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Budget 2018

Budget Highlights

Ottawa is making great progress – our economy grows stronger, we are adding jobs and attracting families and business, quality of life for all our residents is improving, and we are securing a sustainable financial blueprint for 2019 and beyond. 2018 will see the opening of Stage 1 of the O-Train Confederation Line light rail transit system and the start of Stage 2 construction, which will dramatically change our city’s landscape and transportation network.

Draft Budget 2018 demonstrates Council’s commitment to growing our city by investing in the things that matter most to residents: continued protection of our critical infrastructure and assets, keeping our communities safe and vibrant, and making the environment a top priority. This budget makes secure and affordable investments in the City’s social and physical infrastructure which will pave the way to a progressive future for our city and its residents.

This term of Council’s record of achieving balance and staying within a 2 percent tax rate continues, while meeting our obligations under the minimum wage increase and helping community agencies who deliver important front line services to residents.

In order to keep Ottawa on pace with other large municipalities, our economy must remain a top priority. The Draft Budget 2018 offers a combination of investments that will further position Ottawa as a leading creator of jobs and enhance our ability to attract great talent. We will pursue economic development initiatives in partnership with stakeholders such as Invest Ottawa and post secondary institutions. This will position us to attract businesses and families now and into the future. Highlights of Draft Budget 2018 include:

An Affordable City

  • Limiting the proposed tax revenue increase for City and Police to 2 per cent
  • Limiting the proposed transit levy to 2.5 per cent
  • Limiting recreation fee increases on most programs and services to 2 per cent
  • Limiting the annual increase to garbage fees by $2 for single family and $1 for multi-residential households
  • Issuing the first green municipal bonds in Canada, making $102 million in capital available to build Stage 2 of light rail transit

A Caring City

  • $30 million over three years from the Province of Ontario for the Home for Good program, to create 150 new supportive housing units and support 310 households to find and maintain affordable housing
  • An additional $4.7 million for a total of $14.4 million in federal and provincial funding for the Investment in Affordable Housing program, a 48 per cent increase from 2017
  • $1.4 million from the Government of Canada for the Homelessness Partnering Strategy, which funds the Housing First Strategy
  • $1 million more in provincial funding for the Community Homelessness Prevention Initiative, which supports people at risk of or experiencing homelessness
  • Adding $760,000 for a total of $26.3 million in 2018 to housing and homelessness agencies
  • $13.6 million to support access to licensed child care in 2017 from provincial and federal governments Child Care Expansion funding, an additional investment of approximately $7.3 million is anticipated in 2018
  • $2.9 million increased provincial funding for the early years’ sector
  • Increasing funding to social services agencies by $675,000 (3 per cent) plus an additional $325,000 for a total investment of $23.1 million to support social service agencies that provide access to the basics including food programs, day programs, counselling and support services
  • Increasing the recreation fee subsidy to $1.1 million to assist low-income families gain access to recreation programs
  • Investing in our Paramedic Service by hiring 14 new paramedics
  • Continuing to fund crime prevention and adding 25 new police officers
  • Improving school safety by adding 10 adult school crossing guards
  • EquiFare, a new single-ride fare for low-income residents
  • $100,000 increase for transportation services provided by rural community support service agencies
  • $40,000 to each ward for the Temporary Traffic Calming Measures Program
  • $600,000 to install of accessible pedestrian countdown signals across the city

A Sustainable City

  • $2 million to the City’s Energy Evolution program, including $1 million to reduce energy consumption in City facilities and $500,000 to improve the City’s green vehicle fleet initiatives
  • $500,000 for community energy initiatives, which will be matched by the private sector
  • $24 million to improve the City’s fleet
  • $1.3 million to plant 125,000 trees and regenerate Ottawa’s forest cover across rural, suburban and urban communities
  • Up to $47 million over four years in provincial and federal funding to repair and retrofit social housing apartment buildings with energy efficient heating, improved insulation, window replacements
  • $9.8 million in additional funding for transit operations, for a total of $284.9 million
  • Expanding transit service for growing areas of the city with 17 buses purchased in 2017
  • $4 million to improve cycling facilities across the city
  • $3.5 million to conduct two environmental assessments as part of the Barrhaven Rail Safety Program for rail crossings at: Woodroffe Ave, Southwest Transitway and Fallowfield Road, and at the Jockvale Road multi-use pathway crossing

A Prosperous City

  • More than $550 million in 2018 alone to complete Stage 1 and begin procurement and early works for Stage 2 of the O-Train Confederation Line light rail transit project
  • $477 million to renew City infrastructure in 2018
  • $60.2 million in total infrastructure growth projects for 2018
  • $125 million to renew City assets, including buildings, pathways, roads, bridges, sidewalks and curbs, an increase of $10.5 million
  • More than $44 million to resurface and upgrade roadways, including portions of Nixon Drive, Gallagher Road, Longfields Drive, Maitland Avenue, West Hunt Club Road, Marvellville Road, Tenth Line Road and Stonehaven Drive
  • More than $8 million to renew of existing transit related assets including the buildings, Transitway roads and bridges, an increase of $2 million
  • More than $36.15 million to renew existing City buildings, facilities and parks
  • $7 million to build new parks
  • Increasing the winter operations budget by $2.3 million for a total of $68.3 million
  • Increasing the pothole repair program by $600,000 to a total of $8 million
  • $150,000 in additional funding for the Arts Momentum Fund, for a total of $300,000
  • $100,000 for a Community Improvement Program on Montreal Road to invest in redevelopment of lands or buildings that are underused, idled or in need of repair
  • Completing the new Ottawa Art Gallery and Arts Court facility and hiring 10 new staff
  • $330,000 in additional funding for arts, heritage and festival organizations for a total annual cultural funding budget of $11.3 million
  • 3 per cent increase to community recreation and outdoor rink grants

Details of the pie chart are provided in the table below.

2018 Total Expenditures

$3.42 Billion - By Service

Water/Sewer/Solid Waste 13.6%

Ottawa Police Services 9.5%

Ottawa Public Library 1.5%

Public Health 1.7%

Capital Formation Costs 9.2%

Transportation 5.4%

General Government 6.6%

Parks, Recreation, Cultural & Building Services 7.0%

Emergency and Protective Services 8.5%

Planning, Building Code & Economic Development 2.2%

Community & Social Services 19.6%

Transit 15.2%

2018 Total Revenues

$3.42  Billion - By Funding Source

Fees & Services Charges 24.5%

Reserves 1.7%

Federal/Provincial/Municipal Grant 19.6%

Payment in Lieu of Taxes 5.5%

Other 2.0%

Property Taxes 46.7%

Details of the pie chart are provided in the table below.

2018 Capital Program

$729.4 Million - By Service

Transportation Services 14%

Transit Services 26%

Police Services 9%

Other Tax Supported Services 17%

Drinking Water & Wastewater Services 21%

Integrated Roads, Water & Wastewater 13%

2018 Capital Program

$729.4  Million - Funding Source

Revenue 8%

Debt 29%

Development Charge Cash/Debt 8%

Reserve 55%

Have your say on Draft Budget 2018

Public engagement and feedback are important elements in the draft budget process, helping the Mayor and Council guide and direct where public funds are invested. As part of the pre-budget consultation process, Councillors conducted information sessions from mid-September to late-October – providing information on the municipal budget process to residents and getting their views and ideas on priorities for this draft budget. In addition to the Councillor-led sessions, online resources were available to raise awareness on the budget process, including an interactive consultation tool that allowed residents to plan a simulated municipal budget. With the Draft Budget 2018 tabled, there are still opportunities for the public to offer comments and input before the final Budget goes to Council for consideration on December 13:

  1. Register as a public delegation at a standing committee, board or commission budget review meeting.
    Members of the public can make a five-minute presentation to standing committees, boards and commissions at meetings that take place from November 21 to December 7:
     •  November 21 - Environment and Climate Protection Committee
     •  November 23 – Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee
     •  November 27 – Ottawa Police Service Board
     •  November 28 - Planning Committee
     •  November 29 – IT Sub-Committee
     •  November 30 – Audit Committee
     •  December 4 – Transit Commission
     •  December 5 – Finance and Economic Development Committee
     •  December 6 – Transportation Committee
     •  December 7 – Community and Protective Services Committee

    Presentations on specific subjects must be brought to the standing committee, board or commission that is responsible for that subject. You can find a breakdown of standing committees, boards and commission by services on ottawa.ca/budget2018.

