, Planning Committee approved the report titled Building Better and Smarter Suburbs: Strategic Directions and Action Plan. The report speaks to the challenge of supporting land efficiency and functionality in new suburban subdivisions, while at the same time improving urban design and long-term cost effectiveness.

Building Better and Smarter Suburbs is now in its implementation phase. Three Working Groups – Streets, Schools, and Parks – are developing recommendations based on the Strategic Directions and Action Plan items in the report. Solutions will be implemented as they become available throughout this Term of Council (2015-2018).

Building Better and Smarter Suburbs: Strategic Directions and Action Plan [ PDF 4.52 MB ]

Complete Streets in Ottawa

Complete Streets and Multimodal Level-of-Service in Ottawa

What are complete streets?

Complete Streets incorporate the physical elements that allow a street to offer safety, comfort and mobility for all users of the street regardless of their age, ability, or mode of transportation. A Complete Streets approach uses every transportation project as a catalyst for improvements within the scope of that project to enable safe, comfortable and barrier-free access for all users. In other words, complete streets:

  • Accommodate multiple modes
  • Incorporate context-sensitive design principles
  • Can be used as a way to improve neighbourhoods and support liveability

All streets can be Complete Streets but they look different based on the surrounding context. In Ottawa, they will differ:

  • In rural, suburban, and urban contexts
  • For local, collector, and arterial roads
  • Based on land use characteristics and Official Plan designations.

On 14 October 2015 Council approved the Transportation Committee Report, Complete Streets Framework (ACS2015-PAI-PGM-0159) that provided a definition of Complete Streets; outlined the progress and preparation for an implementation framework and included guidelines for Multi-Modal Level of Service as a supplement to the Traffic Impact Assessment Guidelines.

A brief information sheet highlights, Complete Streets in Ottawa.

The Multimodal Level of Service (MMLOS) Guidelines provide guidance to practitioners (City staff, consultants, etc.) on how to assess the various LOS for the different modes of transportation and what the specific target service levels for each mode should be given the location and context the transportation project.
The MMLOS tools are intended to be applied across a variety of projects that require detailed analysis of transportation impacts. In other words, whenever a project or study requires the completion of level of service analysis, MMLOS should be applied. Scenarios that require MMLOS evaluation may include transportation environmental assessments, corridor studies, neighbourhood traffic management studies, or development projects.

Purpose of Guidelines and Introduction to Multimodal Level of Service

In the past, municipalities often focused on the performance of vehicular traffic in evaluating the level of service (LOS) on streets. Since no comparable LOS measures have been commonly institutionalized for other modes of travel, the tradeoffs between vehicle delay and its impacts on the quality of travel by other modes are often overlooked. That is, the typical outcome of improving level of service is wider roads with more travel lanes, higher vehicle volumes, and faster vehicle speeds. These network modifications often degrade conditions for other modes (i.e. walking and cycling), and this trade-off is not incorporated into the standard motor vehicle LOS indicator.

However, recognition of the need to provide more multi-modal streets has marked a shift towards establishing performance measures for all modes: cycling, walking, transit, and vehicular. This all in-one evaluation tool is referred to as Multimodal Level of Service and will allow performance measurement for all modes

Design Guidelines for New Development Application Gateway Features

A gateway feature, sometimes referred to as an “entrance feature”, can be described as an element intended to assist commuters in finding their way, and in so doing contributing a sense of identity for a community.

Learn More

Design Guidelines for Rural Villages

Purpose and Application

The purpose of these guidelines is to provide design guidance to assess, promote and achieve appropriate development in Villages. These guidelines shall be applied at the development review stage for proposed Official Plan and Zoning Bylaw amendments, Subdivisions and Site Plan Control applications.

