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Baseline Road Rapid Transit Corridor (Bayshore Station to Heron Station) Planning and Environmental Assessment Study

The study title was changed from the Baseline Transit Intensive Corridor to reflect the Bus Rapid Transit designation in the City's 2013 TMP

Open House #2 - Tuesday, November 20th, 2012

Bayshore Station to Prince of Wales Drive
Planning and Environmental Assessment Study
Second Open House

Tuesday, November 20th, 2012
Ben Franklin Place (The Chamber)
101 Centrepointe Drive, Nepean
Transit Access: Approximately 300 metre walk from Baseline Station
6:30 to 9 p.m., presentation: 7:30 p.m.

The City of Ottawa is undertaking a planning and environmental assessment study for the proposed Baseline Road Transit Intensive Corridor (BTIC). The BTIC is a component of the City’s growth management strategy, which aims at increasing transit modal share by providing a high quality city wide transit service. The City’s current Transportation Master Plan (TMP) identifies Baseline Road as a future Transit Intensive Corridor between Richmond Road and Prince of Wales Drive, with connections to Bayshore and Baseline Transitway Stations. This study will consider alternative options and designs for transit improvements and result in the expansion and improvement of the City’s transit network.

Study Area

The Study Area stretches between Bayshore Station and Prince of Wales Drive and includes the area around Bayshore Station and Baseline Station. It highlights consideration of the roles and functions of Bayshore and Baseline Stations as transfer points.

Consultation

There will be on-going public consultation activities during the course of the study, including Open House events.

This second Open House will provide an overview of study progress to-date, including the evaluation of alternative corridor alignments and an overview of design alternatives which will be considered. Your participation during the course of the study is important.

The study is being undertaken in accordance with the transit project assessment process as prescribed in Ontario Regulation 231/08, Transit Projects. The Project Environmental Assessment phase will be initiated after completion of the Project Planning Phase. Information on the BTIC study is available on the City’s project web site at: ottawa.ca/baselinecorridor.

In addition, you can send comments by e-mail, regular mail or fax using the following contact information:

Jabbar Siddique, P. Eng.
Senior Project Engineer
110 Laurier Avenue West, 4th Floor
613-580-2424, ext. 13914
Fax: 613-580-2578
E-mail:Jabbar.Siddique@ottawa.ca

Open House No. 2 - Display Boards

Welcome

Welcome to the second Public Open House and Presentation for the Baseline Road Transit Intensive Corridor: Bayshore Station to Prince of Wales Drive (BTIC) Planning and Environmental Study.

This Public Open House and meeting is one of several opportunities for public involvement during the study.
The project study team is here tonight to discuss the planning work that has occurred to date. The project study team is comprised of:

  • The City of Ottawa (Planning and Growth Management, Public
  • Works and Transit Services Departments)
  • A multi-disciplinary consulting team, led by Delcan Corporation,
  • with the assistance of:
  • Joint Venture of Griffiths Rankin Cook Architects and
  • David S. McRobie Architects
  • James B. Lennox & Associates Landscape Architects
  • Golder Associates
  • Gradient Micro Climate Engineering
  • Altus Group
  • Muncaster Environmental Planning

Welcome [ PDF - 334 KB ]

What we expect from you tonight

We are also seeking your comments on the work undertaken to date:

  • Planning and design principles
  • Alternative corridor alignments
  • Preliminary corridor evaluation
  • Alternative design options

Please identify any issues and concerns that you would like to see addressed during the study.
Your views and contributions are important to the success of this project!

Comments can also be submitted by email to Jabbar.Siddique@ottawa.ca.
 

?What we expect from you tonight [ PDF - 54 KB ]

Study overview

Ottawa's Transportation Master Plan (TMP) identifies a network of inter-linked transit corridors comprised of primary rapid transit corridors, transit intensive corridors and transit priority corridors. Baseline Road is identified in the TMP as a transit intensive corridor between Richmond Road and Prince of Wales Drive, with connections to the Bayshore and Baseline Transitway Stations. Transit intensive corridors link to the primary rapid transit corridors and support all-day dedicated transit facilities.

The primary goals of this study are to:

  • Complete a planning study to determine the preferred design for a transit intensive corridor that will support the urban development and land use objectives identified in the Official Plan and Community Design Plans, as well as the TMP mode split targets, and relevant provincial, NCC and federal plans, strategies and policies
  • Address federal and provincial EA requirements and document the project's impacts on the environment, including the necessary mitigation to offset any negative impacts

Study overview [ PDF - 239 KB ]

Study process

The City of Ottawa is proceeding with the preparation of a Planning and Environmental Assessment (EA) Study for the Baseline Road Transit Intensive Corridor. This project will result in the expansion and improvement of its transit network to accommodate existing and future travel demand, as outlined in the City's Transportation Master Plan.

