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Maps of Ottawa

geoOttawa

geoOttawa is an interactive map tool that allows you to view map layers, get information and answers about the locations in the City of Ottawa.  Search by address, intersections, streets, facilities, or park names to find a location.  Many different layers of information are available such as parks, schools, City facilities, property parcels, roads, zoning and aerial photos dating back to 1928.  geoOttawa is your starting point for mapping available from the City of Ottawa.

Launch geoOttawa

Information on how to use geoOttawa or provide feedback is available of the geoOttawa Help pages.

geoOttawa beta

A new beta version will replace the current geoOttawa by end of 2020.  Send your Feedback within the application to  help improve the next generation of geoOttawa.  See the information on how to use the application within the app.  The new geoOttawa can be used on almost any device, tablet or mobile phone.

Launch geoOttawa beta

How to find out if your house is in the 1-in-100 year flood plain

The 1-in-100 year flood plain is the area of land which would be subject to flooding during the 1-in-100 year flood.  There is a 1% chance in any given year of a flood occurring that would meet or exceed the extent of flooding represented by the 1-in-100 year flood plain.

In My Neighbourhood

  • 'In My Neighbourhood' is a bilingual, interactive map of Ottawa that offers a quick way for residents to locate schools, libraries, parks, recreation facilities, community services, events, land development applications and more in a geographic neighbourhood.
  • In My Neighbourhood is accessible from a desktop PC, mobile phone, and tablet device and leverages location-aware features to automatically find the user's location. To enjoy all of the functionality, In My Neighbourhood is best viewed on the following browsers: Microsoft IE 11, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, Apple Safari, iOS Safari 4.0+, and Android Chrome 2.3+.
  • Use the map or satellite view of In My Neighbourhood to find the information you need by either entering a city address, by selecting a point of interest on the map or by selecting an item from the list. The interactive map allows you to see details such as address numbers, landscape features, property lines, roads and parks. You can even get directions!
  • Additional features and information will be added to In My Neighbourhood as they become available, in our ongoing effort to serve you better.
  • Didn't find what you were looking for within the In My Neighbourhood tool? Let us know how we can improve the tool by submitting your suggestions online through the feedback button.
  • For help using the application, please visit our user help page.

Launch In My Neighbourhood

Disclaimer

For a version of In My Neighbourhood that is web accessible,  visit In My Neighbourhood desktop edition.

In order to view property parcel data on In My Neighbourhood, the license agreement between the City of Ottawa and Teranet Enterprises Inc., the provider of the City's parcel data, requires agreeing to the Terms of Use below. For access and terms of use for other City of Ottawa datasets, please refer to the Open Data Catalog.

Teranet Property Parcel Map Layers:

For the Teranet Property Parcel Map Layers, The City of Ottawa hereby grants to You a non-exclusive, non transferable license to view and print a single copy of the Teranet Parcel material available on this application solely for personal non-commercial use.  You must agree to and accept these Terms and Conditions by clicking the "Agree" button.  About Teranet Property Parcel Layer contains more information on the license agreement between the City of Ottawa and Teranet Enterprises Inc., the provide of the City's property parcel data.

 

In My Neighbourhood Online Help

In My Neighbourhood is an interactive map of Ottawa that offers a quick way for residents to locate schools, libraries, parks, recreation facilities, community services, land development applications and more throughout the city. The interactive map allows you to see details such as address numbers, landscape features, property lines, roads and parks.

Using the Application

When a resident finds their address on In My Neighbourhood or uses their current location, the application will identify the nearest facilities, services and events. In addition, the application makes it easy to retrieve relevant information about that facility or service.

