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Open Houses

Open house - 11 May 2015

Main Street Renewal Open House
Monday, May 11, 2015
6 to 9 pm
Room 120, Saint Paul University 
Laframboise Hall, Ground Floor
249 Main Street, Ottawa

Welcome

Welcome to this Public Open House for the Main Street Renewal project. This is an opportunity for you to learn about the project and provide input. Tonight you will learn about the progression of the project since the previous open house in November 2014, including:

  • The council-approved complete concept for Main Street;
  • The final detailed designs;
  • Construction phasing and timing;
  • Traffic management plans, including detours;
  • Interim transit service;
  • Interim pedestrian and cycling routes;
  • Stakeholder communications

Study process

The Main Street Renewal study area includes:

  • Main Street from Echo Drive to the McIlraith Bridge;
  • Lees Avenue from Main Street to Chestnut Avenue;
  • A portion of Rideau River Drive.

In 2013, the City of Ottawa completed an Environmental Assessment for the Main Street Renewal project. In July 2013, City Council approved the complete street design for Main Street recommended in the EA process.

The subsequent design process resulted in draft detailed designs to enable the reconstruction of the study area streets. Construction on the Lees Avenue portion of the project was completed in 2014.

Detailed designs for Main Street and Rideau River Drive have been completed and the project has been tendered to enable construction to commence in May 2015. The plans are available for review.

Consultation activities

Designs for the street have been prepared by the City and its consulting team (led by Parsons), with guidance provided by a street design “Working Group”. This committee includes representation from various City branches, businesses, residents, and community organizations. The Working Group has been meeting regularly to help the City make key design decisions, and address community concerns. Many thanks to these dedicated volunteers as well as the office of Councillor David Chernushenko and his staff.

The first Public Open House for this project was held on October 17th, 2012. Information presented included existing conditions, the need for the project, and the general “solution” for the street being a renewal of the street infrastructure. Subsequently, Public Open Houses were held on June 17 and 18, 2013, to present the EA evaluation results, the preliminary preferred design, and its implications for travel and streetscaping.

The City of Ottawa Transportation Committee meeting on July 5th, 2013 provided a further opportunity for stakeholder input. The City has also continued to meet with the Working Group and individual land owners during the subsequent detailed design process. Six Working Group meetings have been held since July 2013. A fourth Public Open House was held on November 20, 2014. Consultation with individual stakeholders is ongoing.

Street design vision - a complete street

The overall objective for Main Street is to link the street together as a unified corridor, creating memorable places along it, while recognizing and supporting the character of its various parts. Principles include:

  • As a ‘complete street’, strike an appropriate balance for all modes using the street, with an emphasis on better provisions for walking, cycling, and transit use in keeping with Official Plan objectives for the street;
  • Provide ‘cycle tracks’ to implement the Transportation Master Plan’s vision for the corridor as a ‘spine route’;
  • Create as much space as possible for wide sidewalks, by minimizing the amount of required roadway/asphalt used by vehicles;
  • Use an integrated family of streetscaping elements such as street lighting, street furniture, trees and plantings, public art, parking solutions, signage, and surface treatments to act as the glue that bonds the corridor together and reinforces character and history while also inspiring renewal;
  • Seek opportunities to enhance and add visual interest to the streetscape;
  • Reclaim lands for public use within the Right-of-Way (ROW) that currently have encroachments, and recommend improvements to front or side yards on private lands adjacent to the corridor; and
  • Have regard for the planning and design principles discussed in the Old Ottawa East Community Design Plan and reconstruct the street in a manner that supports them.

Planned function

The street is designated in the Official Plan as an Arterial Road, and as such is to, “not only accommodate car and truck traffic, but also serve pedestrians, public utilities, cyclists, and public transit buses”.

North of Clegg Street, the corridor is also designated in the Official Plan as a Traditional Mainstreet. The Official Plan requires the City to consider changes such as “lane reductions” when the City is proposing public works in this corridor, to create space within the right-of-way that can assist in the pursuit of community design and transportation planning objectives for these special design-controlled sectors of the City.

Transportation features

Echo Drive to Harvey Street:

  • Maintain two lane plus turn lane configuration
  • Establish 4.0m shared curb lanes to provide for on-road cycling
  • Widen sidewalks and provide streetscaping

Harvey Street to Evelyn Avenue:

  • Maintain four lane configuration to enable the higher vehicle traffic flows through these critical intersections
  • Establish a combination of 4.0m shared curb lanes and cycle tracks to provide for cycling,depending on right-of-way availability
  • Join the contra-flow bike lane on Graham Ave. to a new southbound cycle track
  • Widen sidewalks and provide streetscaping
  • Pursue minor right-of-way widenings

Evelyn Avenue to Oblate Avenue:

  • Reduce vehicle travel lanes from four to two, with left-turn lanes at most intersections
  • Establish cycle track in each direction
  • Widen sidewalks and provide streetscaping
  • Provide permanent parking bays on the east side, and on-street parking on the west side
  • Pursue minor right-of-way widenings

Oblate Avenue to Toronto Street:

  • Reduce vehicle travel lanes from four to two, with left-turn lanes at most intersections
  • Establish cycle track in each direction
  • Widen sidewalks and provide streetscaping
  • Provide permanent parking bays along both sides, between Oblate Avenue and Clegg Street

Toronto Street to McIlraith Bridge:

  • Reduce vehicle travel lanes from four to three (two northbound lanes and one southbound lane)
  • Establish cycle track southbound and bike lane northbound
  • Widen sidewalks and provide streetscaping

Rideau River Drive:

  • Provide a northbound contra-flow bike lane
  • Extend the west side sidewalk southerly, and connect to the future Rideau River West multi-use pathway

Travel implications

The following is a summary of the key traffic-related considerations that are associated with the project:

  • Based on data at the McIlraith Bridge, the Main Street Corridor currently accommodates approximately 1,500 persons per direction traveling in the peak hour, with the non-auto modal share (walk, bike, transit) at approximately 6%, auto passenger 15%, and auto driver 79%;
  • The Corridor carries between 900 and 1,200 veh/h per direction in the peak hour – this is currently accommodated in two vehicle lanes per direction;
  • The theoretical capacity of a single vehicle lane is approximately 900 veh/h;
  • Once the corridor is reconstructed with one vehicle lane per direction (in sections), the street is not expected to accommodate the existing peak hour vehicle traffic; and
  • The projected shortfall during the peak hours is expected to be accommodated through some combination of the following:
    • Some Corridor motorists will change their mode to walking, cycling or transit use;
    • Some Corridor motorists will elect to travel outside of the peak hour (i.e. peak period lengthened);
    • Some Corridor motorists will select other routes such as Riverside Drive, Bank Street, or Bronson Avenue; and
    • Some motorists will elect to travel through the corridor with reduced level of service.

Area sustainable transportation initiatives

The City is in the process of planning, designing, and or implementing a few transportation initiatives in the broader area that will reinforce the community's sustainable transportation infrastructure and further support the success of the Main Street Renewal project. These initiatives include:

  • The transportation capacity of Confederation Line and the Lees Station which is within walking distance of Old Ottawa East;
  • A pedestrian and cycling bridge crossing of the Rideau Canal opposite Clegg Street, which will link Old Ottawa East to Lansdowne Park and The Glebe;
  • A Multi-use Pathway along the west side of the Rideau River; and
  • Bike Lanes across the McIlraith Bridge, implemented as part of the bridge's rehabilitation.

What is a cycle track?

A cycle track is a bicycle facility along a city street that is physically separated from the motorized vehicle traffic lanes, and is also separate from the sidewalk. It is generally separated from auto traffic by a narrow median, a raised curb, a planting strip, or on-street parking.

Benefits of a cycle track:

  • More inclusive to a wider spectrum of potential riders including youth, seniors, and casual cyclists;
  • Promotes much higher cycling use; and
  • Provides for greater safety through separation.

Pedestrian and cyclist safety features

Separation of Sidewalk and Cycle Track:

North of Clegg Street:

  • Visually (tonal) and tactile distinction in paving stone strip (0.2m wide) between cycle track and sidewalk
  • Utility zone separating the sidewalk and cycle track, with street trees, street lights, bike racks, and street furniture
  • Cycle track to use asphalt, but sidewalk to be lighter-coloured pavers

South of Clegg Street:

  • Where the cycle track abuts the concrete sidewalk, a distinctive paving stone strip will be used to provide sidewalk separation

Crossing the road:

  • At non-signalized side street crossings, raised crosswalks and cross-rides enhance pedestrian and cyclist safety
  • At all side street crossings, bicycle crossrides and 'elephant's feet' delineate ride path
  • Additional cross-rides are provided across Main Street, at Hawthorne Ave., Clegg Street, and Riverdale Ave., to integrate east-west community cycling routes
  • Accessible curb ramps with tactile walking surface indicators are located at all intersections

At bus stops:

  • Bicycles to yield to pedestrians getting on and off the bus – signage to be determined
  • Supplemental space (1.2m to 2.0m+) between curb and cycle track to assist with bus loading and unloading
  • No elevation change between curb, cycle track, and sidewalk to allow barrier-free movement
  • Tactile walking surface indicators opposite the bus's front doo

Cycling options during construction

During construction on Main Street, any open travel lanes are available to cyclists.

Soutbound cyclists are welcomed to use Main Street. The northbound cyclist detour is Mutchmor/Echo.

Cyclists are exempt from 'local traffic only' restrictions.

Cyclists who wish to bypass construction activity on Main Street can use the following corridors as part of their journey, in addition to any local streets:

  • Mutchmor Road connects Main Street to Echo Drive, which is an available cycling route that travels north-south through the corridor.
  • Clegg Street is an available cycling route that travels east-west.
  • Marlowe Crescent runs parallel to Main Street from Clegg Street and Elliot Avenue, and is an available cycling route.

Public art

Through the public art selection process, Ottawa-based artist Stuart Kinmond has been awarded a public art commission for an installation on Main Street.

Artist Statement:

Main Street is a diamond in the rough. A neglected thoroughfare with a beautiful community around it, bordered by the canal on one side and the river on the other. Most of the attractive features of Old Ottawa East are not evident when you drive along Main St. The concept for this public artwork originated in the desire to make these features visible, like windows onto the street. The colored windows also reflects the strong ecclesiastical heritage of the community.

Main Street needs a strong infusion of pedestrian oriented activities and opportunities. There is not a single public space along the whole length of the street for the pubic to sit and gather. The idea of a public square seemed like a desirable addition to the street. Hence the idea of Main (pronounced Main Square). My design became a mini public square, including the benches, the paving, and shade structures as well as the windows with colored glass.

The 3 windows have images of the canal, the river and the land between. Each of the windows has 3 separated glass panels, that create a parallax as the viewer moves by them, whether on foot, bicycle or in a car.

Stuart Kinmon

Brantwood Place gates rehabilitation

The Brantwood Place Gates, built in 1912, are an important component of the community's cultural heritage, and are designated under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

They have been identified as requiring structural rehabilitation, due to their age and deteriorating condition.

Planning Committee approved the application to rebuild the Gates on July 8 , 2014. The Gates will be carefully dismantled, and re-assembled using new and salvageable components.

The Gates will be reinstated about 1.2 to 1.5 metres east of their current location to allow them to meet the requirements for sidewalk width, and to improve visibility for drivers.

The rehabilitation will be co-ordinated with the construction schedule of the Main Street Renewal project.

