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Smoke-free – Public Places (By-law No. 2001-148)

Disclaimer

By-laws contained in this section have been prepared for reference purposes only. Every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of this information; however it is not to be used in place of actual by-laws.

Actual by-laws can be obtained at the following locations:

City Archives
James Bartleman Centre
100 Tallwood Dr. (Corner of Woodroffe)
Ottawa, Ontario
tel.: 613-580-2857
fax : 613-580-2614
e-mail: archives@ottawa.ca

Ottawa Public Library
120 Metcalfe, Ottawa Room
613-580-2945

A by-law of the City of Ottawa respecting smoking in public places.

WHEREAS the Council of the City of Ottawa has the authority to pass by-laws prohibiting and regulating the smoking of tobacco and the carrying of lighted tobacco products in public places within the municipality pursuant to Section 213 of the Municipal Act, R.S.O. 1990, Chap. M.45, as amended;

AND WHEREAS it has been determined that second hand tobacco smoke (exhaled smoke and the smoke from idling cigarettes, cigars and pipes) is a health hazard or discomfort for many inhabitants of the City of Ottawa;

THEREFORE the Council of the City of Ottawa enacts as follows:

Definitions
1. In this by-law:
(a) "amusement arcade" means a place to which the public has access and which is equipped with five (5) or more machines or devices that may be used for playing games solely for the entertainment and amusement of the players;
(b) "arena" means any building, location or premises comprised of, but not restricted to, a rink, floor or ice surface, spectator seating areas, dressing rooms and canteen facilities, to which the public has access to view or participate in sporting events;
(c) "ashtray" means a receptacle for tobacco ashes and for cigar and cigarette butts;
(d) "bar" means an establishment licensed by the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario where persons under 19 years of age are not permitted to enter, either as a patron or as an employee;
(e) "barber shop" or "hairdressing establishment" means any building, location or premises where hair is styled, cut, trimmed, treated or washed;
(f) "bingo hall" means any building, location or premises where the conduct of bingo events is licensed;
(g)  "City" means the City of Ottawa;
(h) "City Clerk" means the City Clerk of the City of Ottawa;
(i) "common area" means any indoor area of a building that is open to the public for the purposes of access to a retail shop, establishment or office and includes corridors, passageways, unenclosed eating areas in corridors, passageways, public restrooms, unenclosed public seating areas and unenclosed public standing areas, whether or not the eating area, seating area or standing area is leased;
(j) "Council" means the City Council of the City of Ottawa;
(k) "food court" means an area within a shopping mall where food or drink is offered for sale or sold to the public for immediate consumption;
(l) "inspector" means a person appointed by Council as a municipal by-law enforcement officer to enforce this by-law;
(m) "laundromat" means any facility, premises or area within a building to which the public has access established for the purposes of laundering, washing or drying on a self-service basis;
(n) "person" includes a corporation;
(o) "place of public assembly" means the whole or part of an indoor area to which the public has access by right or by invitation, express or implied, whether by payment of money or not, but does not include a place when used exclusively by one or more individuals for a private gathering or personal purpose;
(p) "proprietor or other person in charge" means the person who controls, governs or directs the activity carried on within the premises designated as prohibited areas under this by-law and includes the person who is actually in charge thereof at any particular time;
(q) "public building" means any enclosed building or group of buildings to which the public has access;
(r) "public facility" means any hall, room, or banquet area that is publicly owned and is rented for an event or function; 
(s) “public place” means,
(a) the whole or part of an indoor area to which the general public is invited or permitted access and includes a school bus; and
(b) an outdoor patio
(amended by By-law Nos. 2012-87 and 2012-119)
(t) "public portion" means the area of any building to which the public has access;
(u) "public restroom" means any restroom or washroom to which the public has access;
(v) "reception area" means the public space used by an office or establishment for the receiving or greeting of customers, clients or other persons dealing with such office or establishment;
(w) "restaurant" means an establishment engaged in the sale and service of food or drink or both food and drink to the public for consumption on the premises but does not include a bar;
(x) "retail shop" means any building or part of a building, booth, stall or place where goods are exposed for sale or offered for sale by retail;
(y) "school bus" means a public vehicle licensed for the purpose of transporting children to and from school or to or from any activity, event or function associated therewith;
(z) "service counter" means an indoor counter where a person receives a service including, but not limited to, the exchange of money, sales, provision of information, transactions, advice or the transfer of money or goods;
(aa) "service line" means an indoor line of two (2) or more persons awaiting service of any kind regardless of whether or not such service involves the exchange of money, including but not limited to sales, transactions, provision of information or advice and transfers of money or goods;
(ab) "shopping mall" means any enclosed building or group of buildings containing one or more retail shops; and
(ac) "smoke" or "smoking" includes the carrying of a lighted cigar, cigarette, pipe or any other lighted smoking equipment. 
(ad) “outdoor patio” means an outdoor area, whether enclosed or not, of a bar, restaurant or food court where food, beverages, wine, spirits or any of them may be consumed by or served to the public or members of a club or organization but does not include that part of the outdoor area that is located on the highway;
(ae) “highway”means a common and public highway and includes any bridge, trestle, viaduct or other structure forming part of the highway and, except as otherwise provided, includes a portion of the highway.
(definitions (ad) and (ae) added by By-law No. 2012-87)