The Study will follow a two-step process:

  • A Planning and Functional Design Phase (underway) to determine corridor alignment alternatives, station locations and transit priority measures
  • An Environmental Assessment Phase to meet the requirements of the provincial Transit Project Assessment Process.

At the end of the Planning Phase, the study findings will be presented to the City's Transportation Committee, and to City Council before the environmental assessment phase is initiated.

  • Data Collection
  • Generate and Evaluate alternative designs (alternative method)
  • Undetake technical studies to understand potential impacts and develop mitigation measures
  • Prepare draft reports

Notice of Commencement

Consultation on draft Environmental Project Report (EPR) which describes, Potential Impacts, Proposed Mitigation / Monitoring Measures and Alternatives: 120 days

Notice of Completion

Review of the Environmental Project Report: 30 days

Ministers Review: 35 days 

Statement of Completion

Pre-Planning and Consultation

Ontario Transit Project Assessment Process (6 months)

Study process [ PDF - 110 KB ]

Study progress

Information presented at the first Public Open House in April, 2012 included:

  • Existing conditions information for the study area:
    • Human environment features such as traffic and transit volumes, land use, heritage resources and municipal infrastructure
    • Natural environment features such as watercourses, vegetation, soils
  • Need and Justification for the project:
    • Official Plan direction for land use and growth
    • Transportation Master Plan network and modal split objective
  • Preliminary corridor alignment alternatives:
    • Alternative alignments in the western and central parts of the study area to provide connections to Bayshore Shopping Centre, Queensway-Carleton Hospital and through the Algonquin College/Centrepointe Town Centre areas
  • Potential design concepts being considered:
    • Transit priority measures
    • Other considerations

Feedback received on the study to-date has focused on the following areas:

  • Preliminary corridor alignments:
    • Particularly in the areas of Queensway-Carleton Hospital, Bayshore, and Centrepointe/Algonquin College
  • Property impacts:
    • Including access and potential for expropriation
  • Project implementation:
    • Timing of short and long-term transit improvements
  • Impacts to traffic, pedestrians and cyclists:
    • What trade-offs are required to address competing needs??

Study progress [ PDF - 55 KB ]

Study schedule

Study schedule [ PDF - 118 KB ]

Consultation

Effective consultation will play a key role in the success of this project. The City has created three separate Consultation Groups representing various agency, business and public stakeholders, to provide direct input
and feedback during the course of the study.

Consultation with the following groups is occurring throughout the study:

Agency Consultation Group (ACG), comprised of representatives from federal, provincial, municipal and other approval authorities and agencies.

Business Consultation Group (BCG), comprised of representatives from local businesses, business associations and institutions.

Public Consultation Group (PCG), comprised of representatives from city councillors, community associations and special interest groups.

General Public

The General Public will have the opportunity to build awareness, knowledge and understanding of the study through:

  • Public Open Houses and Presentations (4)
  • Media Coverage
  • Newspaper Notices
  • Study Reports
  • Comment-Questionnaires
  • Written Submissions
  • Study Website and Email

Additional Opportunities for input include:

City of Ottawa Transportation Committee
  • Interim reports and final study recommendations will be presented to Transportation Committee, and City Council, for approval
  • An opportunity for public input is provided at the Committee meeting

National Capital Commission
The study will be presented to the National Capital Commission to obtain input from:

  • Executive Management Committee (EMC)
  • Advisory Committee on Planning, Design and Realty (ACPDR)

Consultation [ PDF - 60 KB ]

Planning and Design Principles

  • Planning and design principles have been identified to guide the development and evaluation of alternative corridors and designs
  • The principles enable a shared understanding by all stakeholders of the project and its expectations, especially where trade-offs may need to be made in order to address competing needs
  • The planning and design principles and their associated criteria are:
    • Increase transit ridership, mobility and access
    • Support a sustainable transportation system
    • Compatibility with adjacent communities
    • Connect regional facilities and support lands designated for development
    • Protect, improve and restore the natural environment
    • Protect historical, cultural and archaeological resources
    • Provide a wise public investment

Planning and Design Principles [ PDF - 133 KB ]

