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Development application forms

Submitting a development application form

All development applications except for those to the Committee of Adjustment can be filled out electronically. The online application forms contain useful links and additional information to help applicants navigate through the development review process.  Applications also include a fee calculator to help ensure that proper fees are collected with a submission.

  1. Before submitting a form you should complete the City’s Pre-application Consultation Process– even if your application is not subject to pre-application consultation you are strongly encouraged to contact Planning staff to discuss your proposal and determine study and plan requirements.
  2. Ensure that you have attempted to complete all applicable sections of the application form. If required information is missing, the City has the ability to place your application on hold until that information is received.
  3. Please note that application forms cannot be saved electronically. You must print the form immediately after you have finished typing in the required information. Forms can be printed manually or by using the ‘Print Form’ button included on the last page of each form. If you are using the links within the form you will be redirected to a new page. You must use the back arrow button to return to the form once you retrieve the information you are looking for.
  4. After you have completed your application form, you should submit it, your payment, and copies of all required studies and plans to a Client Service Centre.  The application will be forwarded to the appropriate department where staff will be assigned.

All required items from Pre-consultation must be completed including engineering reports stamped and signed.  The application is reviewed in detail by the assigned staff to ensure it is complete. Staff will advise the applicant if the application does not meet the requirements and if other information is required. It is important to note that the target timelines for applications will not commence until the submission requirements and any information or materials required to process the application are submitted by the applicant.

Demolition control

Application Tools

When a property owner wishes to demolish all or part of a building, a Demolition Permit is normally issued by Building Code Services along with the building permit for the replacement structure.

However, if no building permit for a replacement building has been issued, Demolition Control approval from the Planning and Growth Management Department may be necessary. Demolition Control approval is required in cases where all of the following are true:

  • Where no building permit for a new building on the site has been issued; 
    AND
  • Where the demolition will result in the elimination of one or more residential dwelling units; 
    AND
  • Where the building to be demolished is located within the Area of Demolition Control as defined by Schedule 1 of the Demolition Control By-law 2012-377.

Even in cases where all of the above conditions are true, the proposed demolition may still be exempt from the Demolition Control approval if:

  • An order to remove the residential property has been issued under the Fire Protection and Prevention Act,1997, S.O. 1997, c.4
    OR
  • The residential property has been found to be unsafe under section 15.10 of the Building Code Act, 1992 and an order has been issued under that section.

How to apply

Before making an application, you should discuss your proposal with staff. Please review the Fee Schedule for the appropriate fee. Application forms are available at all Client Service Centres or online together with the requirements for submissions. It should be submitted at one of the City’s Client Service Centres with the required fee and any other information that may be needed to assess your application.

What Happens Next

The application will be processed by staff, who circulate it to City Departments, the Ward Councillor, Community Organizations and required public bodies for comments. A sign will be installed on the property briefly describing the proposal.

Once all comments have been received, the planner assigned to the application will prepare a report with a recommendation to either approve or refuse the request for Demolition Control approval.

In most cases the report will be directed to the General Manager of Planning and Growth Management, who will make a decision under delegated authority from Council. However, when the proposal is to demolish a heritage building, or when the Ward Councillor withdraws delegated authority from the General Manager, the matter will be referrred to the Planning Committee. You may appear at the Committee meeting to present your views, since this is a public meeting. The recommendation of Committee then proceeds to City Council, who will make the final decision to approve or refuse the Demolition Control application.

Further Information

This publication is intended to provide general information only. The original by-laws, acts, regulations and other relevant documents should be consulted for detailed reference. For more information please visit one of the Client Service Centres or call the City of Ottawa at 3-1-1.

Establishing non-conforming rights

Application Tools

In certain circumstances you may be able to develop your property by establishing non conforming rights to a land use or other zoning standard. This means that you are able to demonstrate a right that existed before the Zoning By-law regulations existed or were changed. You may submit an affidavit at any Client Services Centre attesting to such a non conforming right. The applications or processes where an affidavit could be submitted are:

  • building permit
  • front yard parking
  • compliance reports
  • license application
  • cash-in-lieu of parking
  • alleged Zoning By-law violation

Role of Participants

Applicant: files affidavit providing information substantiating non conforming right. Three fundamental rules apply when submitting an affidavit:

  • Does the person(s) putting forward a claim have personal knowledge?
  • Was the specific use or non-complying zone standard lawfully established on the day the zoning regulations were changed?
  • Has it been continuous since establishment?

City Staff: provides assistance to all applicable individuals involved in the process, conducts validation process for all affidavits filed and undertakes notification process for filed affidavits.

Counter Claimant: files counter affidavit applying the same criteria as in filing an affidavit. Any affidavit filed must be based on facts. The information provided to the City will be treated seriously and the person(s) making the counter claim will be expected to appear in court, as may be required to assist in pursuing compliance with the Zoning By-law.

What happens next

The affidavit is internally reviewed to determine acceptability.

If the affidavit is determined invalid the applicant is notified and the process ends. Other options would have to be explored to allow development to take place (Zoning By law amendment, Committee of Adjustment application).

If the affidavit is determined to be valid a circulation process is initiated. A notice is sent to the Ward Councillor, Community Organization and owners/occupants within a 60 metre radius of the applicable property. The notice contains a summary of the affidavit, an explanation of the process and a contact person within the Planning and Growth Management .

Counter Affidavit process

If a counter affidavit is submitted (Commissioner of Oaths from the Client Service Centres will be available to commission counter affidavits) staff review is undertaken to determine its validity. If the counter claim is determined invalid the circulation process ends and individuals who replied to the circulation notice are informed of the decision and the application/process will proceed.

If the counter affidavit is considered valid, the applicant and counter claimant are notified that the counter claim has been accepted (the Director, Planning and Infrastructure Approvals or the Director of Building Services may issue an extension of 15 days at the request of the claimant where a legitimate case has been made).

When a counter affidavit is accepted, the applicant is notified that a violation exists. The applicant is liable to rectify the issue by using one of the following options:

  • voluntarily complying with existing regulations
  • applying for a Zoning By-law amendment
  • applying to the Committee of Adjustment for a minor variance

If the applicant fails to take steps to regularize the issue the matter would be dealt with through the courts. It should be noted that the counter affidavit participant would be expected to be involved if court action is required.

Feed-in-Tariff (FIT) Program

Application Tools

Background

The Feed-In Tariff (FIT) Program encourages and promotes greater use of renewable energy sources including on-shore wind, waterpower, renewable biomass, biogas, landfill gas and solar photovoltaic (PV) for electricity generating projects in Ontario.

A formal application is required to initiate a FIT Program submission. The application fees are as follows:

  • Site Specific Resolution and Forms: $350 subject to HST
  • Blanket Support Resolution and Forms: $200 subject to HST
  • Form(s) Only: $200 subject to HST
  • Blanket Support Resolution: No Fee.

The FIT Program is open to projects with a rated electricity generating capacity greater than 10 kilowatts (kW) and generally up to 500 kW. Applicants interested in pursuing a project of 10 kW or less (e.g., a residential rooftop solar PV installation), may qualify under the microFIT Program for small renewable energy projects. For more information on FIT please refer to the Independent Electricity System Operator’s (IESO) website. The IESO operates the electricity market and directs the operation of the bulk electrical system in Ontario.

The IESO awards priority points (higher ranking) to those projects that receive the formal support of Council. City staff prepare the needed support resolutions, referred to as “Prescribed Forms” on behalf of Council.

In addition to preparing blanket and individual resolutions of support, staff may also be asked to prepare an exemption resolution; to confirm that the City supports a project that does not meet all of the Province’s location, setback and screening criteria. Staff are also required to confirm that the municipality has provided such support. Staff may also be asked by the applicant to provide confirmation of the site’s zoning.

