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Checklists for emergency preparedness

Important family documents checklist

A "family documents" kit will protect your identity and ensure you and your family get the help you need in an emergency. Making one is easy, inexpensive and quick - and it can make all the difference.

Your important "family documents" kit should contain all the documents you may need in an emergency.

Assemble the documents in a waterproof, portable container and store it in an easy to get to location.

Your kit should contain:

  • Insurance policies, contracts, deeds, stocks and bonds
  • Passports, immigration papers
  • Social Insurance Numbers
  • Immunization records
  • List of prescriptions
  • Bank account numbers
  • Credit card account numbers and companies
  • Inventory of valuable household goods
  • Important telephone numbers
  • Family records (birth, marriage, death certificates)
  • Photos of family members in case you are separated

For more information on emergency preparedness, call 3-1-1, or consult the Red Pages in your phone book.

Pet preparedness checklists

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Have a Plan for your Pets!

Pet Preparedness Checklists & Tips

Pets are important members of our family. Just as an emergency preparedness kit can help keep you and your family safe, a pet emergency preparedness kit, can help ensure the safety of your pets. It is best to keep everything stored in sturdy containers such as a duffel bag, or covered trash containers that can be accessed and carried easily.

Your pet emergency preparedness kit should contain:

  • A blanket
  • Pet beds and toys, if you can easily take them, to reduce stress.
  • A secure carrying cage to transport your pet. Clearly label the cage with your name and contact information, your veterinarian’s name and contact information, and any special requirements your pet may have. It's also a good idea to include the phone number of a friend or relative outside your immediate area in case you are out of your home for an extended period and become separated from your pet.
  • Medications your pet may be taking and related medical records, including a record of vaccinations.
  • Sufficient food and clean water for at least five days in watertight containers.
  • Information on your pet including feeding schedules, or behavioural issues in case they are placed in foster care or you need to leave them with a friend or relative.
  • Manual can opener, spill-proof food dishes, or other feeding supplies you may require.
  • Newspaper, cat litter, wood chips or any other extra supplies for sanitary reasons.
  • Up-to-date identification tags, which should be securely fastened to your pet's collar.
  • Current photos and descriptions of your pets. This helps others identify them in case you and your pets are separated, and to prove that they are yours.
  • A leash, harness, or muzzle as required by your pet.

Things to consider ahead of time:

  • Find a safe place to evacuate to. Emergency Reception and Lodging Centres may not be able to accept pets (with the exception of service animals) for health and safety reasons, so it is important that you make alternate arrangements. Make a list of animal-friendly places and keep it handy. This could include hotels, motels, friends, relatives, or boarding facilities that might be able to shelter animals in emergencies; include 24-hour telephone numbers.
  • Make arrangements well in advance for a trusted neighbour to take your pets and meet you at a specified location in case you aren’t home. Be sure the person is comfortable with your pets, knows where your animals are likely to be, knows where your disaster supplies are kept, and has a key to your home. This could also be a professional service provider such as your a dog walker.

During an emergency:

  • Bring pets into the house and confine them so you can leave with them quickly if necessary. Warning of emergencies may come several hours or minutes in advance so it is important that you are ready to go.
  • Take your pet with you if possible. Often you cannot be sure how long you may be away from your home so it is important that you take your pet with you so that they are not exposed to harm.
  • If you have to leave your pet behind the following actions may increase your pet’s chances for survival:
    • Ensure you post a highly visible sign in your window to let rescue workers know how many pets were left behind and what type.
    • Leave plenty of water in a large open container, which cannot be tipped over.
    • Leave plenty of dry food in timed feeders so your pet does not eat all their food in one day.
    • Don’t cage your pet or tie them up, as their chances for survival are greater if they can escape easily.
    • Ensure that any loose pets are wearing a collar with proper identification and contact information.

Following a disaster:

If you become separated from your pet during a disaster the following tips may assist you in finding them more quickly.

