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City owned green buildings

Green Buildings - City of Ottawa

In recognition of the importance of reducing the environmental footprint of the building sector, the City of Ottawa is supporting, promoting and implementing green building practices. The City of Ottawa has developed a Green Building Policy to ensure new buildings and large scale renovations are designed and constructed in a more sustainable manner. The policy uses the LEED® Canada certification rating system to verify municipal buildings have reached sustainability targets.

The City of Ottawa has a number of municipal buildings that are LEED® certified, as well as other green building projects including green roofs, the Lansdowne Park Redevelopment, and the Glebe Parking Garage.

LEED® certified municipal buildings

Project 

Size

Value

Completion

LEED® Rating

Beaverbrook Branch of the Ottawa Public Library

 23,896 sq ft

$8.8 M

Aug. 2014

Silver

Richcraft Sensplex (Ottawa East)

94,740

$26 M

Aug. 2014

Certified

Trail Road Waste Facility

35,000 sq ft

$13.1 M

June 2013

Silver

François Dupuis Recreation Centre

38,000 sq ft

$14 M

Feb. 2013

Silver

Conroy Public Works Yard

18,700 sq ft

$9.5 M

Sept. 2012

Silver

Goulbourn Recreation Complex Arena Expansion

35,000 sq ft

$9 M 

Mar. 2012

Silver

Barrhaven Fire Station No. 47

12,250 sq ft

$4.4 M

Dec. 2011

Silver

Kanata Recreation Complex Expansion (LEED® Commercial Interiors - CI)

14,000 sq ft

 $1.9 M

Sept. 2011

CI  Silver

Kanata West Fire Station No. 46

12,250 sq ft

$4.4 M

June 2011

Silver

Overbrook Community Centre Expansion

10,000 sq ft

$3.1 M

Mar. 2011 

Gold 

Centrepointe Theatre Expansion

25,600 sq ft

$9.3 M

Mar. 2011

Silver

James Bartleman Archives and Library Materials Centre

92,000 sq ft 

$27 M

Mar. 2011

Gold

Carlsbad Springs Community Centre

6,500 sq ft

$2.5 M

Dec. 2010

Certified

Huron Early Learning Centre

5,500 sq ft

$2.97 M

Sept. 2010

Silver

Ottawa Central Ambulance Communications Centre

25,000 sq ft

$6.7 M

June 2010

Certified

Hunt Club Riverside Park Community Centre

6,000 sq ft

$3.7 M

Mar. 2010

Certified

OC Transpo Interior Fit-Up (LEED® Commercial Interiors - CI)

18,000 sq ft

$2.3 M

Aug. 2009

CI Gold

Shenkman Arts Centre

78,000 sq ft 

$33 M 

June 2009 

Silver

Albion-Heatherington Community Centre

7,000 sq ft

$1.5 M

Dec. 2008

Certified

Goulbourn Recreation Complex Expansion

22,000 sq ft

$5.0 M

Nov. 2008

Certified

Rideau Valley Conservation Authority Headquarters

22,000 sq ft

$5.6 M

Oct. 2007

Gold

Vars Fire Station No.73

8,800 sq ft

$2.4 M

Mar. 2007

Certified

Ottawa Paramedic Service Headquarters

100,000 sq ft

$18.9 M

Mar. 2006

Certified

Projects undergoing the LEED® certification process

Project 

Size

Value

Completion

LEED® Rating (target)

Minto Recreation Complex - Barrhaven

163,000 sq ft

 $54 M

Nov. 2014

 Silver

Richcraft Recreation Complex - Kanata

105,000 sq ft

$40 M 

Aug. 2013 

Gold

Greenboro Community Centre Expansion

10,000 sq ft

$3.1 M

June 2011

Certified

OC Transpo Articulated Bus Garage

10,000 sq ft

$4.5 M

May 2010

Certified

OC Transpo Dispatch Building

162,000 sq ft

$58 M

Sep 2010

Certified

LEED®projects under design and construction that plan to pursue LEED®

Project 

LEED® Rating (target)

Belfast Yard Light Rail Transit Maintenance and Storage Facility

Certified

Innovation Centre at Bayview Yards

Gold

François Dupuis Recreation Centre Expansion 

Gold

Ottawa Art Gallery Expansion

Silver

Trim Road Works Yard

Silver

Bloomfield Works Yard

Silver

Fire station one in the east end

Silver

Fire station two in the east end

Silver

City of Ottawa Green Roof Projects

  • Britannia Water Treatment Plant

  • OC Transpo Dispatch Building

LEED® Neighbourhood - Lansdowne Park Redevelopment 

The Lansdowne Redevelopment project, completed in 2014, is Ottawa’s first green community designed to follow LEEDTM. Lansdowne has received Silver Plan Pre-Certification (Stage 2) under the LEEDTM for Neighbourhood Development program and joins four neighbourhoods in Ontario and 15 across Canada that are leading the way in sustainability. 

Lansdowne has been transformed through smart growth and green building into a sustainable and vibrant mixed-use community that is a positive example for the rest of Ottawa.  The site is open and well-connected, and encourages walking, cycling, and public transit use.  The location reduces urban sprawl and automobile dependence.  The 14.8 hectares of urban park, public plazas, and heritage buildings create a sense of place and animate the site through programming.  All new buildings were designed to be energy efficient, and incorporate green features.  Lansdowne has become a unique destination for both residents and visitors to live, work, and play.

Green Garage - Glebe Parking Garage

The Glebe Parking Garage, completed in October 2015, was designed to be a mobility hub for the local community.  This project is the first in the City to target Green Garage Certification, which is an international rating system administered by the Green Parking Council that recognizes sustainable practices in parking structure design, construction, and management. 

The four-level garage has 144 vehicle parking spaces, which include two car share spaces, two electric vehicle (EV) charging stations, and preferred parking for low-emitting, fuel efficient, and alternative fuel vehicles. The garage also provides 29 ring and post covered bicycle spaces, two of which have electrical outlets for rechargeable bikes or scooters, and a bike repair station.  The building’s sustainability features include: solar panels feeding energy back into the Hydro grid to offset onsite energy use, natural ventilation; controlled, energy efficient lighting; regionally-sourced and recycled materials; and two parkettes with water efficient landscaping.

Albion-Heatherington Community Centre

Project

Size

Construction Value

Completion / Estimated Completion Date

LEED® Rating

Target Rating

Heatherington Community Centre
1560 Heatherington Rd., Ottawa

8,000 sq. ft.