How to apply

Before making an application, you should discuss your proposal with staff. Please review the Fee Schedule for the appropriate fee. Application forms are available at all Client Service Centres or online together with the requirements for submissions. It should be submitted at one of the City’s Client Service Centres with the required fee and any other information that may be needed to assess your application.

Please contact the Rural Affairs Office at ruralaffairs@ottawa.ca or dial 3-1-1 to speak with Rural Strategist to determine if your proposal is eligible for a Municipal Council Blanket Support Resolution.

Front Ending Application

Application Tools

Front Ending Agreements are requested by developers when they wish to advance the building of specific growth-related capital works.  The specific works can vary, from intersection controls through to arterial roads and critical sub-surface infrastructure.  Works must be included in the City’s Development Charge Background Study and are subject to review for eligibility.  Through the agreement, developers agree to finance the design and delivery of the capital works and recover their costs from the City at a later date according to the Council approved budget spending forecast.

A formal application form is required to initiate a Front-Ending Agreement. The application fee is $14,321.45 ( Total fee comprised of $8,146.00 Planning Fee, $5,465.00 Legal Services fee, $710.45 HST on Legal Services fee).  Please contact the relevant Development Review Manager prior to making an application.

How to apply

Before making an application, you should discuss your proposal with staff. Please review the Fee Schedule for the appropriate fee. Application forms are available at all Client Service Centres or online together with the requirements for submissions. It should be submitted at one of the City’s Client Service Centres with the required fee and any other information that may be needed to assess your application.

Heritage Confirmation Letter

Application Tools

A Heritage Confirmation Letter is formal correspondence from the City confirming whether the property in question is subject to Part IV or Part V of the Heritage Conservation Act.

A formal application is required to receive a Heritage Confirmation Letter.  The fee is $180.00 not subject to HST.

City staff will investigate the property to determine any applicable heritage designation once the application is received.

How to apply

Before making an application, you should discuss your proposal with staff. Please review the Fee Schedule for the appropriate fee. Application forms are available at all Client Service Centres or online together with the requirements for submissions. It should be submitted at one of the City’s Client Service Centres with the required fee and any other information that may be needed to assess your application.

Historic Land Use Inventory

Application Tools

This is an informal process through which a party can request information on existing or former uses of a site. This offers an alternative to the legislated process under the Municipal Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (MFIPPA).

A formal application is required to initiate a search of the Historic Land Use Inventory.  The fee is $100.00 not subject to HST.

The search process is triggered upon receipt of a request for information application along with the appropriate consent and signed disclaimer.

The nature of the information that the Departments may have on a particular property will vary, depending on their scope of activities and mandate. As a result, the amount of information available on a property will vary on a case-by-case basis. 

How to apply

Before making an application, you should discuss your proposal with staff. Please review the Fee Schedule for the appropriate fee. Application forms are available at all Client Service Centres or online together with the requirements for submissions. It should be submitted at one of the City’s Client Service Centres with the required fee and any other information that may be needed to assess your application.

Lifting 30 centimetre reserve

Application Tools

A 30 cm reserve is a strip of land 30 cm wide, running along the street frontage or perimeter of a property or perpendicularly across a road right-of-way, that is deeded temporarily to the City as a condition of a subdivision agreement. This reserve has the effect of technically denying access to a property, or adjacent lands because the law requires that all land must have frontage on a public street to qualify for a building permit. The reserve is used as a means to control development until such time as various conditions are met or to prohibit development on lands that are not yet scheduled for development. The lifting of these reserves can result in the dedication of land as public highways, the reconveyance of land back to the owner or in some cases both.

If the conditions no longer apply, an application may be made to request that the City "lift" the requirement for the reserve, giving the property owner direct access to a public street. For Lifting of 30 cm Reserves, the City Legal staff prepare a By-law and forwards the By-law to City Council.

How to apply

Before making an application, you should discuss your proposal with staff. Please review the Fee Schedule for the appropriate fee. Application forms are available at all Client Service Centres or online together with the requirements for submissions. It should be submitted at one of the City’s Client Service Centres with the required fee and include the following information:

  • A description of your property, including the location of the 30 cm reserve
  • A Registered Plan number
  • The reasons why you want to have the reserve lifted.

Your application must be accompanied by a survey plan, and any other information which may be needed to assess your application.

Appeal

There are no formal appeal procedures in the event that the City does not approve your application. However, you could seek private legal advice to see if action could be taken to enforce lifting the 30 cm reserve.

Lifting of 30 cm Reserves Approvals Process

The various steps and the corresponding length of time required in the Lifting of 30 cm Reserves are illustrated in the following chart:

Calendar Days/Weeks Elapsed

Pre-application consultation with Public and/or City Staff (optional)

Prior to Filing Application

Milestone Step

Delegated Authority

Application Submission

Day 1

Application Reviewed for Adequacy

Day 6

Circulation to Technical Agencies And Ward Councillor

Day 14 (Week 2)

End of Circulation Period

Day 28 (Week 4)

End of Issue Resolution

Day 35 (Week 5)

Report Preparation - Delegated Authority

Day 42 (Week 6)

Report Sign Off by Program Manager

Day 44 (Week 6)

City Council (Passage of By-Law)

Day 58 (Week 8)

Further Information

This publication is intended to provide general information only. The original by-laws, acts, regulations and other relevant documents should be consulted for detailed reference. For more information please visit one of the Client Service Centres or call the City of Ottawa at 3-1-1.

Lifting holding by-law

Application Tools

A Holding Zone is used in conjunction with a zoning designation when the proposed uses for those lands are considered premature or inappropriate for development at a certain time or until the applicant has met certain conditions or requirements.

Landowners can apply to have these holding zones lifted in order to proceed with development. The Managers have the delegated authority to approve these types of applications if the prescribed pre-conditions have been met. Otherwise the application must be reviewed by the Planning or Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee and approved by City Council. Notice of intent to Lift a Holding Zone must be given in accordance with the Planning Act (advertise in paper or notice by mail to all affected landowners) and the corresponding By-law must be approved by City Council.

How to apply

Before making an application, you should discuss your proposal with staff. Please review the Fee Schedule for the appropriate fee. Application forms are available at all Client Service Centres or online together with the requirements for submissions. It should be submitted at one of the City’s Client Service Centres with the required fee and any other information that may be needed to assess your application.

Lifting of Holding Zone Process

The various steps and the corresponding length of time required in the lifting of a Holding Zone process are illustrated in the following chart:

Calendar Days/Weeks Elapsed

Pre-application consultation with Public and/or City Staff (optional)

Prior to Filing Application

Milestone Step

Delegated Authority

Authority Withdrawn

Application Submission

Day 1

 

Application Deemed Complete

Day 6

 

Circulation to Technical Agencies,

Day 14 (Week 2)

 

End of Circulation Period

Day 28 (Week 4)

Day 28 (Week 4)

End of Issue Resolution/Delegated Authority

Day 35 (Week 5)

Day 43 (Week 6)

Report Preparation (Delegated Authority or Planning or Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee Report)

Day 42 (Week 6)

Day 51 (Week 7)

Report Sign Off by Manager

Day 44 (Week 6)

N/A

Report Sign Off by General Manager

N/A

Day 53 (Week 7.5)

Report Sign Off by Deputy City Manager

N/A

Day 60 (Week 8.5)

Notification of Committee Meeting And Report Mail out to Public

N/A

Day 67 (Week 9.5)

Planning or Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee Meeting

N/A

Day 82 (Week 12)

City Council (Passage of By-law)

Day 58 (Week 8)

Day 95 (Week 13.5)

Further Information

This publication is intended to provide general information only. The original by-laws, acts, regulations and other relevant documents should be consulted for detailed reference. For more information please visit one of the Client Service Centres or call the City of Ottawa at 3-1-1.