    To register before the meeting, contact the relevant Committee Coordinator through ottawa.ca or call 3-1-1. Presenters are encouraged to provide a copy of their presentation electronically before the meeting.
     
  2. Contact your City Councillor​
    While the pre-budget Councillor-led consultations are over, you can still contact your Councillor directly to express your views or any concerns you might have about the Draft Budget 2018.
     
  3. Email budget@ottawa.ca
  4. Tweet @ottawacity using hashtag #ottbudget
  5. Call 3-1-1 (TTY: 613-580-2401). Rural residents call 613-580-2400

 

Increasing our investment in critical infrastructure

Cities across Canada are faced with finding a balance between reinvesting in existing infrastructure and fund new and growth projects. Draft Budget 2018 demonstrates Ottawa’s commitment to capital investments and infrastructure – including roads, sewers, City facilities, parks and greenspaces.

In 2018, residents will welcome Stage 1 of the O-Train Confederation Line and see the start of Stage 2 of the O-Train Confederation Line light rail transit project – with a value of work at more than $550 million in 2018 alone.

The City’s infrastructure assets are valued at over $42 billion. Draft Budget 2018 will invest in necessary work to ensure aging infrastructure remains in a state of good repair and supports communities across the city.

Renewal and upgrades to City roads and infrastructure

Roads play a vital role in a City’s overall infrastructure by ensuring that residents can travel safely and easily through urban and rural communities. Draft Budget 2018 permanently increases the annual pothole repair program by $600,000 to $8 million.

Overall, Draft Budget 2018 allocates $447 million in infrastructure renewal for projects across the city. Draft Budget 2018 increases the contribution to the Capital Budget by $12.6 million to $112.4 million total, including:

  • $39.2 million to resurface roads, including $12 million for rural roads, an increase of 17 per cent over 2017
  • $42.2 million to upgrade rural infrastructure, an increase of 13 per cent
  • $25 million to renew City bridges, a 16 per cent increase
  • $8.3 million to improve transit supported assets
  • $2.3 million to renew sidewalks and pathways

Parks and recreation facilities

The City’s recreation centres will receive a boost of $2.1 million for a total budget of $17.7 million to renew and enhance our buildings, swimming pools, splash pads, fitness spaces and outdoor courts. Some facilities that will undergo upgrades in 2018 include Bob MacQuarrie Recreation Complex, Nepean Sportsplex, Walter Baker Sports Centre and John G. Mlacak Community Centre.

Draft Budget 2018 also increases the parks renewal budget by $250,000 to $5.25 million. 2018 will see improvements made to a number of City parks including: Mulligan Park, Kinburn Park, Bryanston Gate Park, Woodroffe Park, Bateman Park, Aladdin Park and Cummings Park.

These investments will allow the City to keep pace with current population growth trends while ensuring that critical infrastructure is upgraded as needed. This will lead to a longer lifespan for our aging facilities and an improved experience for users and their families.

Improving winter operations

The recent trend in weather systems have brought increasingly varied and unpredictable winter weather to Ottawa. The City maintains a vast geographic area of roadways, sidewalks, pathways and parking lots. This combination has increased pressure on the City’s winter operations budget to meet the needs of our community. After an internal review and external audit, the 2018 winter operations budget is increasing by $2.3 million, for a total of $68.3 million. This increased funding will support residents in all modes of travel, including expanding the winter cycling network to include O’Connor Street and Main Street bike lanes.

Draft Budget 2018 also invests $250,000 to expand the Trim Road Works Yard which will include snow and salt storage and a refuelling station for City vehicles.

Upgrading sewers, watermains and water treatment facilities

Draft Budget 2018 dedicates $202 million to rehabilitate, renew and build new critical water, wastewater and stormwater infrastructure across the city. Of that, $22.8 million will be invested for upgrades at the R.O. Pickard Environmental Centre, and $24.5 million will also be spent on water system upgrades at water treatment facilities.  

Major projects for 2018 include $15 million to upgrade the Graham Creek storm sewer, and road, water and sewer improvements on Elgin Street, Aylmer-Fulton, Carlyle-Rosedale and Glengarry-Onslow. 

 

Supporting safe and vibrant communities

The City is investing in our vibrant and diverse neighbourhoods – the building blocks of a great city. Draft Budget 2018 allows for the consistent service delivery that makes Ottawa a liveable city. It ensures that the City can address the needs of all residents, and in particular those that are most vulnerable.

Home for Good initiative

In September 2017, the Province of Ontario committed up to $30 million over three years, for the Home for Good Initiative. This investment will provide housing assistance and supports to people achieve and maintain housing stability. 

This investment, will fund up to 150 new supportive housing units and expand the Housing First program, add peer support workers, and provide funding for rent supplements and housing allowances, and help 310 households to find and keep suitable, affordable and supportive housing.

Affordable housing and homelessness

The City of Ottawa will receive nearly $47 million over four years from the federal and provincial governments for repairs and retrofits to social housing and include upgrades such as new energy efficient heating, improved insulation and window replacements.

The City will also receive an increase of $4.7 million to develop new affordable and supportive housing, this results in a total investment from the federal, provincial government of $14.4 million and a contribution of $1.3 million from the City, a total of $15.7 million. The Government of Canada will provide the City with $1.4 million for the Homelessness Partnering Strategy.

Investing in the Paramedic Service

Ottawa is a large geographical city with a growing population, spanning urban, suburban and rural regions. This, combined with an aging population, places increased pressure on the paramedic system. Draft Budget 2018 invests in this essential service by adding 14 paramedics and one emergency response vehicle to help maintain response times as mandated by the province.

EquiFare single-ride fare

As part of Draft Budget 2018 and as an extension of the monthly Equipass, the City will introduce the EquiFare, a single-ride fare program, at a cost of $1.75. This program will provide low-income transit customers with another economical alternative ensuring that this essential service remains within reach of residents with limited financial means. These programs will have a total budget of $3.7 million.

Increasing transit service

When Stage 1 of the O-Train Confederation Line opens later in the year, we will also see a dramatic shift in how we move around our city –. The O-Train Confederation Line will carry up to 10,700 passengers per hour. In 2018, transit service will be expanded to growing areas of the City using 17 new buses purchased in 2017.

Draft Budget 2018 includes funding for the continued operation of new and expanded services in growing areas of the city that were approved in 2017. Draft Budget 2018 also provides an additional $100,000 in funding for rural community support service agencies, to allow them to increase transportation services for seniors and people with disabilities in rural parts of the city.

$50.4 million will be spent to replace 80 life-expired buses, ensuring reliable transit service for customers travelling across the city. An additional $23.9 million will be used to refurbish and maintain 85 buses to ensure they are in good working condition and provide a good customer experience. $500,000 is allocated to transit accessibility improvements at Transitway and O-Train stations for all customers, including seniors and customers with disabilities.

Investing in long-term care

Draft Budget 2018 invests $4.86 million in upgrades for the City’s Long-term care facilities, including Peter D Clark Long Term Care Home, Garry J. Armstrong, Centre d’Acceuil Champlain and Carleton Lodge.

Supporting social agencies

Draft Budget 2018 includes an increase of $1 million dollars for a total investment of $23.1 million in base funding for social service providers who receive Community Funding. Social service agencies will be better positioned to respond to the growing needs of residents, including access to food programs, day programs, counselling and support services.

Childcare and early years investments

The City is receiving additional funding of $13.6 million through the Provincial Child Care Expansion Plan (CCEP) and the Federal Canada-Ontario Early Learning and Child Care Plan (ELCC) in 2017. It is also anticipated the City could receive an additional $7.3 million in 2018 as part of these commitments.

As the City assumes the responsibility for the local management of the Ontario Early Years Child and Family Centres, the province will provide $9.6 million to the City of Ottawa, which represents an increase of $2.9M from 2017 for the sector. This funding will assist in the transition year for existing providers in order to work with stakeholders to structure and build the new system and its capacity.

Investing in the arts

Draft budget 2018 increases funding for arts, heritage and festival organizations by $330,000 for a total annual cultural funding budget of $11.3 million. A $150,000 increase to the Arts Momentum Fund will bring the fund up to $300,000, to go towards local art initiatives and encourage the cultural vibrancy of our city. This year will also see the completion of the new Arts Court facility, where 10 new staff will be hired. 