Potential corridor alignments and evaluation

Overview

  • For most of its length, the Baseline Road Transit Intensive Corridor will be located within existing road rights-of-way
  • In some locations, widening of these rights-of-way will be required to provide new transit infrastructure while accommodating the needs of general traffic, pedestrians and cyclists
  • Alternative alignments in the western and central parts of the study area to provide connections to Bayshore Shopping Centre, Queensway-Carleton Hospital, and through the Algonquin College/Centrepointe Town Centre areas have been developed and evaluated
  • Future stages of the study will consider and evaluate alternative designs within the preferred corridor

Evaluation

  • Evaluation criteria and indicators were developed based on the planning and design principles
  • In some locations, further work is required to confirm a preferred corridor, and multiple options may be carried forward to address short and long-term needs

Potential corridor alignments and evaluation [ PDF - 481 KB ]

Bayshore Alternatives

Option 1 – Holly Acres

  • On-street along Holly Acres Road between Richmond Road and Highway 417, using the existing transit only roadway to access Bayshore Station
  • Provides for inbound and outbound movement of buses
  • Dedicated transit lanes provided by widening of Holly Acres Road or reallocation of existing lanes from general purpose traffic
  • Tie-in with planned Highway 417 on-ramp changes

Option 2 – Richmond /Bayshore

  • On-street along Richmond Road and Bayshore Drive, using the northern portion of Woodridge Crescent to access Bayshore Station
  • Inbound and outbound bus movements may need to take different routings due to existing intersection geometry/physical barriers
  • Dedicated transit lanes on Richmond Road only, through widening or reallocation of lanes. Buses would run in mixed traffic on Woodridge Crescent

Option 3 – Richmond/Transitway

  • On-street along Richmond Road, with a new eastbound bus-only connection to the West Transitway to provide access to Bayshore Station
  • Can accommodate inbound bus movements only. Outbound buses from Bayshore Station would use either Holly Acres Road or Woodridge Crescent/ Bayshore Drive
  • Additional ramp connections to/from Richmond Road may enhance bus access to/from Bayshore Station for other bus routes
  • In long-term, conversion of West Transitway to LRT would be in conflict with this option?

Bayshore Alternatives [ PDF - 386 KB ]

Bayshore - Evaluation

Principle

Option 1: 
Holly Acres

Option 2:
Richmond/
Bayshore

Option 3:
Richmond/
Transitway

Increase transit ridership, mobility and access

4.25

1.50

3.63

Support a sustainable  transportation system

4.40

1.40

2.20

Be compatible with adjacent communities

4.00

2.40

4.40

Connect regional facilities and support lands designated for development

No difference

No difference

No difference

Protect, improve and restore the natural environment

4.71

4.14

4.21

Protect historical, cultural and archaeological resources

4.00

3.00

5.00

Provide a wise investment

4.20

4.60

4.00

Total

25.56

17.04

23.44

Carried Forward

Yes

 

Yes

Least Preferred: 1-1.9
Most Preferred: 5

  • Holly Acres and Richmond/Transitway options are proposed to be carried forward for further consideration as part of the alternative design stage of the study
  • Recommended Plan may include elements of both options to address short and long-term requirements

Bayshore - Evaluation [ PDF - 72 KB ]

Queensway-Carleton Hospital Alternatives

Option 1 – Ring Road

  • Uses existing hospital ring road (John Sutherland Drive) between Richmond Road and Baseline Road, following route of existing bus service
  • Dedicated transit lanes would not be provided, resulting in slower transit trips
  • Transit priority may be provided at intersections with Richmond Road and Baseline Road
  • Requires continued agreement with hospital to run on private property

Option 2 – East of Hospital

  • Uses a new transit only road which would be built east of the hospital between Baseline and Richmond Roads
  • Provides for faster transit trips but does not serve hospital effectively
  • Requires NCC land and loss of existing greenspace adjacent to residential community
  • Connections to Baseline Road and Richmond Road challenging due to intersection geometry and spacing

Option 3 – Baseline/Richmond

  • On-street along Baseline Road and Richmond Road
  • Dedicated transit lanes would be provided by road widening and reallocation of existing traffic lanes (auxilliary lanes)
  • Existing bridges over Highway 416 can accommodate new transit lanes without need to widen structures
  • Does not provide direct rapid transit service to hospital, although local routes could continue to operate onto hospital property

Option 4 – West of Hospital

  • New roadway along west side of hospital, combined with new hospital ring road
  • Combination of transit-priority and mixed traffic operation through hospital area
  • Design of roadway needs to integrate existing multi-use pathway and hydro corridor access requirements
  • Requires modified agreement with hospital to run on private property
  • Connections at Richmond Road and Baseline Road challenging due to intersection geometry

Queensway-Carleton Hospital Alternatives [ PDF - 252 KB ]