McIlraith Bridge rehabilitation

The City is undertaking the rehabilitation of the McIlraith Bridge, which will be co-ordinated with the construction schedule of the Main Street Renewal project.

The project will introduce bike lanes on the bridge and enhance roadway lighting.

The structural rehabilitation of the McIlraith Bridge includes repairs to concrete, expansion joint replacements, and coating of the existing structural steel.

Work on the rehabilitation of McIlraith Bridge is scheduled to take two years beginning in 2015. During construction, the bridge will be reduced to one travel lane in each direction. Over the winter months, the bridge will be returned to two travel lanes in each direction.

Communications during construction

The City is making best efforts to provide regular and timely communications on the project. The following City-wide and publicly accessible tools will be used:

  • Public Open House (May 11th, 2015);
  • Variable message boards in advance of northbound lane closures;
  • Public Service Announcements;
  • City website;
  • Social media (i.e. Twitter);
  • Traffic Reports.

Other communication activities are designed to benefit local land owners and residents, businesses, institutions, and the Old Ottawa East Community Association.  These include:

  • Construction Start Notices;
  • Meetings with businesses/institutions and Community Association as required;
  • Meetings with small groups of residents as required;
  • Mailing list (construction schedule look ahead via email – sign-up!);
  • Construction Communications Liaison Officer (Dianna Ashworth 613 863-3873).

Underground services and renewal

The Main Street corridor accommodates a range of municipal services and utilities that require replacement or modification due to their age and condition, and the need to accommodate the community's needs. Key infrastructure investments by the City of Ottawa include:

  • A new 300 to 375 mm sanitary sewer, running between Bower Street and Rideau River Drive.
  • Sanitary sewers between Harvey Street and Bower Street will be renewed using a trenchless technology, with the exception of a 35m section north of Hawthorne that must be removed and replaced. The trenchless technology is called Cured-In-Place-Pipe (CIPP) and it creates a new jointless, seamless pipe within the existing pipe. The use of this technology will minimize the need for excavation.
  • A new 406 mm water main extending between Hawthorne Avenue and Riverdale Avenue, and a 250 mm watermain between Riverdale Avenue and Rideau River Drive; and
  • New sewer and water lateral services to adjacent buildings.

Private utilities including hydro, bell, gas, and cable are being renewed or relocated as required. Modifications to Bell's underground plant has been ongoing since fall 2014.

Large storm sewer tunnelling component

The project also involves the installation of a new 1200 mm storm sewer tunnel extending between Greenfield Avenue and south of Lees Avenue. This is a major piece of infrastructure, located deep under the roadway, that provides the storm sewer outlet required to separate the combined sewer system north of Highway 417.

The contractor will be installing this large storm sewer utilizing a trenchless technology. This is intended to minimize the extent of excavation required lane reductions and traffic disruption in this section. It also reduces the risk of impact on adjacent buildings and infrastructure and the Highway 417 overpass structure. An existing smaller diameter local storm sewer will remain above the tunnel to service adjacent buildings and catchbasins.

It is anticipated that the tunnel portion will terminate south of Lees Avenue and the 1200mm storm sewer will extend to Springhurst Avenue using an open-cut excavation method.

Construction requirements

The project will include the total reconstruction of the street cross-section, including above-grade and below-grade infrastructure. The corridor will be constructed in stages. The initial focus of construction is expected to be on the north section of the corridor.

The construction process may entail:

  • Lane restrictions and detours;
  • Delineation of a construction area, including safety precautions;
  • Deep excavation and removal of all street infrastructure in the construction area;
  • Replacement of below-ground municipal services and utilities as required and road sub-grade;
  • Construction of new curbs, sidewalks, cycling facilities and travel lanes;
  • Placement of street lights and streetscaping elements.

Lees Avenue reconstruction update

Lees Avenue, between Main Street and Chestnut Avenue, was reconstructed as part of this project.

The modifications included wider sidewalks, an eastbound bike lane, and a wide shared westbound lane.

Construction was completed in 2014.

The project team is investigating the possibility of modifying the pavement markings on Lees Avenue between Chestnut Street and 200 Lees Avenue, to provide for on-road bike lanes. If pursued, this will include the elimination of on-street parking in this area.

 Deferral of construction between Echo Drive and Harvey Street

The current plan is to defer the reconstruction of the two blocks of Main Street between Harvey Street and Echo Drive to coincide with sewer separation works in the adjacent community (Greenfield/Concord/Echo/Montcalm).

Echo Drive to Greenfield Avenue will be closed to traffic (local access only) to facilitate deep sewer installation towards Springhurst Avenue. The road will reopen in later phases of construction.

The sewer separation project north of Harvey Street and along Greenfield Ave will continue after the completion of the Main Street Renewal project, subject to Council approval of funding. The two blocks of Main Street north of Harvey Street will then be reconstructed.

Managing on-street parking availability and driveway access

The construction project will result in the reduction of available on-street parking spaces, and temporary/intermittent blockages to private driveways. The timing and scheduling of this is dependent on the contractor's activities and is difficult to provide advance notice, but best efforts will be made to do so. The following parking changes are anticipated:

  • Parking north of Clegg will be removed as of May 12, 2015
  • Parking south of Clegg will be removed when construction starts in that section
  • Parking on Rideau River Drive will be removed during construction of that section
  • Parking restrictions on side streets will remain in place as they are there to accommodate businesses

The following locations have been identified as potential additional parking location for the duration of construction (provided no issue arises):

  • On Evelyn, east of the school on the north side to Rosemere – “15 minute parking” to be revised to “15 minute parking Monday-Friday” which will allow 3 hour parking on the weekends; and
  • Glenora between Herridge and Hazel – parking on both sides during the summer months (April to November).

In the event that access to a driveway is restricted due to construction activities (such as sidewalk construction), a Temporary On-Street Parking Permit (orange form) will be distributed to residents to permit on-street parking within two blocks of the residence.

Managing cut-through traffic

The City apologizes for the potential disruption/inconvenience cut-through traffic will cause and thanks you for your patience. Best efforts will be made to manage this potential, including:

  • The City will be using an aggressive communications plan to ensure that residents and travelers of the City of Ottawa are aware of the closures and lane reductions associated with the Main Street Reconstruction:
  • The City will use advanced messaging, and be signing detours as far out as Riverside in order to capture the travelling public and advise them to avoid the area.
  • A secondary detour will be provided at Riverdale to catch any travelers that missed the signs on approach to Riverside; and
  • The City has worked hard to maintain alternate modes of transportation through this community including securing an agreement with the NCC to allow transit on Colonel By and there will be a separate signed cyclist detour route.

Nevertheless, the necessary detours and inevitable congestion caused by construction will likely result in an increase of traffic on local streets. Cut-through traffic is already experienced on some local streets since the advanced utility work commenced last November and will likely continue during the Main Street reconstruction.

It is anticipated that cut-through traffic and general traffic congestion will spike during the first few weeks of detour implementation. This is normal. It takes several weeks for traffic to adjust to a new traffic detour as motorists try different routes or different modes of transportation to reach their destinations. For this reason, the City does not react to congestion issues during the first few weeks unless there is an immediate safety hazard. Once the traffic has somewhat settled down (after 2 to 4 weeks), the City will closely monitor the area and will take steps to try to minimize.

To understand and mitigate the potential of cut-through traffic, the city is taking actions to address traffic speed, utilize traffic calming measures, and enforce the traffic management provisions.

Traffics speed monitoring

Before construction commenced in fall 2014, the City collected traffic speed data on several local streets in Old Ottawa East. The City also purchased 4 speed boards that will be dedicated to Old Ottawa East for the duration of the Main Street reconstruction. These speed boards will be strategically located to collect data on local streets. Change to this traffic speed data will be used to determine speeding issues throughout the community.

Traffic calming tools

The City has limited traffic calming tools to reduce cut-through traffic but the options listed below will be evaluated and implemented as necessary. Any traffic calming measures implemented will be removed at the end of construction.

  • “Local Traffic Only” Signs could be used as necessary and may reduce cut-through traffic.
  • Speed humps or speed tables can reduce speed on a local street but they can only be used in limited situations due to their negative impact on emergency and transit services. Additional negative impacts include drainage impacts, parking removal requirement and increase vibrations to nearby houses.
  • Road narrowings can reduce speed on a local street. Some street parking may be lost.
  • Movement prohibitions (such as left-turn restrictions) can reduce cut-through traffic but also limit access to residents, and need to be used cautiously.

Enforcement of traffic management provisions and laws can aid in mitigating the potential for cut through traffic. Enforcement is an efficient tool to reduce noncompliance of turn restrictions and reduce speeding, for example.

However, police officers cannot be dedicated to the Main Street project because of the need to balance resources throughout the City. The Main Street project is also unable to pay for enforcement because it would be against the Police Service Act. However, the public can assist the Ottawa Police Service by filing traffic complaints and report unsafe drivers by calling the Ottawa Police Service at 613-236-1222 extension 7300.

Alternatively, you may submit an on-line report.

Why one lane of traffic?

The project involves the installation of municipal services located deep under the roadway. The installation process occupies a wide cross-section within the right-of-way, and the right-of-way is especially narrow (typically in the range of 20m). The contractor requires space for:

  • The trench excavation;
  • The location and “swing” of installation equipment;
  • Access to the trench; and
  • Installation of protection barriers;

It is for this reason that space exists only for one lane of traffic along the construction limits

Six month northbound bus transit detour

During a six month long phase of construction in the sector between Riverdale Avenue and Clegg Street, it will not be possible to have northbound traffic on Main Street in that sector. General northbound traffic will be detoured away from the community, however it is necessary to provide for a northbound route for OC Transpo bus service that serves the Old Ottawa East Community. During that six month period, the plan is to run the northbound OC Transpo bus routes #5 and #16 from Main Street to Elliot Street to Marlowe Crescent to Clegg Street, and onto Colonel By Drive northbound.

The City recognizes that this temporary bus route represents a change in the community and that residents may have concerns. The City will be making its best efforts to ensure that this temporary bus route is as successful as possible, including the following:

  • Appropriate signage will be installed at Elliot Street to confirm that this northbound route is for buses and is not a general traffic detour route;
  • OC Transpo Bus drivers will be provide with an advisory reminding them of the local residential street context;
  • Existing on-street parking permissions that conflict with bus turning manoeuvers at intersections will be amended as well as parking regulations;
  • OC Transpo can be contacted at 613 842-3600.

This phase of construction will commence later in 2015 or in early 2016. The community will be provided with as much advanced notice as possible.

Bus Route Detours [ PDF – 615 KB ]

Traffic management

Traffic Management Plan [ PDF – 905 KB ]
Traffic and Cyclist Detours [ PDF – 716 KB ]

Noise and vibrations

Construction activities and equipment associated with the Main Street Renewal construction project will cause noise and ground vibrations. The City will be making best efforts to manage this.

In regards to noise implications, the Contractor is required to abide by the City of Ottawa Noise By-law No.2004-253.

The objective of the by-law is to “preserve, protect and promote public health, safety, welfare and peace and quiet of inhabitants of the City”. Construction crew hours of work are typically 7:00 am to 6:00 pm, but special circumstances may arise.

The ground vibrations from the construction activities that are expected as part this type of project rarely reach the levels that can cause damages to homes or buildings. In addition, humans are much more sensitive to these vibrations than buildings or other types of structures. Typically, vibrations from these types of construction activities are more of an annoyance than a cause of property damage.