$1.8M

February 2009

 

LEED® Certified


In Dec 2006 design started on the new City of Ottawa Heatherington Community Centre located on 1560 Heatherington Rd., Ottawa. The 745 m2 (8000 sq ft) new community centre will replace the existing portables on the site which have passed the end of their serviceable life.

Design team

The design team consisted of:

  • Architect: Watson MacEwen Architects, with McCallum Sather architects
  • Structural engineer: Cleland Jardine Engineering
  • Mechanical and electrical engineer: Wood Banani Bouthillette Parizeau Engineering
  • Civil engineer: Totten Sims Hubicki Engineers Architects Planners
  • Project control, estimating: Hanscomb Inc.
  • City of Ottawa: Kevin Wherry, Project Manager for Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services and Ian Craig, Project Manager for Real Property Asset Management, Design and Construction

Environmental features

The building incorporates a wide range of sustainable design features, which will reduce energy consumption, use of natural resources, impact on the environment, and improve occupant health and comfort. The building design is targeted for LEED® certification in accordance with City of Ottawa Green Building policy. Some of the sustainable design features include:

  • Water saving in landscape design and plumbing
  • Control of storm water run-off
  • Reduced heat impact from the roof
  • Enhanced commissioning procedures to maximize effectiveness of building systems
  • Reduced energy consumption
  • Elimination of CFC refrigerants
  • Use of renewable and recycled materials
  • Reduced use of toxic construction materials and waste control measures
  • Control by occupants of temperature, natural ventilation, and lighting for greater comfort

Articulated Bus Dispatch Building

Project

Size

Construction Value

Completion / Estimated Completion Date

LEED® Rating

Target Rating

Articulated bus dispatch building
745 Industrial Ave., Ottawa

10,255 sq. ft.

$5 M

August 2010

 

LEED® Silver


The dispatch building one of two buildings, in which this building will support the dispatch operation for the new articulated bus maintenance facility for OC Transpo’s articulated bus fleet dispatched from this Industrial Road facility. This building will house the dispatching functions and will include: office space; lounge and lunchroom facilities, training / meeting room space, and a fitness facility.

Design team

The design team consisted of:

  • Project manager: IBI Group
  • Architect: IBI Group
  • Structural engineer: IBI Group
  • Mechanical and electrical engineer: IBI Group
  • Civil engineer: IBI Group
  • LEED® AP: IBI Group
  • Interior designer: IBI Group
  • Landscape architect: Corush Sunderland Wright
  • Noise consultant: Swallow Acoustic Consultants Limited
  • Air quality consultant: A.J. Chandler and Associates
  • City of Ottawa: Paul Hussar, Project Manager and Robert Farris, Project Manager

Environmental features

In order to support the City of Ottawa’s guidelines for sustainable development the facility has been designed targeting achievement of LEED® Silver certification. The focus on this facility has been on reducing the energy usage using a combination of an energy efficient building skin (walls, roof and windows), high efficiency mechanical systems, and a sophisticated lighting and building control system.

To accent the energy usage the space has been designed to provide as pleasant atmosphere to the bus operators and building occupants as possible. The building has been designed to provide excellent indoor air quality, and provide a bright comfortable workspace.

Key environmental works on this building:

  • Building skin—intensive green roofing system
  • Building lighting — lighting control system to vary lighting based on time and ambient light conditions
  • Building glazing — maximum glazing to provide natural daylight and views to 90 percent of regularly occupied spaces

Barrhaven Fire Station No 47

Project

Size

Construction Value

Completion / Estimated Completion Date

LEED® Rating

Target Rating

Barrhaven Fire Station No. 47
Greenbank Road at Cambrian Road, Ottawa

12,250 sq. ft.

$3.5 M

Summer 2011

 

LEED® Silver

The project began in 2008 initiating a density and response study which concluded additional fire services were required allocating $5.7M for the construction of a 3 Bay Urban Fire Station. CSV Architects, in consultation with City staff have prepared a reduced spatial program for 2011.

Totalling 1138 m2 (12,250 sq.ft.), the schematic design covers the full program of spatial requirements: the lobby, offices, dorms, locker rooms, dining / kitchen, washrooms, storage, meeting / training, watch room, exercise room, equipment spaces, apparatus bay, gear room, hose tower, clean room, and janitorial room. The exterior program includes an extraction compound, parking, on-site storm water management, garbage, and natural landscaping.

Design team

The design team consisted of:

  • Architects: CSV Architects
  • Structural engineer: Halsall Associates
  • Mechanical and electrical engineer: McKee Engineering
  • Landscape architect: Corush Sunderland Wright Ltd.
  • Site services / civil engineer: McIntosh & Perry Consulting Engineers
  • LEED® / sustainable design consultant: CSV Architects
  • Enhanced commissioning: Cathcart Mechanical Performance
  • Interior designer: Turnbull Design Consultants
  • City of Ottawa: Shawn Lynch, Project Manager, Infrastructure Services, Design & Construction, Architecture

Environmental features

The building will incorporate a wide range of sustainable design features, which will reduce energy consumption, use of natural resources, impact on the environment, as well as improve the occupant’s health and comfort. The building design is targeted for LEED® Silver certification in accordance with City of Ottawa policies. Some of the sustainable design features include:

  • Reduced energy consumption – Target 40 percent cost savings
  • Water saving in landscape design with water infiltration and storage
  • Advanced storm water management to control run-off via bio swales and landscaping
  • High energy efficient windows and doors along with passive solar design
  • Radiant in-floor heating and an increased attention to air quality through-out
  • Enhanced commissioning procedures to maximize effectiveness of all systems.
  • Robust building envelope and durable building material selection and detailing
  • Use of natural, renewable, recycled and regionally produced materials within
  • Reduced use of toxic construction materials and low VOC surface materials and finishes
  • Reduced heat impact from the roof and landscaped area via steel roof and plantings
  • Occupant control of temperature, natural ventilation, and lighting / glazing for comfort
  • Elimination of CFC refrigerants via a higher engineering goal and program
  • Convey and emphasize the ecology and environmental theme for visitors of all ages

Central Archives - Ottawa Public Library Materials Centre

Project

Size

Value

Completion / Estimated Completion Date

LEED® Rating

Target Rating

Central Archives Ottawa Public Library Materials Centre
100 Tallwood Drive, Nepean

92,000 sq. ft.

$27 M

March 2011

 

LEED® Silver

The project will house the City of Ottawa Archives and the Ottawa Public Library’s Technical Services and Materials Management. The 92,000 sq.ft. building will be constructed at the south-west corner of Woodroffe Avenue and Tallwood Drive; immediately west of the proposed southwest Transitway. The building will be three storeys cast in place concrete structure atop a piled foundation. The exterior finish will be a combination of masonry and composite cement panels.