General Prohibitions

2. The following are designated public places for the purposes of this by-law:
(a) the common area of a public building;
(b) an indoor service line or service counter in any premise to which the public has access;  
(c) a place of public assembly;
(d) a public restroom;
(e) a food court;  
(f) a public facility;  
(g) a reception area;
(h) the public portion of an amusement arcade;  
(i) a municipally owned building;
(paragraph (i) amended by By-law No. 2012-87)
(j) a bingo hall;
(k) a bowling alley;
(l) a billiard hall;
(m) the public portion of any restaurant;
(n) the Rideau Carleton Slots facility located at 4837 Albion Road in the old municipality of the City of Gloucester;
(o) the public portion of any bar;
(p) an arena;
(q) the public portion of any retail shop;
(r) the common area of a shopping mall  
(s) the public portion of any laundromat;
(t) the public portion of any barber shop or hairdressing establishment;
(u) the Frank Clair Stadium, Jetform Park and the Terry Fox Athletic Facility Stadium or any successor name to such facilities arising from a sponsorship agreement; 
(paragraph (u) amended by By-law No. 2012-87)
(v) a school bus;  
(w) a taxicab;
(x) a limousine;
(y) an outdoor patio.
(paragraph (y) added by By-law No. 2012-87) 
3. No person shall smoke in any public place designated under Section 2 of this by-law.