Lifting interim control by-law

Application Tools

When City Council wishes to undertake a review or study of its land use policies related to a specific area, or areas, of the city, Council may pass an "Interim Control By-law". Passage of this sort of By-law effectively prohibits the continued use of the land, buildings or structures within the specified area(s), except for those uses set out in the By-law. An Interim Control By-law may be in effect for up to one year, to allow sufficient time to complete the desired review or study. However, Council may amend the By-law to extend the period of time during which it will be in effect for one more year, provided the total period of time does not exceed two years from the date that the initial Interim Control By-law was passed. An Interim Control By-law can be lifted as it applies to a particular parcel of land if it does not have an effect on the outcome of the review or study or if they have been completed.

Council is not obligated under the Planning Act to give notice to the public prior to the passing of an Interim Control By-law, although, such notice must be given within 30 days after the By-law has been passed. Any member of the public has the right to file an appeal to the Ontario Municipal Board objecting to the By-law, provided the appeal is received by the municipality within 60 days of the passing of the By-law. In such instances, unlike a Zoning By-law, the disputed Interim Control By-law remains in effect pending the outcome of the Ontario Municipal Board hearing.

How to apply

Before making an application, you should discuss your proposal with staff. Please review the Fee Schedule for the appropriate fee. Application forms are available at all Client Service Centres or online together with the requirements for submissions. It should be submitted at one of the City’s Client Service Centres with the required fee and any other information that may be needed to assess your application.

Lifting of Interim Control By-Law Process

The various steps and corresponding length of time required in the lifting of an Interim Control By-law process are illustrated in the following chart:

Calendar Days/Weeks Elapsed

Pre-application consultation with Public and/or City Staff (optional)

Prior to Filing Application

Milestone Step

Delegated Authority

Application Submission

Day 1

Application Deemed Complete

Day 6

Community "Heads Up" (if required)

Day 9

Circulation to Technical Agencies, Community Organizations and Ward Councillor

Day 14 (Week 2)

Posting of On-site Sign

Day 17 (Week 2.5)

End of Circulation Period

Day 45 (Week 6.5)

Community Information and Comment Session (CICS) If Required

(Add 2 weeks to all subsequent processes)

End of Issue Resolution

Day 60 (Week 8.5)

Report Preparation

Day 68 (Week 10)

Report Sign-Off by General Manager

Day 70 (Week 10)

Report Sign-Off by Deputy City Manager

Day 77 ( Week 11)

Committee Meeting Advertisement and Report Mail out to Public

Day 83 (Week 12)

Planning and Planning or Agriculture and Rural Affair Committee Meeting

Day 98 (Week 14)

City Council (Review/Passage of By-Law)

Day 111 (Week 16)

End of Appeal Period

Day 146 (Week 20)

Further Information

This publication is intended to provide general information only. The original by-laws, acts, regulations and other relevant documents should be consulted for detailed reference. For more information please visit one of the Client Service Centres or call the City of Ottawa at 3-1-1.

Lifting part lot control

Application Tools

Part lot control is a provision of the Planning Act that, as the term implies, regulates the transfer or sale of part of a lot within a registered plan of subdivision. The municipality uses this provision as a means of preventing the possible uncontrolled division of lots within a plan of subdivision after the plan has been registered.

In certain circumstances, Part Lot Control may be suspended to allow a property owner to legally divide his or her lot, or lots, within a registered plan of subdivision. In such instance, provided the proposed lot division does not require new roads or municipal services, an application can be submitted to the City requesting that it pass a By-law to temporarily "lift" Part Lot Control, in order to allow enough time for the applicant to complete the necessary procedures. It should be noted that the vast majority of Part Lot Control Lifting applications are not subject to public notification or consultation.

Once an application for Lifting of Part Lot Control has been submitted, staff prepares the draft By-law and forwards it to Legal Services for review. Once Legal Services is satisfied that the lot owner has fulfilled all applicable conditions, if any, the draft By-law is then sent to City Council for adoption.

How to apply

Before making an application, you should discuss your proposal with staff. Please review the Fee Schedule for the appropriate fee. Application forms are available at all Client Service Centres or online together with the requirements for submissions. It should be submitted at one of the City’s Client Service Centres with the required fee and any other information that may be needed to assess your application.

Your application should be accompanied by plans illustrating the parts of lots in the subdivision that you wish to convey (three copies of the Plan of Survey is recommended).

Appeal

There are no formal appeal procedures if the City fails to approve your application to temporarily remove Part Lot Control. However, you may still apply to the Committee of Adjustment for a consent.

Lifting Part Lot Control Approval Process

The various steps and corresponding length of time required in the Part Lot Control process are illustrated in the following chart:

Manager Approval - No Public Notification or Consultation

Calendar Days/Weeks Elapsed

Pre-application consultation with Public and/or City Staff (optional)

Prior to Filing Application

Milestone Step

Delegated Authority

Authority Withdrawn

Application Submission

Day 1

 

Application Reviewed for Adequacy

Day 6

 

Community "Heads Up" (if required)

N/A

 

Circulation to Technical Agencies And Ward Councillor

Day 14 (Week 2)

 

Posting of On-site Sign

N/A

 

End of Circulation Period

Day 28 (Week 4)

Day 28 (Week 4)
Preferred last day to withdraw delegated authority

End of Issue Resolution

Day 35 (Week 5)

Day 43 (Week 6)

Report Preparation (Delegated Authority or Planning or Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee)

Day 40 (Week 6)

Day 51 (Week 7)

Report Sign Off by Program Manager

Day 45 (Week 6.5)

N/A

Report Sign Off by General Manager

N/A

Day 53 (Week 7.5)

Committee Report Sign Off by Deputy City Manager

N/A

Day 60 (Week 8.5)

Notification of Committee Meeting And Report Mail out to Public

N/A

Day 67 (Week 9.5)

Planning or Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee Meeting

N/A

Day 82 (Week 12)

City Council Review and Passage of By-law

Day 59 (Week 8)

Day 95 (Week 13.5)

Further Information

This publication is intended to provide general information only. The original by-laws, acts, regulations and other relevant documents should be consulted for detailed reference. For more information please visit one of the Client Service Centres or call the City of Ottawa at 3-1-1.

Municipal concurrence and public consultation process for antenna systems

Official Plan amendment

Application Tools

The Official Plan is a comprehensive document designed to guide and direct future growth of the city in a logical and orderly manner to ensure healthy growth, which will benefit all residents.

The Official Plan is intended to be of assistance to both community interests and public administrators. Through the Official Plan, private interests are informed of future development policies and as a result are encouraged to plan accordingly. Public administrators benefit by an enhanced ability to program future services that result in the most cost-effective delivery of those services.

Since the Official Plan sets the tone and direction for the entire city, it must be detailed enough to guide day-to-day decision making on land use, transportation and development matters yet general enough to allow for some flexibility.

The Official Plan is implemented through the use of zoning, site plan control, local improvement strategies and the use of more detailed secondary planning processes. It is, in effect, a blueprint of how a city wants to guide and direct future land use development.

If a proponent wishes to develop land differently than the Official Plan prescribes, they may make an application for an Official Plan Amendment. The Planning or Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee, City Council or the Ontario Municipal Board must approve any amendment to the Official Plan. The Planning Act has a provision whereby City Council must make a decision on any Official Plan Amendment application within 120 days of receipt of the application. If City Council does not make a decision within this timeframe, the applicant can appeal to the Ontario Municipal Board on the basis that a decision has not been made within this time period.