 

Protecting our environment

The City of Ottawa is responsible for ensuring that our natural areas, including a vast network of forests, greenspaces, rivers and streams, remain in pristine condition for future generations. These greenspaces serve as a draw for residents and visitors by offering a natural space for walking, cycling and outdoor play. Draft Budget 2018 invests in projects that improve our environmental sustainability.

The City will continue to help protect our natural environment by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and consumption of electricity and natural gas. Draft Budget 2018 also continues to fund protection of our waterways, wetlands and groundwater.

Light rail transit

Council approved the light rail transit system project in 2012 with the goal of transforming Ottawa – its environmental benefits will also be significant. Replacing bus and car trips with the LRT’s zero emission electric trains means reducing carbon dioxide by approximately 110,000 tonnes per year by 2048, the equivalent of planting 11 million new trees.

It will also reduce emissions of air contaminants such as carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, nitrous oxides, sulphur oxides and particulate matter by approximately 3,000 tonnes in 2048. The monetary value of these environmental benefits has been estimated at $32 million per year.

Energy Evolution

The City supports green innovation and is committed to supporting initiatives that transform Ottawa into a thriving city powered by clean energy. Draft Budget 2018 dedicates over $2 million into energy conservation, green fleet and environmental protection initiatives.

  • $500,000 to build on existing stakeholder initiatives and leverage provincial and federal climate change investments
  • $1 million to reduce energy consumption in City facilities, including energy conservation retrofits and expanding and improving automation

In an effort to reduce the City’s GHG emissions, Council recently passed a motion to allow Fleet Services to purchase hybrid and electric vehicles when operationally possible as part of the fleet renewal program. In 2018, $24 million will be invested in fleet lifecycle renewal. An additional $500,000 will be invested in Green Fleet initiatives such as anti-idling systems, biofuels and hybrid vehicles.

Wet Weather Flow Management

The City will invest $2 million in the wet weather flow management system, which ensures that stormwater, snow melts, and sanitary sewage drainage systems operate within their design capacities and mitigates potential impacts to private property and the natural environment.

Tree planting program

Draft Budget 2018 invests $1.3 million to plant 125,00 trees across the city to increase forest cover in urban, suburban and rural areas. This will help mitigate the impact of Emerald Ash Borer on the City’s streets, facilities, parks and natural spaces.

 

Prudent financial management

Tax Rate

Draft Budget 2018 reaffirms Council’s commitment to fiscal prudency and balance by limiting the annual tax increase at 2 per cent. As a growing city, Ottawa is faced with important decisions around improving existing assets and infrastructure and committing dollars to new projects that support growth.

This term of Council has kept its promise of low tax rate changes. This budget ensures the City’s continued financial stability while pushing forward on several significant city-building projects like light rail transit, a revitalized Arts Court and the Bayview Innovation Centre. As well as developing plans for future major City projects like Stage 2 of light rail transit, redeveloping LeBreton Flats and the new Central Library.

While Draft Budget 2018 includes modest increases in spending, it continues to take a prudent approach towards planning for unforeseen circumstances by maintaining sufficient funding within the City’s established reserves. The sound management of Ottawa’s long-term debt is essential to investing in capital for current and future generations and maintaining our solid credit rating. The City’s commitment to fiscal responsibility has ensured that the 2017 year-end debt level will be in line with the Council-approved Long Range Financial Plan.

Strategic and practical borrowing

The City’s outstanding debt of $1.71 billion at the end of 2016 represents an 8.86 per cent of the City’s total assets of $19.3 billion. That is equivalent of an $35,440 mortgage on a $400,000 home.

The City does not plan to issue no new debt in 2018 because of the early issuance of debt in 2017 that took advantage of low interest rates, avoiding $17 million in interest costs. The total outstanding debt issued in 2017 was $432 million with outstanding debt estimated to be $2.27 billion by the end of the year. The debt to equity ratio has remained stable.

Green bonds

The City will continue to take prudent, innovative approaches to financing. The City recently issued the first green municipal bonds in Canada, making $102 million in capital funding available to build the O-Train light-rail system.

Issuing green bonds will be a means to attract new investment activity and borrow at a more competitive 3.259 per cent rate, two basis points lower than a regular debenture issue. This lower rate equates to a cost reduction of $400,000 on a $102 million green debenture issue.

Maintaining solid credit

The City of Ottawa is rated AA by Standard and Poor’s Rating Services and Aaa by Moody’s Investor Services – the highest possible credit rating. 

The City’s credit ratings are based on a number of factors including its high levels of liquidity, its lower than average debt burden, stable economic base, long-range planning and economic outlook. The ratings reflect strong fiscal outcomes and prudent financial management.

The City of Ottawa’s excellent credit rating helps investors and creditors measure the City’s ability to meet its financial obligations.  Excellent credit ratings mean that it is less expensive for the City to borrow money. The City’s lower costs for capital improvements can be passed on to residents as taxpayers and stakeholders. 

 

Regional Highlights: Central

Wards 7, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17 and 18

Bay, Rideau-Vanier, Rideau-Rockcliffe, Somerset, Kitchissippi, Capital and Alta Vista

Draft Budget 2018 paves the way to a progressive future for our city and residents. The draft budget invests in critical infrastructure and assets, community protection and the environment. It also positions Ottawa as a leading creator of jobs, and enhances our ability to attract great talent, businesses and families now and into the future.

Regional projects - $67.4 million

Traffic - $2.5 million

  • $1.64 million to make the following intersections safer for pedestrians: St. Laurent Boulevard and Donald Street, Gladstone Avenue and Rochester Street, and Richmond Road and Churchill Avenue
  • $280,000 for temporary traffic calming measures
  • Up to $280,000 for one pedestrian crossover in each ward
  • $200,000 to replace hydro poles at Elmvale Acres
  • $54,000 to repair cable faults on Edgeworth Avenue, Strathmore Boulevard and Audrey Avenue
  • $12,000 to replace street light poles on Old St. Patrick Street and Caverley Street

Parks and buildings - $19.3 million

  • $3.7 million to build Wateridge Community Park
  • $3 million to update the Centre D’Accueil Champlain, the Centre Richelieu Vanier, the Garry J. Armstrong Long Term Care Centre, the Rideau Street Library, the Vanier Library, the Ottawa School of Art and the Byward Market Building
  • $2.8 million to build Wateridge Town Square Park
  • $1.8 million to update the By-Law Services Admin Facility, the Alta Vista Park Playground, Featherstone Park, the Hutton Park Playground, the Alta Vista Library, Fire Station 35 and the Pleasant Park Transitway Station
  • $1.6 million to update the Foster Farm Community Centre, the Carling Family Shelter, Woodroffe Park and the Pinecrest Bus Storage Facility
  • $1.2 million to build Oblates Urban Park
  • $1 million to update the Jack Purcell Recreation Complex and Ottawa City Hall
  • $900,000 to update the Hintonburg Community Centre, the Dovercourt Recreation Complex, the Forward Ave Family Shelter and the Ottawa Gymnastics Club Building
  • $820,000 to update the Brewer Arena, Central Park, Dalhousie South Park, the Billings Bridge Transitway Station and the Glebe Community Centre
  • $700,000 to replace the roof at the St-Laurent Don Gamble Recreation Complex and to replace the play structure and equipment at the Cummings Park Playground
  • $550,000 to build Rockhurst Park
  • $511,000 to build the Gladstone Neighbourhood Park
  • $300,000 to build a splash pad for Springhurst Park
  • $291,000 to expand the Dovercourt Recreation Centre
  • $100,000 to conduct a study for Brewer Park
  • $25,000 for interpretive signs at Lansdowne Park
  • $20,000 to improve the pathway and ball diamond at Riverrain Park
  • $7,500 to resurface the tennis court at Manor Park
  • $7,500 for play equipment at Alta Vista Public School

Roads - $7.2 million

  • $7.15 million to resurface Carling Avenue, Ritchie Street, Maitland Road, Woodroffe Avenue, Vanier Parkway, Riverside Drive, Alta Vista Drive and Chapman Boulevard

Transportation - $1.6 million

  • $1.5 million to install new pathway lighting along the LRT pathway between the University of Ottawa and Hurdman Station
  • $113,000 to build a sidewalk on Rockingham Avenue between Bank Street and Clementine Boulevard

Parking - $11.7 million

  • $9.5 million to finish construction of the Glebe Parking Garage
  • $1.9 million to maintain the six central parking lots