Nevertheless, at the beginning of construction and further to the owners' consent, pre-construction inspections of the buildings and structures in the immediate vicinity of the construction zone will be carried out. This preconstruction inspection is performed in order to obtain a representative sampling of pre-construction conditions of the various structures and to provide comparative documentation in the rare instance that construction operations impact the nearby buildings.

Furthermore, as part of the construction contract, the Contractor is required by the City to carry liability insurance for this project. The Contractor will be assuming full responsibility for the construction work until it is entirely completed. If damage is sustained by a property owner, then the property owner would be required to submit their claim for damages to the General Contractor.

Upon construction completion, noise and vibrations experienced today may be reduced from historic conditions. This is possible because the new travel surface will be smoother, and the nearest vehicle lanes will be moved further away from adjacent properties.

Key contacts

Key contacts are as follows:

Project E-mail Addresses:

City Project Manager: Josée Vallée 613 580-2424 x21805 Josee.Vallee@ottawa.ca

Contract Administrator: Dave Hatton 613 225-1311 ext. 521 dhatton@IBIGroup.com

Contractor Representative: Alphonse Blank 613 913-9032

24 hour emergency number:  613 839-2816 (Karson Konstruction) or 3-1-1 (City of Ottawa)

Next steps

Construction process has commenced.

Open house - 20 November 2014

Main Street Renewal Open House
Thursday, November 20th, 2014
6 to 9 pm
Normandin Room
Saint Paul University 
Laframboise Hall, Second Floor
249 Main Street, Ottawa

Welcome

Welcome to this Public Open House for the Main Street Renewal project. This is an opportunity for you to learn about the project and provide input. Tonight you will learn about the progression of the project since the previous open house in June 2013, including:

  • The council-approved complete street concept for Main Street
  • Streetscaping, street furnishings, and public art
  • Municipal services and utility modifications
  • Preliminary plans for construction traffic management
  • Utility works to be performed in advance of street reconstruction

Representatives from the City and its design team are available to answer questions that you may have.

You are encouraged to complete a Comment / Questionnaire sheet.

Study process

The Main Street Renewal study area includes:

  • Main Street from Echo Drive to the McIlraith Bridge
  • Lees Avenue from Main Street to Chestnut Avenue
  • A portion of Rideau River Drive

In 2013, the City of Ottawa completed an Environmental Assessment for the Main Street Renewal project. In July 2013, City Council approved the complete street design for Main Street recommended in the EA process.

The subsequent design process resulted in draft detailed designs to enable the reconstruction of the study area streets. Construction on the Lees Avenue portion of the project began in 2014, and is substantially complete at this point.

Draft detailed designs for Main Street and Rideau River Drive have been completed to enable construction to commence in Spring 2015. The draft plans are now available for review.

Consultation activities

Designs for the street have been prepared by the City and its consulting team (led by Parsons), with guidance provided by a street design “Working Group”. This committee includes representation from various City branches, businesses, residents, and community organizations. The Working Group has been meeting regularly to help the City make key design decisions, and address community concerns. Many thanks to these dedicated volunteers as well as the office of Councillor David Chernushenko and his staff.

The first Public Open House for this project was held on October 17th, 2012. Information presented included existing conditions, the need for the project, and the general “solution” for the street being a renewal of the street infrastructure. Subsequently, Public Open Houses were held on June 17 and 18, 2013, to present the EA evaluation results, the preliminary preferred design, and its implications for travel and streetscaping.

The City of Ottawa Transportation Committee meeting on July 5th, 2013 provided a further opportunity for stakeholder input. The City has also continued to meet with the Working Group and individual land owners during the subsequent detailed design process. Six Working Group meetings have been held since July 2013, and consultation with individual stakeholders is ongoing.

Street design vision – a complete street

The overall objective for Main Street is to link the street together as a unified corridor, creating memorable places along it, while recognizing and supporting the character of its various parts. Principles include:

  • As a ‘complete street’, strike an appropriate balance for all modes using the street, with an emphasis on better provisions for walking, cycling, and transit use in keeping with Official Plan objectives for the street;
  • Provide ‘cycle tracks’ to implement the Transportation Master Plan’s vision for the corridor as a ‘spine route’;
  • Create as much space as possible for wide sidewalks, by minimizing the amount of required roadway/asphalt used by vehicles;
  • Use an integrated family of streetscaping elements such as streetlighting, street furniture, trees and plantings, public art, parking solutions, signage, and surface treatments to act as the glue that bonds the corridor together and reinforces character and history while also inspiring renewal;
  • Seek opportunities to enhance and add visual interest to the streetscape;
  • Reclaim lands for public use within the Right-of-Way (ROW) that currently have encroachments, and recommend improvements to front or side yards on private lands adjacent to the corridor; and
  • Have regard for the planning and design principles discussed in the Old Ottawa East Community Design Plan and reconstruct the street in a manner that supports them.

Planned function

The street is designated in the Official Plan as an Arterial Road, and as such is to, “not only accommodate car and truck traffic, but also serve pedestrians, public utilities, cyclists, and public transit buses”.

North of Clegg Street, the corridor is also designated in the Official Plan as a Traditional Main street. The Official Plan requires the City to consider changes such as “lane reductions” when the City is proposing public works in this corridor, to create space within the right-of-way that can assist in the pursuit of community design and transportation planning objectives for these special design-controlled sectors of the City.

A complete street

In July 2013, City Council approved the 'complete street' design for Main Street. In the Environmental Assessment Study, it performed best in terms of:

  • Supporting a healthy business environment with high quality sidewalks, cycling facilities, and 24 hour parking in protected bays;
  • Promoting pedestrian safety and comfort due to a separation of the sidewalk from vehicle lanes and shortening of crosswalk lengths;
  • Providing the most inclusive cycling facility (cycle track) for cyclists of all ages and abilities;
  • Enabling space for improvements to community character and the visual environment;
  • Reduced motor vehicle speed due to narrowing of roadway and road geometry;
  • Increasing the separation between motor vehicles and residences and reducing their associated effects in terms of noise and vibration;
  • Providing for an appropriate Arterial Road capacity and level of service for vehicles using the corridor while enabling pursuit of the City's objectives identified in the Official Plan, Transportation Master Plan, and the Old Ottawa East Community Design Plan.

Following the direction of council, the project team has continued to consult with the community while developing its detailed designs.

Transportation features

Echo Drive to Harvey Street

  • Maintain two lane plus turn lane configuration
  • Establish 4.0m shared curb lanes to provide for on-road cycling
  • Widen sidewalks and provide streetscaping

Harvey Street to Evelyn Avenue

  • Maintain four lane configuration to enable the higher vehicle traffic flows through these critical intersections
  • Establish a combination of 4.0m shared curb lanes and cycle tracks to provide for cycling, depending on right-of-way availability
  • Join the contra-flow bike lane on Graham Ave. to a new southbound cycle track
  • Widen sidewalks and provide streetscaping
  • Pursue minor right-of-way widenings

Evelyn Avenue to Oblate Avenue

  • Reduce vehicle travel lanes from four to two, with left-turn lanes at most intersections
  • Establish cycle track in each direction
  • Widen sidewalks and provide streetscaping
  • Provide permanent parking bays on the east side, and on-street parking on the west side
  • Pursue minor right-of-way widenings

Oblate Avenue to Toronto Street

  • Reduce vehicle travel lanes from four to two, with left-turn lanes at most intersections
  • Establish cycle track in each direction
  • Widen sidewalks and provide streetscaping
  • Provide permanent parking bays along both sides, between Oblate Avenue and Clegg Street

Toronto Street to McIlraith Bridge

  • Reduce vehicle travel lanes from four to three (two northbound lanes and one southbound lane)
  • Establish cycle track southbound and bike lane northbound
  • Widen sidewalks and provide streetscaping

Rideau River Drive

  • Provide a northbound contra-flow bike lane
  • Extend the west side sidewalk southerly, and connect to the future Rideau River West multi-use pathway

Travel implications

The following is a summary of the key traffic-related considerations that are associated with the project:

  • Based on data at the McIlraith Bridge, the Main Street Corridor currently accommodates approximately 1,500 persons per direction traveling in the peak hour, with the non-auto modal share (walk, bike, transit) at approximately 6%, auto passenger 15%, and auto driver 79%;
  • The Corridor carries between 900 and 1,200 veh/h per direction in the peak hour – this is currently accommodated in two vehicle lanes per direction;
  • The theoretical capacity of a single vehicle lane is approximately 900 veh/h;
  • Once the corridor is reconstructed with one vehicle lane per direction (in sections), the street is not expected to accommodate the existing peak hour vehicle traffic; and
  • The projected shortfall during the peak hours is expected to be accommodated through some combination of the following:
    • Some Corridor motorists will change their mode to walking, cycling, or transit use;
    • Some Corridor motorists will elect to travel outside of the peak hour (i.e., peak period lengthened);
    • Some Corridor motorists will select other routes such as Riverside Drive, Bank Street, or Bronson Avenue; and
    • Some motorists will elect to travel through the corridor with reduced level of service.

Area sustainable transportation initiatives

The City is in the process of planning, designing, and or implementing a few transportation initiatives in the broader area that will reinforce the community's sustainable transportation infrastructure and further support the success of the Main Street Renewal project. These initiatives include:

  • The transportation capacity of Confederation Line and the Lees Station which is within walking distance of Old Ottawa East;
  • A pedestrian and cycling bridge crossing of the Rideau Canal opposite Clegg Street, which will link Old Ottawa East to Lansdowne Park and The Glebe;
  • A Multi-use Pathway along the west side of the Rideau River; and
  • Bike Lanes across the McIlraith Bridge, implemented as part of the bridge's rehabilitation.

What is a cycle track?

A cycle track is a bicycle facility along a city street that is physically separated from the motorized vehicle traffic lanes, and is also separate from the sidewalk. It is generally separated from auto traffic by a narrow median, a raised curb, a planting strip, or on-street parking.

Benefits of a Cycle Track:

  • More inclusive to a wider spectrum of potential riders including youth, seniors, and casual cyclists;
  • Promotes much higher cycling use; and
  • Provides for greater safety through separation.

Pedestrian and cyclist safety features

Separation of sidewalk and cycle track

North of Clegg Street
  • Visually (tonal) and tactile distinction in paving stone strip (0.2m to 0.6m wide) between cycle track and sidewalk
  • Utility zone separating the sidewalk and cycle track, with street trees, street lights, bike racks, and street furniture
  • Cycle track to use asphalt, but sidewalk to be lighter-coloured pavers
South of Clegg Street
  • Where the cycle track abuts the concrete sidewalk, a distinctive surface will be used to provide sidewalk separation

Crossing the road

  • At non-signalized side street crossings, raised crosswalks and cross-rides enhance pedestrian and cyclist safety
  • At all side street crossings, bicycle cross rides and 'elephant's feet' delineate ride path
  • Additional cross-rides are provided across Main Street, at Hawthorne Ave., Clegg Street, and Riverdale Ave., to integrate east-west community cycling routes
  • Accessible curb ramps with tactile walking surface indicators are located at all intersections

At bus stops

  • Bicycles to yield to pedestrians getting on and off the bus – signage to be determined
  • Supplemental space (1.2m to 2.0m+) between curb and cycle track to assist with bus loading and unloading
  • No elevation change between curb, cycle track, and sidewalk to allow barrier-free movement
  • Tactile walking surface indicators opposite the bus's front door

Public art

Through the public art selection process, Ottawa-based artist Stuart Kinmond has been awarded a public art commission for an installation on Main Street.