Official Plan Amendments can be citywide, area-wide or site-specific. Given the importance of an OPA and the impact a change in the Official Plan may have on a community, there is an extensive public consultation process that includes pre-consultation activities.

How to apply

If you believe you may need an Official Plan Amendment in order to carry out your proposed development, you should first meet with staff to determine if an amendment is in fact needed, if the proposed development is appropriate for the site, or if there is another way in which the development could be accomplished. This would also be a good opportunity to discuss with staff the policy direction within the Plan for the particular type of development. Pre-application consultation with City Staff is required

If it is determined that an amendment to the Official Plan is the only means available for accomplishing your development, you should submit the appropriate application form to a Client Service Centre and online.

What happens next

The application is processed by staff who will circulate it to City departments, the ward Councillor, community organizations and required public bodies for comments. A sign will be installed on the property briefly describing the proposal.

Once all comments have been received, the planner assigned to the application will prepare a report to Planning Committee and City Council with a recommendation to approve or refuse the Official Plan application. You may appear at the Planning Committee meeting to present your views, since this is a public meeting.

The recommendation of Planning Committee then proceeds to City Council. If Council approves the proposed amendment, it will pass a by-law which will be circulated to give interested parties the chance to appeal. A 20-day appeal period is provided for, once notice of Adoption of the By-law has been given. If no appeals are received by the end of the appeal period, the amendment becomes law.

Appeal

If Council refuses your application or neglects to make a timely decision, you may appeal to the Ontario Municipal Board. The Board will hold a hearing to decide on the amendment.

Other Approvals or Permits that may be required

Official Plan Amendment Process

The various steps and corresponding length of time required in the OPA process are illustrated in the following chart:

Calendar Days/Weeks Elapsed

Pre-application consultation with City Staff (Required)

Prior to filing Application

Pre-application consultation with Public (optional)

Prior to Filing Application

Milestone Step

Delegated Authority

Application Submission

Day 1

Application Deemed Complete

Day 6

Community "Heads Up" (if required)

Day 9

Circulation to Technical Agencies, Community Organizations and Ward Councillor

Day 14 (Week 2)

Posting of On-site Sign

Day 17 (Week 2.5)

End of Circulation Period

Day 45 (Week 6.5)

Community Information and Comment Session (CICS)

(add 2 weeks to all subsequent steps in the process)

End of Issue Resolution

Day 60 (Week 9)

Report Preparation

Day 68 (Week 10)

Report Sign-off by General Manager

Day 70 (Week 10)

Report Sign-off by Deputy City Manager

Day 77 (Week 11)

Committee Meeting Advertisement and Report Mail out to Public

Day 83 (Week 12)

Planning or Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee Meeting

Day 98 (Week 14)

City Council Review

Day 111 (Week 16)

Passage of By-law

Day 125 (Week 18)

Notice of Decision

Day 140 (Week 20)

End of Appeal Period

Day 160 (Week 23)

Further Information

This publication is intended to provide general information only. The original by-laws, acts, regulations and other relevant documents should be consulted for detailed reference. For more information please visit one of the Client Service Centres or call the City of Ottawa at 3-1-1.

Parkland contribution

The parkland contribution is land that must be conveyed or the equivalent value in cash that must be paid to the City as a condition of development or redevelopment of a property. The Planning Act provides that the City may require this conveyance or payment in order to ensure that adequate land or funds have been set aside for park and recreation purposes as the City grows.

City staff will determine if a parkland contribution applies to your proposed development when you apply for a development application. The amount of land that will be required for different categories of land use is established in the City’s Parkland By-law (2009-095).

Staff will determine the parkland contribution, based on the requirements of the Parkland By-law and information provided in your initial application. The City may determine at its own discretion, whether to request land or cash based on a number of factors. These factors include the type, density and location of the development, the amount of land required, the proximity of existing or planned open space in the community and the suitability of the land being developed for park purposes.

Once determined, the property owner must then either convey or agree to convey the land, if land is requested, or pay the money representing the value of the land that would otherwise be required. The City will undertake an appraisal of the land value where the City requires the money. The City will not be able to finalize any development application, or issue a building permit until the land is conveyed or the money in-lieu of the land is paid.

The Planning Act also provides mechanisms for landowners to initiate a review or appeal the amount of the parkland to be conveyed or the calculation of value of the land, where money in-lieu of land is to be paid to the City.

Plan of condominium

Application Tools

Under Ontario's Condominium Act (1998), applicants are required to obtain condominium approval for construction of all new condominium units in Ottawa. The Act permits the following types of condominiums: common elements condominium; standard condominium; phased condominium; vacant land condominium and leasehold condominiums. It is typically required for the conversion of rental developments to condominium as well.

Once an application for a Plan of Condominium has been submitted, the Planner will circulate it to City Departments, the Ward Councillor and required public bodies for their comments.

The planner will then prepare a Delegated Authority Report recommending draft plan approval with conditions. If the Ward Councillor or applicant do not concur with staff's recommendations/ conditions or Delegated Authority is lifted from staff, then a report to Planning Committee or the Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee would be required.

After all the conditions of draft plan approval have been met and where appropriate documented letters of clearance have been received, final approval can be given. The Condominium Plan and agreement can then be registered in the land titles/registry system.

How to apply

Before making an application, you should discuss your proposal with staff. Pre-application consultation with City staff is required for vacant land or common elements condominiums. Please review the Fee Schedule for the appropriate fee. Application forms are available at all Client Service Centres or online together with the requirements for submissions. It should be submitted at one of the City’s Client Service Centres with the required fee and any other information that may be needed to assess your application.

What happens next

When the Draft Plan approval is granted, there are usually a number of conditions to be met by the applicant prior to final approval and registration. Among the conditions is usually a requirement that the owner enter into a Condominium agreement with the City regarding matters such as the construction of roads, servicing and parkland dedication, if these have not been covered through a Site Plan Control process. Applicants may be required to provide a letter of credit in order for the City to ensure that all of the conditions are fulfilled if not already covered through a prior site plan approval. The responsibility for fulfilling the conditions of draft approval rests primarily with the developer, as does the timing involved.

Appeal

There is an appeal process prior to the issuance of draft approval. Also, the applicant may appeal the conditions of draft approval to the Ontario Municipal Board at any time before the plan receives final approval.

Other Approvals or Permits that may be required

  • Zoning By-law Amendment or Minor Variance - If proposed development does not conform to the Zoning By-law
  • Site Plan Control Applications - For commercial and industrial developments, for certain residential developments, for the establishment of parking lots, for certain changes in land use, and for any development in certain zones

Public Consultation vs. No Public Consultation

The following types of condominiums are not subject to public consultation:

  • Standard condominiums
  • Leasehold condominiums
  • Phased condominiums

The following types of condominiums are subject to public consultation:

  • Vacant land condominiums
  • Common elements condominiums

Plan of Condominium Approvals Process

The various steps and corresponding length of time required in the condominium approval processes are illustrated in the following chart.