Bridges - $760,000

  • $400,000 to rehabilitate the Booth Street Bridge
  • $260,000 for the design work for one of the piers of the Prince of Wales Bridge
  • $100,000 to design the Bank Street Canal Bridge

Water - $19.3 million

  • $19 million for integrated road, sewer and watermain work on Aylmer Avenue and Glengarry Road
  • $200,000 for a transportation study of integrated road, sewer and watermain work on Catherine Street
  • $100,000 to conduct a surface corridor footprint assessment on Isabella Street/Chamberlain Avenue and at Alta Vista Drive and Summit Avenue

Economic Development - $100,000

  • $100,000 for a Community Improvement Program to invest in redevelopment of lands or buildings that are underutilized, idled, or in need of repair or in need of renovation on Montreal Road

Housing - $5.3 million

  • $5.3 million to Cornerstone Housing for Women to acquire and renovate affordable supportive housing for single women

City-wide projects - $101.5 million

Traffic - $600,000
  • $600,000 for pedestrian countdown signals and accessible pedestrian signals

Transit - $85.9 million

  • $50.4 million to replace 80 buses
  • $23.9 million to refurbish 85 buses
  • $8.9 million for road and signal projects to improve transit speed and reliability
  • $1 million to reinstate roads after O-Train Confederation Line construction
  • $900,000 to improve bus stops
  • $750,000 to complete the Tunney’s Pasture bus operator building and bus staging area

Water - $46.5 million

  • $10.5 million to assess, rehabilitate and upgrade water treatment systems at Lemieux Island and Britannia, including the SCADA and electrical systems, and for process expansion at Britannia
  • $1 million to rehabilitate a water pumping station
  • $22.5 million to assess, rehabilitate and upgrade the R.O. Pickard Environmental Centre, including the SCADA and electrical systems, and to replace the scum removal facility
  • $11 million to rehabilitate Delorme, March Road and Harvard sewage pumping stations
  • $1.5 million for SCADA rehabilitation and upgrades at remote sewage pumping stations

Trees - $1.3 million

  • $1.3 million to plant 125,000 trees to increase forest cover and manage the impact of the Emerald Ash Borer

Infrastructure - $2.3 million

  • $2 million to manage wet weather flow
  • $290,000 to conduct accessibility audits and to remediate pathways and paving remediation

Regional projects currently under way - $343.1 million

The dollars for these projects are budgeted for 2017 and 2018. The work to complete the projects may span over multiple years.

Parks and buildings - $6.7 million

  • $2.4 million to redevelop Reid Park
  • $599,000 to update the play equipment at Dalhousie South Park and Featherston Park
  • $570,000 to remediate the soil and build an accessible pathway at Bayview Friendship Park
  • $552,000 to redevelop Laroche Park
  • $540,000 to develop Cardinal Glen Park
  • $500,000 to expand the Dovercourt Recreation Centre
  • $360,000 to expand the Manor Park Community Centre
  • $352,000 to build the Sens rink
  • $350,000 to replace the playgrounds at Cumming Park and Hutton Park
  • $250,000 for the new St Charles Market Park 
  • $145,000 to replace the lights at Central Park Patterson’s Creek
  • $99,000 to add amenities to Fire Hall Park
  • Replacing the fire alarm system at Centre Richelieu Vanier

Water - $255.4 million

  • $64.56 million for integrated road, sewer and watermain work on Lavergne Street, Joliet Avenue, Ste-Cécile Street, Cody Avenue, Montreal Road, North River Road, Range Road, Mann Avenue and Russell Avenue
  • $61.63 million for integrated road, sewer and watermain work on Fairbairn Street, Bellwood Avenue, Willard Street, Belmont Avenue and Bank Street
  • $57.6 million for integrated road, sewer and watermain work on Elgin Street, Albert Street, Slater Street and Bronson Avenue
  • $20 million to renew the storm sewer at Valley Drive
  • $16.98 million for integrated road, sewer and watermain work on Iona Street, Broadhead Avenue, Mailes Avenue, and Loretta Avenue North and South
  • $15.95 million for integrated road, sewer and watermain work on Gibson Street, Denver Avenue, Tampa Avenue, Orlando Avenue and Avenue P-Q-R-S-T
  • $10.3 million for integrated road, sewer and watermain work on Borthwick Avenue, River Lane and Crichton Street
  • $4.45 million to renew watermains at Helena Street, Sherbourne Road and Glynn Avenue
  • $3 million to design a new intake from the Ottawa River to the Lemieux Island Water Purification Plant
  • $650,000 to replace the Sherbourne watermain
  • $240,000 for the Graham Creek Erosion Project
  • $80,000 for the Stillwater Creek Erosion Project
  • Replacing stormwater culverts at Davidson’s Side Road

Transportation - $28.7 million

  • $12 million for design and preparatory work to acquire property for a new bus transit corridor from Bayshore Transitway Station to Heron Transitway Station
  • $5.5 million for the City’s portion of the Rideau Canal Crossing from Fifth Avenue to Clegg Street
  • $3 million to conduct an environmental assessment for the future Kanata Light Rail Transit
  • $2.5 million for the City’s share to conduct an environmental assessment for a downtown traffic tunnel
  • $2 million for a bicycle facility on Bay Street
  • $1.1 million to enhance Scott Street for pedestrians, cyclists and transit users after the Transitway detour is removed
  • $1 million to study, design and build initiatives that will increase walking, cycling and transit use in the Richmond Road corridor
  • $743,000 for area traffic management and traffic calming measures along Byron Avenue, Bayfield Avenue and in Lowertown East
  • $500,000 to study and design complete streets enhancements to Albert Street, Slater Street and the Mackenzie King Bridge
  • $350,000 for bike lanes on McArthur Avenue from the Rideau River Pathway to St. Laurent Boulevard

Bridges - $5.6 million

  • $2.36 million to renew the Porters Island Bridge
  • $3.2 million to renew the Lemieux Island Pipe Bridge

Arts and culture - $38.8 million

  • $38.8 million to redevelop the Ottawa Art Gallery and Arts Court

Parking - $2.3 million

  • $1.701 million to maintain the ByWard Market parking garages
  • $341,000 to maintain five parking lots
  • $230,000 to install a parking guidance system and signs at a parking garage

Transit - $5 million

  • $5 million to maintain and improve the O-Train Trillium Line

City-wide projects currently under way – $125.3 million

Transportation - $9.6 million

  • $4.14 million to enhance community connectivity and add signs and wayfinding to a rural cycling tourism route, including:
    • Colonel By at the Corkstown Bridge
    • Confederation Line Station links
    • Trillium Pathway Link to Dow’s Lake
    • Trainyards Pathway to Belfast Road
  • $4 million to improve cycling facilities, including:
    • Lowertown New Edinburgh Neighbourhood Bikeway
    • O’Connor Street Bikeway cycling facility
    • Scott Street and Albert Street corridor cycling facility connection
    • Rideau River Western Pathway
    • Trainyards Drive Pathway
    • Riverside Drive to Rodney Crescent
  • $1.5 million to improve pedestrian facilities, including:
    • Dumaurier Avenue
    • Tremblay Road
    • Industrial Avenue/Neighbourhood Way

Traffic - $600,000

  • $600,000 for pedestrian countdown signals and accessible pedestrian signals

Transit - $17.3 million

  • $5.85 million to improve Transitway and O-Train stations and facilities
  • $5.5 million for the transition program for light-trail transit (On Track 2018) 
  • $3.1 million to replace support vehicles used for security, supervision and maintenance
  • $1.8 million to assess, rehabilitate and improve safety and security at Transitway and O-Train stations
  • $1 million to improve accessibility at Transitway and O-Train stations

Housing - $93.8 million

  • Up to $47 million over four years in provincial and federal funding to repair and retrofit social housing apartment buildings with energy efficient heating, improved insulation and window replacements
  • Up to $30 million over three years (2017 to 2020) in provincial funding for the Home for Good Initiative, which provides housing assistance and supports to achieve and maintain housing stability
  • $1.4 million in federal funding from the Homelessness Partnership Strategy to help people with long shelter stays and complex needs move from emergency shelters to permanent housing
  • $14.4 million in federal and provincial funding to develop new affordable and supporting housing
  • $1 million in provincial funding from the Community Homelessness Prevention Initiative

Emergency and protective services – $4 million

  • $1.3 million to replace defibrillators
  • $2.7 million for power assist stretchers and loaders

 

Regional Highlights: East

Wards 1, 2, 11 and 19

Orléans, Innes, Beacon Hill-Cyrville and Cumberland

Draft Budget 2018 paves the way to a progressive future for our city and residents. The draft budget invests in critical infrastructure and assets, community protection and the environment. It also positions Ottawa as a leading creator of jobs, and enhances our ability to attract great talent, businesses and families now and into the future.