The Library Materials Handling Centre will house two distinct functions from the Ottawa Public Library. Technical Services is the group that manages the purchase of new library material and the processing of the material from the point that it arrives from a publisher to the point at which it is in the Library’s general circulation.

Materials Handling manages the material in circulation that flows to and from all of the City’s 33 branches; material will arrive and will flow through a computerized sorting system that automatically sorts materials into the specific branch destinations.

Design team

The consultants involved in the project are:

  • Architect: Barry J. Hobin and Associates, Shoalts and Zaback Architects in Association
  • Structural engineer: Cunliffe & Associates
  • Mechanical engineer: Goodkey Weedmark and Associates
  • Landscape architect: Corush Sunderland Wright
  • LEED®: Morrison Hershfield
  • Civil engineer: Novatech Engineering
  • City of Ottawa: Chris Wanczycki Senior Project Manager, Infrastructure Services, Design and Construction.

Environmental features

The Project will be applying for a LEED® Silver designation. The Archives will house four storage vaults with high density shelving storing the City’s municipal records, art-work and photographic items in addition to a reference library for use by researchers, students and members of the public who are interested in the City’s history. There will be a ground floor exhibit space and laboratories for the conservation of the City’s archival material. The building will incorporate sustainable design features, which will reduce energy consumption, use of natural resources, impact on the environment, and improve occupant health and comfort. Some of the sustainable design features include:

  • Heating ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system which will incorporate heat pump technology helping to maintain simultaneous building environments for both staff occupying the building and specialized collections vaults.
  • Upgraded Storm Water Management design requirements to meet criteria established for the area with the Ministry of the Environment, National Capital Commission and City of Ottawa staff targets to mitigate storm water impact.
  • Energy performance in the architectural and mechanical systems and controls to better Model National Energy Code for Buildings (MNECB) standards.
  • Robust building envelope and durable building material selection and detailing
  • Use of Certified wood products and natural products for interior finishes.
  • Construction waste management implemented by the general contractor.
  • Reduced heat impact from the roof and landscaped area.
  • Enhanced commissioning procedures to maximize effectiveness of mechanical systems and track LEED® requirements related to design and construction.
  • Likely and highly probable credits with a 2 credit contingency
    • 38 points achieved possible points: 70
    • All pursed credits (Likely, highly probable credits, and credits with risk of not achieving) with a 6 credit contingency
    • 42 points achieved possible points: 70
    • Certified 26-32 points Silver 33-38 points Gold 39-51 points Platinum 52-70 points

Centrepointe Theatre Expansion

Project

Size

Construction Value

Completion / Estimated Completion Date

LEED® Rating

Target Rating

Centrepointe Theatre expansion
101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa

28,300 sq. ft.

$9.35M

March 31, 2011

 

LEED® Silver

The project originally started in 2002 and reached approved schematic design sign off before being put “on hold” in 2003 due to lack of funding. As part of the 2009 Federal, Provincial, Municipal Stimulus funding, the project has been restarted. Barry Hobin architect, in consultation with City staff, theatre administration and stakeholders, has prepared a spatial program and updated schematic design for the Theatre Expansion.

Totaling approximately 2,630 sq.m. (28,300 sq.ft.), the schematic design covers the full program of spatial requirements: the addition of a rehearsal studio, lobby, two new dressing rooms, green room, catering kitchen, storage, workshop, administrative offices and washroom, accessible elevator, a second loading dock, and volunteer, multi-purpose, first aid, janitorial rooms.

Design team

The design team consisted of:

  • Architects : Barry J. Hobin Architects
  • Structural engineer: Cunliffe & Associates
  • Mechanical and electrical engineer: Goodkey Weedmark Engineering
  • Landscape architects: Laroque Levstek
  • Site services / civil engineer: Golder Associates
  • LEED® / sustainable design consultant: Build Green Solutions
  • City of Ottawa: Burl Walker, Project Manager for Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services and Richard Fouchard, Project Manager, Infrastructure Services Design & Construction

Environmental features

The building will incorporate a wide range of sustainable design features, which will reduce energy consumption, use of natural resources, impact on the environment, and improve occupant health and comfort. The building design is targeted for LEED® Silver certification in accordance with City of Ottawa policies. Some of the sustainable design features include:

  • Reduced energy consumption – target 40 percent cost savings
  • Water saving in landscape design and plumbing
  • Control of storm water run-off
  • Increased attention to air quality during construction phase
  • Enhanced commissioning procedures to maximize effectiveness of mechanical systems as well as theatrical systems.
  • Robust building envelope and durable building material selection and detailing
  • Use of renewable, recycled and regionally produced materials
  • Reduced use of toxic construction materials
  • Reduced heat impact from the roof and landscaped area
  • Control by occupants of temperature, natural ventilation, and lighting for greater comfort
  • Elimination of CFC refrigerants
  • Incorporation of an educational LEED® display along with building tours focussing on the project’s sustainable features

East District Pool Facility

Project

Size

Construction Value

Completion / Estimated Completion Date

LEED® Rating

Target Rating

East Pool Facility
2263 Portobello Drive, Orléans

37,000 sq. ft.

$13.3 M

Summer 2012

 

LEED® Silver


Currently in schematic design stage, this new pool facility (37,000 sq ft) is scheduled to be completed in early 2012. The program includes a 25M – 6 lane main pool basin, leisure basin, and dry sauna. The pool basins will be treated with a combination chlorine / UV water purification system. To accommodate supplementary programming, a multi-purpose room and fitness centre is included to compliment the main aquatic focus of the facility.

Design team

The design team consisted of:

  • Architect: GRC Architects
  • Structural engineer: Halsall Engineers
  • Mechanical and electrical engineer: McKee Engineering
  • Landscape architect: James B. Lennox & Associates
  • Civil engineer, building envelope and LEED®/sustainable design consultant: Morrison Hershfield
  • City of Ottawa: Kevin Jones, Project Manager for Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services and Richard Fouchard, Project Manager, Infrastructure Services Design and Construction

Environmental features

The building will incorporate a wide range of sustainable design features, which will reduce energy consumption, use of natural resources, impact on the environment, and improve occupant health and comfort. The building design is targeted for LEED® silver certification in accordance with City of Ottawa policies. Some of the sustainable design features include:

  • Heat recovery from excess pool water
  • Energy performance – target 40 to 50 percent better than Model National Energy Code for Buildings (MNECB)
  • Radiant in-floor heating
  • Increased attention to air quality in the pool environment
  • Robust building envelope and durable building material selection and detailing
  • Water saving in landscape design and plumbing
  • Control of storm water run-off
  • Reduced heat impact from the roof and landscaped area
  • Enhanced commissioning procedures to maximize effectiveness of mechanical systems
  • Elimination of CFC refrigerants
  • Use of renewable, recycled and regionally produced materials
  • Reduced use of toxic construction materials
  • Control by occupants of temperature, natural ventilation, and lighting for greater comfort

Goulbourn Recreation Complex Expansion

Project

Size

Construction Value

Completion / Estimated Completion Date

LEED®

Rating

Target Rating

Goulbourn Recreation Complex
Community Centre expansion
1500 Shea Road, Stittsville

23,000 sq. ft.