Signs

4. The proprietor or other person in charge of any public place designated or regulated under this by-law shall ensure that a sufficient number of signs as prescribed by Section 7 are conspicuously posted so as to clearly identify that smoking is prohibited.
(amended by By-law No. 2001-447)
5. Despite section 4, in every shopping mall or other public building referred to in Section 2 , the proprietor or other person in charge of the shopping mall or other public building shall ensure that,
(a) signs are posted in accordance with Section 7 in every common area of the shopping mall or other public building,
(b) signs are posted at every entrance to the shopping mall or other public building, which are visible and in sufficient numbers, clearly indicating in English and in French that smoking is prohibited in the common areas of the shopping mall or other public building, and
(c) signs referred to in clauses (a) and (b) are in accordance with Section 7.
6. Despite Section 4, in every bar, the proprietor or other person in charge of a bar shall ensure that a sign or signs is posted at every entrance to the bar that clearly identifies in English and French that the bar will be smoke-free.
7. (1) The signs referred to in this by-law shall consist of graphic symbols that comply with the provisions of this section.
(2) The following graphic symbol shall be used to indicate the areas where smoking is prohibited pursuant to this by-law: on a white background with the circle and the interdictory stroke in red.
(3) The graphic symbol referred to in subsection (2) shall include the text "City of Ottawa By-law/Règlement municipal de la Ville d'Ottawa" in letters and figures at least five (5%) percent of the diameter of the circle in the symbol.
(4) To the symbols referred to in subsection (2) there may be added additional appropriate symbols such as directional arrows.
(5) Despite the fact that the symbol referred to in subsection (2) is a cigarette, it shall include a lighted cigar, cigarette, pipe or any other lighted smoking instrument.
(6) With respect to size of the graphic symbol, the diameter of the circle in the symbol referred to in subsection (2) shall be not less than the number of centimetres prescribed below, based upon the maximum viewing distance in direct line of sight, as follows:
(a) three (3 m) metres or less - ten (10 cm) centimetres,
(b) six (6 m) metres or less - fifteen (15 cm) centimetres,
(c) twelve (12 m) metres or less - twenty (20 cm) centimetres,
(d) twenty-four (24 m) metres or less - thirty (30 cm) centimetres,
(e) forty-eight (48 m) metres or less - forty (40 cm) centimetres,
(f) seventy-two (72 m) metres or less - sixty (60 cm) centimetres.
(7) Despite subsection (6), the diameter of the circle in the symbol referred to in subsection (5) used pursuant to Section 7 to be erected at the entrance to every shopping mall or other public building shall be a minimum of ten (10 cm) centimetres.
(8) Deviations from the colour or content of the signs prescribed by this section that do not affect the substance or that are not calculated to mislead do not vitiate the signs.
(9) Any sign prohibiting smoking that refers to a by-law of an old municipality is deemed to be referring to this by-law.
(10) Despite subsection (6), with respect to taxicabs or limousines, the diameter of the circle in the graphic symbol referred to in subsection (2) and used pursuant to Section (6) shall be not less than ten (10) centimetres.
Ashtrays
8. The proprietor or other person in charge of a public place regulated under this by-law shall ensure that no ashtrays are placed or allowed to remain in any public place where smoking is prohibited pursuant to this by-law.
Council-Approved Policies
9. Council-approved non-smoking policies with respect to the public portions of the City's buildings are deemed to be specified within this by-law.
10. No person shall smoke in any area designated as an area where smoking is prohibited by any Council-approved policy referred to in Section 9.
Duties
11. No proprietor or other person in charge of a public place shall permit smoking where smoking is prohibited under this by-law.
Offences
12. (1) Subject to subsection (2), every person who contravenes any provision of this by-law is guilty of an offence as provided for in subsection 429(1) of the Municipal Act, 2001.
(2) Every person who hinders or obstructs a person lawfully carrying out the enforcement of this by-law is guilty of an offence.
13. A person who is convicted of an offence under Section 12 of this by-law is liable to a minimum fine of $500.00 and a maximum fine of $100,000.00 as provided for in subsection 429(3) 1. of the Municipal Act, 2001.
14. A person who is convicted of an offence under Section 12 of this by-law is liable, for each day or part of a day that the offence continues, to a minimum fine of $500.00 and a maximum fine of $10,000.00 and the total of all daily fines for the offence is not limited to $100,000.00 as provided for in subsection 429(3) 2. of the Municipal Act, 2001.
14A. When a person has been convicted of an offence under this by-law, the Superior Court of Justice or any court of competent jurisdiction thereafter, may, in addition to any penalty imposed on the person convicted, issue an order 
(a) prohibiting the continuation or repetition of the offence by the person convicted; and
(b) requiring the person convicted to correct the contravention in the manner and within the period that the court considers appropriate.
(Sections 12 to 14A amended by By-law No. 2012-87)
Enforcement
15. (1) The provisions of this by-law respecting the designation of non-smoking areas, the posting of signs and the duties imposed on the proprietor or other person in charge of a public place shall be enforced by inspectors.
(2) An inspector may, at any reasonable time, enter any designated public place for the purposes of determining compliance with this by-law.
Conflicts
16. If a provision of this by-law conflicts with an Act or a regulation or another by-law, the provision that is the most restrictive of smoking shall prevail.
Severability
17. If any section or sections of this by-law or parts thereof are found in any court of law to be illegal or beyond the power of Council to enact, such section or sections or parts thereof shall be deemed to be severable and all other sections or parts of this by-law shall be deemed to be separate and independent therefrom and to be enacted as such.
Repeal
18. The following by-laws of the old municipalities are repealed:
(a) By-law No. 116 of 2000 of the Corporation of the City of Gloucester entitled "The City of Gloucester Public Places Smoking By-law";
(b) By-law No. 30/2000 of The Corporation of the Township of Rideau entitled "Being a by-law to regulate smoking in public places";
c) By-law No. 69-93 of The Corporation of the City of Kanata entitled "Being a by-law of the Corporation of the City of Kanata to regulate smoking in public places", as amended;
(d) By-law No. 115-92 of the Corporation of the City of Nepean entitled "Being a by-law of The Corporation of the City of Nepean to regulate smoking in public places", as amended;
(e) By-law No. 82-97 of the Corporation of the Township of Osgoode entitled "Being a by-law respecting smoking in Municipal Owned Recreation Facilities";
(f) By-law 24-98 of The Corporation of the Township of Cumberland entitled "Being a by-law to regulate smoking in all facilities owned and/or operated by the Corporation of the Township of Cumberland";  
(g) By-law No. 3502 of the Corporation of the City of Vanier entitled "Being a by-law to repeal by-law numbers 2826 and 2889 and to designate smoking areas in municipal facilities";
(h) By-law No. 47 of 1995 of the Corporation of the Township of West Carleton entitled "Being a by-law respecting smoking in public places"; and
(i) By-law Number 123-92 of The Corporation of the City of Ottawa entitled "A by-law of The Corporation of the City of Ottawa respecting smoking in public places", as amended.