Queensway-Carleton Hospital – Evaluation

Principle

Option 1:
Ring Road

Option 2:
East of Hospital 

Option 3:
Baseline/
Richmond

Option 4:
West of Hospital

Increase transit ridership, mobility and access

2.50

2.83

3.50

4.00

Support a sustainable  transportation system

2.67

2.67

3.58

3.25

Be compatible with adjacent communities

3.21

1.79

4.57

3.57

Connect regional facilities and support lands designated for development

4.00

2.00

3.50

5.00

Protect, improve and restore the natural environment

4.90

3.60

4.85

3.80

Protect historical, cultural and archaeological resources

4.00

1.50

4.33

3.33

Provide a wise investment

4.20

2.20

4.00

3.40

Total

25.48

16.59

28.34

26.35

Carried Forward

 

 

Yes

Yes

Least Preferred: 1-1.9
Most Preferred: 5

  • Ring Road option does not provide rapid transit but can be maintained for local transit access as at present
  • East of hospital option will not be carried forward due to construction cost, land acquisition, and community impact
  • Baseline/Richmond option is proposed to be carried forward as best short term option to support increased transit priority in hospital area
  • Further consideration will be given to west of hospital option as a potential long-term design solution with integration into hospital redevelopment plans

Queensway-Carleton Hospital – Evaluation [ PDF - 73 KB ]

Centrepointe/Algonquin College Alternatives

Option 1 – Baseline/Woodroffe

  • On-street along Baseline Road, Woodroffe Avenue and Constellation Drive, using either Navaho Drive or College Avenue to access Baseline Station
  • Dedicated lanes on Baseline Road and Woodroffe Avenue would be provided by widening the roadway or reallocating existing traffic lanes
  • Corridor does not directly serve main part of Algonquin College campus

Option 2 – Baseline/Constellation

  • On-street along Baseline Road and Constellation Drive, using local road network to be built as part of the Centrepointe Town Centre redevelopment to access Baseline Station
  • Ability to provide transit priority infrastructure on Constellation Crescent and Centrepointe Town Centre local road network is limited
  • Corridor does not directly serve main part of Algonquin College campus

Option 3 – Navaho

  • On-street along Navaho Drive and Constellation Crescent
  • Dedicated transit lanes along Navaho Drive would require widening of the roadway
  • Provides rapid transit service in proximity to both Algonquin College and existing commercial development on north side of Navaho Drive
  • Could use either Navaho Drive or College Avenue to access Baseline Station

Option 4 – College

  • Follows existing bus routing through Algonquin College
  • Limited ability to provide transit priority measures on Algonquin College lands
  • Provides best access to campus but results in slower transit trips
  • Requires use of private lands for operation
  • Possible long-term redevelopment of campus may be able to accommodate better bus routing and priority

Centrepointe/Algonquin College Alternatives [ PDF - 351 KB ]

Centrepointe/Algonquin College – Evaluation

Principle

Option 1:
Baseline/
Woodroffe

Option 2:
Baseline/
Constellation

Option 3:
Navaho

Option 4:
College

Increase transit ridership, mobility and access

3.71

3.29

3.93

3.64

Support a sustainable  transportation system

2.25

2.50

4.50

3.75

Be compatible with adjacent communities

3.86

3.71

4.86

3.00

Connect regional facilities and support lands designated for development

3.00

3.00

5.00

4.25

Protect, improve and restore the natural environment

4.50

4.50

3.75

4.00

Protect historical, cultural and archaeological resources

4.33

4.33

4.00

4.00

Provide a wise investment

2.80

2.20

4.60

3.80

Total

24.45

23.53

30.64

26.44

Carried Forward

 

 

Yes

Yes

Least Preferred: 1-1.9
Most Preferred:  5

  • Options 1 and 2 will not be carried forward as they do not provide direct rapid transit service to the main part of the Algonquin College campus and require operation through the congested Baseline/Woodroffe intersection
  • Option 3 is proposed to be carried forward, with additional design work undertaken to look at the routing to connect with Baseline Station
  • Option 4 is proposed to be carried forward for further investigation
  • Additional work will be undertaken to determine possible strategies to improve transit operations on the campus in the short and long-term

Centrepointe/Algonquin College Alternatives – Evaluation [ PDF - 73 KB ]

Alternative Design Overview

  • The planning and design of the Transit Intensive Corridor will consider and balance the interrelated needs of transit, pedestrians, cyclists, goods movement and automobile traffic, including:
    • Improved transit services
    • Dedicated cycling facilities
    • Pedestrian facilities
    • Station and stop locations
    • Property issues, including roadway widening requirements and access management
    • Reallocation of road space or widening to accommodate new transit infrastructure
  • The Recommended Plan will address short and long term implementation staging of proposed changes and develop potential “quick win” measures to address existing issues affecting transit service along the corridor
  • The ultimate design will accommodate dedicated transit lanes through the study area
  • Grade separations at signalized intersections will be considered where other options are not feasible