$5M

November 2008

 

LEED® Silver

In November 2008, the 23,000 sq ft expansion of the Goulbourn Recreation Complex was officially opened to the public. The expansion space includes a gym and fitness facility, and multi-purpose rooms for events, health programs, and community meetings.

Design team

The design team consisted of:

  • Architect: CSV Architects
  • Structural engineer: Halsall Associates Ltd.
  • Mechanical and electrical engineer: McKee Engineering
  • Landscape architect: Lashley & Associates
  • Civil engineer: Capital Engineering Group
  • City of Ottawa: Richard Fouchard, Project Manager, Infrastructure Services, Design & Construction

Environmental features

The building incorporates a wide range of sustainable design features that will reduce energy consumption, use natural resources, reduce the impact on the environment, and improve occupant health and comfort. The building design is targeted for LEED® silver certification in accordance with City of Ottawa policies. Some of the sustainable design features include:

  • Reduced energy consumption – 36 percent better than Model National Energy Code for Buildings (MNECB) (saving $16,000.00 per year)
  • Green House gas emissions reduced by 67 tonnes per year
  • Plumbing fixtures that reduce water consumption up to 395,000 litres per year
  • Native drought resistance landscape planting that will require no irrigation.
  • Recycled content in materials that saves extracting new material.
  • Use of regionally produced materials
  • Construction waste diversion exceeded 75 percent.
  • Hardwood floor in the gym comes from sustainably harvested forests, certified by the Forest Stewardship Council.
  • Trees planted along the west side of the building will help shade the summer sun, while allowing sunlight into the building in the winter months when the trees lose their leaves.
  • Control by occupants of temperature, natural ventilation and lighting for greater comfort.
  • Enhanced indoor air quality during construction and testing prior to occupancy.
  • Incorporation of an educational LEED display along with building tours focussing on the facility’s sustainable features.

Greenboro Community Centre Expansion

Project

Size

Construction Value

Completion / Estimated Completion Date

LEED® Rating

Target Rating

Greenboro Community Centre expansion
1505 Lorry Greenberg Drive, Ottawa

9,800 sq. ft.

$3M

March 31, 2011

 

LEED® Silver


This project, funded by stimulus dollars, is a 9,800 sq.ft. addition to the existing Greenboro Community Centre and District Library. The Community Centre was constructed in 1988 and the District Library addition was completed in 2006. The District Library was designed to meet LEED® standards, however certification from CaGBC was not pursued.

The current expansion includes a (dividable) aerobics room, dance studio and a combination seniors / youth activity room as well as washrooms and change rooms.

As part of the stimulus program, all construction must be completed by March 31, 2011.

Design team

The design team consisted of:

  • Structural engineer: Shoalts Zaback Architects with Leibe Engineers
  • Mechanical and electrical engineer: Antares Engineering
  • Landscape architect: Corush Sunderland & Wright
  • Civil engineer: Novatech Engineering
  • City of Ottawa: Patrick Legault, Project Manager for Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services and Richard Fouchard, Project Manager, Infrastructure Services Design and Construction

Environmental features

The building will incorporate a wide range of sustainable design features, which will reduce energy consumption, use of natural resources, impact on the environment, and improve occupant health and comfort. The building design is targeted for LEED® silver certification in accordance with City of Ottawa policies. Some of the sustainable design features include:

  • Heat recovery from washroom exhaust
  • Water saving in landscape design and plumbing (over 30 percent reduction)
  • Energy Performance – target 40 percent better than Model National Energy Code for Buildings (MNECB)
  • Robust building envelope and durable building material selection and detailing
  • Use of Certified wood products
  • Construction Waste Management – targeting 85 percent diverted from landfill.
  • Control of storm water run-off
  • Reduced heat impact from the roof and landscaped area
  • Enhanced commissioning procedures to maximize effectiveness of mechanical systems
  • Elimination of CFC refrigerants
  • Use of renewable, recycled and regionally produced materials (targeting beyond 20 percent)
  • Reduced use of toxic construction materials
  • Control by occupants of temperature, natural ventilation, and lighting for greater comfort
  • Over 90 percent of spaces to have daylight and views.

Huron Early Learning Centre

Project

Size

Construction Value

Completion / Estimated Completion Date

LEED® Rating

Target Rating

Huron Early Learning Centre
24 Capilano Drive, Ottawa

5,500 sq. ft.

$1.85 M

September 2010

 

LEED® Silver


The project began in 2007 initiating a feasibility study to relocate the existing Huron Towers Childcare allocating $1.004M for the demolition of an existing house and the construction of a new 3,000 sq. ft. daycare. CSV Architects, in consultation with City staff, have prepared an increased spatial program for a current daycare to meet legislation. Council approved additional funding for a total of $2.974M.

Totalling 511 m2 (5,500 sq. ft.), the schematic design covers the full program of spatial requirements: the addition of an after school program, lobby, office, toddler room, pre-school art, pre-school gross motor, cubby spaces, staff room, dining room, kitchen, pantry, clean-up room, laundry, washrooms, storage rooms, equipment spaces, and janitorial rooms. The exterior program includes a toddler playground area, pre-school playground area, a natural playground area, storage sheds, and natural landscaping.

