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2011 Census

2011 Census

2011 Census and 2011 National Household Survey (NHS)

This section provides population, housing, labour force and income statistics for the wards and sub-areas for the City of Ottawa.

This data is provided from both the Census and the National Household Survey (NHS). Census topics include: Population and Dwelling Counts; Age and Sex; Families, Households and Marital Status; Structural Type of Dwelling and Collectives; and Language. The NHS is a voluntary survey that was conducted by Statistics Canada for the first time in 2011. NHS data topics include: Immigration and Ethnocultural Diversity; Aboriginal Peoples; Education and Labour; Mobility and Migration; Language of work; Income and Housing.

You can select any geography by clicking your mouse on the area of the map or the name of the ward or sub-area listed below the map. After a selection is made, data for Ottawa and the selected ward or sub- area will be presented in PDF format. Definitions for variables and terms and concepts used are provided on a separate detailed glossary which can be selected from this page.

Census data provides information on the characteristics of Ottawa's usual residents only. Usual residents are defined as those that normally live in the household they reside in. While non-usual residents or persons living temporarily in a household (A group made up of diplomats and their families, college and university students who occupy units but usually live elsewhere in Canada or in other countries, and people who are working temporarily in Ottawa) are not counted as part of the Census population.

City services are provided to Ottawa's entire population; hence, no distinction is made between usual or non-usual residents in the City-derived population estimates. City estimates are therefore slightly larger than those reported in the census. These differences are even more pronounced in areas inside the Greenbelt, especially in areas where there is a high percentage of rental units. The City advises users to understand the concepts and definitions used in the census and NHS and to use caution in interpreting 2011 census data and in particular the sample-based NHS data.

For further information on census definitions and concepts we encourage users to visit the 2011 Census Dictionary on the Statistics Canada website.

Glossary for Profiles

Population

Population (Census)

The population universe includes variables that provide information about individuals, covering demographic characteristics and language. The population universe (target population) of the 2011 Census includes the following groups:

  • Canadian citizens (by birth or by naturalization) and landed immigrants (permanent residents) with a usual place of residence in Canada.
  • Canadian citizens (by birth or by naturalization) and landed immigrants (permanent residents) who are aboard either on a military base or attached to a diplomatic mission.
  • Canadian citizens (by birth or by naturalization) and landed immigrants (permanent residents) at sea or in port abroad merchant vessels under Canadian registry or Canadian government vessels.
  • Persons with a usual place of residence in Canada who are claiming refugee status and family members living with them.
  • Persons with a usual place of residence in Canada who hold study permits and family members living with them.
  • Persons with a usual place of residence in Canada who hold work permits and family members living with them.

For Census purposes, these last three groups of people are referred to as 'non- permanent residents.' They have been included since 1991. Foreign residents are excluded from the population universe. Foreign residents are persons who belong to the following groups:

  • Government representatives of another country attached to the embassy, high commission or other diplomatic body of that country in Canada, and members of their families living with them.
  • Members of the Armed Forces of another country who are stationed in Canada and family members living with them.
  • Residents of another country visiting Canada temporarily (for example, a foreign visitor on vacation or on business, with or without a visitor's permit).

Population (National Household Survey)

The population universe includes variables that provide information about individuals in private households, covering demographic, ethnocultural, language, mobility, education, income, place of work, journey to work and labour force characteristics.

The population universe (the target population) of the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) is the population in private households. It excludes persons whose usual place of residence is a collective dwelling, for example, a hospital, a hotel, or a seniors' residence.

The target population of the NHS consists of persons from the following groups whose usual place of residence is a private dwelling in Canada:

  • Canadian citizens by birth or by naturalization) and landed immigrants (permanent residents).
  • Persons who are claiming refugee status and family members living with them.
  • Persons who hold study permits and family members living with them.
  • Persons who hold work permits and family members living with them.

For the purposes of the NHS, these last three groups of people are referred to as 'non permanent residents.' Foreign residents are excluded from the population universe. Foreign residents are persons who belong to the following groups"

  • Government representatives of another country attached to the embassy, high commission or other diplomatic body of that country in Canada, and members of their families living with them.
  • Members of the Armed Forces of another country who are stationed in Canada and family members living with them.
  • Residents of another country visiting Canada temporarily (for example, a foreign visitor on vacation or on business, with or without a visitor's permit).