Artist statement

Main Street is a diamond in the rough; a neglected thoroughfare with a beautiful community around it, bordered by the canal on one side and the river on the other. Most of the attractive features of Old Ottawa East are not evident when you drive along Main St. The concept for this public artwork originated in the desire to make these features visible, like windows onto the street. The coloured windows also reflect the strong ecclesiastical heritage of the community.

Main Street needs a strong infusion of pedestrian oriented activities and opportunities. There is not a single public space along the whole length of the street for the pubic to sit and gather. The idea of a public square seemed like a desirable addition to the street; hence, the idea of Main² (pronounced Main Square). My design became a mini public square, including the benches, the paving, and shade structures as well as the windows with coloured glass.

The 3 windows have images of the canal, the river and the land between. Each of the windows has 3 separated glass panels, that create a parallax as the viewer moves by them, whether on foot, bicycle or in a car.

Stuart Kinmond

Brantwood Place Gates rehabilitation

The Brantwood Place Gates, built in 1912, are an important component of the community's cultural heritage, and are designated under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

They have been identified as requiring structural rehabilitation, due to their age and deteriorating condition.

Planning Committee approved the application to rebuild the Gates on July 8 , 2014. The Gates will be carefully dismantled, and re-assembled using new and salvageable components.

The Gates will be reinstated about 1.2 to 1.5 metres east of their current location to allow them to meet the requirements for sidewalk width, and to improve visibility for drivers.

The rehabilitation will be co-ordinated with the construction schedule of the Main Street Renewal project.

Brantwood Place Gates – proposed location [ PDF – 238.65 KB ]

The existing Brantwood Place Gates

McIlraith Bridge rehabilitation

The City is undertaking the rehabilitation of the McIlraith Bridge, which will be coordinated with the construction schedule of the Main Street Renewal project.

The project will introduce bike lanes on the bridge and enhance roadway lighting.

The structural rehabilitation of the McIlraith Bridge includes repairs to concrete, expansion joint replacements, and coating of the existing structural steel.

Work on the rehabilitation of McIlraith Bridge is scheduled to take two years beginning in the summer of 2015. During construction, the bridge will be reduced to one travel lane in each direction. Over the winter months, the bridge will be returned to two travel lanes in each direction.

Lees Avenue reconstruction update

Lees Avenue, between Main Street and Chestnut Avenue, was reconstructed as part of this project.

The modifications included wider sidewalks, an eastbound bike lane, and a wide shared westbound lane.

Construction is substantially complete at this point.

The project team is investigating the possibility of modifying the pavement markings on Lees Avenue between Chestnut Street and 200 Lees Avenue, to provide for on-road bike lanes. If pursued, this will include the elimination of on-street parking in this area.

Construction requirements

The project will include the total reconstruction of the street cross-section, including above-grade and below-grade infrastructure. It is anticipated that the corridor will be constructed in stages. The stages are not yet determined however, the initial focus of construction is expected to be on the north section of the corridor.

A typical construction process may entail:

  • Lane restrictions and detours;
  • Delineation of a construction area, including safety precautions;
  • Deep excavation and removal of all street infrastructure in the construction area;
  • Replacement of below-ground municipal services and utilities and road sub-grade;
  • Construction of new curbs, sidewalks, cycling facilities and travel lanes; and
  • Placement of street lights and streetscaping elements.

The limits of each stage and the precise manner of construction will be determined following the tender process and with input from the contractor.

Traffic management during construction

Traffic management during construction [ PDF – 802.51 KB ]

Bus service during construction

Bus service during construction [ PDF – 841.25 KB ]

Cycling options during construction

During construction on Main Street, any open travel lanes are available to cyclists.

Cyclists are exempt from 'local traffic only' restrictions.

Cyclists who wish to bypass construction activity on Main Street can use the following corridors as part of their journey, in addition to any local streets:

  • Mutchmor Road connects Main Street to Echo Drive, which is an available cycling route that travels north-south through the corridor.
  • Clegg Street is an available cycling route that travels east-west.
  • Marlowe Crescent runs parallel to Main Street from Clegg Street and Elliot Avenue, and is an available cycling route.

Advanced utility works

Some utility works will take place prior to the commencement of work for the Main Street Renewal project. The completion of these works will streamline the construction schedule of the street renewal reconstruction starting in spring 2015, and minimize conflicts between utility crews and road construction crews.

Hydro Ottawa will undertake some pole replacement work between Clegg St. and Riverdale Ave., and manhole reconstructions on each side of the McIlraith Bridge prior to street reconstruction.

Bell Canada will replace underground duct structures on Main Street. The first phase commences in November 2014 between Greenfield Avenue and Clegg Street, and the second phase (south of Clegg Street) is expected to commence after the first phase is complete, potentially in spring 2015.

Work will require elimination of the easternmost travel lane. Main Street will generally operate with one lane in each direction plus left turn lanes (between Clegg Street and Lees Avenue) during the winter months.

Proposed temporary lane arrangement drawing [ PDF – 292.46 KB ]

Deferral of construction between Echo Drive and Harvey Street

The current plan is to defer the reconstruction of the two blocks of Main Street between Harvey Street and Echo Drive to coincide with sewer separation works in the adjacent community (Green-field/Concord/Echo/Montcalm).

Echo Drive to Greenfield Avenue will be closed to traffic (local access only) to facilitate deep sewer installation towards Springhurst Avenue. The road will reopen in later phases of construction.

The sewer separation project north of Harvey Street and along Greenfield Ave will continue after the completion of the Main Street Renewal project, subject to Council approval of funding. The two blocks of Main Street north of Harvey Street will then be reconstructed.

Underground services and renewal

The Main Street corridor accommodates a range of municipal services and utilities. Watermains and sanitary sewers require replacement due to their age and condition. The project creates an opportunity to replace the services at one time and to improve their level of service.

The services will be sized to enable the corridor's planned land use intensification.

The existing combined sewer system is being replaced with a separated sanitary and storm system in an effort to redirect flows.

Stormwater retention within the roadway will be provided to improve the system's level of service.

There are some older, flat roof buildings located along the corridor that may have roof drains that are connected to the combined sewers in the street. Opportunities to separate roof drains from the sanitary sewer will be explored in an effort to reduce the likelihood of downstream combined sewer system overflows.

Private lands streetscape integration

The City's objective is to improve the visual quality of the street and provide a seamless streetscape along both sides of the street lot line.

Minor modifications to private lands may be completed by the City in order to tie in grades and surfaces along the street lot line, provided that landowner consent is provided.

Street trees will be proposed on adjacent private lots in some locations subject to landowners’ consent.

Where private land uses encroach on the City's right-of-way, the City will take this reconstruction opportunity to reclaim the right-of-way for sidewalk purposes and streetscaping.

Once designs are finalized, the City's Real Property Asset Management (RPAM) department staff will be contacting landowners to discuss property improvements and to obtain consents where required.

Landscaping

Landscaping drawings (Echo Drive to Herridge Street) [ PDF – 120.39 KB ]
Landscaping drawings (Herridge Street to the McIlraith Bridge) [ PDF – 744.27 KB ]

Managing construction period disruption

The construction project activities will have the potential to impact institutions, businesses and residents along the corridor and in the adjacent community. Opportunities to mitigate construction related impacts can be “built into” the design. The project will:

  • Establish, as an overall goal, that the time and extent of the construction project's potential negative effects on adjacent businesses and landowners and on the surrounding community and its environment be minimized as much as practical;
  • Place a priority on the need to retain a basic level of transportation accessibility to the street-fronting land uses, including pedestrian accessibility to building fronts as well as on-street parking where possible;
  • Provide for an acceptable level of service by emergency service vehicles;
  • Acknowledge that the surrounding community may experience effects, particularly if traffic is temporarily routed along alternative streets, and that those neighbourhoods will also need to be consulted when making and implementing traffic management solutions;
  • Consider the use of a range of environmental mitigation tools such as erosion and sediment control plans, contaminated materials management plans, noise and vibration monitoring, and geotechnical investigations; and
  • Construction crew hours of work (typically 7:00 am to 6:00 pm weekdays), but special circumstances may arise
  • Prescribe construction mitigation requirements in detailed designs and tenders, to the degree possible.

Communications during construction

The City will be committed to working collaboratively and continuously with affected parties during the pre-planning and construction period. The City will:

  • Actively involve adjacent institutions, businesses, landowners, and residents in finding solutions to manage the project's construction period disruption;
  • Keep lines of communication open between the City, its contractor with area institutions, businesses and community associations;
  • Retain a “Communications Liaison” that will assist in relaying information in a timely manner;
  • Use Block Captains to relay information between the City/Contractor and all land owners and businesses along the street;
  • Make best efforts to schedule construction activities that work around special events and promotions; and
  • Please notify the City if you are interested in volunteering as a ‘Block Captain’ for your block.

Next steps

Project is expected to be ready for tendering process in January 2015.

A final Public Open House is planned for the Spring of 2015, near the start of construction, to present final traffic management and construction plans.

Information relating to the project will be posted on the City of Ottawa's project specific website.

Don't forget to complete a Comment/Questionnaire Sheet…your comments are welcomed and highly valued by the City.

Thank you!

Josée Vallée, P. Eng.
Senior Engineer, Infrastructure Projects
Infrastructure Services Department
Design and Construction Municipal East Branch
City of Ottawa
100 Constellation Crescent, 6th Floor
Ottawa, ON K2G 6J8
josee.vallee@ottawa.ca
Tel: (613) 580-2424 x 21805
Fax: (613) 560-6064

Ron Clarke, MCIP, RPP
Manager, Urban Planning & Design
Parsons
1223 Michael Street, Suite 100
Ottawa, ON  K1J 7T2
ronald.clarke@parsons.com
Tel.: (613) 738 -4160 x5226
Fax: (613) 739-7105

Open Houses – June 17th and June 18th, 2013

Monday, June 17th, 2013
5 to 8:00 pm
Saint Paul University
Laframboise Hall, Second Floor
Normandin Room
249 Main Street, Ottawa

Tuesday, June 18th, 2013
5 to 8:00 pm
Greenboro Community Centre
Rooms A and B
363 Lorry Greenberg Drive, Ottawa

?Welcome

Welcome to this Public Open House for the Main Street Renewal project and the McIlraith Bridge Rehabilitation project. This is an opportunity for you to learn about the projects and provide input. The Main Street Renewal Environmental Assessment project will include:

  • Pedestrian, cycling and transit modifications
  • Streetscaping, greening and public art
  • Street lighting and street furnishings
  • Municipal services and utility modifications
  • Construction activities, communications and traffic management

The McIlraith Bridge Rehabilitation project will include rehabilitation of the McIlraith Bridge structure and modification to the bridge deck surface. This includes the removal of the median and the introduction of on-street cycling lanes together with four vehicle travel lanes.

Photograph looking north on Main Street at Hawthorne Avenue.  View of cars and highway overpass. Photograph of Brantwood Gates. 

Study area

Study area [ PDF - 2.2 MB ]

Study scope and limits

The City of Ottawa is undertaking an Environmental Assessment and detailed design exercise for the renewal of Main Street and a portion of Lees Avenue and Rideau River Drive.