Regional projects - $22.2 million

Traffic - $3.6 million

  • $2.3 million to improve the intersections at Brian Coburn Boulevard and Strasbourg Street, and at St. Laurent Boulevard and Donald Street
  • $380,000 to enhance pedestrian safety
  • $300,000 for a new traffic control signal at Brian Coburn Boulevard and Aquaview Drive
  • $160,000 to implement temporary measures for traffic calming
  • Up to $160,000 to install one new pedestrian crossover in each ward
  • $126,000 to repair seven cable faults
  • $100,000 for new traffic control devices at Milton and Navan roads
  • $50,000 for intersection control at Brian Coburn Boulevard and Esprit Drive
  • $30,000 to replace street light poles

Parks and buildings - $11 million

  • $3.61 million to upgrade the Bob Macquarrie Recreation Complex and the Place D’Orleans Transitway Station
  • $3 million to renovate the Pat Clark Community Centre
  • $1.6 million to design and build the Spring Valley Trails Community Park
  • $1 million for repairs at the Earl Armstrong Arena and the Splash Wave Pool
  • $529,000 for a new gymnasium at MIFO
  • $390,000 to replace roofs at the Cumberland Museum, the Knox Presbyterian Church and the Mainville House, and upgrades at the Navan Memorial Centre and Fire Station 53
  • $255,000 to extend the Lavallee Plaza Park
  • $220,000 to replace equipment at the Blackburn arena and investigate systems at the Orleans Library
  • $192,000 for a new playground at Notre-Dame-des-Champs Park
  • $63,000 for a new batting cage and to replace the scoreboard at Heritage Park
  • $50,000 for a water source at Harkness Park
  • $36,000 for dug outs at Wilfred Murray Park
  • $7,500 for fencing around the soccer field at Carriere Park
  • $5,000 for fencing around the ball diamond at Yves Richer Park
  • $4,000 for new bulletin boards at Blue Willow and Silverbirch Park
  • New Fire Station Portobello to open in 2018
  • New Fire Station Cyrville to open in 2018

Roads - $7.5 million

  • $7.45 million to resurface Old Tenth Line Road, OR 174, Tenth Line Road, Charlemagne Boulevard, Renaud Road, Donald Street, Wilhaven Drive and Dunning Road

Bridges - $130,000

  • $130,000 for the Anderson Road bridge at the Johnston Municipal Drain

City-wide projects - $101.5 million

Traffic - $600,000

  • $600,000 for pedestrian countdown signals and accessible pedestrian signals

Transit - $85.9 million

  • $50.4 million to replace 80 buses
  • $23.9 million to refurbish 85 buses
  • $8.9 million for road and signal projects to improve transit speed and reliability
  • $1 million to reinstate roads after O-Train Confederation Line construction
  • $900,000 to improve bus stops
  • $750,000 to complete the Tunney’s Pasture bus operator building and bus staging area

Water - $46.5 million

  • $10.5 million to assess, rehabilitate and upgrade water treatment systems at Lemieux Island and Britannia, including the SCADA and electrical systems, and for process expansion at Britannia
  • $1 million to rehabilitate a water pumping station
  • $22.5 million to assess, rehabilitate and upgrade the R.O. Pickard Environmental Centre, including the SCADA and electrical systems, and to replace the scum removal facility
  • $11 million to rehabilitate Delorme, March Road and Harvard sewage pumping stations
  • $1.5 million for SCADA rehabilitation and upgrades at remote sewage pumping stations

Trees - $1.3 million

  • $1.3 million to plant 125,000 trees to increase forest cover and manage the impact of the Emerald Ash Borer

Infrastructure - $2.3 million

  • $2 million to manage wet weather flow
  • $290,000 to conduct accessibility audits and to remediate pathways and paving remediation

Regional projects currently under way - $72.2 million

The dollars for these projects are budgeted for 2017 and 2018. The work to complete the projects may span over multiple years.

Parks and buildings - $7.9 million

  • $1.97 million for the new Cardinal Village Community Park
  • $1.58 million for the new Avalon West Community Park
  • $1.26 million for the new 3.1-hectate Cardinal Creek Park
  • $980,000 for the new Trails Edge Park 2 – Patrick Dugas Park
  • $439,000 for the new Summerside West Parkette 2 (Monardia Park Mattamy)
  • $390,000 for a new splash pad at Loyola Park
  • $386,000 for the new Avalon South Pathway
  • $258,000 for the new Hillside Vista Park
  • $225,000 for a sports field at the François Dupuis Recreation Centre
  • $163,000 to renew the playground at Caserta Park
  • $96,000 to design and construct Silo Park
  • $50,000 to replace the playground at Notre-Dame-des-Champs Park
  • $50,000 to upgrade the Blair Road Fire Station

Water - $46.8 million

  • $10.4 million to retrofit, rehabilitate and/or replace asset components at the communal well-based drinking water systems in Munster Hamlet, the Richmond- King's Park Subdivision, Carp, Vars and the Greely - Shadow Ridge Subdivision
  • $22.5 million to assess, rehabilitate and upgrade the Robert O. Pickard Environmental Centre, including the SCADA and electrical systems and replacing the scum removal facility
  • $8.33 million to upgrade the HVAC system at ROPEC
  • $3.3 million to rehabilitate and improve reliability at the ROPEC Raw Water Pumping Station
  • $1.35 million to renew stormwater culverts on OR 174 over Cardinal Creek, O’Toole Road and Mitch Owens Road
  • $458,000 for the Billberry Creek Erosion Project
  • $431,000 to oversize the Orleans Business Park sanitary sewer

Transportation - $2.2 million

  • $1.5 million to extend the Blackburn Hamlet Bypass and to conduct an environmental assessment to extend the Cumberland Transitway Westerly from Blair Road to Brian Coburn Boulevard
  • $372,000 for traffic management and calming measures along Grey Nuns Drive and Merkley Drive, and Viseneau/Barrington
  • $300,000 to improve intersection control at Portobello Boulevard and Valin Street, Navan Road and Orleans Boulevard
  • $40,000 for a sidewalk along 1500 Belcourt Boulevard

Bridges - $1.3 million

  • $930,000 to renew the Hall Road Bridge
  • $380,000 to renew the Sarsfield Road Bridge

Fire stations - $14 million

  • $7 million for the Cyrville Road Fire Station
  • $7 million for the Ottawa East Fire Station on Portobello Boulevard

City-wide projects currently under way – $125.3 million

Transportation - $9.6 million

  • $4.14 million to enhance community connectivity and add signs and wayfinding to a rural cycling tourism route, including:
  • Ogilvie Road Pathway connections from Blair Road to Montreal Road
  • Cumberland Transitway Corridor Pathway (Trans Orleans Pathway), from Liska Street to Trim Road
  • $4 million to improve cycling facilities, including:
  • Connecting the Prescott-Russell Recreational Trail Link to Cyrville Road
  • New multi-use pathway on Shefford Road from Montreal Road to the Ottawa River Pathway
  • $1.5 million to improve pedestrian facilities, including:
  • Cyrville Road along Cummings Avenue, Michael Street and Star Top Road
  • Colonial Road crossing at Henn Drive to existing sidewalk on south side

Traffic - $600,000

  • $600,000 for pedestrian countdown signals and accessible pedestrian signals

Transit - $17.3 million

  • $5.85 million to improve Transitway and O-Train stations and facilities
  • $5.5 million for the transition program for light-trail transit (On Track 2018) 
  • $3.1 million to replace support vehicles used for security, supervision and maintenance
  • $1.8 million to assess, rehabilitate and improve safety and security at Transitway and O-Train stations
  • $1 million to improve accessibility at Transitway and O-Train stations

Housing - $93.8 million

  • Up to $47 million over four years in provincial and federal funding to repair and retrofit social housing apartment buildings with energy efficient heating, improved insulation and window replacements
  • Up to $30 million over three years (2017 to 2020) in provincial funding for the Home for Good Initiative, which provides housing assistance and supports to achieve and maintain housing stability
  • $1.4 million in federal funding from the Homelessness Partnership Strategy to help people with long shelter stays and complex needs move from emergency shelters to permanent housing
  • $14.4 million in federal and provincial funding to develop new affordable and supporting housing
  • $1 million in provincial funding from the Community Homelessness Prevention Initiative

Emergency and protective services – $4 million

  • $1.3 million to replace defibrillators
  • $2.7 million for power assist stretchers and loaders

 

Regional Highlights: South/Rural South

Wards 3, 8, 9, 10, 16, 20, 21, 22

Barrhaven, College, Knoxdale-Merivale, Gloucester-Southgate, River, Osgoode, Rideau-Goulburn, Gloucester-South Nepean

Draft Budget 2018 paves the way to a progressive future for our city and residents. The draft budget invests in critical infrastructure and assets, community protection and the environment. It also positions Ottawa as a leading creator of jobs, and enhances our ability to attract great talent, businesses and families now and into the future.