The guidelines shall be applied in conjunction with Council-approved City policies such as, but not limited to, Secondary Plans, Village Plans, Community Design Plans (CDPs), Neighbourhood Plans and other design guidelines. If a conflict in application arises, where there is more precise or village-specific information as part of an approved City policy, for example, as contained within a CDP, the more detailed information will take precedence over the guidelines. Village community visioning exercises may also provide useful background information to further inform the application of these guidelines. Proponents should be able to demonstrate how their proposal considers the guidelines. The guidelines are not prescriptive; they are flexible to accommodate exceptions and may not all apply equally in all cases.
 

Design Guidelines for Rural Villages [ PDF - 684 KB ]
  • Purpose and Application
  • Official Plan Direction
  • Objectives
  • Context and Issues
  • Design Guidelines
    • Community Layout and Design
    • Heritage and Architecture
    • Built Form
    • Streetscape
    • Open Space
  • Definition
  • Glossary

Downtown moves: Transforming Ottawa’s streets

downtown moves
Chapter 1 [ PDF 1.5 MB ]

Chapter 2 [ PDF 5.5 MB ]
Chapter 3 [ PDF 5.1 MB ]
Chapter 4 [ PDF 4.2 MB ]
Chapter 5 [ PDF 222 KB ]
Index [ PDF 505 KB ]

Full document [ PDF 15.5 MB ]

Executive Summary

Downtown Moves is an Urban Design and Transportation Study that identifies ways to create more vibrant, inclusive, safe and accessible streets for residents, workers and visitors of all ages and abilities across Ottawa's Central Business District (CBD). The overall aim is to make walking, cycling and transit use more comfortable and convenient by redistributing and improving the streetscape environment. The Study informs the City on how to best capitalize on the transformative opportunities presented by the implementation of the Confederation Line light rail transit (LRT) project, and seamlessly integrate the future stations at street level.Executive Summary

The Downtown Moves study was undertaken between September 2011 and March 2013 and included several rounds of public consultation. The Study was approved by Transportation Committee on March 4, 2013, with broad public support, and subsequently approved by Council on March 27, 2013.

The construction of the underground LRT will have a transformative impact across the downtown when it opens in 2018. For example, it will alleviate the current bus rapid transit bottleneck on downtown streets and create space that can be reallocated to other street uses and functions. It will change travel patterns of the projected 47,000 morning commuters arriving by LRT who will be seeking new walking routes to their downtown destinations.

As a result of this investment in the LRT, the Downtown Moves Study provides innovative solutions to guide a wide range of planning and engineering projects proposed for Ottawa's CBD and its public spaces in order to create complete and safe environments. Specific examples include: widening of sidewalks, provision of pedestrian priority crossing measures, creation of complete cycling networks, creation of Transit Interface Zones for the seamless transfer between different transportation modes, and consolidation of design guidelines to better integrate buildings with the public realm.

Downtown Moves starts with a clear Vision and Strategic Directions that outlines the Study approach and guides the development and evaluation of all aspects of this study. Vision Plans provide additional planning and design analyses of downtown streets organized by the distinct needs of pedestrians, cyclists, transit users, and vehicle drivers. Then, a New Street Design Framework outlines a process to evaluate street design options and identify the preferred solution that is best for the planned function and the adjacent community.
The Street Design Toolkit identifies a range of best practises and creative solutions that are tailored and applicable to the Ottawa context. The best practices are organized into four major mobility modes: pedestrians, cyclists, transit and vehicles .The section also includes over a dozen Complete Street Design Solutions that rebalance street space among the various uses. Downtown Moves also developed pioneering research into the concept of "Pedestrian Level-of-Service" to furthering planning for active transportation in Ottawa.
To assist the community, municipal politicians, business and civic leaders and City staff envision the potential opportunities for change, Street Demonstrations are provided to illustrate innovative and integrated urban design and transportation solutions that could be accomplished on Ottawa's downtown streets.