Age Group

Refers to the age at last birthday before the reference data, that is, before May 10, 2011. This variable is derived from date of birth.

Households/Dwellings

Household Size

Number of persons occupying a private dwelling.

Household Type

Category to which a person living alone or a group of persons occupying the same dwelling belong. There are two categories: non-family households and family households.

  • A non-family household consists of either one person living alone or of two or more persons who share a dwelling, but do not constitute a family.
  • Family households are divided into two subcategories: one-family households and multiple-family households.
  • Private Households

The private households universe is composed of subuniverses and variables which pertain to the person or the group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy a private dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada. Household variables are distinct from dwelling variables, in that the latter ones pertain to dwelling characteristics, not to persons occupying the dwelling.

Structural Type of Dwelling

Characteristics that define a dwelling's structure, for example, the characteristics of a single-detached house, a semi-detached house, a row house, or an apartment or flat in a duplex.

  • Single-detached house – A single dwelling not attached to any other dwelling or structure (except its own garage or shed). A single-detached house has open space on all sides, and has no dwellings either above it or below it.
  • Semi-detached house – One of the two dwellings attached side by side (or back to front) to each other, but not to any other dwelling or structure (except its own garage or shed). A semi-detached dwelling has no dwellings either above it or below it, and the two units together have open space on all sides.
  • Row house – One of three or more dwellings joined side by side (or occasionally side to back), such as a town house or garden home, but not having any other dwellings either above or below.
  • Apartment or flat in a duplex – One of two dwellings, located one above the other, may or may not be attached to other dwellings or buildings.
  • Apartment in a building that has five or more storeys – A dwelling unit in a high-rise apartment building which has five or more storeys.
  • Apartment in a building that has fewer than five storeys – A dwelling unit attached to other dwelling units, or other non-residential space in a building that has fewer than five storeys.
  • Other single-attached house – A single dwelling that is attached to another building and that does not fall into any of the other categories, such as a single dwelling attached to a non-residential structure (e.g., a store or a church) or occasionally to another residential structure (e.g., an apartment building).
  • Mobile home – A single dwelling, designed and constructed to be transported on its own chassis and capable of being moved to a new location on short notice. It may be placed temporarily on a foundation, such as blocks, posts or a prepared pad (which may be covered by a skirt).
  • Other moveable dwelling – A single dwelling, other than a mobile home, used as a place of residence, but capable of being moved on short notice, such as a tent, recreational vehicle, travel trailer or houseboat.

Families

Census Family Structure (Families by Type)

Refers to the classification of Census families into married couples (with or without children of either and/or both spouses), common-law couples (with or without children of either and/or both partners), and lone-parent families by sex of parent. A couple may be of the opposite or same sex. A couple with children may be further classified as either an intact family or stepfamily, and stepfamilies may, in turn, be classified as simple or complex. Children in a Census family include grandchildren living with their grandparent(s) but with no parents present.

Census Family Composition (Families by Number of Children)

Refers to the classification of Census families (that is, married or common-law couples, with or without children, and lone parents with at least one child) by the number and/or age group of children living at home. A couple may be of opposite or same sex. A couple with children may be further classified as either an intact family or stepfamily, and stepfamilies may, in turn, be classified as simple or complex. Children in a Census family include grandchildren living with their grandparent(s) but with no parents present.

Language

Mother Tongue

Refers to the first language learned at home in childhood and still understood by the individual at the time of the Census.

Mobility/Immigration

Mobility Status – Place of Residence 1 year Ago

Information indicating whether the person lived in the same residence on the reference day, May 10, 2011, as he or she did one year before, May 10, 2010. This means that we have 'movers' and 'non-movers.' There are different types of 'movers': people who moved within the same city or town (non-migrants), people who moved to a different city or town (internal migrants) and people who came from another country to live in Canada (external migrants).

Mobility Status – Place of Residence 5 years Ago

Information indicating whether the person lived in the same residence on the reference day, May 10, 2011, as he or she did five years before, May 10, 2006. This means that we have 'movers' and 'non-movers.' There are different types of 'movers': people who moved within the same city or town (non-migrants), people who moved to a different city or town (internal migrants) and people who came from another country to live in Canada (external migrants).

Immigrant Status

Immigrant status refers to whether the respondent is a non-immigrant, an immigrant or a non-permanent resident.