Regional projects - $63.4 million

Traffic - $4.3 million

  • $1.6 million for new devices for traffic control at Conroy Road, Davidson Road and Barnsdale Road
  • $1.5 million for new measures for intersection control at Stittsville Main Street and West Drive Drive, and for Fernbank Road and Robert Grant Avenue
  • $320,000 to implement temporary measures for traffic calming
  • Up to $320,000 for one new pedestrian crossover in each ward
  • $300,000 to design modifications for the intersection at Bankfield Road and Prince of Wales Drive
  • $160,000 to replace hydro poles at Southwood Drive and Cobden Road
  • $108,000 to repair cable faults at Bassano Street, St. Claire Avenue, Woodfield Drive, Fernwood Drive, Egan Road, Walkley Drive, Windham Crescent
  • $18,000 to replace street light poles at Spring Cress Drive and Staghorn Green, Meadowlands Drive, Uplands Drive

Parks and buildings - $26.4 million

  • $6.5 million to upgrade the Nepean Sportsplex, the General Burns Community Building, the playground at Bateman Park, the Howard Darwin Centennial Arena and the Tanglewood Park Community Centre
  • $4.5 million to purchase land for the Riverside South Recreation Complex and Library
  • $4.3 million to upgrade Agincourt Park, Ben Franklin Place, the Nepean Museum, the Peter D. Clark Centre and the Pinecrest Recreation Complex
  • $2.9 million to design the Riverside South Community Centre and Library
  • $1.4 million for a sprinkler system at the Sportsplex
  • $1.027 million for the new Diamond Jubilee Park
  • $1 million to replace lights and a shed at Owl Park and for updates to the Clyde Avenue Water Services Facility
  • $1 million to replace the gazebo at Mulligan Park and for upgrades at the Walter Baker Sports Centre
  • $900,000 to replace components of the Alfred Taylor Recreation Centre, the Manotick Library, and the playgrounds at Blue Rock Park and Richmond Lions Park
  • $790,000 to replace components of the Osgoode Community Centre, Stuart Holmes Arena, and the playgrounds at Greely West Park, Harold Barnhart Park and Josie Anselmo Memorial Park
  • $560,000 to improve Beryl Gaffney Park
  • $500,000 to replace asphalt on the tennis courts at Aladdin Park and to replace the play equipment at Russell Boyd Park
  • $300,000 for a splash pad at Ben Franklin Park
  • $300,000 for local park improvements in Osgoode
  • $153,000 for a mountain bike park at Carlington Park
  • $110,000 to replace the windows at Carleton Lodge and to update the dressing rooms at the Fred Barrett Arena
  • $50,000 for a batting cage at Pinecrest Park
  • $45,000 to renovate and build a new basketball half court at Nanaimo Park
  • $39,000 for a new gazebo at Twin Elm Rugby Park
  • $37,500 for new park furniture and landscaping at Lynwood Park

Roads - $16.3 million

  • $16.34 million to resurface Jockvale Road, Navaho Drive, Maitland Avenue, Morrison Drive, West Hunt Club Road, Meadowlands Drive, Fisher Avenue, Airport Parkway, Marvelville Road, Mitch Owens Road, Stagecoach Road, Yorks Corners Road, Van Rens Street, Rideau Valley Drive South, Fallowfield Road

Transportation - $600,000

  • $600,000 to renew the pathways from Karsh Park, Conroy Park and Forestglade Crescent

Bridges - $480,000

  • $150,000 to design the Jockvale Bridge over the Jockvale River
  • $150,000 to design the TransCanada Trail Pedestrian Bridge over Robertson Road
  • $130,000 for the Anderson Road Bridge
  • $50,000 to design the Byron Street Bridge

Water - $15.8 million

  • $15 million to rehabilitate the Graham Creek storm sewer
  • $800,000 to replace the control gate and upgrade the odour abatement system at the Riverside South stormwater management facility

Housing - $5 million

  • $5 million for the Youth Services Bureau for a 39-unit supportive housing building for high-risk, vulnerable youth, and a youth hub with integrated programs and services

City-wide projects - $101.5 million

Traffic - $600,000

  • $600,000 for pedestrian countdown signals and accessible pedestrian signals

Transit - $85.9 million

  • $50.4 million to replace 80 buses
  • $23.9 million to refurbish 85 buses
  • $8.9 million for road and signal projects to improve transit speed and reliability
  • $1 million to reinstate roads after O-Train Confederation Line construction
  • $900,000 to improve bus stops
  • $750,000 to complete the Tunney’s Pasture bus operator building and bus staging area

Water - $46.5 million

  • $10.5 million to assess, rehabilitate and upgrade water treatment systems at Lemieux Island and Britannia, including the SCADA and electrical systems, and for process expansion at Britannia
  • $1 million to rehabilitate a water pumping station
  • $22.5 million to assess, rehabilitate and upgrade the R.O. Pickard Environmental Centre, including the SCADA and electrical systems, and to replace the scum removal facility
  • $11 million to rehabilitate Delorme, March Road and Harvard sewage pumping stations
  • $1.5 million for SCADA rehabilitation and upgrades at remote sewage pumping stations

Trees - $1.3 million

  • $1.3 million to plant 125,000 trees to increase forest cover and manage the impact of the Emerald Ash Borer

Infrastructure - $2.3 million

  • $2 million to manage wet weather flow
  • $290,000 to conduct accessibility audits and to remediate pathways and paving remediation

Regional projects currently under way - $202.6 million

The dollars for these projects are budgeted for 2017 and 2018. The work to complete the projects may span over multiple years.

Parks and buildings - $13.6 million

  • $3 million to expand the Manotick Arena
  • $1.6 million to redevelop the Sawmill Creek Pool and Community Centre
  • $1.49 million for the new Half Moon Bay South Community Park
  • $1.338 million for the new Cobble Hill Park
  • $1.081 million for two new parks in Riverside South
  • $1.03 million for the new Half Moon Bay South Greendale Park
  • $521,000 to replace the playgrounds at Geoff Wightman Park and Paul Landry Park
  • $480,000 for the new Nixon Farm (Sarah McCarthy) Neighbourhood Park
  • $424,000 to renew Greenbank Park
  • $400,000 for the new Emerald Links
  • $380,000 for the new Doug Frobel Park
  • $350,000 for the new Kings Grant Neighbourhood Park
  • $228,000 to replace the playground at Josie Anselmo Park
  • $226,000 a seasonal boarded rink at Richmond Lions Community Park
  • $208,000 for new play equipment for Harold Barnhart Park
  • $200,000 to build the Sens Rink at Heatherington Park
  • $170,000 to renew the playground at Greely West Park
  • $160,000 for the new Longfields Phase 6 Park
  • $155,000 to replace the playground at Russell Boyd Park
  • $152,000 to replace the playground at Blue Rock Park
  • $150,000 to redevelop a fitness park at Mooney’s Bay Park
  • $137,000 for the new Riverwalk Park
  • $130,000 to replace the play equipment at Bateman Park
  • $100,417 for the new Lela Scharf Park
  • $66,200 to replace the gazebo at Bel-Air Park
  • $54,000 for the new Mud Creek Park
  • New amenities for Ivy and Gordon Scharf Park