Alternative Design Overview [ PDF - 54 KB ]

Curb-side lanes design alternative

  • Bus lanes would be located along the outside (curb lanes) of the roadway
  • Dedicated lanes accommodated by either widening or reallocation of existing traffic lanes (e.g. where six lanes currently exist)
  • Would operate similar to existing bus lanes on Woodroffe Avenue, south of Baseline Station
  • General purpose traffic can use bus lane to access driveways or make right-turns at intersections
  • Allows local and limited stop services as buses can pass each other
  • Stations along sidewalk
  • Interaction with vehicles at driveways and intersections reduces transit service efficiency

Curb-side lanes design alternative [ PDF - 465 KB ]

Median lanes design alternative

  • Bus lanes would be located on the inside (median) lanes of the roadway
  • Dedicated lanes accommodated by either widening or reallocation of existing traffic lanes (e.g. where six lanes currently exist)
  • A physical median would separate eastbound and westbound traffic along Baseline Road, similar to the existing condition
  • Stations would be located at intersections at median platforms in middle of roadway
  • Two basic options:
    • Double median, where bus lanes are physically separated from traffic on each side
    • Single median, where bus lanes are separated from adjacent traffic by painted lines and a rumble strip
  • Both options provide for more segregation between transit and general purpose traffic, resulting in a higher quality of transit service
    • Existing full movement unsignalized intersections or driveways would need to be signalized or closed

Median lanes design alternative [ PDF - 476 KB ]

One-side lanes design alternative

  • Bus lanes would be located on one side of roadway, adjacent to existing traffic lanes
  • Due to increased footprint requirement, road widening would be required
  • Access impacts means a limited ability to implement in much of the corridor
  • Intersection operations an issue due to additional conflict points created
  • Transitions required at each end to allow buses into/out of dedicated lanes
  • Good physical separation for transit results in higher quality of service

One-side lanes design alternative [ PDF - 216 KB ]

Station and stop locations

  • Stations typically located further apart than on local bus routes to allow an improvement in transit travel times (e.g. approximately every 400 m)
  • Stations will be located at major cross-streets with connecting bus routes, activity centres, major destinations along corridor
  • Need to consider how local and rapid transit bus services will operate together in corridor to provide best coverage and connections
  • Stations would have improved transit amenities to provide higher quality of service

Station and stop locations [ PDF - 113 KB ]

Bicycle/Pedestrian infrastructure

  • Design of the transit intensive corridor will incorporate dedicated bicycle lanes along Baseline Road, as per the Ottawa Cycling Plan
  • Dedicated facilities along other roads which may be used as part of the transit intensive corridor will be considered as well
  • Improvements to the pedestrian environment to encourage walking and activity along corridor will be integrated into the design where appropriate
  • Good cycling/pedestrian connections to stations are important to provide a quality transit experience

Bicycle/Pedestrian infrastructure [ PDF - 130 KB ]

Next Steps/Your Input is Valuable

Following this Public Open House:

  • Your comments will be reviewed along with input received from the Consultation Groups
  • The preliminary preferred corridor alignment through the Bayshore, Queensway-Carleton Hospital and Centrepointe/Algonquin College areas will be confirmed
  • The Consultation Groups will be involved in the development of alternative design options
  • The evaluation of alternative design options will be presented at a third Public Open House, early in 2013
  • Information about the study will continue to be posted on the City's website as it becomes available

Your Input is Valuable

Thank you for taking an interest in the Baseline Road Transit Intensive Corridor study.
Your views and contributions are important to the success of this study!

Comments can also be submitted to Jabbar.Siddique@ottawa.ca.

Next Steps/Your Input is Valuable [ PDF - 61 KB ]

Open House #3 - June 2, 2014

Monday, June 2, 2014
Ben Franklin Place (The Chamber)
101 Centrepointe Drive, Nepean
Transit Access: approximately 300 metre walk from Baseline Station
6:30 to 9 p.m., presentation: 7:30 p.m.

The City of Ottawa is working on a Planning and Environmental Assessment (EA) Study for the proposed Baseline Road bus rapid transit facility. The City's Transportation Master Plan (TMP 2013) identifies Baseline Road as a future transit corridor to achieve modal share targets as set out in the TMP. The EA Study will determine measures to improve transit service efficiency along the corridor and result in the expansion of the City's transit network.