Public Notification and Consultation

Calendar Days/Weeks Elapsed

Pre-application consultation with City staff (required for vacant land or common elements condominiums)

Prior to Filing Application

Pre-application consultation with Public (optional)

Prior to Filing Application

Milestone Step

Delegated Authority

Authority Withdrawn

Application Submission

Day 1

 

Application Deemed Complete

Day 6

 

Community "Heads Up" (if required)

Day 9

 

Circulation to Technical Agencies, Community Organizations and Ward Councillor

Day 14 (Week 2)

 

Posting of On-site Sign

Day 14 (Week 2)

 

End of Circulation Period
Preferred last day to withdraw delegated authority
(Issue Resolution)

Day 42 (Week 6)

Day 42 (Week 6)

Statutory Public Meeting

Day 63 (Week 9)

N/A

End of Issue Resolution

Day 77 (Week 11)

Day 63 (Week 9)

Report Preparation (Delegated Authority or Planning or Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee Report)

Day 86 (Week 12.5)

Day 63 (Week 9)

Report Sign Off by Manager

Day 87 (Week 7)

N/A

Report Sign Off by General Manager

N/A

Day 70 (Week 10))

Report Sign Off by Deputy Manager

N/A

Day 77 (Week 11)

Notification of Committee Meeting And Report Mail out to Public

N/A

Day 83 (Week 12)

Planning Committee Meeting

N/A

Day 98 (Week 14)

Notice of Decision

Day 102 (Week 14.5)

Day 113 (Week 16)

End of Appeal Period

Day 123 (Week 18)

Day 134 (Week 19)

No Public Notification or Consultation

Calendar Days/Weeks Elapsed

Pre-application consultation with Public and/or City staff (optional for standard leasehold or phased condominiums)

Prior to Filing Application

Milestone Step

Delegated Authority

Authority Withdrawn

Application Submission

Day 1

 

Application Deemed Complete

Day 6

 

Community "Heads Up" (if required)

N/A

 

Circulation to Technical Agencies, Community Organizations and Ward Councillor

Day 14 (Week 2)

 

Posting of On-site Sign

N/A

 

End of Circulation Period
Preferred last day to withdraw delegated authority
(Issue Resolution)

Day 28 (Week 4)

Day 28 (Week 4)

Community Information and Comment Session (CICS) (if required)

N/A

N/A

End of Issue Resolution

Day 35 (Week 5)

Day 43 (Week 6)

Report Preparation (Delegated Authority or Planning or Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee Report)

Day 42 (Week 6)

Day 51 (Week 7)

Report Sign Off by Program Manager

Day 49 (Week 7)

N/A

Report Sign Off by General Manager

N/A

Day 53 (Week 7.5)

Report Sign Off by Deputy City Manager

N/A

Day 60 (Week 8.5)

Notification of Committee Meeting And Report Mail out to Public

N/A

Day 67 (Week 9.5)

Planning or Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee Meeting

N/A

Day 82 (Week 12)

Notice of Decision

Day 64 (Week 9)

Day 96 (Week 14)

End of Appeal Period

Day 84 (Week 12)

Day 116 (Week 16.5)

Further Information

This publication is intended to provide general information only. The original by-laws, acts, regulations and other relevant documents should be consulted for detailed reference. For more information please visit one of the Client Service Centres or call the City of Ottawa at 3-1-1.

Plan of subdivision

Application Tools

A subdivision is a tract of land that has been divided into several building lots or blocks. These lots or blocks can be used for residential, industrial, commercial, institutional (e.g. school) or open space/parks depending on the designation of the land within the Official Plan and Zoning By-law. An approved plan of subdivision is required in order for the lots and blocks to be sold or conveyed separately. A registered plan of subdivision is a legal document that outlines all the details and conditions required to develop a parcel of land.

How to apply

Before making an application, you should discuss your proposal with staff. Pre-application consultation with City staff is required for new plans of subdivision. Please review the Fee Schedule for the appropriate fee. Application forms are available at Client Service Centres and online together with the requirements for submissions. It should be submitted at one of the City’s Client Service Centres with the required fee and any other information that may be needed to assess your application. You may also be required to complete some special studies (e.g. traffic, noise, servicing etc.) in support of your application.

What happens next

The application will be processed by staff, who will circulate it to City departments, the ward Councillor, community organizations and required public bodies for comments, as well as to all property owners within 120 metres of the subject site. A sign will be installed on the property, briefly describing the proposal. A Public Meeting must be held, usually in the community, to allow the public an opportunity to provide comments on the proposed plan of subdivision.

Once all comments have been reviewed, the assigned planner will then prepare a "Delegated Authority Report" recommending Draft Plan approval with conditions or refusal of the application. If the ward Councillor or applicant do not concur with staff's recommendations/conditions or Delegated Authority is lifted from staff, then a report to Planning Committee or the Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee would be required.

When Draft Plan Approval is granted, there are usually a number of conditions to be met by the applicant prior to final approval and registration of the plan of subdivision. Among the conditions there is usually a requirement that the owner enter into a subdivision agreement with the City regarding matters such as the construction of roads, servicing and parkland dedication. Applicants will be required to provide a letter of credit in order for the City to ensure that all of the conditions are fulfilled. The responsibility for fulfilling the conditions of draft approval rests primarily with the developer, as does the timing involved.

After all the conditions of Draft Plan Approval have been met and when appropriate documented letters of clearance have been received, final approval can be given. The Subdivision Plan and agreement can then be registered in the land titles/registry system.

Appeal

If the City fails to approve your plan, or you do not agree with the conditions which have been imposed, you may request that the case be referred to the Ontario Municipal Board. Others, such as the public or public bodies can appeal the decision as well.

Other Permits or Approvals that may be required

  • Official Plan Amendment - If proposed development of land does not conform to the Official Plan
  • Zoning By-law Amendment - If proposed development does not conform to the Zoning By-law.
  • Site Plan Control Applications - For most commercial and industrial development, for certain residential developments, for the establishment of parking lots, for certain changes in land use, and for any development in certain zones.

Draft Plan of Subdivision Approvals Process

The various steps and corresponding length of time required in the Plan of Subdivision processes are illustrated in the following chart:

     

Calendar Days/Weeks Elapsed

Pre-application consultation with City Staff (required)

Prior to Filing Application

Pre-application consultation with Public (optional)

Prior to Filing Application

Milestone Step

Delegated Authority

Authority Withdrawn

Application Submission

Day 1

 

Application Deemed Complete

Day 6

 

Community "Heads Up" (if required)

Day 9

 

Circulation to Technical Agencies, Community Organizations and Ward Councillor

Day 14 (Week 2)

 

Posting of On-site Sign

Day 17 (Week 2.5)

 

End of Circulation Period
Preferred last day to withdraw delegated authority
(Issue Resolution)

Day 45 (Week 6.5)

Day 45 (Week 6.5)

Statutory Public Meeting (in community)

Day 66 (Week 8.5)

N/A

Report Preparation (Delegated Authority or Planning or Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee PC/ARAC)

Day 80 (Week 11.5)

Day 68 (Week 10)

Report Sign off by Program Manager

Day 87 (Week 12.5)

N/A

Report Sign off by General Manager

N/A

Day 70 (Week 10)

Report Sign-off by Deputy City Manager

N/A

Day 77 (Week 11)

Statutory Public Meeting Notice (at PEC/ARAC)

N/A

Day 83 (Week 12)

Planning or Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee Meeting

N/A

Day 98 (Week 14)

Notice of Decision

Day 102 (Week 14.5)

Day 112 (Week 16)

End of Appeal Period

Day 122 (Week 17.5)

Day 132 (Week 19)

Further Information

This information is intended for general use only. The original by-laws, acts, regulations and other relevant documents should be consulted for detailed reference. For more information please visit one of the Client Service Centres or call the City of Ottawa at 3-1-1.

Pre-application Consultation

Application Tools

A Pre-Application Consultation fee applies to all applications where pre-application consultation is mandatory.  There is no fee for applications where pre-application consultation is not mandatory.

The fee will be applied to the following application types:

  • Official Plan Amendment
  • Major Zoning By-law Amendment
  • Site Plan Control subject to public consultation
  • Plan of Condominium subject to public consultation
  • Plan of Subdivision
  • Municipal Concurrence and Public Consultation Process for Antenna Systems.