  • Non-immigrant refers to a person who is a Canadian citizen by birth.
  • Immigrant refers to a person who is or has ever been a landed immigrant/permanent resident. This person has been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities. Some immigrants have resided in Canada for a number of years, while others have arrived recently. Some immigrants are Canadian citizens, while others are not. Most immigrants are born outside Canada, but a small number are born in Canada. In the 2011 National Household Survey, 'Immigrants' includes immigrants who landed in Canada prior to May 10, 2011.

Non-permanent resident refers to a person from another country who has a work or study permit or who is a refugee claimant, and any non-Canadian-born family member living in Canada with them.

Ethnic Origin

Ethnic origin refers to the ethnic or cultural origins of the respondent's ancestors.

Education

Highest Certificate, Diploma or Degree

Information indicating the person's most advanced certificate, diploma or degree.

This is a derived variable obtained from the educational qualifications questions, which asked for all certificates, diplomas and degrees to be reported. The general hierarchy used in deriving this variable (high school graduation, trades, college, university) is loosely tied to the 'in-class' duration of the various types of education. At the detailed level, someone who has completed one type of certificate, diploma or degree will not necessarily have completed the credentials listed below it in the hierarchy. For example, a registered apprenticeship graduate may not have completed a high school certificate or diploma, nor does an individual with a master's degree necessarily have a 'certificate or diploma above the bachelor's level.' Although the hierarchy may not fit all programs perfectly, it gives a general measure of educational attainment.

The following qualifications are to be noted:

  • For this variable, the category 'High school diploma or equivalent' includes persons who have completed the requirements for graduation from a secondary school or the equivalent, but no postsecondary certificate,
  • diploma or degree. Example of secondary (high) school equivalency certificates are General Educational Development (GED) and Adult Basic Education (ABE). A secondary (high) school diploma or graduation certificate or equivalent is sometimes classified as junior or senior matriculation, general or technical-commercial.
  • The 'Registered Apprenticeship certificate' category includes Journeyperson's designation. A journeyman's or journeyperson's certificate in the trades is obtained through successful completion of the examinations for a Certificate of Qualification (COQ). Candidates for the exam must have several years of work experience in the trade or have received their registered apprenticeship certificate through a combination of on-the-job training and in-school training
  • Other trades certificates or diplomas such as pre-employment or vocational certificates and diplomas are brief trade programs completed at community colleges, institutes of technology, vocational centres, and similar institutions.
  • College, CEGEP and other non-university certificates or diplomas are obtained from: a community college; a CEGEP (both general and technical); and institute of technology; a school of nursing; a private business school; a private or public trade school; or a vocational school. Included in this category are teaching and nursing certificates awarded by provincial departments of education, with the exception of teachers' or nurses qualifications obtained at university-affiliated faculties of education or nursing. College certificates or diplomas of two years or more usually have a minimum entrance requirement of a secondary (high) school diploma or its equivalent.
  • University certificates or diplomas (below or above bachelor level) are awarded for non-degree programs of study completed through a university. They are often connected with professional associations in fields such as accounting, banking, insurance or public administration. If the university certificate or diploma program does not require a bachelor degree to enrol, then it is classified as below the bachelor's level. If a university certificate or diploma program normally requires a bachelor's degree as a prerequisite, then it is classified as above the bachelor level.
  • University degrees are obtained through universities and other degree- granting institutions.
  • Examples of postsecondary institutions include community colleges, institutes of technology, CEGEPs, schools of nursing, private or public trade schools, private business colleges, and universities.

Labour Force

Employed

Persons who, during the week of Sunday, May 1 to Saturday, May 7, 2011:

    1. Did any work at all at a job or business, that is, paid work in the context of an employer- employee relationship, or self-employment. It also includes persons who did unpaid family work, which is defined as unpaid work contributing directly to the operation of a farm, business or professional practice owned and operated by a related member of the same household;
    2. Has a job but were not at work due to factors such as their own illness or disability, personal or family responsibilities, vacation or a labour dispute. This category excludes persons not at work because they were on layoff or between casual jobs, and those who did not then have a job (even if they had a job to start at a future date).

Labour Force

Refers to whether a person was employed, unemployed or not in the labour force during the week of Sunday, May 1 to Saturday, May 7, 2011

Labour Force = Employed + Unemployed

Not in the Labour Force

Refers to persons who, during the week of Sunday, May 1, to Saturday, May 7, 2011, were neither employed nor unemployed.