Design team

The design team consisted of:

  • Architect: CSV Architects
  • Structural engineer: Halsall Associates
  • Mechanical and electrical engineer: FOX Engineering
  • Landscape architect: Lashley & Associates
  • Site services / civil engineer: Capital Engineering Group
  • LEED® / sustainable design consultant: CSV Architects
  • Enhanced commissioning: Cathcart Mechanical Performance
  • City of Ottawa: Louise Cerveny, Planner, Project Manager, Planning and Growth Management; Shawn Lynch, Project Manager, Infrastructure Services Design and Construction Division

Environmental features

The building will incorporate a wide range of sustainable design features, which will reduce energy consumption, use of natural resources, impact on the environment, as well as providing a healthy environment through the use of low VOC emitting surface materials, millwork and furnishings that improve the overall air quality and occupant’s health and comfort. The building design is targeted for LEED® Silver certification in accordance with City of Ottawa policies. Some of the sustainable design features include:

  • Reduced energy consumption – Target 40 percent cost savings
  • Water saving in landscape design with water cistern storage and plumbing
  • Advanced storm water management to control run-off via bio swales and landscaping
  • High energy efficient windows and doors along with passive solar design
  • Radiant in-floor heating and an increased attention to air quality through-out
  • Photo voltaic roof panel systems to generate electricity back to the Hydro One grid.
  • Solar hot water systems reducing the energy used to generate the daily requirements
  • Enhanced commissioning procedures to maximize effectiveness of all systems.
  • Robust building envelope and durable building material selection and detailing
  • Use of natural, renewable, recycled and regionally produced materials within
  • Reduced use of toxic construction materials and low VOC surface materials and finishes
  • Reduced heat impact from the roof and landscaped area via steel roof and stone dust
  • Occupant control of temperature, natural ventilation, and lighting for greater comfort
  • Elimination of CFC refrigerants via a higher engineering goal and program
  • Convey and emphasize the ecology and environmental theme for childcare programming

Industrial Bus Garage

Project

Size

Construction Value

Completion / Estimated Completion Date

LEED® Rating

Target Rating

Articulated bus maintenance garage
755 Industrial Ave., Ottawa

156,000 sq. ft.

$58 M

September 2010

 

LEED® Silver


The maintenance garage is one of two buildings, in which this building will support the bus maintenance operations for the new articulated bus maintenance facility for OC Transpo’s articulated bus fleet dispatched from this Industrial Road facility. This building will house the administration, maintenance, stores, fueling and cleaning functions and will include: office spaces; lounge and lunchroom facilities, training / meeting room space.

Design team

The design team consisted of:

  • Project manager: IBI Group
  • Architect: IBI Group
  • Structural engineer: IBI Group
  • Mechanical and electrical engineer: IBI Group
  • Civil engineer: IBI Group
  • LEED® AP: IBI Group
  • Interior designer: IBI Group
  • Landscape architect: Corush Sunderland Wright
  • Noise consultant: Swallow Acoustic Consultants Limited
  • Air quality consultant: A.J. Chandler and Associates
  • City of Ottawa: Paul Hussar, Project Manager and Robert Farris, Project Manager

Environmental features

In order to support the City of Ottawa’s guidelines for sustainable development the facility has been designed targeting achievement of LEED® Silver certification. The focus on this facility has been on reducing the energy usage using a combination of an energy efficient building skin (walls, roof and windows), high efficiency mechanical systems, and a sophisticated lighting and building control system.

To accent the energy usage the space has been designed to provide as pleasant atmosphere to the bus mechanics and other building occupants as possible. The building has been designed to provide excellent indoor air quality, and provide a bright comfortable workspace.

Key environmental works on this building:

  • Recycled content selection for construction materials
  • Building lighting — lighting control system to vary lighting based on time and ambient light conditions
  • Building glazing — maximum glazing to provide natural daylight and views to 75 percent of regularly occupied spaces
  • Construction innovation: rapid impact / dynamic compaction of soils

Kanata North Recreation Complex

Project

Size

Value

Estimated Completion

LEED® Rating (target)

Richcraft Recreation Complex - Kanata

90,000 sq ft

$36 M

Fall 2013

Gold

The Richcraft Recreation Complex - Kanata (RRCK)  will fulfill a long-standing need for a major recreation complex to serve the rapidly growing north-western region of the City of Ottawa, offering a range of community and recreation facilities.

On April 13th, 2011, Council approved the core recreation program for the RRCK project as the basis for the design, construction and operation of the new complex and site.

The complex will total approximately 90,000 sq. ft. of gross floor area, composed of the following building and site program spaces:

Building Program

  • 25 m, 8-lane pool
  • Leisure pool & facilities
  • Male, female & family change rooms
  • 2 Full-size gymnasia
  • Individual conditioning space
  • Youth Room
  • Meeting & multi-purpose rooms
  • Serving kitchen
  • Reception and Administration
     

Site Program

  • One full-size, artificial turf lighted sports field
  • Children’s play area (preschool & school-age)
  • Water play area
  • One full basketball court & one half-court
  • Skateboard Park
  • Vehicular drop-off & service vehicle access
  • Parking
  • Trillium Woods Trailhead

Design-Build Team

  • Contractor: Bondfield Construction Co. Ltd.
  • Architect: Salter Pilon Architecture Inc.
  • Landscape Architect: Douglas Ruhland Associates Ltd.
  • Skate Park: New Line Skateparks Inc.
  • LEED: Arborus Consulting
  • Structural Engineer: exp. Services Ltd.
  • Mechanical & Electrical Engineer: MCW Consultants Ltd.
  • Civil Engineer: Counterpoint Engineering Ltd.
  • Project Management: verTerra Corporation
  • City of Ottawa: Recreation Planning & Facility Development, Parks, Recreation & Cultural Services Department / Design & Construction, Buildings & Parks Branch, Infrastructure Services Department

Environmental features

The RRCK is designed to meet LEEDTM (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Gold certification. Mechanical systems will minimize energy use and follow environmentally friendly principles, including:

  • Water-efficient plumbing fixtures will reduce water use by 30% compared to standard plumbing fixtures.
  • A greywater recovery system will recover shower and lavatory water. Separate sanitary piping will convey the greywater to a 5,000-litre cistern in the basement. Greywater will pass through a biofilter, chlorinator and UV sterilization system before being pumped back to the water closets and urinals.
  • A ground source heat pump system will use a geoexchange field underneath the outdoor soccer fields as a heat sink in the summer and heat source in the winter for the building. Preliminary energy modelling prepared by NORR Architects & Engineers indicates that the project will be 50% more energy efficient than a comparable Model National Energy Code for Buildings (MNECB) reference building, resulting in estimated energy savings of 5,095 GJ annually.
  • HVAC systems are designed to meet ASHRAE 55-2004 Thermal Comfort Conditions for Human Occupancy. Space temperature setpoints will be adjusted through the Building Automation System (BAS).
  • Roof top units and ceiling mounted heat pumps will contain no hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs).
  • Space return air will be drawn from low-level wall-mounted return air grilles to maximize the space air change effectiveness.
  • Change rooms and washrooms will be exhausted through a central heat recovery ventilator. This recovered heat will be used to supplement space heating.
  • The swimming pool space will be conditioned by a unit that reclaims heat from an integral dehumidifier. The unit will reject heat to the pool water or to the heat pump loop, enabling the surplus heat to be reused elsewhere in the building. The unit will be capable of providing 100% outdoor air when outside air conditions are suitable for economizer operation.
  • The Building Automation System will monitor and control all building mechanical systems and provide scheduling, optimum start/stop of major equipment, and maintenance.
  • Air flow to all program rooms will be modulated based on CO² sensors to ensure ideal indoor temperature and humidity when occupied, and minimal air flow during unoccupied times, thereby optimizing energy consumption.
  • A robust air barrier component, with all insulation installed outboard of this air barrier, will result in a uniform, continuous thermal and air/vapour barrier and eliminate air movement from exterior to interior.
  • Thermally-broken aluminum window frames with thermal edge low conductivity spacers at all perimeters with low ‘E’, argon-filled double- or triple-glazing. A two-component, closed-cell spray-applied foam system will be installed to maintain continuity of air barrier from wall system to window framing system.

Kanata West Fire Station No 46

Project

Size

Construction Value

Completion / Estimated Completion Date

LEED Rating

Target Rating

Kanata West Fire Station No. 46
34 Iber Road, Ottawa
12,250 sq. ft. $3.8 M February 2011  LEED® Silver LEED® Silver

The project began in 2008 initiating a density and response study which concluded additional fire service was required allocating $5.7M for the construction of a new 3 Bay Urban Fire Station. CSV Architects, in consultation with City staff, have prepared a reduced spatial program for 2010.

Totalling 1138 m2 (12,250 sq.ft.), the schematic design covers the full program of spatial requirements: the lobby, offices, dorms, locker rooms, dining / kitchen, washrooms, storage, meeting / training, watch room, exercise room, equipment spaces, apparatus bay, gear room, hose tower, clean room, and janitorial room. The exterior program includes a natural site, extraction compound, parking, on-site storm water management, and natural landscaping.

Design team

The design team consisted of:

  • Architect: CSV Architects
  • Structural engineer: Halsall Associates
  • Mechanical and electrical engineer: McKee Engineering
  • Landscape architect: Lashley & Associates
  • Site services / civil engineer: McIntosh & Perry Consulting Engineers
  • LEED® / sustainable design consultant: CSV Architects
  • Interior designer: Turnbull Design Consultants
  • Enhanced commissioning: Cathcart Mechanical Performance
  • City of Ottawa: Shawn Lynch, Project Manager, Infrastructure Services, Design, Construction and Architecture

Environmental features

The building will incorporate a wide range of sustainable design features, which will reduce energy consumption, use of natural resources, impact on the environment, as well as improve the occupant’s health and comfort. The building design received LEED® Silver certification in accordance with City of Ottawa policies. Some of the sustainable design features include:

  • Reduced energy consumption – target 40 percent cost savings
  • Water saving in landscape design with water infiltration and storage
  • Advanced storm water management to control run-off via bio swales and landscaping
  • High energy efficient windows and doors along with passive solar design
  • Radiant in-floor heating and an increased attention to air quality through-out
  • Enhanced commissioning procedures to maximize effectiveness of all systems.
  • Robust building envelope and durable building material selection and detailing
  • Use of natural, renewable, recycled and regionally produced materials within
  • Reduced use of toxic construction materials and low VOC surface materials and finishes
  • Reduced heat impact from the roof and landscaped area via steel roof and plantings
  • Occupant control of temperature, natural ventilation, and lighting / glazing for comfort
  • Elimination of CFC refrigerants via a higher engineering goal and program
  • Convey and emphasize the ecology and environmental theme for visitors of all ages

Kinburn Arena

Project

Size

Value

Completion / Estimated Completion Date

LEED® Rating

Target Rating

Kinburn Arena
5670 Carp Road, Kinburn

34,500 sq. ft.

$5.4 M

TBD

 

LEED® xxxxx


This rural site is 4.0 hectares in area and is geographically central in the former Township of Kinburn, immediately southwest of Constance Bay. The specific site is located at the southeast corner of the intersection of Kinburn Side Road and Carp Road and is approximately 15 minutes north of the Kanata North Business Park.

This project is a P3 project and includes the design, construction and operation of the arena, the existing Client Service Centre building and a new paramedic post. The arena is a 34,500 square foot indoor recreation ice complex housing one NHL ice surface, change rooms, a lobby and a concession area.

Design team

The design team consisted of:

Morley Hoppner Group, EMA Architects

  • Structural engineer: Adjeleian Allen Rubeli Engineers
  • Mechanical and electrical engineer: Stantec Engineering
  • Landscape architect: Douglas & Ruhland Associates
  • Civil engineer: Novatech Engineers
  • LEED® / sustainable design consultant:
  • Interior design:
  • Enhanced commissioning:
  • City of Ottawa:

Environmental features

The building will incorporate a wide range of sustainable design features, which will reduce energy consumption, use of natural resources, impact on the environment, as well as improve the occupant’s health and comfort. The building design is targeted for LEED® xxxxx certification in accordance with City of Ottawa policies. Some of the sustainable design features include:

  • Use of T-5 light fixtures, complete with occupancy sensors in the rink for reduced energy consumption, switchable lighting levels and a more even light distribution on the ice surface
  • Implementation of a durable building plan to ensure extended service life of the building and its components
  • Water saving in landscape design and plumbing
  • Control of storm water run-off and storage of this water on site for firefighting purposes complete with a dry hydrant system
  • Hydronic in-floor heating in the change rooms, washrooms and shower areas for improved user health and comfort
  • Heat recovery for the change rooms, washrooms and shower area ventilation and exhaust system
  • Heat recovery from the refrigeration plant to heat hot water for the ice-resurfacing machine
  • Enhanced commissioning procedures to maximize effectiveness of building systems
  • Elimination of CFC refrigerants
  • Use of renewable and recycled materials
  • Reduced use of toxic construction materials
  • Control by occupants of temperature, natural ventilation, and lighting for greater comfort
  • Use of web camera and web site for public education

Minto Recreation Complex - Barrhaven

About the building

Project

Size

Value

Completion

Target LEED®

Rating

Minto Recreation Complex - Barrhaven
3500 Cambrian Road

163,000 sq. ft.