The Implementation Section of the report identifies:

  • Potential streetscape projects that can be implemented incrementally as part of lifecycle renewal over the next five, 10 and 20-year planning horizon
  • 13 "Vital Moves", representing realistic projects or actions that builds on the information and analysis presented in the Study
  • Guidance to amend the City's Official Plan and Transportation Master Plan, as well as the update of the Cycling and Pedestrian plans
  • An implementation program structured around City business practices and departments
  • How Downtown Moves fulfills the role of a "Master Plan" as defined in the Ontario Municipal Class Environmental Assessment (2011), to further the Study's rigour and usefulness.

Going forward, Downtown Moves will guide the renewal of downtown streets, promoting active transportation, improved urban design conditions and creating an inclusive environment to people of all ages and ability levels.

Johnston Road Concept Plan

Development Principles and Design Guidelines

Concept Plan [PDF 70 KB]

Proposed Concept Plan Map [ PDF 1.0 MB ]

The following development principles and design guidelines are to be used as the principle reference for the City to direct the preparation of development applications and to evaluate submissions in the development review process. Application of these principles and guidelines are meant to ensure that future development achieves a consistently high level of site planning, architecture and landscape design.

  1. Be consistent with the Provincial Policy Statement and Official Plan policies for lands designated Employment Area.
  2. Foster development that ensures the area’s future as a sound and economically viable place of business offering a variety of employment opportunities which meet a high level of urban design regarding site planning, architecture and landscape design, while recognizing the uniqueness of a railway facility in its midst.
  3. Investigate and be prepared to take creative action for any opportunities to effectively use the existing railway lines to full advantage of both the Employment Area and the surrounding residential community.
  4. Facilitate the development of the lands in an effective and efficient manner while allowing for a variety of block and lot sizes, while recognizing that the size of lots will be market-driven and based on the desires of the landowner, but as per minimums established by the Comprehensive Zoning By-law.
  5. Support the preference for light industrial uses as established through the public consultation process.
  6. Make use of existing infrastructure services and allow for orderly expansion where required.
  7. Provide the opportunity to encourage and integrate efficient public transit service with pedestrian and cycling networks within the area and between new and existing development.
  8. Provide two new local roads to provide maximum access for as much of the site as possible.
  9. Reduce direct vehicular access to Johnston Road for lands located at both the northwest corner of Johnston and Conroy Road and the northeast corner of Johnston and Albion.
  10. Encourage linkages to pedestrian and cycling paths as identified in the Ottawa Pedestrian Plan and Ottawa Cycling Plan through the development review process.
  11. Maintain existing natural topographic features, distinctive land forms, vegetative and drainage characteristics as much as possible to enhance site development, including the retention of all existing large healthy trees, and substantial masses of mature shrubs.
  12. Ensure that the Conroy Woods and the Greenboro Turtlehead Nature Area (GTNA) continue to be protected when considering new development proposals within the area by implementing any mitigation measures as required by supporting studies.
  13. Promote a finished development setting that is cohesive and employs a formal landscape design to impart a pleasantly distinctive visual character for the area.
  14. Ensure that development interfaces with the adjacent residential community in a sensitive manner, with building facades of new development oriented toward Johnston Road.
  15. Create an environment which is physically compatible and aesthetically enhanced on those portions of individual properties which are visible to abutting residential areas through the use of landscape elements, such as berms, tree and shrub planting and decorative fencing, etc.
  16. Develop an effective visual separation between new business park uses and nearby uncomplimentary or incompatible industrial, commercial, utility or other such uses.
  17. Employ Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) techniques in all facets of site development review.

Design guidelines

The guidelines discuss how development can be sensitively integrated with the existing context, how it can contribute to the visual image of the area, and how it can address functional requirements of safe and efficient circulation. The guidelines recommend accentuating gateways and façade treatment along public rights-of-way. Key consideration is given to compatibility between new development in the Employment Area and the surrounding community. The guidelines also strive to reduce the visual prominence of associated parking areas by locating them at the rear of buildings or effectively screening them from adjacent pedestrian areas, residential areas and public streets. Effective linkages for pedestrians and cyclists will be accommodated through development review with the goal to create a barrier-free network that serves developments within the industrial park and the broader community system. Street trees planted in a consistent manner on all public boulevards will create a strong and cohesive visual identity for the whole industrial business park. Effective landscaping also will be used at gateway intersections leading into the industrial park, to screen unsightly elements, and to buffer adjacent residential uses from future industrial uses.