Map View

Use the Switch Basemap option to select between a map view or an aerial photo view.

the basemap tool available from the menu

Map Based Navigation

There are several ways to interact with the map:

  1. Hold down the shift key and drag a box on the map to zoom in
  2. Hold Down Ctrl+Shift to zoom out
  3. Roll your mouse scroller to zoom in/out
  4. Click the +/- buttons on the map to zoom in/out
  5. Use the +/- keys on your keyboard to zoom in/out
  6. Use the arrow keys to pan north, south, east and west

Finding an Area of Interest

To locate services, events or facilities and other nearby points of interest you can either:

  • Use the search field (enter an address, facility name, neighbourhood name, etc.)
  • Click an item of interest from the list
  • Click on a point on the map
  • Use the locator tool to search based on your current location

locator tool available from the menu

  1. The search field can be used to find an address, facility name or neighbourhood name. Enter the address you're interested in and select the location you are searching for (i.e. bank) from the list:the search drop down menu
  2. Once an address has been entered, a list of services, events and facilities will be listed below. From the search results, click on an item of interest to locate it on the map (i.e. Library - Main, as illustrated below):Point of interest on the map
  3. Click on the title of the category you are interested in (it will turn yellow) then on an item of interest on the map to see the address and other details:pin on the map
  4. Use your current location to find the services, facilities or events that are in your area by clicking the find icon in the top right of your screen.

locator tool available from the menu

Directions

You can also get directions to each facility using your current location or an address you select. By entering your current address, the nearest services, events or facilities will be listed by category. When you find a facility you'd like to visit or item of interest, click the Direction buttondirection sign to have it appear on the map and to calculate the directions and route.

Browser Compatibility

In My Neighbourhood is best viewed on the following browsers:

Microsoft IE 11
Mozilla Firefox
Google Chrome
Apple Safari
iOS Safari 4.0+
Android Chrome 2.3+

For the best accessible experience using assistive technologies when visiting In My Neighbourhood, please avoid using Internet Explorer version 8 or earlier and JAWS version 9 or earlier.

Reporting a Problem

Report an issue or provide feedback with In My Neighbourhood.

Help us perfect our data

The City of Ottawa strives to provide the most accurate information to its residents. However, if you notice an error, please submit it by clicking on the link "Report errors here" found on the map when data is displayed.

Make a Suggestion

Additional features and information will continue to be added, in our ongoing effort to serve you better. If you would like to suggest that certain information be included as part of In My Neighbourhood please send us your ideas.

 

In My Neighbourhood Online Help - mobile edition

In My Neighbourhood is an interactive map of Ottawa that offers a quick way for residents to locate schools, libraries, parks, recreation facilities, community services, land development applications and more throughout the city. The interactive map allows you to see details such as address numbers, landscape features, property lines, roads and parks.

Using the Application

When a resident finds their address on In My Neighbourhood or uses their current location, the application will identify the nearest facilities, services and events. In addition, the application makes it easy to retrieve relevant information about that facility or service.

If you are a mobile user requiring assistive technology, the City of Ottawa recommends you choose iOS for the best experience.

Map Based Navigation

There are several ways to interact with the map:
1. Click the +/- buttons on the map to zoom in/out
2. Use the arrow keys to pan north, south, east and west
3. Use your fingers to swipe to move north, south, east and west
4. Pinch in and pinch out to zoom in or out.

Finding an Area of Interest

1. The search field can be used to find an address, facility name or neighbourhood name.

Enter the address you're interested in. From the options listed, select the location you are searching for (i.e. Credit Union):

search results

Once an address has been displayed on the map, click on the arrow to view options.

view options

Select the category of interest to view all options that are in close proximity to the address entered (i.e. Recreation facilities as illustrated below):

categories of interest

Select the City map icon to view all the items from that category that are within the City limits. city map iconZooming out allows for more items to be displayed on the map.

To get additional information, click the arrow beside the point of interest..

arrow

Information such as name, address or website if available will be displayed. Select the yellow traffic arrows to display the selected item on the map and display turn by turn driving directions.

green arrow

2. Alternatively, you can use your current location to search the services, facilities or events that are in your area. Click the Locator icon in the top bar of your screen.

locator icon

Click on the arrow to then see the categories of interest. Your current position will be shown on the map.

current location

If you receive an error message such as "Permission Denied", it may be that you have your location services turned off. This is a privacy feature. For help turning location services on for Apple products click here. For help with Android devices click here.