The project will result in detailed designs to enable the complete reconstruction of Main Street between Echo Drive and the Rideau River. This street sector is requiring complete reconstruction due to the age and condition of the infrastructure. Renewal of the roadway and sidewalk of Lees Avenue between Main Street and Chestnut Street is also being designed. Modifications to a portion of Rideau River Drive are also proposed. Measures to manage potential environmental impacts will be recommended.

Pending EA approval and City budget decisions, the designs are being completed to enable the street reconstruction to commence in 2014.

Key Plan [ PDF - 589 KB ]

Environmental Assessment process

Environmental Assessment process [ PDF - 473 KB ]

Consultation activities

Alternative Designs for the street have been prepared and evaluated by the City and its consulting team (led by Delcan) with guidance provided by a street design “Working Group”. This committee includes representation from many City branches, businesses, residents, and community organizations.

The Working Group has been meeting regularly to help the City make and/or inform key design decisions.

Many thanks to these dedicated volunteers as well as the office of Councillor David Chernushenko and his staff.

Background information was presented at a Public Open House held on October 17th, 2012. Information presented included existing conditions, the need for the project, and the general “solution” for the street being a renewal of the street infrastructure.

Photograph of community members partaking in a walkabout tour of Main Street.

Existing conditions - maps

Existing conditions - maps [ PDF - 4.8 MB ]

Existing vehicle traffic conditions

  • Main Street has a four lane cross-section from Highway 417 to the McIlraith Bridge (just three lanes north of Highway 417)
  • Between Highway 417 and Mason Terrace, on-street parking is permitted in some locations during the off-peak periods, resulting in only one clear lane in each direction during these periods
  • Four clear travel lanes are available during the peak periods (7:00 to 9:00am and 3:30 to 5:30pm)
  • Weekday commuter peak hour volumes range between 900 and 1,200 veh/h in each direction
  • Mid-day volumes are in the order of 600 to 800 veh/h in each direction
  • Comparable vehicle volumes in both directions during peak hours (relatively equal flow)
  • Heavier turning movements at Lees, Hawthorne, and Greenfield which are Arterials, and Riverdale (a Collector)
  • Concern regarding speeds - the posted speed limit on Main Street is 50km/h, but recorded speeds are well in excess
  • South of Beckwith Road, 85th percentile speeds in excess of 70 km/h observed in several blocks

Existing vehicle traffic conditions [ PDF - 968 KB ]

Street design vision

The overall objective for Main Street is to link the varied character areas together as a unified corridor, creating memorable places along it, while recognizing and supporting the defining character of its various parts. Principles include:

  • Strike an appropriate balance for all modes using the street, with an emphasis on better provisions for walking, cycling, and transit use in keeping with Official Plan objectives for the street
  • Create as much space as possible for wide sidewalks, by minimizing the amount of required roadway/asphalt used by vehicles
  • Use an integrated family of streetscaping elements such as street lighting, street furniture, trees and plantings, public art, parking solutions, signage, and surface treatments to act as the glue that bonds the corridor together and reinforces character and history while also inspiring renewal
  • Seek opportunities to enhance and add visual interest to the streetscape
  • Reclaim lands for public use within the Right-of-Way (ROW) that currently have encroachments, and recommend improvements to front or side yards on private lands adjacent to the corridor
  • Have regard for the planning and design principles discussed in the Old Ottawa East Community Design Plan and reconstruct the street in a manner that supports them

Photograph of Main Street today looking south from Hazel Street.

Long term transportation considerations

Main Street and Lees Avenue play vital roles in the City's transportation network as set out in the Official Plan, Transportation Master Plan and Ottawa Cycling Plan. The following considerations have influenced the plans for street reconstruction:

  • Pedestrians: As a Traditional Mainstreet (Echo to Clegg), there is an emphasis in providing a wide, comfortable sidewalk zone. As an Arterial Road, sidewalks of appropriate width and designed to promote walking are required along the entire street
  • Cycling: The corridor is a “Spine Route”, meaning that cyclists need to be accommodated on-street and that connections to adjacent cycling routes need to be made
  • Bus Transit: The corridor provides for OC Transpo routes (5, 16, 613). Efforts to improve speed and reliability of transit service, and street amenities at bus stops, are priorities
  • Vehicles: The corridor is a designated arterial road and is intended to carry high volumes of vehicle traffic over longer distances, as well as providing for walking, biking and transit use. It is also identified as a truck route.

Photograph of existing sidewalk condition on Main Street.  Example of deteriorating conditions. Photograph of a cyclist on Main Street. Photograph of a cyclist on Main Street sharing the lane with a vehicle.

Photograph of an OC Transpo Bus on Main Street. Photograph of mixed-traffic conditions on Main Street.

On-street cycling network improvements

The Main Street and Lees Avenue corridors are designated on-road cycling routes. Various measures are possible to improve the street for cyclists:

  • Today, no cycling facilities are provided on Main Street
  • The City’s 2008 Ottawa Cycling Plan suggest the streets be designed with wide shared travel lanes with “sharrows”, for Main Street between Echo and Clegg, and for Lees Avenue
  • Sharrows are paint markings on the lanes that assist in defining where cyclists are encouraged to travel, and where motor vehicles are not
  • South of Beckwith Road, the 2008 Ottawa Cycling Plan suggests dedicated (1.5 - 1.8m) cycling lanes be provided
  • As part of the City’s ongoing review of the Ottawa Cycling Plan, the City has identified portions of Main Street and Lees Avenue as a “Tier 1 Cycling Facility”. The appropriateness of a “cycle track” has been evaluated
  • An abundance of post and ring bike racks will be provided throughout the corridor

Photograph of a cyclist on Main Street sharing the lane with a vehicle. Photograph of bicycle parking outside a business on Main Street. Photograph of a cyclist on Main Street.

Alternative design 1

Alternative Design #1 would involve reconstructing the street to include the same number of narrow travel lanes (a combination of three and four lanes throughout the corridor), as exist today.  Off-peak, curb-lane parking would be provided in various locations. There is an opportunity to improve the pedestrian environment slightly. However, there would be no enhancement provided for cyclists north of Toronto Street.

Alternative design 1 [ PDF - 1.1 MB ]

Alternative design 2 - wide shared lanes

Alternative Design #2 would involve reconstructing the street with generally the same number of travel lanes as exists today.  However, north of Toronto Street, the outer lanes would be wider shared-use lanes to be shared with cyclists. Off-peak, curb-lane parking would be provided in various locations.

Alternative design 2 - wide shared lanes [ PDF - 1.1 MB ]

Alternative design 3 - addition of bike lanes

Alternative Design #3 would involve reconstructing the street with generally the same number of narrow travel lanes as exists today, with the addition of dedicated cycling lanes adjacent to the curb south of Harvey Street. On-street parking would not be provided South of Hawthorne Avenue.

Alternative design 3 - addition of bike lanes [ PDF - 1.1 MB ]

Alternative design 4 - reduced vehicle lanes with turning lanes and bike lanes

Alternative Design #4 would involve reconstructing the street with generally the same number of travel lanes as exists today between Echo Drive and Evelyn Avenue, with the outer lanes to be wide shared-use lanes. Between Evelyn Avenue and Rideau River Drive, the street would be reconstructed with one narrow travel lane in each direction, with turn lanes at most intersections, and cyclists accommodated in dedicated (painted) bike lanes located along the curb line.  On-street parking would be provided between Evelyn Avenue and Oblate Avenue (permanent parking bays on east side), between Oblate Avenue and Clegg Street (permanent parking bays on both sides), and a few other locations.

Alternative design 4 - reduced vehicle lanes with turning lanes and bike lanes [ PDF - 1.1 MB ]

Alternative design 5 - reduced vehicle lanes with turning lanes and cycle track

Alternative Design #5 would involve reconstructing the street with generally the same number of travel lanes as exists today between Echo Drive and Evelyn Avenue.  Through these blocks, cyclists use a combination of wide shared-use lanes and cycle tracks, depending on the available right-of-way.  Between Evelyn Avenue and Riverdale Avenue, the street would be reconstructed with one narrow travel lane in each direction, with turn lanes at most intersections, and cyclists accommodated in a segregated bike lane (cycle track) behind the road curb.  Parking would be provided on-street and in some permanent parking bays between Harvey Street and Oblate Avenue, and in permanent parking bays on both sides between Oblate Avenue and Clegg Street.

Alternative design 5 - reduced vehicle lanes with turning lanes and cycle track [ PDF - 1 MB ]

Alternative designs north of Evelyn Avenue

All five Alternative Designs share the same basic vehicle lane arrangement north of Evelyn Avenue, in the north end of the Main Street corridor.

  • Four vehicle travel lanes are provided in the three blocks between Evelyn Street and Hawthorne Avenue. Traffic analyses indicate the need to retain four travel lanes to provide for current and anticipated higher traffic volumes at acceptable levels of service through the intersections at Hawthorne and Lees Avenue, as well as providing for bus stops and bus turning movements.
  • Traffic analyses indicate that lane reductions through this section would result in unacceptable level of service for vehicles, and undesirable queuing through these intersections involving the nexus of three Arterial Roads.
  • Between Hawthorne Avenue and Lees Avenue, the four vehicle travel lanes are retained, where the vehicle movement demands are the greatest.
  • North of Harvey Street, all five designs maintain the existing lane arrangement which is one travel lane in each direction, with turn lanes at Greenfield Avenue. This is considered appropriate to meet the vehicle travel demand through the north end of the Main Street Corridor.
  • Hence, the variability in the five Alternative Designs in regards to vehicle lane capacity involves only the portion of Main Street south of Evelyn Avenue.

Evaluation criteria

A total of thirty-four (34) evaluation criteria were selected for this EA.  They are grouped into three broad categories:

Part A: Land Use, Urban Design and Community Sustainability

  • Traditional Mainstreet Consistency
  • Old Ottawa East CDP Consistency
  • Healthy Community Building
  • Business Prosperity and Property Development
  • Residential On-Street Parking
  • Community Heritage
  • Visual Environment
  • Sustainable Landscaping
  • Noise
  • Vibration
  • Outdoor Air Quality
  • Property Acquisition

Part B: Transportation Sustainability

  • Confederation Line Supportive
  • Pedestrian Capacity
  • Pedestrian Safety and Comfort (Sidewalk)
  • Pedestrian Safety (Crosswalks)
  • Cycling Safety and Inclusiveness
  • Cycling Comfort and Service
  • Transit Vehicle Travel Time Reliability
  • Transit User Safety and Comfort
  • Off-Peak Period Vehicle Travel Performance (Opening Year - 2015)
  • Peak Period Vehicle Travel Performance (Opening Year - 2015)
  • Off-Peak Period Vehicle Travel Performance (Long Term - 2031)
  • Peak Period Vehicle Travel Performance (Long Term - 2031)
  • Vehicle Safety
  • Emergency Service Vehicle Travel
  • Motor Vehicle Speed Reduction
  • Traffic Diversion
  • Maintainability

Part C: Natural and Physical Sustainability

  • Terrestrial Habitat
  • Aquatic Habitat
  • Surface Water
  • Soils and Surficial Geology
  • Impacted Materials

Evaluation results

Evaluation results [ PDF - 3.9 MB ]

Preliminary preferred design

Based on the criteria-based evaluation of Alternative Designs, the Preliminary Preferred Design for the Main Street Renewal project is Alternative Design 5. Overall, it performs the best in terms of:

  • Supporting a healthy business environment with high quality sidewalks, cycling facilities, and 24 hour parking in protected bays;
  • Promoting pedestrian safety and comfort due to a separation of the sidewalk from vehicle lanes and shortening of crosswalk lengths;
  • Providing the most inclusive cycling facility (cycle track) for cyclists of all ages and abilities;
  • Enabling space for improvements to community character and the visual environment;
  • Reduced motor vehicle speed due to narrowing of roadway and road geometry;
  • Increasing the separation between motor vehicles and residences and reducing their associated effects in terms of noise and vibration;
  • Providing for an appropriate Arterial Road capacity and level of service for vehicles using the corridor while enabling pursuit of the City's objectives identified in the Official Plan, Transportation Master Plan, and the Old Ottawa East Community Design Plan.