Road Pattern and Development Blocks
  1. Two new local roads will be constructed and aligned in an east - west direction, one north and one south of the railway tracks. These roads are to be developer-initiated and implemented through plan of subdivision approval.
  2. At build-out, each road will connect to both Albion Road and Conroy Road to maximize public transit routing, provide more connectivity for cyclists and pedestrians, and improve public safety for emergency access.
  3. The length or segment of road to be constructed at any one time will be determined through the subdivision approval process, subject to staff approval. Phased construction of the roads and/or blocks, must consider appropriate servicing, surface operations, emergency access, and efficient public transit.
  4. Location of the two new local roads is conceptual. The alignments shown on the concept plan illustrate one way to provide access to as many individually owned, vacant and underutilized sites as possible, while minimizing traffic generation through existing neighbourhoods.
  5. New development at the northwest corner of Conroy and Johnston Roads will have vehicular access provided via a new local road connecting directly to Conroy Road; however, pedestrian and cycling access to Johnston Road will be encouraged.
  6. The most appropriate vehicular access for lands located near the west side of the concept plan, south of the railway tracks, is best determined through the development review process, and with the aid of a Transportation Brief or Transportation Impact Study as per City of Ottawa Transportation Impact Assessment guidelines. In either case, buildings will be encouraged to face Johnston Road, and to provide pedestrian access directly to Johnston Road.
  7. All four, new intersections should be defined as well-articulated, visually enhancing gateway entries into the new employment area, either through significant landscape treatment and /or built form and siting of new buildings.
  8. Existing development blocks vary in size, but overall, are large. A plan of subdivision will create the public roads and will also create smaller blocks or lots for marketing purposes and ownership. Minimum lot sizes are established through the Comprehensive Zoning By-law. The Johnston Road Concept Plan will maintain the flexibility that currently exists.
Permitted Uses and Buildings
  1. This concept plan will encourage a wide range of low-impact light industrial uses, as well as office and office-type uses in a campus-like industrial park setting, recognizing the existing open space, parks and urban natural features. The permitted uses are those listed in the respective zones as per the Comprehensive Zoning By-law, as amended herein, and include office, manufacturing, research and development, warehousing and distribution. A variety of complementary uses are also permitted, such as recreational, health and fitness uses and service commercial uses (e.g., convenience store, personal service business, restaurant, automobile service station and gas bar), occupying small sites on individual pads or in groupings as part of a small plaza, to serve the people working and living in the area, and passing traffic.
  2. Orient buildings to front onto the public right-of-way and ensure that principal entries are clearly identifiable, visible from the street and universally accessible. Entries can be highlighted by designing extra-high lobby space, distinctive doorways and distinctive landscaped entry areas, and also by changing paving materials, textures or colour.
  3. Ensure that facades which face Johnston Road and flank other streets, add interest through their architectural detail. Use the architectural details (e.g. windows, transoms, doorways) and choice of building material to articulate and break up the building mass.
  4. Accentuate corner sites by designing buildings that relate to both street fronts and provide pedestrian access to the building from the corner.
  5. Ensure that building setbacks permit the addition of significant landscaping and an enhanced streetscape treatment.
  6. Avoid large blank walls on all facades, and encourage the use of real windows facing all public rights-of-way.
  7. Ensure visibility into buildings from ground level facades facing public streets and the pedestrian realm. Walls should be highly transparent with windows and doors making up at least 30 per cent of the façade.
  8. It is recognized that certain buildings will include programmatic uses that do not lend themselves to a highly transparent façade (e.g. loading areas). These buildings should be designed so that such uses are located along walls that face away from public streets and the pedestrian realm. The external surface of these walls must be designed to break up the visual size of the wall’s façade by using any of the following techniques:
a.     modulating the façade,
b.    using different building materials, colours, patterns, and textures within the building lane;
c.     changing the roofline;
d.    incorporating display windows;
e.     designing buildings with distinct bases, middles, and upper storeys.