Browser Compatibility

The mobile In My Neighbourhood is best viewed on the following browsers:

  • Microsoft IE 11
  • Mozilla Firefox
  • Google Chrome
  • Apple Safari
  • iOS Safari 4.0+
  • Android Chrome 2.3+

Reporting a Problem

Report an issue or provide feedback with In My Neighbourhood.

Help us perfect our data

The City of Ottawa strives to provide the most accurate information to its residents. However, if you notice an error, please submit it by clicking on the link "Report errors here" found on the map when data is displayed.

feedback link

Make a Suggestion

Additional features and information will continue to be added, in our ongoing effort to serve you better. If you would like to suggest that certain information be included as part of In My Neighbourhood, please send us your ideas.

 

Public and portable washrooms

Map of public and portable washrooms in City of Ottawa facilities and parks with information including: location, hours of operation and level of accessibility.

City facilities have begun a phased-in approach of reopening. Please visit Ottawa’s Reopening Plan webpage for current information on services being offered and contact the facility for current hours of operation.

Accessibility level rating

0 = No accessible stall or universal washroom available.

1 = Basic access to one or more accessible stall or universal washroom including:

• a power door operator into the facility
• a clear path of travel to an accessible stall / universal washroom
• at least one grab bar available.

2 = Criteria from level 1, plus:

• appropriate height of washroom amenities
• a power door opener

3 = Criteria from level 1 and 2, plus:

• a large turning radius in universal washroom or washroom stall
• one or more grab bars at appropriate heights
• automatic toilet flushers

Heritage Conservation Districts

Heritage Conservation District Designation under Part V of the Ontario Heritage Act

Part V of the Ontario Heritage Act (OHA) allows municipalities to recognize and protect neighbourhoods, rural landscapes, main streets or other areas of special cultural heritage value that have a cohesive sense of time and place. Designated heritage districts often enjoy a renewed cultural and economic vitality not only because district designation highlights their special values but also because they are protected from decay and the intrusion of incompatible structures.

Although each district is different, many share common characteristics. Heritage Conservation Districts (HCDs) may have:

  • A concentration of heritage buildings, sites, structures and cultural landscapes
  • Visual coherence through the use of building scale, mass, height, material, proportion, colour that convey a sense if time and place
  • A distinctive character that allows them to be distinguished from neighbouring areas

How Districts are Designated

Community associations, the Built Heritage Sub-Committee (BHS-C), historical societies or any individual may request that an area be considered for designation as a heritage conservation district.

As HCDs are more complex than individual designations, requests to study an area for potential designation as an HCD should be discussed with staff in the Heritage Section prior to the submission of a request. Heritage staff can provide information on the implications of designation, the timelines and the amount of work involved in designating a heritage conservation district.

The process to designate a heritage conservation district under Part V of the OHA is outlined in detail below.

1. Pre-consultation and Background Research

  • Interested parties should contact the Heritage Section to discuss the proposed designation. Background research will indicate if the area merits consideration as a heritage conservation district.

2. Heritage Conservation District Study

  • The Heritage Conservation District Study phase includes the research and evaluation of properties and streetscapes within the proposed district and research of the history of the area. The study helps to inform the Heritage Conservation District Plan.

3. Heritage Conservation District Plan

  • The Ontario Heritage Act requires that a Heritage Conservation District Plan must be drafted prior to the designation of a new district. The plan must include a statement of heritage value and attributes as well as policies and guidelines for the management of the District.
  • A public meeting is held to present the draft plan and receive comments.
  • A report is prepared for the consideration of BHS-C, Planning Committee (PC) and City Council.