Occupation (Based on the National Occupational Classification [NOC-S 2011])

Refers to the kind of work performed by persons during the week of Sunday, May 1 to Saturday, May 7, 2011, as determined by their kind of work and the description of the main activities in their job. The 2011 National Household Survey occupation data are produced according to the NOC 2011. The National Occupational Classification (NOC) 2011 is composed of four levels of aggregation. There are 10 broad occupational categories containing 40 major groups that are further subdivided into 140 minor groups. At the most detailed level, there are 500 occupation unit groups. Occupation unit groups are formed on the basis of the education, training, or skill level required to enter the job, as well as the kind of work performed, as determined by the tasks, duties and responsibilities of the occupation.

Participation Rate

Refers to the labour force in the week of Sunday, May 1 to Saturday, May 7, 2011, expressed as a percentage of the population aged 15 years and over. The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the total population in that group.
Place of Work Status

Classification of respondents according to whether they worked at home, worked outside Canada, had no fixed workplace address, or worked at a specific address (usual place of work).

Unemployed

Refers to persons who, during the week of Sunday, May 1 to Saturday, May 7, 2011, were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either:

    1. Had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or
    2. Were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or
    3. Had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Unemployment Rate

Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week of Sunday, May 1 to Saturday, May 7, 2011.

Income/Shelter Costs

Average Household Income

Average income of households refers to the sum of total incomes in 2010 of households divided by the total number of households.

Household Income

The total income of a household is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that household.

Total Income

Total income from all sources, including employment income, income from government programs, pension income, investment income and any other money income.

Total income refers to monetary receipts from certain sources, before income taxes and deductions, during calendar year 2010. It includes employment income from wages, salaries, tips, commissions and net income from self-employment (for both unincorporated farm and non-farm activities); income from government sources, such as social assistance, child benefits, employment insurance, Old Age Security pension, Canada or Quebec pension plan benefits and disability income; income from employer and personal pension sources, such as private pensions and payments from annuities and RRIF's; income from investment sources, such as dividends and interest on bonds, accounts, GIC's and mutual funds; and other regular cash income, such as child support payments received, spousal support payments (alimony) received and scholarships. The monetary receipts included are those that tend to be of a regular and recurring nature. It excludes on-time receipts, such as: lottery winnings, gambling winnings, cash inheritances, lump sum insurance settlements, capital gains and RRSP withdrawals. Capital gains are excluded because they are not by their nature regular and recurring. It is further assumed that they are less likely to be fully spent in the period in which they are received, unlike income that is regular and recurring. Also excluded are employer's contributions to registered pension plans, Canada and Quebec pension plans, and employment insurance. Finally, voluntary inter-household transfers, imputed rent, goods and services produced for barter, and goods produced for own consumption are excluded from this total income definition.

Notes

2011 Census Methodology

There have been changes in the way information has been collected for portions of the 2011 Census. Statistics Canada advises that his will impact the extent to which comparisons can be made with previous Census results on some census variables. The information previously collected by the long-form Census questionnaire was collected in 2011 as a part of the voluntary National Household Survey (NHS). The following data in the Ward and Sub Area profiles are from the 2006 and 2011 Census and can be directly compared:

  • Population
  • Households
  • Families
  • Language Groups

The National Household Survey

The results of the new National Household Survey were released in 2013:

  • Immigration, Citizenship, Language, Ethnic Origin, Visible Minorities, Religion, Aboriginal Peoples – May 8, 2013
  • Labour, Education, Place of Work, Commuting, Mobility, Migration, Language of Work – June 26, 2013
  • Income, Earnings, Housing and Shelter Costs – August 14, 2013

Tables Totals and Random Rounding

The figures shown in the tables have been subjected to a confidentiality procedure known as "random rounding" by Statistics Canada, wherein each of the numbers is randomly rounded up or down by 5 or 10. This is intended to prevent the possibility of associating these data with any identifiable individual. The totals of each table are the sum of the individual population characteristics in that table as provided by Statistics Canada, each of which may have been randomly rounded. As a result, due to random rounding, the totals for any one table may vary from the total population count for that area as reported by Statistics Canada.