A formal application is required to initiate a mandatory Pre-Application Consultation.  The fee is $500.00 not subject to HST.

This fee is fully refundable upon receipt of a development application for the same lands for which the pre-application consultation occurred, provided that the development application is received within (12) twelve months of the date of the submission of the pre-application consultation.

The fee is non-refundable if no development application is submitted within 12 (twelve) months from the date that the pre-application consultation form was submitted.  

Site Plan Control

Application Tools

The Planning Act is the law that allows the City to pass a site plan control by-law. The site plan control by-law is a legal document that sets out whether development can proceed with or without site plan approval. 

The site plan control process allows the City to influence land development so that it is safe, functional and orderly. It is also used to ensure that the development standards approved by the City and other agencies are implemented and maintained.  

To determine if a proposal qualifies for site plan approval, staff complete a comprehensive review of plans and studies submitted with the site plan control application. Technical agencies, ward councillors and the public all inform staff’s decision to approve, modify or refuse an application for site plan control. 

Building location, landscape treatment, pedestrian access, drainage control and parking layout are a few of the items addressed during review.

Determining if Site Plan Approval is required

Consult the Site Plan Control By-law to determine if a development is exempt from approval. In accordance with the By-law, a development that is exempt may be required to obtain site plan approval if required by the Planning and Growth Management Department. To confirm that site plan approval is not required telephone 3-1-1 to speak with a Development Information Officer. If approval is required a building permit cannot be issued until it is granted.

In general, the following developments may be exempt from approval if the property location, land use and parking count comply with the Site Plan Control By-law.

  • A residential building that is directly accessed from a public road and contains no more than three principal dwelling units. To qualify for a townhouse exemption the lots must be legally subdivided.
  • A non-residential building that is no more than 300 square metres in gross floor area, if there is no existing site plan agreement.
  • An accessory building if the cumulative total size of all accessory buildings on the property is no more than 300 square metres in gross floor area.
  • An outdoor commercial patio.
  • An agricultural use.
  • A building containing more than three dwelling units may be expanded by 30 percent in gross floor area if the addition does not exceed 300 square meters. Additional dwelling and rooming units are not permitted without site plan approval.
  • A non-residential building may be expanded by 30 percent in gross floor area if the addition does not exceed 600 square metres.
  • Most non-residential conversions.
  • Minor changes to an approved site plan if permission from the City is granted.
  • Parking lot expansions in support of an addition or change in use.

New Requirements for Site Plan Control in Sandy Hill

Development pressure has occurred in recent years in Sandy Hill as a result of the demand for student accommodation.  This has lead to the conversion of properties in a manner inconsistent with the existing public realm.

As a result, Sandy Hill has been designated as a Special Site Plan Control Area through an amendment to the City’s Site Plan Control By-law.

Site Plan Control is now applicable to the following:

  1. A residential use building that contains a detached dwelling, linked detached dwelling, semi-detached dwelling, duplex, three unit dwelling, group home, a freehold townhouse containing no more than three dwelling units and where each of those dwelling units are on a separate conveyable lot or a rooming house with a maximum of six rooming units and no dwelling units;
  2. Residential development that constitutes an addition to the land uses listed above;
  3. Development that introduces one or more additional dwelling units to those land uses listed above
  4. Development that introduces one or more additional rooming units to those land uses listed above.

Review Time Frame

There is no public consultation associated with this process.  Site Plan Control is delegated under authority to staff, with sign-off by the General Manager, Planning, Infrastructure and Economic Development.  The decision timeline is 42 days.  Delegated authority can be withdrawn by the Ward Councillor.

Fees

For any residential building that is proposed to contain three or fewer dwelling units, or fewer than six rooming units, the following fees apply to any new construction or addition to the gross floor area of the building:

Any alteration to the front, corner side or other street facing façade

$500

The creation of any new dwelling units where the resulting count does not exceed three dwelling units

$500 per additional dwelling unit (maximum fee $1,500)

The creation of new rooming units where the resulting count does not exceed six rooming units

$500 per two additional rooming units (maximum fee $1,500)

Where the addition or new construction results in a building of 275 square metres gross floor area or less

$0

Where the addition or new construction results in a building of greater than 275 square metres gross floor area, but not more than 350 square metres gross floor area

$500

Where the addition or new construction results in a building of greater than 350 Square metres gross floor area

$2,500

If the building is designated under Part IV or V of the Ontario Heritage Act, then there is no charge for alteration to the front, corner side or other street-facing façade.   

The requirement for Site Plan Control in this area of Sandy Hill can be waived by the General Manager, Planning, Infrastructure and Economic Development or the Chief Development Review Services, with the concurrence of the Ward Councillor.

In general the purposes of the site plan control in these cases is limited to review of design and elevations, where exterior changes are proposed, the location and layout for on-site parking, landscaping, grading and drainage, and waste management. The required information and documentation with respect to a site plan for these purposes are as follows:

The information set forth in Subsections 9(3) to (10) inclusive of By-law 2014-256, as amended.

The information required to address the Planning Act, paragraph 41(7)(a)(7) and:

  1. A one-page planning rationale providing a summary of the nature and intent of the proposed development or redevelopment;
  2. A site plan showing site layout, the location of the building and all its entrances, details of landscaping, and the layout/location of any on-site motor vehicle and bicycle parking;
  3. In the case of additions resulting in buildings of 275 square metres gross floor area and greater, a grading and drainage plan prepared by a certified professional engineer licensed to work in Ontario;
  4. Elevation drawings and three-dimensional colour renderings (at a scale of 1:50) of the building before (in the case of redevelopment or additions) and after development or redevelopment;
  5. Details on cladding materials, windows, and other architectural elements proposed or, in the case of an existing building proposed to be modified, details on how these materials are being changed or replaced;
  6. Floor plans of each floor of the building showing the use of all space, consistent with Building Permit application, including all rooms with their intended purpose, vaults, central storage and collection areas and other facilities and enclosures for the storage of garbage and other waste material.

Note that this process does not exempt any development that would otherwise be subject to the full Site Plan Control process and fees.

Should you have any questions, please contact Simon Deiaco, Program Manager, Development Review Urban Services Unit, at 613-580-2424, ext. 15641 or simon.deiaco@ottawa.ca.

Public Notification and Consultation

Certain site plan proposals are subject to the City's public notification and consultation process. A large sign summarizing the proposal is placed on the property to notify the public that an application has been received. Registered community organizations enrolled with the City are also given notice when a site plan proposal is received in their neighbourhood.

Detailed information about proposals that require public notification and consultation, including a copy of the site plan is available online. Any person who wishes to provide comments to staff for consideration may do so within the designated comment period. Refer to the review status online to determine if the comment period for an application is in progress. To submit comments to staff, select the application number from the list of results. An option to send comment is located on the details page under the heading, File Lead.

If there is significant interest in a proposal a community information and comment session may be held.
In general, the following site plan proposals are subject to public notification and consultation.

  • New residential buildings containing five or more dwelling units.
  • New buildings with a gross floor area of 350 square metres or more, other than a building containing only a Medical Marihuana Production Facility.
  • Additions that expand the gross floor area of a building by more than fifty per cent, excluding a building containing only a Medical Marihuana Production Facility, a residential building containing less than five dwelling units, or a building that after the addition is less than 350 square metres in gross floor area.
  • A change in use that results in the construction of more than 10 new parking spaces, or a drive-through.