Process to designate a property under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act

  • Council votes to establish a Heritage Conservation District Study area as recommended by Staff and BHSC
  • Heritage Staff undertakes a study of the established area.
  • The Heritage Conservation District Study must include:
    • An examination of buildings and other landscape features to determine if the area should be preserved as a heritage conservation district.
    • Recommendations regarding geographic boundaries of the study area
    • Make recommendations regarding the objectives and content of the heritage conservation district plan
    • Make recommendations regarding any required changes to the Official Plan or Zoning Bylaw.
  • Staff consults with the local community and the public regarding the proposed geographic boundaries and the design guidelines in the Study and Plan. Staff revises the Study and Plan as necessary after public consultation.
  • Staff prepares a report and documents for BHSC, PC and City Council review
  • Staff consults with BHSC who makes a recommendation to Council regarding the designation
  • PC makes a recommendation to City Council regarding the designation.
  • City Council votes to designate or refuse the Heritage Conservation District. If approved the Heritage Conservation District Plan is adopted.
  • City Clerk provides Notice of Bylaw to the Owners, Ontario Heritage Trust and published in the newspaper.
  • 30 Day Appeal Period
  • If no appeals are received the by-law comes into effect following the last day of the appeal period and the bylaw is registered on title for the affected properties.
  • If appeals are received, the matter is referred to the Ontario Municipal Board.
  • The OMB holds a hearing and renders a final decision. The OMB may:

1. Repeal the By-law
2. Amend the By-law
3. Dismiss the Appeal

Appeals

Property owners are required to seek approval from the City of Ottawa under the Ontario Heritage Act prior to undertaking the alteration or demolition of a designated heritage property. Complete information about how to apply can be found online.

If Council refuses an application or imposes conditions on its approval, the owner of the property may appeal the decision to the Ontario Municipal Board within 30 days of a decision. Only the property owner may appeal a decision of City Council.

Heritage Conservation Districts

There are 20 HCDs in Ottawa. All of these districts are found within the urban area of the city:

Maps and Descriptions (Launch Map)

 

For more information please contact:

Lesley Collins, MCIP RPP
Program Manager, Heritage Planning
Planning, Infrastructure and Economic Development
E-mail: heritage@ottawa.ca

Water Quality in Ottawa's Rivers, Lakes, and Streams

Summary of Surface Water Monitoring Results in Ottawa

Major Rivers

Water quality in the Ottawa, Mississippi and Rideau Rivers is generally good to excellent. This is largely due to the relatively low proportion of urban development and agriculture upstream of Ottawa.

The exception to the overall “good to excellent” assessment of the City’s major rivers are the two sites located in the most downstream stretch of the Rideau River (at the Bank Street Bridge and St. Patrick Street Bridge), which are rated fair.

Levels of phosphorus in the Rideau River are generally much higher than in the Ottawa and Mississippi Rivers.

Major Tributaries

Water quality in the City’s major tributaries varies. The Jock River has a water quality index ranging from fair to good depending on the location; the Castor is rated marginal to fair; the Carp is poor to fair; and Bear Brook is marginal. Levels of metals in the streams are generally good to excellent; E. coli levels are fair to good in the Jock River, poor to fair in the Carp, and poor to marginal in the other major tributaries. Phosphorus levels are poor to marginal in the Jock River and mostly poor for the other three major tributaries.

Smaller Tributaries

Water quality in the City’s smaller tributaries varies from poor to excellent depending on the pollutant. Levels of metals are good to excellent in the majority of areas, with marginal to fair ratings observed in more urbanized settings. For the most part, phosphorus and E. coli levels are rated as poor to fair in both rural and urban creeks, with good to excellent ratings observed in areas upstream of the City.

In terms of meeting water quality targets, urban creeks are worse than rural creeks. Higher levels of metals in urban creeks reflect urban runoff from roads and parking lots.