$54 M

November 2014

 LEED® Silver

The south entrance to the Minto Recreation Complex – Barrhaven

Minto Recreation Complex – Barrhaven is one of the City’s green recreational facilities. This project has pursued LEED® Silver certification, to verify the building has achieved sustainability targets and reduced its environmental impact.

Minto Recreation Complex serves the growing Barrhaven community with 2 NHL-sized ice rinks, a 6-lane, 25 metre lap pool and a leisure pool, both with an accessible ramp. An exterior artificial turf sports field is built to meet CFL standards and accommodates soccer. Exterior landscaping incorporates storm water ponds with native vegetation to help retain rain water and prevent surcharging of street storm water sewers.

The building is two floors of recreation and multipurpose spaces with a basement for pool structure and pool mechanical services. The structure is cast in place concrete atop piled foundation. The exterior finish is a combination of masonry and metal cladding which does not require lifecycle refinishing. The site promotes pedestrian and cycling access and the adjacent school has convenient access for pre and after school use. The facility interior incorporates natural sunlight throughout the recreational spaces. The interior incorporates visual transparency between spaces, allowing the public to view into the arenas, natatorium and gymnasium from upper and lower level lobby areas. Interior and exterior finishes are designed for durability and allow high capacity public use. The first year of operations reports over a million public visits to the facility which speaks to the positive community response to the facility.

Green features

Minto Recreation Complex incorporates sustainable design features, which helps reduce energy consumption, use of natural resources, impact on the environment, and improve occupant health and comfort. Some of these features include:

  • Diversion of construction waste from landfill during construction.
  • Durable building construction for longer life cycle and mitigate the requirement for repairs or refinishing.
  • Incorporates materials that contain recycled content, to reduce the need to extract and process new materials.
  • Materials and services sourced regionally, to reduce the environmental impact of material transportation.
  • Wood products sourced from sustainably managed forests.
  • Low-emitting interior materials and finishes to improve indoor air quality for building users.
  • The building facility staff use green cleaning products and do not use harsh chemicals for cleaning.
  • Low flow water efficient plumbing fixtures and low power LED lighting.
  • Energy monitoring through Building Automation Systems to improve the efficiency of mechanical and electrical systems.
  • Electrical and natural gas metering on major components to better monitor equipment energy usage.
  • Enhanced commissioning to maximize effectiveness of building mechanical and electrical systems.
  • Variable speed motors and drives so powered mechanisms operate more efficiently and lower power requirements.
  • The facility makes use of the arena ice plant refrigeration process heat by-product by circulating rejected heat through the pool change room in-floor heating systems.
  • Removed snow from regular ice clearing by the Zamboni is processed in snow melt pits heated with plant process rejected heat.
  • Light coloured reflective roofing to achieve a higher albedo and reduce the heat island effect of the building.
  • Bike parking and pedestrian pathways to encourage active non- motorized site access.
  • No landscape irrigation system, and landscape vegetation does not require irrigation.
  • Chemical fertilizers and pesticides are not use in any landscape maintenance.
  • Warranty inspection and follow-up performance verification of commissioned mechanical systems to verify post-occupancy performance.
  • Public art component incorporated facility materials.
  • A wide variety of well attended programs and activities ensure the facility makes full use of heated and lit spaces.

Design and construction team

The consultants involved in the project include:

  • Architect: Perkins+Will
  • Structural Engineer: Halsall
  • Mechanical / Electrical Engineer: Smith + Andersen
  • Landscape Architect: Corush Sunderland Wright
  • Civil engineer: Novatech Engineering
  • Commissioning: Cathcart Mechanical.
  • LEED®: Perkins+Will
  • Consulting Project Management. verTerra Corporation.
  • Building Envelop Consultant. Patenaude Trempe Van Dalen Inc.
  • Contractor: EllisDon
  • City of Ottawa: Kevin Wherry, Parks & Recreation client department representative. Richard Fouchard / Chris Wanczycki, Senior Project Managers, Infrastructure Services, Design and Construction.

Orléans (Shenkman) Arts Centre

Project

Size

Construction Value

Completion / Estimated Completion Date

LEED® Rating

Target Rating

Orléans (Shenkman Arts Centre
245 Centrum Boulevard, Orléans

86,000 sq. ft.

$25 M

June 2009

 

LEED® Silver

On 23 May 2006, Council authorized staff to proceed to enter into negotiations with Orléans Town Centre Partnership for the construction of an Orléans Arts Centre, the sale and lease back of the Orléans Client Service Centre and the sale and development of 9.5 hectares of City-owned vacant land in the Orléans Town Centre.

The Orléans Arts Centre (Shenkman Arts centre) was designed and constructed as an efficient, community-based performing arts centre. The building totals an approximate gross floor area of 8,000 square metres (86,000 square feet).

Council choose the option to showcase the City’s efforts toward achieving sustainable building practices by achieving the City's first LEED® Silver rated building.

By adding to the budget the additional capital cost of approximately $100K, a LEED® Silver rating resulted in specific modifications to the mechanical and electrical systems that will produce long-term efficiencies and reduce operating costs. The upgrades will also relate to enhanced operating measures and controls by the P3 operator (BLJC-JCI) to further reduce operating costs.

It is projected that the annual operating savings related to these LEED® Silver upgrades will exceed the increased annual payment, resulting in a net savings to the City from day one of occupancy of the centre. Because energy costs are predicted to increase through the term of the P3 Agreement, a LEED® Silver rating should cause additional net savings to the City in the future.

Design team

The design team consisted of:

  • P3 partner: Forum Equity Partners Inc.
  • Design builder: Aecon Buildings
  • Architect: Lalande Doyle Architects (L+D)
  • Structural engineer: Adjeleian Allen Rubeli Ltd.
  • Mechanical and electrical engineer: Genivar
  • Landscape architect: James B. Lennox & Associates Inc.
  • Site services / civil engineer: Novatech Engineering
  • LEED® / sustainable design consultant: Genivar
  • City of Ottawa: Richard Fouchard, Project Manager, Infrastructure Services, Design & Construction Architecture

Environmental features

The building will incorporate a wide range of sustainable design features, which will reduce energy consumption, use of natural resources, impact on the environment, as well as improve the occupant’s health and comfort. The building design is targeted for LEED® Silver certification in accordance with City of Ottawa policies. Some of the sustainable design features include:

  • Mechanical and electrical systems that will produce long-term efficiencies and reduce operating costs.
  • Easy access to public transportation and shared parking to help minimize the impact of automobile transportation to the facility.
  • Water efficiency in landscape design and plumbing fixture selection.
  • Elimination of ozone depleting substances from the HVAC equipment.
  • Re-use of materials through specified recycled content and the support of locally produced building materials.
  • Re-use of trees from the site to produce Lobby ceiling panels, some musical instruments and wood for the sculpting studio
  • Increased air quality through the use of automated control strategies combined with continuous monitoring of temperatures and humidity.
  • An education strategy to increase public awareness of sustainable building construction.