Key Steps in the Site Plan Control Approval Process

  • Applicant arranges a pre-application consultation meeting with City staff. Meeting is mandatory if the proposal is subject to public notification and consultation.
  • Applicant submits a complete application with studies, plans and fees to a Client Service Centre. Study, plan and fee requirements are outlined during pre-application consultation. Refer to the City's Guide to Preparing Studies and Plans for information on preparing these requirements.
  • A file lead is assigned to manage the review of the application. Details about the proposal are sent to technical agencies, public bodies and the ward councillor for consideration.
  • After the comment period ends the file lead discusses the outcomes of consultation with the applicant. Any modifications to the proposal are updated on the plans submitted to the City for approval.
  • Approval of Site Plan Control applications is delegated to City staff by Council. Councillors have the authority to withdraw this delegated authority. In these instances, the application will be placed before either the Planning Committee or the Agricultural and Rural Affairs Committee for a decision. If the applicant disagrees with the conditions of approval, they may file an appeal to the Ontario Municipal Board.
  • In accordance with the Site Plan Control By-law, the applicant enters into an agreement or undertaking with the City. The applicant has up to six months from the date of approval to sign a Letter of Undertaking and up to one year to enter into a Site Plan Agreement.
  • As part of the Agreement the applicant provides a development cost estimate to the City so that financial securities can be calculated. Securities are held by the City to ensure that construction is completed in accordance with the approved Site Plan. The applicant provides the City with the required securities in the form of a bank issued letter of credit. The applicant also supplies a certificate of insurance to protect staff completing work on private property.
  • After construction is complete, the development is inspected by staff for compliance. Securities are released if the built project complies with the approved plans. 

Agreements

Agreements are registered on title and remain in effect for the lifetime of the development. A request to release an agreement may be considered if all conditions of the approval have been met. A non-residential agreement must remain on title for at least five years after the release of all financial securities.

Application Fees

Refer to the site plan control fees or telephone 3-1-1 to speak with a Development Information Officer.

Additional Permits and Approvals that may be required

The following permits and approvals are subject to additional fees.

  • Zoning By-law Amendment or Minor Variances - If proposed development does not conform to the Zoning By-law.
  • Heritage Permit - If property is located in a designated Heritage Conservation District.
  • Building Permit - Required for most construction.
  • Private Road Naming application - Required when there is a road under private ownership that provides vehicular access to units that are addressed from the private road. Effective May 1, 2014, the fee for a Private Road Naming application is reduced for an application submitted on the same day and for the same lands as a Site Plan Control application.
  • Road Cut Permit - Required prior to cutting into a road allowance.
  • Water Permit
  • Sewer Connection Permit - If sewer connections or sewer works are proposed.
  • Encroachment Agreement - If the proposal encroaches onto a municipal road allowance.
  • Urban Tree Conservation By-law - If the proposal requires the removal of trees in the urban area.
  • Ministry of Environment Approvals - If the proposal requires a Permit to Take Water, Sewage Works and/or Operating Approvals.
  • Conservation Authority Approvals - If the proposal is adjacent to a significant wetland, floodplain, unstable slope or other natural hazard, or if an alteration to a watercourse is proposed.
  • Ministry of Natural Resources - If the site contains endangered species or habitat, or if the property is adjacent to a watercourse or other land subject to the Public Lands Act.
  • Department of Fisheries and Oceans - If the proposal impacts fish or fish habitat.

Timelines for Processing an Application

Public Consultation
Calendar Days/Weeks Elapsed
Pre-Consultation with City staff (required) Prior to Filing Application
Pre-Consultation with Public (optional) Prior to Filing Application
Milestone Step Delegated Authority Authority Withdrawn
Application Submission Day 1  
Application Reviewed for Adequacy Day 6  
Community "Heads Up" (if required) Day 9  
Circulation to Technical Agencies, Public Bodies, Community Organizations and Ward Councillor Day 14 (Week 2)  
Posting of On-site Sign Day 17 (Week 2.5)  
End of Circulation Period Day 45 (Week 5.5) Day 45 (Week 5.5)
Preferred last day to withdraw delegated authority
Community Information and Comment Session (CICS) If Required (add two weeks to all subsequent steps) (add two weeks to all subsequent steps)
End of Issue Resolution Day 60 (Week 8.5) Day 60 (Week 8.5)
Report Preparation (Delegated Authority or Planning or Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee) Day 67 (Week 9.5) Day 68 (Week 9.5)
Report Sign-off by Manager Day 74 (Week 10.5) N/A
Report Sign-off by General Manager N/A Day 70 (Week 10)
Report Sign-off by Deputy City Manager N/A Day 77 (Week 11)
Notification of Committee Meeting and Report Mail out to Public N/A Day 83 (Week 12)
Planning or Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee Meeting (Review/Decision) N/A Day 98 (Week 14)
No Public Consultation
Calendar Days/Weeks Elapsed
Pre-application consultation with Public and/or City staff (optional) Prior to Filing Application
Milestone Step Delegated Authority Authority Withdrawn
Application Submission Day 1  
Application Reviewed for Adequacy Day 6  
Circulation to Technical Agencies and Ward Councillor Day 14 (Week 2)  
End of Circulation Period Day 28 (Week 4) Day 28 (Week 4)
Preferred last day to withdraw delegated authority
End of Issue Resolution Day 35 (Week 5) Day 43 (Week 6)
Report Preparation (Delegated Authority or Planning or Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee) Day 40 (Week 6) Day 51 (Week 7)
Report Sign-off by Staff or Manager Day 42 (Week 6) N/A
Report Sign-off by General Manager N/A Day 53 (Week 7.5)
Report Sign-off by Deputy City Manager N/A Day 60 (Week 8.5)
Notification of Committee Meeting and Report Mail out to Public N/A Day 67 (Week 9.5)
Planning or Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee Meeting N/A Day 82 (Week 12)

Street or lane closing or opening

Application Tools

Occasionally, the City receives a request to close a public lane or street, and to deed the land to abutting property owners. While these lanes or roads are shown on a registered Plan of Subdivision, they often have not been maintained by the City. Although still legally "open", they may be overgrown with trees and encroached upon by gardens, fences and garages. In other cases, the lane or road is open and closing it would deny access to some properties. Council has adopted an Urban Lanes Management Policy that contains the criteria that guide staff in responding to lane closing applications. This policy is available at ottawa.ca/lanes. Prior to applying for a lane closing, this policy should be reviewed, and any questions with respect to the interpretation of the policy can be addressed to lanes@ottawa.ca.


Once an application is received it is evaluated based on the criteria on Retention or Divestment contained in the Urban Lanes Management Policy. Applications for lanes that are candidates for divestment are circulated to City Departments, the Ward Councillor, Community Organizations, affected agencies, and abutting owners. If the decision is to approve the closure, City Council will pass a By-law.

In the event that a lane or street is closed, the land will remain under the ownership of the City. Once the road closing application is approved, the City may decide to sell the lands at a price to be determined by City Council (usually market value).

For road closures the applicant must provide all necessary documentation and any money owing to the Legal Services Branch prior to the conveyance of lands for a road closing. A by-law must be prepared and passed by Council. (An application can also be made to open a public street or lane.)

How to apply

Before making an application, you should discuss your proposal with staff. Please review the Fee Schedule for the appropriate fee. Application forms are available at Client Service Centres and online together with the requirements for submissions. It should be submitted at one of the City’s Client Service Centres with the required fee and any other information that may be needed to assess your application.

If the closing affects any neighbours, you may want to approach them in order to submit a joint application to minimize objections and reduce costs for surveys and legal services.

Appeal

If the City refuses your application to close or open a lane or street, there is usually no right to appeal, since the City has jurisdiction over its own lands.