Preliminary proposed streetscape plan (Echo Drive to Lees Avenue) [ PDF - 3.1 MB ]

3D rendering of Preliminary Preferred Design north of HWY 417 looking south

3D rendering of Preliminary Preferred Design north of HWY 417 looking south

Preliminary proposed streetscape plan (Lees Avenue to Oblate Avenue) [ PDF - 2.7 MB ]

Preliminary proposed streetscape plan (Oblate Avenue to Clegg Street) [ PDF - 2.3 MB ]

3D rendering of Preliminary Preferred Design in the vicinity of St. Paul’s University

3D rendering of Preliminary Preferred Design looking north in front of St. Paul University

3D rendering of Preliminary Preferred Design looking south towards Hazel Street

Preliminary proposed streetscape plan (Clegg Street to Riverdale Avenue) [ PDF - 2.3 MB ]

3D rendering of Preliminary Preferred Design in the vicinity of Beckwith Gates

3D rendering of the Preliminary Preferred Design in the residential sector south of Clegg Street

Preliminary proposed streetscape plan (Riverdale Avenue to McIlraith Bridge) [ PDF - 3.5 MB ]

Preliminary preferred design – recommended modifications

The recommended modifications to Main Street based on the Preferred Alternative Design 5 are:

Echo Drive to Harvey Street:

  • Maintain two lane plus turn lane configuration
  • Establish 4.0m shared curb lanes to provide for on-road cycling
  • Widen sidewalks and provide streetscaping

Harvey Street to Evelyn Avenue:

  • Maintain four lane configuration to enable the higher vehicle traffic flows through these critical intersections
  • Establish a combination of 4.0m shared curb lanes and cycle tracks to provide for cycling, depending on right-of-way availability (and subject to detailed design)
  • Join the contra-flow bike lane on Graham Avenue to a new southbound cycle track
  • Widen sidewalks and provide streetscaping
  • Pursue minor right-of-way widenings

Evelyn Avenue to Oblate Avenue:

  • Reduce vehicle travel lanes from four to three (one northbound lane and two southbound lanes)
  • Establish cycle track in each direction
  • Provide on-street parking along both sides
  • Widen sidewalks and provide streetscaping
  • Pursue minor right-of-way widenings

Oblate Avenue to Toronto Street:

  • Reduce vehicle travel lanes from four to two, with left-turn lanes at most intersections
  • Establish cycle track in each direction
  • Provide permanent parking bays along both sides, between Oblate Avenue and Clegg Street
  • Widen sidewalks and provide streetscaping

Toronto Street to McIlraith Bridge:

  • Reduce vehicle travel lanes from four to three (two northbound lanes and one southbound lane)
  • Establish cycle track southbound and bike lane northbound
  • Widen sidewalks and provide streetscaping

Potential roundabout at Main/Riverdale

The City of Ottawa's Transportation Master Plan states that roundabouts should be considered when reconstructing intersections, as long as the safety of pedestrians and cyclists is not compromised.  On this basis, a Roundabout Concept, that includes a cycle track feature, has been developed for the Main/Riverdale intersection.

Key Opportunities of the Roundabout Concept at Main/Riverdale

  • Gateway Feature: Defines the transition area between the McIlriath Bridge and the community
  • Traffic Calming: Helps address historically high speeds in this section of the Corridor
  • Pedestrian Safety: Considered safer for pedestrians (compared to other intersection types) on the basis that roundabouts provide:
    • fewer potential vehicle-pedestrian conflict points, and at lower speeds;
    • shorter crossing distances; and
    • less complex crossings (requiring looking in one direction only).
  • Cycling Safety: Cyclists are considered to be the most vulnerable users of roundabouts as they are exposed to the overlapping paths of cars when travelling through or exiting a roundabout. This can be addressed by providing purpose-built bicycle-only facilities (i.e., cycle track) to reduce the risk of crashes and injuries. With this treatment, a multi-lane roundabout is considered comparable to other types of intersections in terms of cycling safety
  • Vehicle Safety: Roundabouts are considered safer for motorists (compared to other intersection types) on the basis that they provide:
    • fewer potential vehicle-vehicle conflict points, and at lower speeds; and
    • elimination of the most severe types of collisions (right-angle and opposing left-turn).
  • Vehicle Performance: The Roundabout Concept is expected to offer comparable, if not slightly better, vehicle performance to that of a signalized intersection.  Both are projected to operate at an overall Level of Service (LoS) C.

Key Constraints of the Roundabout Concept at Main/Riverdale

  • Pedestrian and Cycling Convenience: The street crossing points for pedestrians (and cyclists who opt to dismount and cross as pedestrians) are offset from the natural desire line, resulting in a longer overall travelling distance to negotiate the roundabout.
  • Elliot Avenue: Given the proximity of Elliot Avenue to the roundabout, it would be necessary to close the vehicular connection of this local street to Main Street.
  • Drainage: Given the existing topography in the area, a more sophisticated engineering solution would be needed to provide appropriate drainage of the roundabout.
  • Capital Cost: The capital cost of constructing a roundabout is usually 2 to 3 times greater than constructing a traditional signalized intersection.
  • Property Requirements: The diameter of a multi-lane roundabout typically ranges between 45 and 55 m, which takes up space that could otherwise be re-programmed for other uses. Note that no major property acquisition is needed to accommodate the roundabout at Main/Riverdale, which has an approximate diameter of 50m.

The decision to use a 'T-intersection' or a roundabout at the intersection of Main and Riverdale will be made during the detailed design phase.

Potential Riverdale intersection choices

Potential Riverdale intersection choices [ PDF - 2.2 MB ]

Travel Implications

The following is a summary of the key traffic-related considerations that are associated with Alternative Designs 4 or 5:

  • Based on data at the McIlraith Bridge, the Main Street Corridor currently accommodates approximately 1,500 persons per direction traveling in the peak hour, with the non-auto modal share (walk, bike, transit) at approximately 6%, auto passenger 15%, and auto driver 79%;
  • The Corridor carries between 900 and 1,200 veh/h per direction in the peak hour – this is currently accommodated in two vehicle lanes per direction;
  • The theoretical capacity of a single vehicle lane is approximately 900 veh/h
  • If the Corridor was reconstructed with one vehicle lane per direction, the street could not accommodate the existing peak hour vehicle traffic, with the single lane operating at between 100% and 133% of its capacity.
  • The projected shortfall during the peak hours could be accommodated through some combination of the following:
    • Some Corridor motorists would change their mode to walking, cycling, or transit use;
    • Some Corridor motorists would elect to travel outside of the peak hour (i.e., peak period lengthened);
    • Some Corridor motorists would select other routes such as Riverside Drive, Bank Street, or Bronson Avenue; and
    • Some motorists would elect to travel through the corridor with reduced level of service.

Travel Implications [ PDF - 742 KB ]

Travel implications - opening day and long term scenarios opening year scenario (2015)

  • On opening day, users of the Main Street Corridor will have experienced one or two construction seasons of disruption, where capacity on Main Street will have been reduced to accommodate construction activity.
  • The proposed cycling/pedestrian-friendly “complete street” design would encourage an approximate doubling of the current non-auto modal share from 6% to 12% (Resulting in an auto driver modal share of 73%).
  • If reconstructed with one vehicle lane per direction, the assumed capacity of Main Street is 900 vehicles/hr per direction. In comparison, existing peak hour demand is 1,200 veh/h in the peak direction.
  • This unserved demand of 300 veh/h could be accommodated as follows:
    • ~100 veh/h will have chosen to shift to non-auto modes (walking, cycling, transit)
    • ~50 veh/h will elect to shift travel outside of peak hour
    • ~150 veh/h will shift to an alternative travel route, most likely Riverside Drive

Long-Term Scenario (2031) Consistent with TMP Modal Share Assumptions

  • This scenario demonstrates travel on the Main Street corridor in 2031 assuming the attainment of the Transportation Master Plan's (TMP)'s long-term City-wide auto driver modal share target of 50% for the National Capital Region.
  • A 20% increase in travel demand on Main Street is assumed.
  • Four significant investments are assumed to provide additional travel capacity serving Old Ottawa East and adjacent communities:
    • Confederation Line LRT
    • Multi-use pathway (MUP) along the west side of the Rideau River
    • Pedestrian and cycling bridge across the Rideau Canal, at Clegg Street
    • Alta Vista Transportation Corridor
  • In this scenario, a reduction of ~500 veh/h would take place and vehicle travel demand would be well accommodated by the Main Street Corridor.

Long-term Scenario (2031) with Alternative Modal Share Assumptions

  • It is recognized that not all travel corridors will achieve the City-wide target.
  • This scenario assumes an auto driver modal share of 61%, representing an improvement to the existing state, but not to the target identified in the TMP.
  • ~300 drivers would have chosen to shift to non-auto modes
  • The unserved vehicle demand of ~200 veh/h could be accommodated as follows:
    • ~50 veh/h will elect to shift travel outside of peak hour
    • ~150 veh/h will shift to an alternative travel route, most likely the planned Alta Vista Transportation Corridor or Riverside Drive

Travel implications - road network

  • The street is designated in the Official Plan as an Arterial Road, and as such is to, “not only accommodate car and truck traffic, but also serve pedestrians, public utilities, cyclists, and public transit buses”.
  • North of Clegg Street, the corridor is also designated in the Official Plan as a Traditional Mainstreet. The Official Plan requires the City to consider changes such as “lane reductions” when the City is proposing public works in this corridor, to create space  within the right-of-way that can assist in the pursuit of community design and transportation planning objectives for these special design-controlled sectors of the City.

Travel implications - road network [ PDF - 1.1 MB ]

What is a cycle track?

A cycle track is a bicycle facility along a city street that is physically separated from the motorized vehicle traffic lanes, and is also separate from the sidewalk. It is generally separated from auto traffic by a narrow median, a raised curb, a planting strip, or on-street parking.

Benefits of a Cycle Track:

  • More inclusive to a wider spectrum of potential riders including youth, seniors, and casual cyclists
  • Promotes much higher cycling use
  • Provides for greater safety through separation

What is a cycle track? [ PDF - 888 KB ]

Area sustainable transportation initiatives

The City is in the process of planning, designing, and or implementing a few transportation initiatives in the broader area that will reinforce the community's sustainable transportation infrastructure and further support the success of the Preliminary Preferred Design. These initiatives include:

  • The extraordinary transportation capacity of Confederation Line and the Lees Station which is within walking distance of Old Ottawa East
  • A pedestrian and cycling bridge crossing of the Rideau Canal opposite Clegg Street, which will link Old Ottawa East to Lansdowne Park and The Glebe
  • A Multi-use Pathway along the west side of the Rideau River
  • Bike Lanes across the McIlraith Bridge, implemented as part of the bridge's rehabilitation

Area sustainable transportation initiatives [ PDF - 742 KB ]

On-street parking implications

The five Alternative Designs vary in the amount and type of on-street parking provided. This is demonstrated in the following table.