Areas of Concern

Six creeks were identified during the trends analysis as areas of concern: Bilberry Creek, Green Creek, Bear Brook, Beckett’s Creek, Cardinal Creek and Casey Creek. These monitoring stations show high levels of phosphorus, E. coli and metals. Some of these tributaries drain urban areas, some drain rural areas, and some drain areas with mixed land use.

Surface Water Quality Trends

With the exception of the main channels of the Ottawa and Mississippi Rivers, and naturalized areas upstream of the urban area, phosphorus is a concern in all of the City’s rivers and streams. In all watercourses other than these exceptions, phosphorus levels are rated mostly as poor or marginal and average concentrations exceed water quality targets.

E. coli is not a concern in the Ottawa and Mississippi Rivers. Increasing levels of E. coli are seen in the Rideau River with distance downstream. However, differing levels suggest the influence of local sources rather than a cumulative effect. A significant increase in phosphorus levels is noted when the river reaches the Black Rapids. This is likely the influence of some rural tributaries which empty into the Rideau upstream from Black Rapids.

Increasing levels of phosphorus and E. coli have been found in the Ottawa River, downstream of the urban area. This is due to the influence of the Rideau and Gatineau Rivers, stormwater run off from the Gatineau and Ottawa urban area, and the wastewater treatment plants that serve Ottawa and Gatineau. Increased levels of pollutants are seen in Ottawa’s tributaries during the spring melt when runoff picks up pollutants from farms, yards, roads and parking lots.

Overall, water quality tends to improve as the size of the watercourse increases. Patterns in water quality in the rural and urban areas are somewhat inconsistent, with locations of high water quality found in both rural and urban areas and vice versa. However, there is some evidence that rural tributaries flowing through natural areas (forests or wetlands) are of higher quality than those flowing through agricultural and urban areas.

In addition, water quality index values have generally been better when comparing the index values from the last five years against earlier results, suggesting that water quality may be improving across most water courses within Ottawa.

City of Ottawa Baseline Water Quality Monitoring Program

Why do we monitor?

Water quality monitoring is important and helps answer questions about the condition of a body of water (i.e., the levels of pollutants), stresses on water and the effectiveness of our protection, mitigation and restoration programs. The data collected at program monitoring locations sheds light on trends and is used as baseline information to measure the condition of other water bodies. 

Understanding the health of our rivers and streams is vital to protect the natural environment. Water quality data and information collected by WEP is used by internal City departments for investigations, planning, and restoration and remediation efforts. It is also used by external agencies such as the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF), the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) and the three Conservation Authorities in Ottawa.

Through monitoring we can identify water quality problems, and then develop strategies to address them. Ongoing monitoring allows us to see if our efforts have been successful, and then adjust or adapt activities, if necessary, to achieve our objectives.

How do we evaluate water quality data?

Water quality data is evaluated against three sets of criteria – the Provincial Water Quality Objectives (PWQO), the Canadian Water Quality Guidelines (CWQG) for the Protection of Aquatic Life, and the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) Water Quality Index. The provincial objectives and federal guidelines protect all forms of aquatic life and recreational uses. The CCME Water Quality Index translates complex water quality data into simple terms (e.g., excellent, good, poor) for reporting.

Similar to the Provincial Air Quality Index, the Water Quality Index gives information on overall water quality. The end result is a single index score between 0 and 100 that describes the overall water quality.

Index values closer to 100 indicate higher water quality, while values closer to zero indicate poorer water quality. For an explanation of what a specific Water Quality Index score means, see the table below.

The following water quality categories are recommended by CCME (2001):

Calculated WQI Category What it means
95?100 Excellent Water quality is protected and is virtually threat or impairment free; conditions very close to natural or pristine levels. These index values can only be obtained if all measurements are within objectives virtually all of the time.
80?94 Good Water quality is protected with only a minor degree of threat or impairment; conditions rarely depart from natural or desirable levels.
65?79 Fair Water quality is usually protected but occasionally threatened or impaired; conditions sometimes depart from natural or desirable levels.
45?64 Marginal Water quality is frequently threatened or impaired; conditions often depart from natural or desirable levels.
0?44 Poor Water quality is almost always threatened or impaired; conditions usually depart from natural or desirable levels.