9.     Employ high quality materials in the development of individual sites.

Parking, Loading and Service
  1. Locate parking areas away from the new gateway entrances, and away from Johnston Road.
  2. Locate surface parking at the rear of buildings so that the built form screens the parking area from public streets and from abutting residential uses.
  3. Where parking cannot be located at the rear of buildings, a larger setback from the property line than the building setback will be required, and cars must be effectively screened from view.
  4. Minimize the visual and micro-climatic effects of all parking and other large paved areas through the use of plant materials in combination with earth berms where practical.
  5. Break up large parking areas into smaller ones (maximum of 25 parking spaces in a continuous row) with landscaped islands provided at the ends of parking space rows, each having a width of at least 3m and a minimum area of approximately 15 square metres to accommodate deciduous trees and low shrubs, or ground cover, other than grass, in place of shrubs.
  6. For every four single rows of parking spaces, provide a landscaped centre median, having a minimum width of 2m, to be planted with trees and possibly shrubs.
  7. Landscape the setback between parking areas and the public right-of-way with a row of trees, planted to create a continuous canopy, and understory shrub planting. Where possible, a second row of trees should be added. Plant spacing and planting choices must meet the intent of these guidelines to screen parking areas from view and to provide shade to city sidewalks for pedestrians. Planting may be combined with aesthetic berms, low fences or walls to achieve the desired screening. Screening must be effective in all seasons.
  8. The number of access driveways will be minimized where possible through the encouragement of shared access to parking areas located between buildings that are located on separate properties.
  9. Line the main private driveways with deciduous trees on one or both sides, spaced at an approximate spacing of 7m on centre.
  10. All access to storage areas must be screened from view from the public street and from abutting residential uses, with the use of earth berms and landscaping. The screening must be effective in all seasons and landscaping should not exceed 1m in height.
  11. Loading spaces must not face the Johnston Road right-of-way, and must be screened from view from the Johnston Road right-of-way, and from abutting residential uses.
  12. Loading areas or garbage storage service areas must be at least 6m away from a front yard. When abutting residential uses, mitigation measures to address noise reduction and odour shall be taken, including the consideration of requiring interior garbage/recycling storage, greater setbacks from abutting property lines, and built structures around loading areas. (‘wing-walls’)
  13. Locate loading, garbage and other services (transformers, utility meters, heating, ventilation and air conditioning equipment) in non-prominent locations that do not detract from the aesthetic appeal of the street and are located away from the pedestrian realm and away from abutting residential uses.
  14. Screen mechanical, service and utility areas from view using landscaping and/or materials that match the building. Where context sensitive, e.g. abutting residential or Johnston Road, enclose these elements within the building. Any roof-top equipment will be effectively screened utilizing suitable material complementary to the material used for the main building.
Landscaping Guidelines

Street trees planted in a consistent manner on all public boulevards will create a strong and cohesive visual identity for the whole industrial business park. Effective landscaping will be used at gateway intersections, to screen unsightly elements, and where necessary, to buffer adjacent residential uses from future industrial uses, and new industrial uses from existing uses that currently are not as visually appealing.