On-street parking implications [ PDF - 484 KB ]

Street lighting and furnishings

  • The working group and City have selected a recommended street light system for Main Street.
  • For the “Traditional Mainstreet” section between Echo Drive and Clegg Street, the design will use a combination of tall mount and pedestrian level street lights, using metal halide “white” lights
  • South of Clegg Street, the street will be illuminated by tall mount lights, using high pressure sodium luminaries, reflecting the residential land use context.

Street lighting and furnishings [ PDF - 531 KB ]

Street designs to maximize on-street parking

  • During detailed design the guiding principle is to minimize loss of existing legal on-street parking and to create new opportunities to increase on-street parking supply on Main Street and on side-streets.
  • Unnecessary driveway areas are to be closed or narrowed to free up curb-side space for new on-street parking
  • Opportunities will be sought to locate new fire hydrants in areas that have the least impact on parking
  • The City's Traffic and Parking By-Law prohibits parking within 9 metres of an intersection, within 3 metres of a hydrant, and within 1.5 metres of a driveway
  • Once constructed, the City will evaluate how the available on-street parking supply can be best managed in regards to maximum parking duration regulations

Private lands streetscape integration

  • The City's objective is to improve the visual quality of the street and provide a seamless streetscape along both sides of the street lot line
  • Minor modifications to private lands may be completed by the City in order to tie in grades and surfaces along the street lot line, provided that landowner consent is provided
  • More notable landscape alterations (beyond approximately 1m from the street lot line) can be completed by the City, subject to landowner consent and cost sharing
  • Street trees will be proposed on adjacent private lots in some locations
  • Where private land uses encroach on the City's right-of-way, the City will take this reconstruction opportunity to reclaim the right-of-way for sidewalk purposes and streetscaping
  • Once designs are finalized (Fall/Winter 2013), the City's Real Property Asset Management (RPAM) department staff will be contacting landowners to discuss property improvements and to obtain consents where required

Photograph of illegal side yard parking Photograph of front yard parking Photograph of adjacent commercial uses along Main Street

Provision for public art

  • The City's Public Art Program applies to this project
  • One percent (1%) of the project construction cost will be used to finance Public Art
  • The City's usual Public Art Selection process will be utilized
  • A call for proposals will be issued by the City, in 2013
  • Submissions will be reviewed by a selection jury and a winning proposal chosen based on evaluation criteria developed by the study team
  • An opportunity for public review of submitted Maquettes (models and/or images of the art proposal) will be provided
  • The installation of the resulting public art pieces will follow the completion of the road's streetscaping

Photograph is an example of a public art project Photograph is an example of a public art project Photograph is an example of a public art project

Photograph is an example of a public art project on Wellingston Street in Ottawa Photograph is an example of a public art project on King Edward Avenue in Ottawa Photograph is an example of a public art project

Brantwood Place Gates Heritage reconstruction

  • The Brantwood Place Gates, built in 1912, were subsequently designated as a war memorial and as a heritage structure under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act
  • The Gates are a cherished component of the community's cultural heritage
  • The Gates have been identified has having a need for structural rehabilitation associated with their age and condition
  • With input and endorsement of the Working Group, the City is proceeding to prepare designs that will lead to a “heritage reconstruction” of the Gates.
  • The Gates will be very carefully dismantled and the stones and useable components will be used in the reconstruction
  • The rehabilitation will be completed as part of the Main Street Renewal project

Photograph is a close-up shot of Brantwood Gates. Photograph of Brantwood Gates.

Underground services and renewal

  • The Main Street corridor accommodates a range of municipal services and utilities. Watermains and sanitary sewers require replacement due to their age and condition. The project creates an opportunity to replace the services at one time and to improve their level of service
  • The services will be sized to enable the corridor's planned land use intensification
  • The existing combined sewer system is being replaced with a separated sanitary and storm system in an effort to redirect flows
  • Stormwater retention within the roadway will be provided to improve the system's level of service
  • There are many older, flat roof buildings located along the corridor that may have roof drains that are connected to the combined sewers in the street. Opportunities to separate roof drains from the sanitary sewer will be explored in an effort to reduce the likelihood of downstream combined sewer system overflows
  • The City will also be taking the opportunity to replace lead water services (pipes) where identified

Proposed servicing improvements

This exhibit illustrates some of the underground municipal services that are being planned for Main Street and Rideau River Drive. On Lees Avenue, only surface modifications are proposed.

Proposed servicing improvements [ PDF - 1.8 MB ]

Burying of overhead utility lines

  • Overhead hydro utility poles exist along portions of the Main Street corridor, with the more visually apparent lines being on the west side of the street, North of Clegg Street
  • The Old Ottawa East Community Design Plan indicates as a priority the burial of overhead wires on the West side of Main Street, from Immaculata High School to Clegg Street
  • However, City of Ottawa Council adopted a city wide policy on utility undergrounding on April 13, 2011. The policy states, “that the undergrounding of overhead wires on City right-of-ways be undertaken only when the full cost of burial is paid for by the requesting party, or as otherwise approved by Council on a case-by-case basis”
  • The scoping for the Main Street Renewal project has not provided for undergrounding, however this discussion is ongoing

Photograph showing existing overhead wires along Main Street Photograph showing existing overhead wires along Main Street

Construction requirements

The project will include the total reconstruction of the street cross-section, including above-grade and below-grade infrastructure. It is anticipated that the corridor will be constructed in stages. The stages are not yet determined.

A typical construction process may entail:

  • Lane restrictions (involving either detours or leaving one side of street open);
  • Delineation of a construction area, including safety precautions;
  • Deep excavation and removal of all street infrastructure in the construction area;
  • Replacement of below-ground municipal services and utilities and road sub-grade;
  • Construction of new curbs, sidewalks, cycling facilities and travel lanes; and
  • Placement of street lights and streetscaping elements.

The limits of each stage and the precise manner of construction will be determined following the tender process and with input from the contractor.

Photograph of roadway excavation and construction on an Ottawa area street Photograph of reconstruction of a sidewalk on an Ottawa area street

Managing construction period disruption

The construction project activities will have the potential to impact businesses and residents along the corridor and in the adjacent community. Opportunities to mitigate construction related impacts can be “built into” the design. The project will:

  • Establish, as an overall goal, that the time and extent of the construction project's potential negative effects on adjacent businesses and landowners and on the surrounding community and its environment be minimized as much as practical
  • Place a priority on the need to retain a basic level of transportation accessibility to the street-fronting land uses, including pedestrian accessibility to building fronts as well as on-street parking where possible
  • Provide for an acceptable level of service by emergency service vehicles
  • Acknowledge that the surrounding community may experience effects, particularly if traffic is temporarily routed along alternative streets, and that those neighbourhoods will also need to be consulted when making and implementing traffic management solutions
  • Consider the use of a range of environmental mitigation tools such as erosion and sediment control plans, contaminated materials management plans, noise and vibration monitoring, and geotechnical investigations
  • Construction crew hours of work (typically 7:00 am to 5:00 pm weekdays), but special circumstances may arise
  • Prescribe construction mitigation requirements in detailed designs and tenders, to the degree possible

Photograph of road construction on another street within the City of Ottawa.

Communications during construction

The City will be committed to working collaboratively and continuously with affected parties during the pre-planning and construction period. The City will:

  • Actively involve adjacent businesses, landowners, and residents in finding solutions to manage the project's construction period disruption
  • Keep lines of communication open between the City, its contractor with area businesses and community associations
  • Retain a “Communications Liaison” that will assist in relaying information in a timely manner
  • Use Block Captains to relay information between the City/Contractor and all land owners and businesses along the street
  • Make best efforts to schedule construction activities that work around special events and promotions
  • Please notify the City if you are interested in volunteering as a ‘Block Captain’ for your block

Next steps - ongoing community consultation

Following the completion of the EA process, various opportunities for public involvement will be provided, and public input and comment are welcomed throughout the project process.

  • The results of the project’s Environmental Assessment will be received by the City’s Transportation Committee on July 5, 2013, with Council direction provided on July 17, 2013
  • The final ESR will be made available for the public review during a statutory review period
  • Subsequent to the completion of the EA process and prior to construction, another Public Open house meeting is planned where detailed designs will be presented for input.
  • Information relating to the project will be posted on the City of Ottawa's project specific website. This website will be updated during the course of the project by the City

For further information or to provide comments, contact the City's project manager or the consulting team manager at the addresses below.

For further information or to provide comments, contact the City’s project manager or the consulting team project manager at the addresses below.

Josée Vallée, P. Eng.
Infrastructure Services Department
Design and Construction Municipal East Branch
City of Ottawa
100 Constellation Crescent, 6th Floor
Ottawa, ON  K2G 6J8
E-mail: josee.vallee@ottawa.ca
Tel.:613-580-2424 ext. 21805
Fax: 613-560-6064

Ron Clarke, MCIP, RPP
Main Street Renewal Project
Senior Principal / Manager of Planning
Delcan Corporation
1223 Michael Street, Suite 100
Ottawa, ON  K1J 7T2
E-mail: r.clarke@delcan.com
Tel.: 613-738-4160 ext. 5226
Fax: 613-739-7105

Open House - October 17, 2012

Welcome

Welcome to this Public Open House for the Main Street Renewal.  This is an opportunity for you to learn about the project and provide input.  The project will include:

  • Pedestrian, cycling and transit modifications.
  • Streetscaping, greening and public art.
  • Street lighting and street furnishings.
  • Municipal services and utility modifications.
  • Construction activities, communications and traffic management.

Photograph of Main Street at Hawthorne Avenue Photograph of Main Street at Beckwith Road

Representatives of the City's design team will be available to answer questions that you may have.

You are encouraged to complete a Comment/Questionnaire sheet.

Study Scope and Limits

Key Plan of proposed limits of Main St. Renewal

The City of Ottawa is undertaking a design exercise for the renewal of Main Street and portions of Lees Avenue and Rideau River Drive.

The project will result in detailed designs to enable the complete reconstruction of Main Street between Echo Drive and the Rideau River.  This street sector is requiring complete reconstruction due to the age and condition of the infrastructure.  Renewal of the roadway and sidewalk of Lees Avenue between Main Street and Chestnut Street is also being designed.  Modifications to a portion of Rideau River Drive are also proposed.

Pending City budget decisions, the designs are being completed to enable the street reconstruction to commence in 2014.

Street Design Working Group

Photograph of Working Group members

Designs for the street will be prepared by the City and its consulting team (led by Delcan) with guidance provided by a street design “Working Group”.  This committee includes representation from many City branches, businesses, residents, and community organizations.

The Working Group will be meeting on several occasions to help the City make and/or inform key design decisions.  Many thanks to these dedicated volunteers as well as the office of Councillor David Chernushenko and his staff.

Study Area

Coloured coded map of proposed construction limits

The Canal Sector forms the northernmost section of Main Street, between Echo Drive and the Queensway.  This sector is approximately 180m in length, and is positioned within the Traditional Mainstreet designation.  It has intensified in recent years with the addition of multi-unit residential buildings.