Effective Date

19. This by-law shall come into effect on August 1, 2001.

Short Title

20. This by-law may be cited as the "Public Places By-law".

ENACTED AND PASSED this 9th day of May, 2001
CITY CLERK - MAYOR

Updates

The links below are up-dates related to the smoke-free by-laws:

Nov. 2002Economic Impact Analysis of the No-Smoking By-Laws on the Hospitality Industry in Ottawa KPMG Report Executive Summary
Jul. 15, 2002No net reduction city-wide in visits to bars and restaurants. Public support grows for city's smoking by-law
May 28, 2002Appeal Court Upholds Ottawa Smoke-free Bylaws
Apr. 6, 2002City May Seek Injunctions Against Worst Smoking Offenders
May 6, 2002Letter Sent to Bar and Restaurant Proprietors on Behalf of By-law Services
Apr. 2, 2002City May Seek Injunctions Against Worst Smoking Offenders
Mar. 25, 2002$4,515 Fine in Smoking Case
Mar. 18, 2002$1,700 Fine in Smoking Case
Feb. 19, 2002Stern Warning and $2,400 Fine from Judge in Smoking Case
Dec. 2001Economic Impact Analysis of the No-Smoking By-Laws on the Hospitality Industry in Ottawa - KPMG Report Executive Summary

Economic Impact Analysis of the No-Smoking
By-Laws on the Hospitality Industry in Ottawa

Executive Summary - November 2002

This study reviews available evidence available concerning the impact on bars and restaurants of the smoke free by laws established in Ottawa, in August 2001.

An examination of the economic context indicates that Ottawa experienced significant disruption in two key elements of its economy over the period. Business travel to Ottawa decreased markedly, and was reflected in hotel occupancy rates declining from 65.7% to 58.7%. The high technology industry that spearheaded economic growth for a number of years experienced a significant reversal, with massive lay-offs by the two largest employers in particular, a reduction of 9,500 in total employment and a significant reduction in wealth among shareholders in the community. These impacts were somewhat off-set by growth in government employment and a strong housing market.

A survey of half the bars in the city attempted to quantify these effects more closely but received responses from only 51 establishments; with the result that it is not possible to extrapolate the results of such a small sample to bars generally. However six of the reporting bars showed sales declines that are not clearly related to the change in travel patterns or the shift in employment. The impacts experienced by these bars could be related to the smoke free by law, or to any of the other factors that influence the popularity of individual bars.

The food and beverage industry as a whole (including restaurants) continues to grow, with 90 establishments closing since the by law was implemented, and 123 establishments opening, resulting in approximately 1,200 licensed establishments. Turnover is the norm in this competitive industry that caters to rapidly changing consumer preferences, but the growth in numbers suggests the industry as a whole is healthy, with the greatest growth coming since May. The number of Employment Insurance applications by servers has also shown significant decline since May of this year. It is noted that hotel-based establishments have experienced a difficult year, likely related to the change in business travel, and that some west-end establishments, more dependent upon high technology clientele, have experienced a decline in sales. Bars did appear to have had a more difficult time than restaurants in the past year. A number of long term trends, such as reduced beer consumption, increased liquor consumption, and shifts from domestic to imported beer reflect the changing consumer preferences that pressure the industry. The smoking restrictions may have contributed to changing consumer preferences and the pressures on bars in some niches.

In the over-all economic context, the food and beverage industry appears to be stronger than one would expect. This suggests the smoke free by law has had little or no negative impact on the industry as a whole.