Study Area

The Study Area stretches between Bayshore Station and Prince of Wales Drive and includes the area around Bayshore Station and Baseline Station.

Consultation

The third Open House will provide an overview of study progress to-date, including the evaluation of design alternatives considered and the preliminary recommendations for implementation staging of the project. We encourage your participation in the Open House where you can discuss the project with the study team and provide feedback.

Open House Display Boards

Welcome [ PDF 1.86 MB ]
Study Overview [ PDF 236 KB ]
Study Process [ PDF 1.432 MB ]
Study Progress [ PDF 234 KB ]
Study Schedule [ PDF 330 KB ]
2013 Transportation Master Plan Update [ PDF 1.544 MB ]
Alternative Corridor Alignments [ PDF 5.239 MB ]
Bayshore [ PDF 1.762 MB ]
Queensway Carleton Hospital [ PDF 2.053 MB ]
Centrepointe/Algonquin College [ PDF 1.844 MB ]
Alternative Corridor Design Preliminary Assessment [ PDF 3.348 MB ]
Curb Lanes Design Alternative: Overview [ PDF 2.86 MB
 ]
Median Lanes Design Alternative [ PDF 2.061 MB ]
Preliminary Evaluation of Design Alternatives [ PDF 1.348 MB
 ]
Preliminary Preferred CorridorDesign (Short-term) [ PDF 1.441 MB ]
Preliminary Preferred CorridorDesign (Medium to Long-term) [ PDF 1.446 MB ]
Potential Study Area Expansion [ PDF 4.154 MB ]
Median Lanes Design
 [ PDF 16.6 MB ]
Next Steps [ PDF 1.325 MB ]
Thank you [ PDF 1.416 MB ]

There will be ongoing public consultation activities during the remaining course of the study, including and additional Open House.

The Environmental Assessment portion of the study will be undertaken in accordance with the Transit Project Assessment Process (TPAP) as prescribed in Ontario Regulation 231/08, Transit Projects. 

Accessibility is an important consideration for the City of Ottawa. If you require special accommodation, please call 3-1-1 or e-mail the project lead below before the event.

You can also send comments by e-mail or regular mail using the following contact information:

Jabbar Siddique, P. Eng.
Senior Project Engineer
110 Laurier Avenue West, 4th Floor
613-580-2424, ext. 13914
Fax: 613-580-2578
E-mail: Jabbar.Siddique@ottawa.ca

Background and Study Overview

The proposed facility will:

  • Provide a quality transit service alternative for cross-town transit trips without the need to travel via downtown while connecting major transitway stations which includes Bayshore, Baseline, Confederation (Trillium Line) and Billings Bridge
  • Accommodate increasing travel demand across the City and help achieve modal share targets as set out in the TMP
  • Support City building objectives with respect to connecting significant employment, commercial and higher density residential land uses to the City's rapid transit network
  • Result in the expansion and improvement of the rapid transit network across the city
  • Provide infrastructure for pedestrian and cycling.

Implementation of BRT facility is identified in the TMP as follows:

  • Baseline Station to Billings Bridge Station: within the planning horizon to 2031 (subject to funding)
  • Baseline Station to Bayshore Station: Ultimate build-out post 2031
    • Transit Priority measures: (Queue jump lanes, removal of bus bays, traffic signal priority) Part of 2031 Affordable Network

Background:

Baseline Road is a major transportation corridor that facilitates movement of people and goods in east-west direction. Land use in the study area includes Bayshore Shopping Mall, Queensway-Carleton Hospital, Pinecrest Cemetery, Algonquin College, College Square, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Experimental Farms, Confederation Heights, Billings Bridge Plaza, schools, parks, retail centres, single unit residential homes, town houses and multi-storied apartment buildings.

Other arterials that intersect the proposed BRT corridor are Richmond Road, Greenbank Road, Woodroffe Avenue, Clyde Avenue, Merivale Road, Fisher Avenue, Prince of Wales Drive and Riverside Drive which accommodate substantial north-south travel demand throughout the day with high traffic volumes during peak periods.

Baseline Road is classified as an arterial four-lane roadway with a median that separates east and west traffic movements. City's Official Plan (OP) identifies protection of 44.5 m right-of-way along Baseline Road BRT corridor.

Study Area:

Baseline Road BRT corridor is approximately 14.5 km in length that stretches between Bayshore Station and Billings Bridge Station along a corridor following Holly Acres Road, Richmond Road, Baseline Road, Navaho Drive and Heron Road and includes the area around Baseline Station (Figure 1).