The North Sector includes a four-block (330m) section of Main Street, between the Queensway and Springhurst Avenue.  This sector is within the Traditional Mainstreet designation, and contains potential for intensification due to the presence of larger and deeper lots.  Immaculata High School occupies much of the west-side street frontage.

The Lees Sector includes an approximately 400m section of Lees Avenue, between Main Street and Chestnut Street.  This sector is designated in the Official Plan as a General Urban Area, and predominantly contains low-rise residential uses.

The Central Sector includes a five-block (480m) section of Main Street, between Springhurst Avenue and Clegg Street.  This sector is within the Traditional Main street designation, but also contains several of the largest lots in the study area, associated with important institutions.

The Residential Sector includes the four-block (360m) portion of Main Street between Clegg Street and Mutchmor Road.  Here, Main Street is lined primarily with street-fronting low-density residential uses, and also includes an embassy.  This sector is designated in the Official Plan as a General Urban Area.

The Riverdale Sector includes a three-block (230m) portion of Main Street between Mutchmor Road and Toronto Street.  This sector includes the intersection of Main Street and Riverdale Avenue, and a Hydro facility on the west side of Main Street. Low-density residential uses are found on the east side of Main Street.  This sector is designated in the Official Plan as a General Urban Area.

The River Sector represents the southernmost portion of the project limits, and includes a short (150m) section of Main Street between Toronto Street and the approach to the McIlraith Bridge.  This sector also includes a 130m section of Rideau River Drive south of Main Street.  This sector is designated in the Official Plan as a General Urban Area, and predominantly contains low-rise residential uses.

Street Design Vision

Photograph of Main Street in front of Saint Paul University

The overall objective for Main Street is to strive to link the varied character areas, together as a unified corridor, creating memorable places along it, while recognizing and supporting the defining character of its various parts.  Principles include:

  • Strike an appropriate balance for all modes using the street, with an emphasis on walking, cycling, and transit use.
  • Create as much space as possible for wide sidewalks, by minimizing the amount of required roadway/asphalt used by vehicles.
  • Use an integrated family of streetscaping elements such as street lighting, street furniture, trees and plantings, public art, parking solutions, signage, and surface treatments to act as the glue that bonds the corridor together and reinforces character and history while also inspiring renewal.
  • Seek opportunities to enhance and add visual interest to the streetscape.
  • Reclaim lands for public use within the Right-of-Way (ROW) that currently have encroachments, and recommend improvements to front or side yards on private lands adjacent to the corridor.
  • Have regard for the planning and design principles discussed in the Old Ottawa East Community Design Plan.

Land Use/Zoning

Coloured coded map of the various land uses within the subject area Coloured codes map of the various zoning within the subject area

Municipal Infrastructure/Road Network

Coloured coded map of various infrastructure within the subject area Coloured coded map of road network within the subject area

Public Ownership/Depth to Bedrock

Coloured coded map of land ownership within the subject area Coloured coded map of trend in depth bedrock within the subject area

Heritage/Community Facilities and Open Space

Coloured coded map of facilities within the subject area Coloured coded map and photographs of heritage buildings within the subject area

On-Street Cycling Network Improvements

Photographs of cycling lanes

The Main Street and Lees Avenue corridors are designated on-road cycling routes.  Various measures are possible to improve the street for cyclists:

  • The City’s 2008 Ottawa Cycling Plan suggest the streets be designed with wide shared travel lanes with “sharrows”, for Main Street between Echo and Clegg, and for Lees Avenue.
  • Sharrows are paint markings on the lanes that assist in defining where cyclists are encouraged to travel, and where motor vehicles are not.
  • South of Beckwith Road, the Ottawa Cycling Plan suggests dedicated (1.5 - 1.8m) cycling lanes be provided.
  • The study process will enable a fresh look at the preferred cycling solutions for the streets.
  • An abundance of post and ring bike racks will be provided throughout the corridor.

Long Term Transportation Considerations

Photographs of various types of transportation such as walking, taking the bus, cycling and driving

Main Street and Lees Avenue play vital roles in the City's transportation network.  The following considerations have influenced the street's plans for reconstruction:

  • Pedestrians:  As a Traditional Main street (Echo to Clegg), there is an emphasis in providing a wide, comfortable sidewalk zone.
  • Cycling:  The corridor is a “Spine Route”, meaning that cyclists need to be accommodated on-street and that connections to adjacent cycling routes need to be made.
  • Bus Transit:  The corridor provides for OC Transpo routes (5, 16, 613).  Efforts to improve speed and reliability of transit service, and street amenities at bus stops, are priorities.

Primary Urban Cycling Network/Ottawa Cycling Plan (2008)

Coloured codes map of proposed cycling routes within the subject area Coloured codes map of on-road and off-road cycling routes within the subject area

Private Lands Streetscape Integrations

Photographs of private lands requiring streetscaping

  • The City's objective is to improve the visual quality of the street and provide a seamless streetscape along both sides of the street lot line.
  • Minor modifications to private lands may be completed by the City in order to tie in grades and surfaces along the street lot line, provided that landowner consent is provided.
  • More notable landscape alterations (beyond approximately 1m from the street lot line) can be completed by the City, subject to landowner consent and cost sharing.
  • Where private land uses encroach on the City's right-of-way, the City will take this reconstruction opportunity to reclaim the right-of-way for streetscaping.
  • Once designs are finalized (Fall 2013), the City's Real Property Asset Management (RPAM) department staff will be contacting landowners to discuss property improvements and to obtain consents where required.

Brantwood Place Gates Rehabilitation

Photograph of Brantwood Gates on Main Street at Beckwith Road Photograph of Brantwood Gates on Main Street at Beckwith Road

  • The Brantwood Place Gates, built in 1912, were subsequently designated as a war memorial and as a heritage structure under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.
  • The Gates are a cherished component of the community's cultural heritage.
  • The Gates have been identified has having a need for structural rehabilitation associated with their age and condition.
  • The City completed a technical report in 2011 (Barry Padolsky Associates Inc., Architects, and Delcan) that identified two (2) options for Rehabilitation.
  • The options are: #1. Restore the Gates In Situ, and #2. Rebuild the Gates In Situ.
  • Either option would result in the rehabilitation of the gates in their current location.
  • Whereas Option #2 was recommended in the 2011 report, the report and findings are to be presented to the Main Street Renewal Working Group for input prior to a decision being made by the City.
  • The rehabilitation will be completed as part of the Main Street Renewal project.

Provision for Public Art

Photographs of Public Art along various streets in Ottawa

  • The City's Public Art Program applies to this project.
  • One percent (1%) of the project construction cost will be used to finance Public Art.
  • The City's usual Public Art Selection process will be utilized.
  • A call for proposals will be issued by the City, in 2013.
  • Submissions will be reviewed by a selection jury and a winning proposal chosen based on evaluation criteria developed by the study team.
  • An opportunity for public review of submitted Maquettes.(models and/or images of the art proposal) will be provided.
  • The installation of the resulting public art pieces will follow the completion of the road's streetscaping.

Burying of Overhead Utility Lines

Photograph of location to bury overhead hydro lines Photograph of location to bury overhead hydro lines

  • Overhead hydro utility poles exist along portions of the Main Street corridor, primarily on the west side of the street.
  • The Old Ottawa East Community Design Plan indicates as a priority the burial of overhead wires on the West side of Main Street, from Immaculata High School to Clegg Street.
  • City of Ottawa Council adopted a city wide policy on utility undergrounding on April 13, 2011. The policy states, “that the undergrounding of overhead wires on City right-of-ways be undertaken only when the full cost of burial is paid for by the requesting party, or as otherwise approved by Council on a case-by-case basis.”
  • The scoping for the Main Street Renewal project has not provided for undergrounding, however, the Main Street Renewal Working Group is having a discussion on this matter in Fall 2012.

Underground Services and Renewal

  • The Main Street corridor accommodates a range of municipal services and utilities.  Watermains and sanitary sewers require replacement due to their age and condition.  The project creates an opportunity to replace the services at one time and to improve their level of service.
  • The services will be sized to enable the corridor's planned land use intensification.
  • The existing combined sewer system is being replaced with a separated sanitary and storm system in an effort to redirect flows.
  • Stormwater retention within the roadway will be provided to improve the system's level of service.
  • There are many older, flat roof buildings located along the corridor that may have roof drains that are connected to the combined sewers in the street. Opportunities to separate roof drains from the sanitary sewer will be explored in an effort to reduce the likelihood of downstream combined sewer system overflows.
  • The City will also be taking the opportunity to replace lead water services (pipes) where identified.

Managing Construction Period Disruption

Photograph of a construction crew working on another street

The construction project activities will have the potential to impact businesses and residents along the corridor and in the adjacent community.  Opportunities to mitigate construction related impacts can be “built into” the design.  The project will:

  • Establish, as an overall goal, that the time and extent of the construction project's potential negative effects on adjacent businesses and landowners and on the surrounding community and its environment be minimized as much as practical.
  • Place a priority on the need to retain a basic level of transportation accessibility to the street fronting land uses, including pedestrian accessibility to building fronts as well as on street parking where possible.
  • Provide for an acceptable level of service by emergency service vehicles
  • Acknowledge that the surrounding community may experience effects, particularly if traffic is temporarily routed along alternative streets, and that those neighbourhoods will also need to be consulted when making and implementing traffic management solutions.
  • Consider the use of a range of environmental mitigation tools such as erosion and sediment control plans, contaminated materials management plans, noise and vibration monitoring, and geotechnical investigations.
  • Construction crew hours of work (typically 7:00 am to 5:00 pm weekdays), but special circumstances may arise.
  • Prescribe construction mitigation requirements in detailed designs and tenders, to the degree possible.

Communications during Construction

Drawing of people around a boardroom table

The City will be committed to working collaboratively and continuously with affected parties during the pre-planning and construction period.  The City will:

  • Actively involve adjacent businesses, landowners, and residents in finding solutions to manage the project's construction period disruption.
  • Keep lines of communication open between the City, its contractor with area businesses and community associations.
  • Retain a “Communications Liaison” that will assist in relaying information in a timely manner.
  • Use Block Captains to relay information between the City/Contractor and all businesses along the street.
  • Make best efforts to schedule construction activities that work around special events and promotions.
  • Please notify the City if you are interested in volunteering as a ‘Block Captain’ for your block.

Next Steps – Ongoing Community Consultation

Various opportunities for public involvement will be provided, and public input and comment are welcomed throughout the project process.

  • Three additional Public Open house meetings are planned for 2013, where options and streetscape designs will be presented for input as they are developed.
  • Information relating to the project will be posted on the City of Ottawa's project specific website.  This website will be updated during the course of the project by the City.

For further information or to provide comments, contact the City's project manager or the consulting team manager at the addresses below.

Josée Vallée, P. Eng.
Senior Engineer, Infrastructure Projects
Infrastructure Services Department
Design and Construction Municipal East Branch
City of Ottawa
100 Constellation Crescent, 6th Floor
Ottawa, ON  K2G 6J8
josee.vallee@ottawa.ca
Tel.:  (613) 580-2424, x 21805
Fax:  (613) 560-6064

Ron Clarke, MCIP, RPP
Senior Principal, Manager of Planning
Delcan Corporation
1223 Michael Street, Suite 100
Ottawa, ON  K1J 7T2
r.clarke@delcan.com
Tel.:  (613) 738-4160, x5226
Fax:  (613) 739-7105

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