  • Report your pet missing with the nearest animal shelter. Provide a recent photo and any distinctive markings, which may help identify your pet. Make sure to follow-up with them every few days as they may continue to receive new animals frequently.
  • Contact your veterinarian, neighbours, and emergency contacts listed on your pet’s collar or cage. They may have been contacted about your pet, or be caring for them.
  • Once you are able to safely return to your neighbourhood search the area and if possible post signs with photos of your pet and contact information.
  • Get informed. The media often provides valuable information on what the city is doing and key contact information.

Once you return home with your pet:

  • Don't allow your pets to roam loose. Familiar landmarks and smells might be gone, and your pet will probably be disoriented. Pets can easily get lost in such situations, so ensure they are leashed if they are outside the house. For a few days, keep dogs on leashes and keep cats in carriers inside the house. If your house is damaged, they could escape and become lost.
  • Be patient with your pets after a disaster. Your pet has also experienced a traumatic event. Try to get them back into their normal routines as soon as possible, but be ready for behavioural problems that may result from the stress of the situation. If behavioural problems persist, or if your pet seems to be having any health problems, talk to your veterinarian.

Car survival checklist

Your emergency car kit should contain adequate supplies to keep you and your family safe and self-sufficient for an extended period of time in the event you become stranded in your car.

Try to keep your car's gas tank at least half-full at all times. Assemble the supplies in a portable container and store it in your trunk.

Your kit should contain:

  • Cell phone
  • Booster cables
  • First aid kit (see checklist)
  • Road maps
  • Methyl hydrate to de-ice the fuel line
  • Ice scraper and brush
  • Sand (or kitty litter)
  • Blankets
  • Candles in a deep can
  • Waterproof matches
  • A tow chain
  • Warning light or flares
  • Flashlight
  • Extra hats, coats and footwear
  • Rain wear
  • Food bars (granola, chocolate, etc.)
  • Fire extinguisher

For more information on emergency preparedness, call 3-1-1, or consult the Red Pages in your phone book.

 

Special needs checklist

A special needs kit will help ensure everyone's unique needs are provided for in the event of an emergency, when regular sources of assistance can be interrupted. Making one is easy, inexpensive and quick - and it can make all the difference.

Your emergency special needs kit should contain adequate supplies to keep you and your family self-sufficient in your home for at least three days.

Prepare a special needs kit for family members with special needs, such as infants and elderly or disabled persons. Assemble the supplies in an easy-to-carry container and store it in an easy to get to location.

Your kit should contain:

  • For babies: jarred baby food; instant cereal or formula; sterilized water to make formula; baby bottles; disposable diapers; extra clothing; snowsuit; medication
  • For adults: special medications; dentures; eyeglasses; hearing aids; batteries; copies of prescriptions
  • For children: toys; games; extra clothing; special medications
  • For the disabled: extra batteries for wheelchairs and other personal care equipment; oxygen; medication; catheters; food for guide or service dogs
  • For pets: water; food; vaccination records

For more information on emergency preparedness, call 3-1-1, or consult the Red Pages in your phone book.

Food and water kit checklist

Having an emergency food and water kit can be critical in an emergency, when regular sources of food and water can be interrupted. Making one is easy, inexpensive, and quick - in fact, you probably already have most of the items you need.

Your emergency food and water kit should contain adequate supplies to keep you and your family self-sufficient in your home for at least three days.

Food should be easy to store with no need for refrigeration. Choose foods that you like and that are pre-cooked, require no cooking, or are cooked easily in little or no water.

Store food in screw top jars or sealed containers. Store drinking water in clean, disinfected containers with secure lids. Rotate and use food and water every six to twelve months. Inspect all food containers for signs of spoilage before use.