Figure 1 Study Area [ PDF 577 KB ]

The primary goals of this study are to:

  • Complete a planning study to establish a recommended plan for the BRT facility that will support the urban development and land use objectives identified in the OP, TMP, relevant provincial, National Capital Commission and federal plans, strategies and policies
  • Address EA requirements and document the project's impacts on the environment, including the necessary mitigation to offset any negative impacts
  • Consider and balance the interrelated needs of transit, pedestrians, cyclists, goods movement, automobile traffic and property issues.
For further information contact:

Jabbar Siddique, P.Eng.
Sr. Project EngineerTransportation Planning
Planning and Growth Management Department
110 Laurier Avenue West, 4th Floor
Ottawa, ON K1P 1J1
613-580-2424, ext. 13914
Facsimile: 613-580-2578
E-mail:jabbar.siddique@ottawa.ca
 
 

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the Baseline Road Bus Rapid Transit Corridor?

The Baseline Road Bus Rapid Transit Corridor is a proposed transportation facility along Baseline and Heron roads between Heron Station and Baseline Station, and along Richmond Road and Holly Acres Road between Baseline Station and Bayshore Station. The corridor will feature at-grade, median bus-only lanes, as well as new protected cycle tracks and sidewalks to improve the environment for cyclists and pedestrians. The Baseline corridor will continue to have four lanes for general traffic.

When is this project planned?

An environmental assessment study is underway and is expected to be completed and presented to Council in 2017. Once approvals are in place, the detailed design process would begin, which could take approximately two years to complete. Construction would follow when funding is secured.

Why is the facility needed?

The City's Transportation Master Plan (TMP) identifies an expanded rapid transit network as a key component in reaching the city-wide goal of having 30 per cent of all commuting trips made by transit. The Baseline transit facility will provide transit customers with a reliable and quick east-west commute without having to go through downtown. The corridor connects many employment and development areas, commercial centres, and education and government institutions. It also links to the O-Train Confederation Line at Bayshore and Baseline stations, and O-Train Trillium Line at Confederation Heights station.

What is the preferred alignment?

The transit facility extends nearly 14 kilometres between Bayshore Station and Heron Station, along a corridor following Holly Acres Road, Richmond Road, Baseline Road, Heron Road, and includes the area around Baseline Station and Navaho Drive.

What is in the corridor?

Baseline Road will be redeveloped into a complete street, meaning there will be facilities for all major modes of transportation (e.g. cycling, driving, etc.). In each direction, the widened road will include:

  • A bus-only lane in the median
  • Two general traffic lanes
  • A narrow boulevard/maintenance strip
  • A protected cycle track, or paved shoulders (rural cross-section)
  • A sidewalk (urban cross-section)

Twenty-four new transit stations are proposed, and would generally be located at major intersections.

Will this project affect the Central Experimental Farm?

Yes, some property at the Central Experimental Farm will be required for the road widening. Discussions with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAC) have taken place over the course of this study. A buffer strip along the Farm's frontage, in the form of a landscaped "shelter belt," will also be constructed to protect fields against wind, erosion, snow drift and salt spray.

Does this project require additional property?

Along some stretches of the corridor, the existing right of way is very narrow, and insufficient to accommodate the elements of a complete street. In some cases this may involve acquisition of very little property along the edge of an adjacent property; however, in other cases the entire property may be needed. The proposed design has a reduced project footprint wherever possible.

How many properties will be affected?

At this stage of the project, it appears that approximately 173 residential properties will be affected. Of these, up to 15 may need to be acquired in full. Forty-four commercial properties will also be affected. Frontage strips will be required from 10 federal/provincial properties. The detailed design may result in further refinements regarding the amount of property required.

What is the City's process for acquiring properties?

The City will negotiate with owners in accordance with the City's Real Property Acquisition Policy, on the basis of market value and applicable entitlements. At this stage of the project (an environmental assessment study), it is too early to initiate the property acquisition process. Before that can happen, funding for implementation has to be secured and detailed design has to be undertaken to finalize the property requirements.

Why not just reduce the car lanes to one per direction, to avoid property impacts?

The option of reducing vehicle traffic to one lane in each direction was explored as an alternative configuration, but it was determined that congestion levels would be too high to accommodate the existing and future transportation needs of motorized non-transit vehicles.

What is the estimated ridership expected to use the Baseline BRT corridor?

Currently, between 6,400 and 6,700 transit customers use the corridor every day – with about 1,500 people using the corridor during the weekday morning peak hour. Ridership is expected to grow as a result of the improved service along the corridor. By 2031, more than 10,000 customers per day are predicted to use the Baseline corridor.