Road Closure and Conveyance Process

The various steps and corresponding length of time required in the Road Closure and Opening process are illustrated in the following chart:

Calendar Days/Weeks Elapsed

Pre-Consultation with Public (optional)

Prior to Filing Application

Milestone Step

Delegated Authority

Application Submission

Day 1

Application Reviewed for Adequacy

Day 6

Community "Heads Up" (if required)

Day 9

Circulation to Technical Agencies, Community Organizations and Ward Councillor

Day 14 (Week 2)

Posting of On-Site Sign (if travelled road)

Day 17 (Week 2.5)

End of Comment Period

Day 45 (Week 6.5)

Community Information and Comment Session (CICS) if required

(add two weeks to all subsequent steps)

Issue Resolution

Day 52 (Week 7.5)

Report Preparation (Delegated Authority)

Day 59 (Week 8.5)

Report Sign off by Program Manager

Day 61 (Week 9)

Advertisement of Notice of Intent to Close Road (Planning or Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee - Consider Objections to Closure if any)

Day 65 to 100 (Week 9 to 14)

Finance and Economic Development Committee (Establish Price)

Day 98 (Week 14)

City Council

Day 106 (Week 15)

By-Law Passed by Council

Day 117 (Week 17)

Further Information

This information is intended for general use only. The original by-laws, acts, regulations and other relevant documents should be consulted for detailed reference. For more information please visit one of the Client Service Centres or call the City of Ottawa at 311.

Zoning By-law amendment

Application Tools

The Official Plan outlines in a broad manner the land use and development guidelines within Ottawa. A Zoning By-law, on the other hand, outlines how a specific parcel of land may be used. Zoning By-laws also regulate lot size, parking requirements, building height and other site-specific factors.

If an applicant wishes to develop a property in a manner that deviates from the current zoning provisions, they must apply for a Zoning By-law Amendment; also referred to as a rezoning. For example, a change of use from residential to commercial would require a Zoning By-law Amendment. The Planning Committee or the Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee and then City Council must approve any amendment to the Zoning By-law, which is subject to an appeal process.

There are four types of Zoning By-law Amendments in the normal process – a major rezoning, a minor rezoning, one that arises from the severance of a surplus farm dwelling and an extension of a temporary use by-law for a garden suite. A Minor Zoning Amendment only applies to the following:

  • Modifications to performance regulations only (not adding a new use to the zone, but only requesting a change to regulations such as height, floor space index, density, yards etc.)
  • Extension of a zoning boundary to reflect addition of lands to existing property
  • Establishment of a temporary garden suite or a group home (request that this use be permitted)
  • Lifting of interim control for one use only

Sometimes a property owner only wants to make a minor deviation to the Zoning By-law provision such as a building setback or height restriction requirements. Owners who want to have minor changes to the use of their property that differ only slightly from Zoning By-law provisions can instead apply to the Committee of Adjustment for what is known as a minor variance.

In some cases, changes to By-laws result in developed properties losing their former conformance with zoning regulations. In this case, if the owner had legally used their property or if they had obtained a construction permit before the Zoning By-law changed, they may have "non-conforming rights" to use the land as they had before the new zoning came into affect. However, the Committee of Adjustment must approve any change to or expansion of such use.

How to apply

Before making an application, you should discuss your proposal with staff. Pre-application consultation with City staff for major zoning amendments is required. Please review the Fee Schedule for the appropriate fee. Application forms are available at all Client Service Centres or online together with the requirements for submissions. It should be submitted at one of the City’s Client Service Centres with the required fee and any other information that may be needed to assess your application.

What Happens Next

The application will be processed by staff who will circulate it to City departments, the ward Councillor, community organizations and required public bodies for comments, as well as to all property owners within 120 metres of the subject site. A sign will be installed on the property briefly describing the proposal.

Once all comments have been received, the planner assigned to the application will prepare a report to Planning Committee or the Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee and City Council with a recommendation to approve or refuse the rezoning application. You may appear at the Planning Committee meeting to present your views, since this is a public meeting.

The recommendation of Committee then proceeds to City Council. If Council approves the proposed amendment, it will pass a by-law which will be circulated to give interested parties the chance to appeal. A 20-day appeal period is provided for, once notice of Adoption of the By-law has been given. If no appeals are received by the end of the appeal period, the amendment is in full force and effect.

Appeal

If Council refuses your application or neglects to make a timely decision, you may appeal to the Ontario Municipal Board. The Board may hold a Hearing to decide on the amendment.

Other Permits or Approvals that may be required

  • Official Plan Amendment - If proposed use of land does not conform to the Official Plan.
  • Heritage Approval - If property is located in a Heritage Conservation District.
  • Site Plan Control Applications - For most commercial and industrial developments, for certain residential developments, for the establishment of parking lots, for certain changes in land use, and for any development in certain zones.
  • Building Permit - Required for most construction.
Zoning By-law Amendment Process

The various steps and corresponding length of time required in the Zoning By-law Amendment process are illustrated in the following chart:

   

Calendar Days/Weeks Elapsed

Pre-application consultation with City staff (required)

Prior to Filing Application

Pre-application consultation with Public (optional)

Prior to Filing Application

Milestone Step

Delegated Authority

Application Submission

Day 1

Application Deemed Complete

Day 6

Community "Heads Up" (if required)

Day 9

Circulation to Technical Agencies, Community Organizations and Ward Councillor

Day 14 (Week 2)

Posting of On-site Sign

Day 17 (Week 2.5)

End of Circulation Period

Day 45 (Week 6.5)

Community Information and Comment Session (CICS)

(add 2 weeks to all subsequent steps in the process)

End of Issue Resolution

Day 60 (Week 9)

Report Preparation

Day 68 (Week 10)

Report Sign-off by General Manager

Day 70 (Week 10)

Report Sign-off by Deputy City Manager

Day 77 (Week 11)

Committee Meeting Advertisement and Report Mail out to Public

Day 83 (Week 12)

Planning or Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee Meeting

Day 98 (Week 14)

City Council Review/Passage of By-Law

Day 111 (Week 16)

Notice of Decision

Day 126 (Week 18)

End of Appeal Period

Day 146 (Week 21)

Zoning By-law Amendment Related to Severance of Surplus Farm Dwelling Process or
Extension of Temporary Use By-law for Garden Suite Process

The various steps and corresponding length of time required for zoning amendments related to the severance of surplus farm dwellings or the extension of temporary use by-laws for garden suites are illustrated in the following chart:

   

Calendar Days/Weeks Elapsed

Pre-Consultation with Public and/or City staff (optional)

Prior to Filing Application

Milestone Step

Delegated Authority

Application Submission

Day 1

Application Deemed Complete

Day 6

Community "Heads Up" (if required)

Day 9

Circulation to Technical Agencies, Community Organizations and Ward Councillor

Day 14 (Week 2)

Posting of On-site Sign

Day 14 (Week 2)

End of Circulation Period

Day 28 (Week 4)

Community Information and Comment Session (CICS)

(add 2 weeks to all subsequent steps in the process)

End of Issue Resolution

Day 34 (Week 5)

Report Preparation

Day 37 (Week 6)

Report Sign-off by General Manager

Day 39 (Week 6)

Report Sign-off by Deputy City Manager

Day 49 (Week 7)

Committee Meeting Advertisement and Report Mail out to Public

Day 50 (Week 8)

Planning or Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee Meeting

Day 60 (Week 8)

City Council Review/Passage of By-Law

Day 75 (Week 11)

Notice of Decision

Day 85 (Week 12)

End of Appeal Period

Day 105 (Week 14)

Further Information

This information is intended for general use only. The original by-laws, acts, regulations and other relevant documents should be consulted for detailed reference. For more information please visit one of the Client Service Centres or call the City of Ottawa at 3-1-1.