  1. At least 30 per cent of the total area of the lot for each individual site development must be landscaped area.
  2. Any portion of a site not covered by a building or hard surface material also shall be landscaped, even for sites where future buildings are proposed, and phased for a later date.
  3. A minimum of approximately 35 per cent of all trees and a minimum of approximately 20 per cent of all shrubs planted on a site should be coniferous or broad leafed evergreens.
  4. Use intensive planting along all public rights-of-way, between the curb and edge of right-of-way, in a consistent and distinctive formal pattern such that a continuous canopy or screen is created:
a.     Plant any deciduous trees along the street at an approximate spacing of 6m on centre, while recognizing that tree spacing will vary with species selection;
b.    Any combination of deciduous trees and coniferous trees along the street should be approximately 7.5m on centre.

5.     Select plant species that are non-invasive, tolerant of urban conditions, and drought resistant, with preference given to native species that can meet these conditions.

6.     A landscaped area with a minimum width of three metres is required along all property lines. Pedestrian walkways or cycling linkages can form part of this area.

7.     The side property lines separating individual sites are to be defined by informal plantings of trees and shrubs, and at the adjacent streetline, a formal grouping of coniferous trees (minimum of two trees on each side of any side property line) shall be included with contrasting smaller plant materials linking the coniferous trees to the deciduous street trees.

8.     Bio-swales should be investigated as a means of natural irrigation for any landscaped islands and landscaped setbacks along property lines.

9.     Foundation planting for all buildings fronting Johnston Road will be encouraged.

10. Plantings of shrubs and/or other plant materials shall be encouraged along the front façade of all buildings, (unless the planting diminishes a distinctive architectural feature or effect) and along building walls in the vicinity of all main pedestrian spaces or walkways, keeping Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design principles in mind.

11. Use compatibly designed street furnishings and other hard landscape elements within the public streetscape, and on private sites (e.g., lighting, address and signage elements), and employ similar planting designs along the streetscape and on the adjacent portions of private sites (e.g. tree species selection and rhythm along roads and driveways, property line definition plantings, entrance planting features) in order to create strong visual unity for the overall employment area.

12. Establish a landscaped buffer around the edges of any new development to preclude incompatible or uncomplimentary views onto other sites within the employment area, such as along the railway lands or outdoor storage areas, and any other uses that currently do not add to the aesthetically pleasing environment that is sought through this Plan.

13. Develop small courtyards or plazas at the main entrance to all buildings; and make these spaces sheltered from the elements and visible from the street and/or from the beginning of the main vehicular driveway leading to parking areas in the rear.

14. All building entrances and related entry courts and plazas are to be well-lit, sheltered and clearly visible when entering the site, and are to be defined by landscape elements.

15. Use plantings or appropriately sized shrubs, and/or trees to visually soften extensive lengths of building walls (e.g. 9m sections or greater) which have few windows or other substantial architectural relief, especially when adjacent to or readily visible to residential uses.

Pedestrian and Cycling Environment

As the industrial business park develops, it is essential to create a well-defined pedestrian and cycling environment along all public roads and within the individual development sites.

  1. Through the development review process for subdivision and site plan applications, create a pedestrian and cycling system incrementally, which at build-out, will serve the entire industrial business park and provide opportunity for future linkages to the surrounding communities, public areas, community amenities and transit stops.
  2. Provide for the future allocation of pathway blocks at regular intervals in the industrial park to access the future pathways as identified by the Ottawa Cycling Plan and Ottawa Pedestrian Plan, at the time of subdivision and/or site plan control applications.
  3. Build sidewalks or multi-use pathways on at least one side of the new roads in accordance with City standards.
  4. Provide for appropriate pedestrian and cycling connections to all new development immediately adjacent to the north side of Johnston Road, through the site plan and subdivision review processes.
  5. Design for on-road cycling for the new roads.
  6. Provide a physical environment that is safe, convenient, universally accessible to all users, and generally pleasant for pedestrian users, such that walkways have a minimum width of at least 1.5m and at least 2m for main walkways leading to a main building entrance.
  7. Ensure that all areas of the vehicular and pedestrian circulation system are lit to provide sufficient visibility for safety and security, preferably with free standing fixtures that are task oriented, and reduce glare and light spill-over. The positioning of light standards shall be used to help delineate routes and provide spatial definition for different functional areas.
  8. Sign all pedestrian pathway and cycling linkages leading to those nearby pathways identified in the Ottawa Pedestrian Plan and Ottawa Cycling Plan, when built.
  9. Provide seating and shaded areas along pathways at roughly 200m intervals.
  10. Clearly highlight street crossings through special pavement treatment for pedestrians and cyclists.
  11. Provide bicycle parking in highly visible locations close to well-lit building entrances and that are connected to the pedestrian system.