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Letter Sent to Bar and Restaurant Proprietors on Behalf of By-law Services - May 6, 2002

Dear Proprietor:

On behalf of the City of Ottawa, I would like take this opportunity to recognize the outstanding efforts made by those establishments that have been respecting the City's Smoke-Free By-laws. Be assured that they have not gone unnoticed.

The following is an update on recent developments in relation to those by-laws.

It has been eight months since the new regulations took effect and 95% of Ottawa's bars and restaurants are smoke-free. The citizens of Ottawa tell us that they rarely encounter smoking in bars and restaurants and that the new laws are a tremendous success. The general public appreciates your ongoing support of this important public health legislation.

Unfair Competition

As you are aware, a small number of establishments continue to violate the by-laws. Many of you have expressed concern that this is unfair and does not represent a level playing field. We fully share that concern and we are working vigorously to ensure full compliance with the regulations.

By-law Services staff is aggressively charging violators. To date, close to 1,000 charges have been laid, almost exclusively against the core group of flagrant violators. Further, the City's Legal Services team is aggressively prosecuting offences in Court. Ninety percent of prosecutions have resulted in convictions, including most recently a fine of $4,505 against the Newfoundland Pub, which unsuccessfully used the "private club" defence.

It has now become clear that various attempts to circumvent the law are ineffective. In response to this, some previously non-compliant establishments have gotten the message and have decided to go smoke-free. We welcome this change. It not only protects the health of staff and patrons but also helps eliminate unfair competition. Those establishments that join this group before they are convicted will be given consideration by the City Solicitor.

Regrettably, some businesses refuse to take advantage of this opportunity. This small group of flagrant violators is taking advantage of lengthy delays in the prosecution process. In response to this, a Committee of City Council decided on Tuesday, April 2, 2002, that more aggressive measures were necessary to ensure compliance and fairness. Such measures include:

  1. Authority for the City Solicitor to seek injunctions against the most serious offenders. An injunction is an order from the Superior Court to comply with the by-laws. Businesses that violate the injunction could be found in contempt of court and subject to fines of up to $25,000 and court costs.
  2. A commitment from a bar or restaurant to be smoke-free indoors is required before the City will issue a permit for a patio on City property.

Public Place and Workplace Definitions

Some business owners have erroneously believed that they could set up a so-called "private club" and allow smoking. The Court has ruled recently, in the cases of the Newfoundland Pub and Quickchef, that the Smokers' Choice model is not exempt from the by-law. In fact, the Court indicated that such "clubs" are a pretence designed to circumvent the by-law. The City is determined to preserve a level playing field and will vigorously prosecute any establishments that try to circumvent the law in this manner.

The rules surrounding this issue are clear:

  • if an establishment is open to or serves the public, it must be smoke-free under the Public Places By-law;
  • if an establishment has staff, it must be smoke-free under the Workplace By-law.

KPMG Economic Impact Study

Some establishments may have recently received a letter from the international consulting company, KPMG, which is conducting a four-part, scientific analysis of the economic and health impact of the smoke-free by-laws. The letter was sent to 150 establishments requesting their participation in Part Two of the study, which will focus on bars and pubs. The methodology of the study was discussed with the Ottawa Restaurant, Hotel and Motel Association and with PUBCO. Both groups encourage the recipients of the letter to participate in the study, the results of which will be available later this spring.

I trust that this information will be of assistance and thank you again for your on-going cooperation. Should you have questions about the enforcement of the smoke-free by-laws, please feel free to contact my office as indicated below.

Yours truly,

Susan Jones
Director
By-law Services

Smoke-free bylaws enforcement information for proprietors:

613-727-6699 (phone)
613-727-6701 (fax)
311@ottawa.ca

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Economic Impact Analysis of the No-Smoking
By-Laws on the Hospitality Industry in Ottawa

KPMG Report Executive Summary December 2001

Executive Summary

KPMG LLP has been engaged by the City of Ottawa to provide assistance in the ongoing monitoring of the economic and health impact of no smoking legislation enacted on August 01, 2001. This is the first of a series of quarterly reports KPMG will issue that will examine the impacts using credible, defensible and methodologically sound data.

The primary purposes of this report are to:

  1. Provide a brief review of economic impact studies carried out in other jurisdictions;
  2. Examine the methodologies and data sources KPMG will use to reach an objective and unbiased conclusion; and
  3. Provide the available preliminary data on potential economic impacts and the economic context.