How and what do we monitor?

The City’s Baseline Monitoring Program monitors water quality across Ottawa and identifies long term trends. Six rivers, four lakes, and forty creeks are monitored on a monthly basis unless prevented by site conditions (such as ice cover). Each sample is analysed for 50 different parameters:

Field Parameters

These parameters are measured using hand held equipment while at the monitoring site:

  • Conductivity
  • Dissolved Oxygen
  • Temperature
  • Turbidity
  • pH

Laboratory Parameters

Samples are collected and transported to a laboratory for analysis on the following parameters:

General Chemistry

  • Alkalinity
  • Calcium
  • Chloride
  • Dissolved Organic Carbon
  • Hardness
  • Potassium
  • Silicon
  • Sodium
  • Sulphate
  • Total Suspended Solids

Nutrients

  • Ammonia
  • Nitrate
  • Nitrite
  • Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen
  • Phosphorous, total
  • Phosphorous, reactive

Metals

  • Aluminum
  • Antimony
  • Arsenic
  • Barium
  • Beryllium
  • Bismuth
  • Boron
  • Cadmium
  • Chromium
  • Cobalt
  • Copper
  • Iron
  • Lead
  • Magnesium
  • Manganese
  • Molybdenum
  • Nickel
  • Selenium
  • Silver
  • Strontium
  • Thallium
  • Tin
  • Titanium
  • Tungsten
  • Uranium
  • Vanadium
  • Zinc
  • Zirconium

Microbiological

  • E. coli

Where can I find Ottawa’s baseline water quality data?

For an overview of the water quality of Ottawa’s rivers, lakes and streams please see our Interactive Water Quality Map. For specific monitoring results from 1998-2014, please visit the Water Quality – Baseline Surface Water Monitoring Program data set found on the City of Ottawa’s Open Data archive.

Water Quality in Ottawa’s Rivers, Lakes, and Streams

Interactive Water Quality Map

The summaries for more than 130 monitoring stations are mapped on the interactive water quality map below. This information reflects conditions in 2014 and has been provided by the City of Ottawa’s Baseline Surface Water Monitoring Program. Monitoring results obtained between 1998 and 2014 can be viewed by accessing the Water Quality – Baseline Surface Water Monitoring Program data set found on the City of Ottawa’s Open Data archive. For an explanation of what each Water Quality Index rating means, please see How do we evaluate water quality data?

Catch Basin Locator Map

The City of Ottawa has over 100,000 catch basins to provide drainage to our roadways and greenspaces. As a critical component of the city storm collection system, keeping catch basins clear of debris (leaves, ice, snow, etc.) is important. Find the location of your nearest catch basin using the interactive map and help keep our system operating effectively. 

Disclaimer

The catch basins depicted in this interactive map are derived from existing and collected engineering drawings for the City of Ottawa's Geographic Information System and are protected by copyright. The locations of this infrastructure information are approximate, and should not be used for construction purposes.

About Teranet Property Parcel Map Layer

Teranet Enterprises Inc. it the provider of the property parcel mapping and land registry data used by the City of Ottawa and displayed within applications or online tools; such as geoOttawa.

In order to view property parcel data within City of Ottawa web sites or applications, the license agreement between the City of Ottawa and Teranet Enterprises Inc. requires You (public user) to agree to the following Terms of Use: The City of Ottawa hereby grants to You a non-exclusive, non-transferable license to view and print a single copy of the Teranet Parcel material available on the web site or application solely for personal non-commercial use. You must agree to and accept these Terms and Conditions as part of using a map tool or application that includes the Teranet property parcel map layer.

Learn more about Teranet.