What would be the travel time savings for transit customers?

There is an estimated saving of 6.5 minutes between Baseline Station and Heron Station for afternoon transit customers. Customers can expect improved reliability and better operating speeds throughout the day due to the bus-only lanes, as buses will no longer have to operate in mixed traffic.

Did public consultations take place?

Yes, the City has been consulting with the public since April 2012. The City has already held three public open houses and will hold a fourth on Wednesday, October 5, 2016 to present the recommended plan to residents. Meetings with affected land owners are also planned for Tuesday, October 4 and Wednesday, October 5.

What is the budget for the current study?

The study budget for the environmental assessment is $1.5 million.

Is this transit project eligible for federal stimulus funding?

Yes, this is a candidate project for the Public Transit Infrastructure Fund (PTIF). The City has received federal funding for detailed design, which is the next step following the completion of the environmental assessment.

How much would it cost to build the Baseline BRT project?

Implementation of the Baseline BRT project will only happen if the City is able to secure funding from provincial and federal partners. The proposed corridor is planned in two stages, with the cost breakdown for each listed below:

  • The section between Baseline Station and Heron Station is considered part of the 2031 Affordable Network. The estimated cost of this stage is $161 million (2019 dollars).
  • The section from Bayshore Station to Baseline Station is part of the Network Concept plan (post 2031).

Although this section will not be completed until sometime after 2031, the City's Transportation Master Plan identifies the implementation of transit priority measures in the affordable plan prior to 2031. The estimated cost of these interim measures is $7 million (2016 dollars), which includes modifications along the corridor to provide priority for transit operation.

What are the next steps?

Public feedback from the final open house on October 5 will be reviewed, and refinements made to the plan as appropriate. The study recommendations will then be presented to the Transportation Committee and Council in early 2017, with the formal environmental assessment process completed by mid-2017. Detailed design would follow.

Open House #4 - October 5, 2016

Open House # 4 (Final)

Wednesday, October 5, 2016
Nepean Sportsplex, Halls A and B
1701 Woodroffe Avenue
6 to 9 p.m., presentation: 7 p.m.
Transit Access: 94, 95, 157, 173

The City of Ottawa is working on a Planning and Environmental Assessment (EA) Study for the proposed at-grade Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) facility between Bayshore Station and Heron Station along a 14.5 km corridor generally following Baseline Road and Heron Road. The proposed facility would accommodate increasing travel demand across the City and help achieve modal share targets as set out in the Transportation Master Plan (TMP).

Implementation of the BRT facility is identified in the TMP as follows:

  • Baseline Station to Billings Bridge Station: Part of 2031 Affordable Transit Network.
  • Baseline Station to Bayshore Station: Part of Network Concept Plan (Post 2031).

The EA Study will determine measures to improve transit service efficiency along the corridor and result in the expansion of the City's transit network.

Study Area

The Study Area stretches between Bayshore Station and Billings Bridge Station along a corridor following Holly Acres Road, Richmond Road, Baseline Road, Navaho Drive and Heron Road and includes the area around Baseline Station.

At the Open House you will:

  • Receive an update on the study's progress
  • Learn about the Recommended Plan for the corridor
  • Have the opportunity to:
    • Discuss the project with the study team and how it may affect your property
    • Provide feedback

Open House Display Boards [ PDF 7.767 MB ]

Functional Design Plans (As presented at Open House #4, October 5, 2016)

Final Functional Design Plans (Approved by the Transportation Committee and City Council, February 2017)

Public input and comment on the information presented at the Open House event will be received until October 21, 2016.

The Environmental Assessment portion of the study will be undertaken in accordance with the Transit Project Assessment Process (TPAP) as prescribed in Ontario Regulation 231/08, Transit Projects. The EA process involves developing, assessing, and evaluating alternatives, which results in a Recommended Plan that will be presented to City's Transportation Committee and Council for approval in 2017.

Interested persons can provide comments throughout the environmental assessment process. Any comments received will be collected under the Environmental Assessment Act and, with the exception of personal information, will become part of the public record as per the Municipal Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (MFIPPA). 

There will be ongoing consultation activities with study stakeholders during the remaining course of the study.

Accessibility is an important consideration for the City of Ottawa. If you require special accommodation, please call or email the contact below before the event.

You can also send comments during the course of the study by email or regular mail using the following contact information:

Jabbar Siddique, P. Eng.
Senior Project Engineer–Environmental Assessment
City of Ottawa
613-580-2424, ext. 13914
Fax: 613-580-2578
Jabbar.Siddique@ottawa.ca

This notice first issued on September 22, 2016.