Methodologically sound studies in other jurisdictions have found restrictive legislation does not have a permanent negative impact on restaurant, bar and pub sales, although short term effects have been observed, generally lasting a month or two, but occasionally as long as six months. Surveys based on establishment owners' or managers' perceptions of impact have often reported significant impacts, but these have not been born out by proper studies.

KPMG will use a variety of data sources and approaches to evaluate the impact in Ottawa. Retail sales tax returns will be the primary measure of sales change, but the analysis will have to consider the impact of the general economic trends, tourism trends, and the "September 11 effect" on sales volumes.

The effects on health and health care costs are hard to measure as they affect a substantial number of people and develop over an extended period of time. It will not be possible to measure them accurately in Ottawa over the current one-year period. However, based upon studies elsewhere, Dr. Ron Colman of GPI Atlantic has estimated the impact of tobacco related illness on the Ottawa economy at between $270 and $390 million. Workplace exposure to second hand smoke costs the economy an additional $40 million in health care costs and lost productivity.

Our next three quarterly reports will include:

  1. March, 2002 - a survey of pub and bar sales in Ottawa, based on random sampling and documentary evidence, and data on smoking prevalence.
  2. May, 2002 - results of a comprehensive analysis of retail sales tax returns for restaurants, bars and pubs in Ottawa (to January, 2002), compared with those in the rest of the province carried out by the Ontario Tobacco Research Unit of the Government of Ontario.
  3. September, 2002 - results of an econometric analysis of restaurant, bar and pub sales in Ottawa, distinguishing the effects of the by-law from the effects of the recession, the terrorist attacks, employment and travel changes and other factors, to be carried out by the Conference Board of Canada.

Each report will also provide other statistical data as relevant to monitor impact or establish the context of any observed changed. Some preliminary findings from this data include:

  • Employment in the Ottawa accommodation and food service sector appears to have risen 6.5% from June to October (from 22,800 to 24,300) despite the decline in total employment from 585,500 to 566,900 (a decline of 18,600 or 3.1%).
  • Similarly, Employment Insurance claims in the accommodation and food service industries actually declined by 5% in August 2001 compared to August 2000 and by 9% in October over a year previous. Claims increased by 1% in September 2001 relative to a year earlier.
  • Bankruptcy and insolvency statistics for restaurants are lower for the period August to November than they have been the last two years (7 verses 12 last year and 8 in 1999). Two "tavern, bar or nightclub" operations underwent insolvency procedures this year, verses one last year and two in 1999.

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Public Places Summary

The Public Places By-law prohibits smoking in certain public places in order to protect the City of Ottawa's inhabitants from the health hazards and discomfort of second-hand smoke.

 

Public Places:

Any indoor area to which the public has access is a public place including such places as retail shops, hairdressers, restaurants, bars, bingo and billiard halls, bowling alleys, taxicabs and limousines. There is no provision for designated smoking rooms in the by-law.

Duties of Owners and Managers:

All proprietors or persons in charge of public places:

  • Must ensure sufficient and conspicuous signage has been posted.
  • Must remove all ashtrays.
  • Other receptacles cannot be used for cigarette or cigar ashes or butts.
  • Must not permit smoking in their establishments.

Duties of the Public:

No person is to smoke in a public place designated in the by-law.

Enforcement:

Municipal By-law Enforcement officers may enter any public place to ensure compliance with the by-law.

Penalties:

Any person, including person in charge of public places, if convicted of an offence under this by-law, is subject to a fine of up to $5000.

This summary is intended as a quick reference guide for your use. For a copy of the by-law, you can call 3-1-1, or click here.

Report smoking in the public or workplace

To report a smoking violation, please select from the following list of locations or situations:

Smoking at a City Facility/Property

Smoking in a Common Area

Smoking at a Hospital or Long Term Care Facility

Smoking at Restaurant, Bar, Patio

Smoking at a School

Smoking Shisha/Hookah

Smoking in the Workplace Violation

Please note that we will do our best to have a by-law officer attend your location, although it may not be possible for one to arrive in time. We are, however, tracking all reported violations of the smoke-free regulations and the information provided will help us to determine problem areas within the City. With this information, by-law officers can conduct focused enforcement efforts based on data collected from public complaints and from staff reports as well.

For more information

Please refer to the tobacco page, the Smoke-Free Public Places By-Law (no. 2001-148) or the Smoke-Free Workplaces By-Law (no. 2001-149) for more information.