Water - $77.1 million

  • $23.7 million for integrated road, sewer and watermain renewal on Prince of Wales Drive
  • $23 million to retrofit, rehabilitate and/or replace components of the communal well-based drinking water systems serving Munster Hamlet, Richmond-King’s Park Subdivision, Carp, Vars and Greely-Shadow Ridge Subdivision
  • $17 million to renew the Graham Creek storm sewer
  • $8.6 million to renew water systems at Bank Street and Leitrim Road
  • $3.5 million for integrated road, sewer and watermain renewal at Larkin Street, Larose Avenue and Lepage Avenue
  • $900,00 to replace the watermain on Redenda Crescent
  • $530,000 to renew the twin culvert at Mitch Owens Road
  • $522,000 to decommission and restore the shoreline of the Jock River
  • $443,500 for the Shield’s Creek Erosion Project
  • Replacing stormwater culverts at River Road, Cabin Road, Dalmeny Road, Taggart Street, Cedarview Road, Conley Road, Constance Lake Road, Eagleson Road, Moodie Drive, Dwyer Hill Road and Donnelly Road

Transportation - $81.4 million

  • $31 million to design and begin building the four-lane Kanata South Link
  • $20.3 million to design the widening of Strandherd Drive
  • $12 million for design and preparatory work to acquire property for a new bus transit corridor from Bayshore Transitway Station to Heron Transitway Station
  • $6.4 million to improve intersections at Cambrian Road and Tuscana Way, Albion and Leitrim roads, Bank Street and Leitrim Road, Mitch Owens Road and Manotick Station, Bankfield Road and First Line Road, Earl Armstrong Road and Collector D, Findlay Creek and Bank Street, River Road and Summerhill Street, Rotary Way and Bank Street, and on Prince of Wales Drive
  • $3.5 million to conduct two environmental assessments for rail crossings at Woodroffe Avenue, Southwest Transitway and Fallowfield Road, and for a multi-use pathway at Jockvale Road
  • $3 million to conduct an environmental assessment for the future Kanata Light Rail Transit
  • $2 million to purchase land along Jockvale Road for new hydro poles
  • $1.2 million to improve the cycling facilities along Cyrville Road
  • $800,000 to conduct an environmental assessment to extend Earl Armstrong Road
  • $700,000 to conduct an environmental assessment to widen Leitrim Road
  • $476,000 for area traffic management and calming measures along Hemmingwood Way and Viewmount Drive

Bridges - $10.4 million

  • $6.75 million to renew the Richmond Bridge
  • $1.9 million to renew the McLean Bridge
  • $860,000 to renew the Ashton Bridge over the Jock River
  • $570,000 to renew the Monaghan Creek Bridge
  • $270,000 to renew the Castor Road Bridge

Transit - $5 million

  • $5 million to maintain and modernize the O-Train Trillium Line

City-wide projects currently under way – $125.3 million

Transportation - $9.6 million

  • $4.14 million to enhance community connectivity and add signs and wayfinding to a rural cycling tourism route, including:
  • Cedarview Road to Holly Acres Road
  • Trillium Pathway Link to Dow’s Lake
  • Dough Thompson Pathway extended to Manotick Village
  • $4 million to improve cycling facilities, including:
  • Multi-use pathway on Woodroffe Avenue
  • Woodroffe Avenue Pathway to Algonquin College
  • Nepean Trail cycling facility
  • $1.5 million to improve pedestrian facilities

Traffic - $600,000

  • $600,000 for pedestrian countdown signals and accessible pedestrian signals

Transit - $17.3 million

  • $5.85 million to improve Transitway and O-Train stations and facilities
  • $5.5 million for the transition program for light-trail transit (On Track 2018) 
  • $3.1 million to replace support vehicles used for security, supervision and maintenance
  • $1.8 million to assess, rehabilitate and improve safety and security at Transitway and O-Train stations
  • $1 million to improve accessibility at Transitway and O-Train stations

Housing - $93.8 million

  • Up to $47 million over four years in provincial and federal funding to repair and retrofit social housing apartment buildings with energy efficient heating, improved insulation and window replacements
  • Up to $30 million over three years (2017 to 2020) in provincial funding for the Home for Good Initiative, which provides housing assistance and supports to achieve and maintain housing stability
  • $1.4 million in federal funding from the Homelessness Partnership Strategy to help people with long shelter stays and complex needs move from emergency shelters to permanent housing
  • $14.4 million in federal and provincial funding to develop new affordable and supporting housing
  • $1 million in provincial funding from the Community Homelessness Prevention Initiative

Emergency and protective services – $4 million

  • $1.3 million to replace defibrillators
  • $2.7 million for power assist stretchers and loaders

 

Regional Highlights: West

Wards 4, 5, 6 and 23

Kanata North, West Carleton-March, Stittsville and Kanata South

Draft Budget 2018 paves the way to a progressive future for our city and residents. The draft budget invests in critical infrastructure and assets, community protection and the environment. It also positions Ottawa as a leading creator of jobs and enhances our ability to attract great talent, businesses and families now and into the future.

Regional investments - $17.07 million

Traffic - $3.7 million

  • $3.05 million for intersection control measures at Stittsville Main Street and West Ridge Drive, Terry Fox Drive and Abbott Street, Terry Fox Drive and Westphalian Avenue, and Fernbank Road and Robert Grant Avenue 
  • $160,000 to implement temporary measures for traffic calming
  • Up to $160,000 to install one new pedestrian crossover in each ward
  • $160,000 to improve the intersection at Campeau Drive and Teron Road
  • $100,000 to design left turn lanes on Hope Side Road
  • $60,000 to replace street lights and hydro pole on Shea Road
  • $54,000 to replace street lights on Pickford Drive

Parks and buildings - $5.17 million

  • $639,000 for the new Stittsville South Cavanagh Park
  • $577,000 for the new Minto Potter's Key Park 
  • $576,000 for the new Richardson Ridge Flat Park
  • $470,000 to replace the wave-generation system at the Kanata Leisure and Wave Pool Centre, to replace play equipment at Beaton Park and to replace pathway lights at Sewell Park
  • $394,000 for the new Stittsville South Regional Park
  • $360,000 to replace a shingled roof at the J.G. Mlacak Centre and to replace the play structure and play equipment at Weslock Park
  • $330,000 to replace play equipment at Bryanston Gate Park and to install handrails at the Johnny Leroux Arena
  • $127,000 for improvements at Hazeldean Gardens
  • $50,000 to design the Richardson Ridge Phase 4 Park
  • $38,000 for new fitness equipment at Langstaff Park
  • $7,500 to renovate the bar at the Carp Mess Hall
  • $1.57 million to acquire and protect a five-hectare portion of Shea Road Woods

Roads - $3.1 million

  • $3.125 million to resurface Terry Fox Drive, March Road, Thomas Dolan Parkway, Bayview Drive, Bishop Davis Drive and Liard Street

Bridges - $760,000

  • $760,000 for the North Mississippi Bridge

Housing - $4.3 million

  • $4.3 million for the International Order of Kings Daughters and Sons to add 58 units to their seniors’ building

City-wide investments - $101.5 million

Traffic - $600,000

  • $600,000 for pedestrian countdown signals and accessible pedestrian signals

Transit - $85.9 million

  • $50.4 million to replace 80 buses
  • $23.9 million to refurbish 85 buses
  • $8.9 million for road and signal projects to improve transit speed and reliability
  • $1 million to reinstate roads after O-Train Confederation Line construction
  • $900,000 to improve bus stops
  • $750,000 to complete the Tunney’s Pasture bus operator building and bus staging area

Water - $46.5 million

  • $10.5 million to assess, rehabilitate and upgrade water treatment systems at Lemieux Island and Britannia, including the SCADA and electrical systems, and for process expansion at Britannia
  • $1 million to rehabilitate a water pumping station
  • $22.5 million to assess, rehabilitate and upgrade the R.O. Pickard Environmental Centre, including the SCADA and electrical systems, and to replace the scum removal facility
  • $11 million to rehabilitate Delorme, March Road and Harvard sewage pumping stations
  • $1.5 million for SCADA rehabilitation and upgrades at remote sewage pumping stations

Trees - $1.3 million

  • $1.3 million to plant 125,000 trees to increase forest cover and manage the impact of the Emerald Ash Borer

Infrastructure - $2.3 million

  • $2 million to manage wet weather flow
  • $290,000 to conduct accessibility audits and to remediate pathways and paving remediation

Regional projects currently under way - $30.4 million

The dollars for these projects are budgeted for 2017 and 2018. The work to complete the projects may span over multiple years.