 

Ottawa's Population

Based on the 2011 Census, Ottawa boasts a population of 883,390, representing an 8.8 per cent increase since 2006. This growth rate is faster than Ontario (5.7%) and Canada as a whole (5.9%). Ottawa accounts for approximately 70% of the population of the Ottawa-Gatineau Census Metropolitan Area, which had a combined 2011 population of 1,236,325.

Population growth is expected to continue. The City's Official Plan predicts growth of 16% over the next 15 years (2016-31). Immigration is a major reason Ottawa's population continues to grow faster than that of Ontario or Canada.

Projected population and employment growth, Ottawa, 2006-2031

The population was 871,000 & 923,000 in 2011.The population is projected to be 1,031,000 in 2021 & 1,136,000 in 2031.The employed population was 530,000 in 2006 & 578,000 in 2011. The employed population is projected to be 640,000 in 2021 &703,000 in 2031

Source: Official Plan Projections

While Ottawa residents are slightly younger than the provincial average (13.2% aged 65 and over in Ottawa in 2011 versus 14.6% aged 65 and over for the province), a significant demographic shift is occurring in Ottawa as the population ages, which is also part of a national demographic change.

The proportion of children in Ottawa has been dropping since the 1960s. The population aged 19 and younger made up 40% of the city's population in 1966. Today, that age group represents approximately 23% of the population. Their share will drop even more to approximately 20% of the total population in 2031. In fact, every age group below age 60 will see a decline in its share of the overall population by 2021.

While the proportion of young adults (aged 20-34) was as high as 29% in the mid-1980s, it is now approximately 21%.  By 2031, young adults will account for less than 19% of city residents.

Mature adults (aged 35-64) made up approximately 32% of the population in the mid-1960s. They now account for 42%, and their share will be roughly 41% by 2031.

Seniors (aged 65 and over) represented approximately 7% of Ottawa's population in the 1960s. Their share has steadily risen to reach 13.2% as of the 2011 Census, and is projected to represent just over 20% of Ottawa's population in 2031.

Changes in demographics influence the mix of City services provided to Ottawa residents.

Projected population by age group, Ottawa, 2006-2031

In 2006, population aged 0-19 was 24.3%, 20-34 was 20.6%, 35-64 was 42.7% and 65+ was 12.4%. In 2011, population aged 0-19 was 23.4%, 20-34 was 20.9%, 35-64 was 42.4% and 65+ was 13.2%. The projected population in 2021 for 0-19 was 20.2%, 20-34 was 20.8%,

Source: 2006 and 2011 Census, and Official Plan Projections

Ottawa is a significant point of entry into Canada for immigrants from around the world. Statistics Canada data show that immigrants to Canada tend to settle mainly in big cities. Immigrants who settle in Ottawa are attracted by high-paying professional jobs or post-secondary studies. They are typically more educated, earn higher wages, and have higher levels of employment than immigrants who settle in other cities. Ottawa also receives the highest percentage of refugees and family-related immigration of any major Canadian centre.

Between 2006 and 2011, Ottawa welcomed 32,485 new arrivals from around the world. Recent immigrants - those who settled here in the past five years - make up 3.7% of the population, down from 4.4% in 2001. Recent immigrants represent the sixth highest concentration in the country.

Overall, 202,605 people born outside Canada reside in Ottawa. They make up over 23% of our population. While Toronto and Vancouver receive the most immigrants among the nation's big cities, Ottawa's immigrant population had the third highest growth rate (23%) between 2006 and 2011, tied with Montreal and trailing Edmonton (36%) and Calgary (35%).

Ethnicity Trends 2006-2011

  • Ottawa has Canada's third-largest Caribbean community, and the second-fastest growing behind Montréal.  As of 2011, there were 22,730 people of Caribbean origin living here.
  • We have Canada's third-largest African community, and the fourth-fastest growing African community in Canada. As of 2011, there were 44,425 people of African origin living here.
  • Ottawa’s Chinese community grew by 17% between 2006 and 2011, the highest growth among Canada's six largest centres, with a population of 40,075 in 2011.
  • Our Middle Eastern community is the fourth-largest in Canada, with over 53,000 people. It grew by 42% between 2006 and 2011, the second-lowest among major centres. 

Total Ottawa-Gatineau immigrants, by place of birth, 2011

In 2011 40.1% of Ottawa immigrants were born in Asia, 28.8% were born in Europe, 16.6% were born in the Americas, 14.2% were born in Africa and 1.4% were born in Oceania.

Source:  Statistics Canada, 2011 Census