Ottawa Paramedic Service Headquarters

Project

Size

Construction Value

Completion / Estimated Completion Date

LEED® Rating

Target Rating

Ottawa Paramedic Service Headquarters
2465 Don Reid Drive , Ottawa

100,000 sq. ft.

$18.9 M

March 2006

LEED® Certified

LEED® Certified

In December 2005, the Ottawa Paramedic Service (OPS) moved into their new headquarters located on Don Reid Drive. This 100,000 square foot facility consolidates the OPS’ previous operations into a single building to serve the residents of Ottawa. The building was designed by Griffiths Rankin Cook Architects and design-built by Aecon Westeinde Alliance Incorporated.

The project is the result of a Public Private Partnership between Forum Leasehold Partners and the City of Ottawa to design- build-lease and operate the facility for the next 25 years. The project incorporates sustainable design features to minimize its environmental impact and operational costs. The project received LEED® certification July 24, 2006.

Design team

The design team consisted of:

  • Architect: GRC Architects
  • Mechanical and electrical engineer: Genivar
  • LEED® / sustainable design consultant: Enermodal
  • City of Ottawa: Robert Faris, Project Manager, Infrastructure Services, Design & Construction Architecture

Environmental features

The building incorporates a wide range of sustainable design features, which reduces energy consumption, use of natural resources, impact on the environment, as well as improves the occupant’s health and comfort. The building design was targeted for LEED® certification in accordance with City of Ottawa policies. Some of the sustainable design features include:

  • Reduced energy consumption – better than Model National Energy Code for Buildings (MNECB)
  • Water saving in plumbing fixtures that reduce water consumption by 40%
  • Native drought resistance landscape planting that will require no irrigation.
  • Recycled content in materials saves on extracting new material.
  • Use of regionally produced materials
  • Construction waste diversion exceeded 75 percent.
  • Wood on the project selected from sustainably harvested forests, certified by the Forest Stewardship Council.
  • Control by occupants of temperature, natural ventilation and lighting for greater comfort.
  • Enhanced indoor air quality during construction and testing prior to occupancy.

Overbrook Community Centre Expansion

Project

Size

Construction Value

Completion / Estimated Completion Date

LEED Rating

Target Rating

Overbrook Community Centre expansion
33 Quill Street, Ottawa

7,500 sq. ft.

$3.1 M

March 2011

 

LEED® Silver / Gold

This project includes interior upgrades to the existing Community Centre and a 7,500 sq. ft. expansion including a new gym and a multi-purpose room. Of the $3.1M construction budget, approximately $1.1M is directed towards upgrades to the existing facility and approximately $2M is directed towards the new construction and enhanced site works. The LEED® scope of work to be submitted to the CaGBC will include the area of the new addition plus the existing South-West wing where the bulk of renovation work will occur.

Design Team

The design team consists of:

  • Architect: CSV Architects
  • Structural engineer: Halsall Associates Limited
  • Mechanical and electrical engineer: McKee Engineering
  • Landscape architect: Corush Sunderland Wright Limited
  • Civil engineer: Capital Engineering Group Limited
  • Energy modelling: Morrison Hershfield
  • Commissioning: Arborus Consulting
  • City of Ottawa: Burl Walker, Project Manager for Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services and Richard Fouchard, Project Manager, Infrastructure Services, Design & Construction Architecture

Environmental Features

The building will incorporate a wide range of sustainable design features, which will reduce energy consumption, use of natural resources, and impact on the environment, and will improve occupant health and comfort. The building design was originally targeting LEED® Silver certification in accordance with City of Ottawa policies; currently the LEED® scorecard indicates that a LEED® Gold certification may be attainable. Some of the sustainable design features include:

  • Heat recovery from washroom exhaust
  • Water conservation in landscape design and plumbing (over 30 percent reduction)
  • Addition of trees at parking areas and a white roof (high albedo) for a reduced heat island effect
  • Energy performance – targeting 40 percent less energy consumption than the Model National Energy Code for Buildings (MNECB)
  • Robust building envelope and durable building material selection and detailing
  • Use of FSC Certified wood products
  • Construction waste management – targeting 85 percent diversion from landfill
  • Control of storm water run-off
  • Enhanced commissioning procedures to maximize effectiveness of mechanical systems
  • Elimination of CFC refrigerants
  • Use of renewable, recycled and regionally produced materials (targeting beyond 20 percent)
  • Reduced use of toxic construction materials
  • Control by occupants of temperature, natural ventilation, and lighting for greater comfort
  • Over 90 percent of spaces to have natural day lighting and views to outside

Vars Fire Station No 73

Project

Size

Construction Value

Completion / Estimated Completion Date

LEED® Rating

Target Rating

City of Ottawa Fire Station No. 47
Rockdale Road, Vars

8,800 sq. ft.

$2M

July 2007

LEED® Certified

LEED® Certified


In July 2007 construction was completed on the new City of Ottawa Fire Station 73 located on Rockdale Road, Vars. The 820m2 (8800 sq ft) volunteer manned station replaces the existing one in Vars which has passed the end of its serviceable life. The new building was awarded the LEED Certified designation on March 9, 2011.

Design team

The design team consisted of:

  • Architects: CSV Architects
  • Structural engineer: Halsall Engineers
  • Mechanical and electrical engineer: McKee Engineering
  • Landscape architect: Lashley & Associates.
  • Civil engineer: McIntosh & Perry Consulting Engineers
  • Construction: Garvey Construction
  • City of Ottawa: Richard Fouchard, Project Manager, Infrastructure Services Design and Construction

Environmental features

The building incorporates a wide range of sustainable design features, which will reduce energy consumption, use of natural resources, impact on the environment, and improve occupant health and comfort. The building design is targeted for LEED® certification in accordance with City of Ottawa policies. Some of the sustainable design features include:

  • Water saving in landscape design and plumbing
  • Control of storm water run-off
  • Reduced heat impact from the roof
  • Enhanced commissioning procedures to maximize effectiveness of building systems
  • Reduced energy consumption
  • Use of in-floor radiant heating
  • Elimination of CFC refrigerants
  • Use of renewable and recycled materials
  • Reduced use of toxic construction materials
  • Control by occupants of temperature, natural ventilation, and lighting for greater comfort