Parks and buildings - $3.2 million

  • $577,000 for the new Fernbank Crossing Park
  • $551,000 to renew the playgrounds at Allenby Park, Kinburn Park, Bryanston Gate Park and Amberway Park
  • $482,000 for the new Suzanna Kemp Park
  • $400,000 for work on the Constance and Buckham’s Bay Community Centre and Library, Fire Stations 45, 61 and 63, the Carp Memorial Hall, the Corkery Community Centre, the March Central Community Centre, the Fitzroy, Huntley and Torbolton Works Salt Domes, the Huntley and Torbolton Works Garages and Offices and the Kinburn Community Centre
  • $384,000 for the new Fernbank Woodlot Park
  • $305,105 for the new Lee Boltwood Park
  • $200,000 to improve the equipment at Stonegate Park/Bridlewood Core Park
  • $163,000 for the new Chenier Lands Park
  • $120,000 to replace the play structure at Beaton Park
  • $50,000 to design the Kanata Town Centre Core Park
  • $5,500 to develop a Facility Fit plan for the Fernbank District Park

Transportation - $6.5 million

  • $3 million to conduct an environmental assessment for the future Kanata Light Rail Transit
  • $1.8 million to improve cycling and pedestrian infrastructure at two intersections on March Road
  • $1.65 million to improve intersection control at Terry Fox Drive and Abbott Street, Terry Fox Drive and Westphalian Avenue, and Palladium Drive and Silver Seven Road
  • $100,000 to design left turn lanes on Hope Side Road

Water - $12.5 million

  • $10.4 million to retrofit, rehabilitate and/or replace components of the communal well-based drinking water systems serving Munster Hamlet, Richmond-King’s Park Subdivision, Carp, Vars and Greely-Shadow Ridge Subdivision
  • $1.2 million to replace stormwater culverts at Upper Dwyer Hill Road, Panmrue Road, Carroll Side Road, Loggers Way, Hamilton Side Road, Diamondview Road, Ritchie Side Road, Kilmaurs Side Road, Torbolton Ridge Road, Beavertail Road, Pinerdige Road, Glennview Place, Old Almonte Road, Old Coach Road and Torwood Drive  
  • $607,000 to oversize the water transmission main in Kanata West
  • $278,000 for the Carp Creek Erosion Project

Roads - $5.9 million

  • $5.935 million to resurface Donald B. Munro Drive, Westhunt Road, Opeongo Road, Dunrobin Road, Baskins Beach Road, Golden Line Road, Limestone Road, Greenland Road, Vaughn Side Road, Panmure Road, Diamondview Road, Willian Hodgins Lane, March Valley Road, Stoneridge Road, Bishop Davis Road, Old Almonte Road, Ferry Road and March Road

Bridges - $2.1 million

  • $700,000 for the Peter Robinson Road Bridge
  • $350,000 for the Kilmaurs Road Bridge
  • $350,000 for the North Mississippi Bridge Mohrs Road Bridge
  • $350,000 for the South Mississippi Bridge Mohrs Road Bridge
  • $350,000 for the Peter Robinson Road Bridge

City-wide projects currently under way – $125.3 million

Transportation - $9.6 million

  • $4.14 million to enhance community connectivity, including safety improvements for cyclists and pedestrians along Campeau Drive, and improvements to cycling signs and wayfinding in rural areas
  • $4 million to improve cycling facilities, including:
  • Ackerson Road Subdivision Pathway
  • $1.5 million to improve pedestrian facilities, including:
  • March Road corridor
  • McCurdy Drive
  • McGibbon Drive

Traffic - $600,000

  • $600,000 for pedestrian countdown signals and accessible pedestrian signals

Transit - $17.3 million

  • $5.85 million to improve Transitway and O-Train stations and facilities
  • $5.5 million for the transition program for light-trail transit (On Track 2018) 
  • $3.1 million to replace support vehicles used for security, supervision and maintenance
  • $1.8 million to assess, rehabilitate and improve safety and security at Transitway and O-Train stations
  • $1 million to improve accessibility at Transitway and O-Train stations

Housing - $93.8 million

  • Up to $47 million over four years in provincial and federal funding to repair and retrofit social housing apartment buildings with energy efficient heating, improved insulation and window replacements
  • Up to $30 million over three years (2017 to 2020) in provincial funding for the Home for Good Initiative, which provides housing assistance and supports to achieve and maintain housing stability
  • $1.4 million in federal funding from the Homelessness Partnership Strategy to help people with long shelter stays and complex needs move from emergency shelters to permanent housing
  • $14.4 million in federal and provincial funding to develop new affordable and supporting housing
  • $1 million in provincial funding from the Community Homelessness Prevention Initiative

Emergency and protective services – $4 million

  • $1.3 million to replace defibrillators
  • $2.7 million for power assist stretchers and loaders

Citizen Budget tool

The 2018 Draft Budget has been tabled at Council on November 8, 2017.  As such, this tool is now available for information purposes only.  You may still provide comments directly to your Councillor.

A summary report of the feedback will be provided to City Council for consideration and shared prior to the approval of the 2018 Budget on December 13.

Table of City Services and Standing Committee reporting structure

City Services and Standing Committee Reporting Structure

City Services and Standing Committee Reporting Structure
City Service Standing Committee
Affordable Housing

Planning Committee

Aquatics, Specialized & City Wide Program Services Community & Protective Services
Building Code Services

Planning Committee

By-Law & Regulatory Services Community & Protective Services

Children's Services

Community & Protective Services
City Clerk & Solicitor Finance & Economic Development
City Manager's Office Finance & Economic Development
Committee of Adjustment External Boards & Agencies
Community Recreation & Cultural Programs Community & Protective Services

Corporate Finance

Finance & Economic Development
Corporate Real Estate Office Finance & Economic Development

Crime Prevention

External Boards & Agencies

Development Review Process (Rural)

Agriculture & Rural Affairs

Drinking Water Services

Environment & Climate Protection Committee - Rate Supported
Economic Development and Long Range Planning Finance & Economic Development
Elected Officials Finance & Economic Development
Environmental Initiatives Environment & Climate Protection Committee - Tax Supported
Facility Operations Service Community & Protective Services

Fire Services

Community & Protective Services

Fleet Services 

Transportation Committee
Forestry Environment & Climate Protection Committee - Tax Supported
General Manager & Business Support Services - Corporate Services Finance & Economic Development
General Manager & Business Support Services - Public Works & Environmental Services Transportation Committee
General Manager & Business Support Services - Service Innovation and Performance Department Finance & Economic Development
General Manager & Business Support Services- Emergency & Protective Services Community & Protective Services
General Manager & Business Support Services- Planning, Infrastructure and Economic Development Finance & Economic Development
General Manager & Business Support Services- Recreation Culture and Facility Services Community & Protective Services
General Manager & Business Support- Services Social Services Community & Protective Services
Housing Services Community & Protective Services
Human Resources Finance & Economic Development
Information Technology Services Finance & Economic Development
Infrastructure Services Environment & Climate Protection Committee - Tax Supported
Long Range Planning

Planning Committee

Long Term Care Community & Protective Services
Non Departmental Finance & Economic Development
Office of the Auditor General Audit
O-Train Construction Finance & Economic Development
O-Train Planning Finance & Economic Development
Ottawa Police Service External Boards & Agencies
Ottawa Public Health External Boards & Agencies
Ottawa Public Library External Boards & Agencies
Paramedic Service Community & Protective Services
Parking Services Transportation Committee
Parks Community & Protective Services
Parks & Facilities Planning Community & Protective Services
Partner and Stakeholder Initiatives Community & Protective Services
Planning Services

Planning Committee

Public Information and Media Relations Finance & Economic Development
Revenue  Services Finance & Economic Development
Right of Way, Heritage and Urban Design

Planning Committee

Roads Services Transportation Committee
Security & Emergency Management Community & Protective Services
Service Ottawa Finance & Economic Development
Service Transformation Finance & Economic Development

Social Services

Community & Protective Services

Solid Waste Services

Environment & Climate Protection Committee - Tax Supported

Stormwater Services

Environment & Climate Protection Committee - Rate Supported
Supply Services Finance & Economic Development

Traffic Services

Transportation Committee

Transit 

External Boards & Agencies

Transportation Planning

Transportation Committee

Wastewater Services

Environment & Climate Protection Committee -Rate Supported