Regional Road Corridor Design Guidelines

Regional Road Corridor Design Guidelines

 

Learn More

Road Corridor Planning & Design Guidelines

Transit-Oriented Development Guidelines

Transit-Oriented Development Guidelines

Approved by City Council on September 26, 2007
Publication #21-12

Learn More

Urban Design Guidelines for Development along Arterial Mainstreets

Urban Design Guidelines for Development along Arterial Mainstreets

Approved by City Council on May 24, 2006
Publication #21-04

Learn More

Urban Design Guidelines for Development along Traditional Mainstreets

Urban Design Guidelines for Development along Traditional Mainstreets

Approved by City Council on May 24, 2006
Publication #21-03

Learn More

Urban Design Guidelines for Drive-Through Facilities

Urban Design Guidelines for Drive-Through Facilities

Approved by City Council on May 24, 2006
Publication #21-07

Learn More

Urban Design Guidelines for Gas Stations

Urban Design Guidelines for Gas Stations

Approved by City Council on May 24, 2006
Publication #21-06

Learn More

Urban Design Guidelines for Greenfield Neighbourhoods

Urban Design Guidelines for Large-Format Retail

Urban Design Guidelines for Large-Format Retail

Approved by City Council on May 24, 2006
Publication #21-05

Learn More

Urban Design Guidelines for Low-rise Infill Housing

Update on the Ontario Municipal Board Appeal Against the Infill Zoning By-law Amendment

On July 8, 2015, Council approved the Infill II By-law 2015-228, which deals with building mass, height, rear and side setbacks, projections, and discreet intensification in low density residential zones (R1 to R4) in inner and outer-urban wards (Wards 7 to 18). It is important to consult with City Staff (Development Information Officer) to ensure proper interpretation of the By-law provisions.

Following adoption of By-law 2015-228, appeals were filed to the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB).

A pre-hearing was held on January 5, 2016, where staff indicated to the OMB that a discussion was ongoing with the Appellants and Participants to resolve the issues raised under the appeals.

Following several meetings held with all parties, a partial settlement was reached on May 2.

This settlement is to be presented for endorsement to Planning Committee on June 14, 2016 and Council on June 22, 2016.

A second pre-hearing is scheduled for July 11, 2016 where staff will present the endorsed settlement to the OMB. The revisions to the By-law resulting from the settlement will become in full force upon OMB endorsement.

The revised By-law will be available following endorsement by the OMB.

Mature Neighbourhoods Streetscape Character Analysis
For further information please contact:

Beth Desmarais
Planning and Growth Management
City of Ottawa
110 Laurier Avenue West
Ottawa
613-580-2424, ext. 13503
E-mail: elizabeth.desmarais@ottawa.ca

This is a series of design guidelines for infill housing to help fulfill some of the design strategies for Ottawa as outlined in the Official Plan. It is intended as a basic framework for the physical layout, massing, functioning and relationships of infill buildings to their neighbours.

Urban Design Guidelines for Low-rise Infill Housing - May 2012 [ PDF - 2 MB ]

1.0 Introduction
2.0 Streetscapes
3.0 Landscape
4.0 Building Design (Built Form)
5.0 Parking and Garages
6.0 Heritage Building Alterations/Additions
7.0 Service Elements
8.0 Infill on Narrow Lots
9.0 Glossary
10.0 Appendix: How Design Guidelines fit with the current Development Approval process