Suggested contents for your food kit include:

  • Grain products (cold, dry and hot cereals; bread sticks; rice; couscous; crackers; pretzels; noodles/pasta; pancake mix; rice cakes; melba toast; granola bars; cookies)
  • Meat and alternatives (canned meat and fish; canned soup, stew or pasta with meat; canned beans, peas, lentils; peanut butter; instant refried beans; textured vegetable protein; sunflower seeds and nuts)
  • Nonperishable milk products (skim milk powder; canned evaporated 2% milk; soy, rice; parmesan cheese; packaged or canned pudding; cheese spread)
  • Vegetables and fruit (canned or jarred vegetables and fruits; fruit and vegetable juices; dried fruit; applesauce; tomato sauce)
  • Other foods (canned or packaged meals; hummus and tabbouleh; pasta sauce mixes; bouillon cubes; honey/jam; instant coffee, tea or hot chocolate, non-perishable pet foods)
  • Additional supplies (cutlery; cups; plates; can opener; bottle opener; waterproof matches or lighter; plastic bags)

Your water kit should contain:

  • At least two litres of drinking water per adult per day
  • At least two litres of water per person per day for cleaning and cooking
  • At least a 3-day supply of water for each person in your household.
  • Purification tablets or chlorine bleach and an eyedropper.

Children, nursing mothers and ill people will need extra water.

If there is no other source, emergency water can be obtained from your water heater, toilet tank and from melted ice cubes.

For more information on emergency preparedness, call 3-1-1, or consult the Red Pages in your phone book.

First aid kit checklist

Having a first aid kit can be critical in an emergency. Making one is easy, inexpensive and quick - and it could save your life.

Your emergency first aid kit should contain adequate supplies to keep you and your family self-sufficient in your home for at least three days. Assemble a second kit for your car.

Assemble the supplies in an easy-to-carry container and store it in an easy to get to location.

Your kit should contain:

  • Sterile adhesive bandages in assorted sizes
  • 2-inch sterile gauze pads (4-6)
  • 4-inch sterile gauze pads (4-6)
  • 2-inch sterile roller bandages (3 rolls)
  • 3-inch sterile roller bandages (3 rolls)
  • Adhesive tape
  • Triangular bandages (3 rolls)
  • Scissors and tweezers
  • Moistened towelettes
  • Alcohol-based hand cleaner
  • Antiseptic
  • Thermometer
  • Tongue depressors (2)
  • Chemical cold pack
  • Petroleum jelly tube
  • Safety pins
  • Soap
  • Vinyl based (non-allergic) medical examination gloves (2 pair)
  • Sunscreen/mosquito repellent
  • First aid manual
  • Non-prescription drugs (pain reliever, anti-diarrhea medication, antacid, laxative, activated charcoal)

For more information on emergency preparedness, call 3-1-1, or consult the Red Pages in your phone book.

Emergency preparedness kit checklist

An emergency preparedness kit will help ensure your safety and the safety of your family. Making one is easy, inexpensive, and quick - in fact, you probably already have most of the items you need.

Your emergency preparedness kit should contain adequate supplies to keep you and your family self-sufficient in your home for at least three days.

Assemble the supplies in an easy-to-carry container and store it in an easy to get to location.

Your kit should contain:

  • Battery-operated or crank radio
  • Flashlights and extra light bulbs
  • Extra batteries
  • Cash or traveler's cheques
  • Utility knife
  • Rope
  • Shovel
  • Fire extinguisher; ABC type
  • Tube tent
  • Blankets/sleeping bags
  • Plastic sheeting
  • Candles and matches/lighter
  • Extra car keys
  • Important papers
  • Food and bottled water
  • Clothing and footwear (one change per person; more for children)
  • Toilet paper and other personal supplies
  • First aid kit
  • Backpack/duffel bag
  • Plastic garbage bags, ties
  • Disinfectant, chlorine bleach
  • Extra fuel for car, stored in a safe place and in an approved container; not a large quantity
  • Map of area and compass
  • Adjustable wrench, to shut off household gas and water
  • Whistle (in case you need to attract attention)
  • Playing cards, games, paper, pencils

For more information on emergency preparedness, call 3-1-1, or consult the Red Pages in your phone book.