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What's happening in your neighbourhood

City wide

The Official Plan, Transportation Master Plan and Infrastructure Master work together to show how the city will grow and what new infrastructure is needed to provide an appropriate level of service. The Master Plans prioritize new infrastructure projects within an affordable budget envelop that includes construction as well as long-term operating costs.

Higher densities and a focus on walking, cycling and transit throughout Ottawa support a more compact and affordable city. This approach to growth is also more environmentally sustainable, since less energy is consumed for buildings and transportation and less land is consumed by development.

How do the Official Plan and Master Plans affect our neighbourhoods?

The official plan and master plans result in on-the-ground change through requirements for new development, changes to the Zoning By-law and construction of new infrastructure.  The plans also lead to more detailed studies and neighbourhood plans.

  • Light rail will make the most significant changes in the City
    • Construction is underway on the Confederation Line – 12.5 km of light rail from Tunney’s Pasture to Blair Station that will reduce congestion and improve travel through the downtown.  When the line is complete in 2018, priority will shift to Stage 2 LRT.
    • The Stage 2 LRT plan ultimately will extend light rail transit from Central Ottawa farther east, west and south. Specifically, the plan will extend rail to Baseline and Bayshore in the west (Confederation Line West), Place d’ Orléans in the east (Confederation Line East), and to Bowesville in the south (Trillium Line O-Train). Although not within the City’s affordable budget envelop, the Stage 2 LRT plan also includes an Airport Rail Link on the Trillium line and extension of the Confederation Line East from Place D’ Orléans to Trim Road.
  • Urban Forest Management Plan
    The trees that grow along city streets, in parks and open space, and in landscaped areas around homes, businesses and institutions make up the urban forest, one of Ottawa’s most valuable assets. This plan will set out the community’s goals for the urban forest and the strategic policies and practices needed to achieve them.
  • Employment Land Review
    Where people work in Ottawa makes a difference to the economy, the life of communities and the use of roads and transit. The review is looking at the employment role of the downtown and mixed-use centres, and the need for business parks dedicated for employment uses.
  • Secondary Dwelling Units in Accessory Structures Zoning Study
    A study is underway to amend the Zoning By-law to permit small, back-yard apartments in garages or other accessory buildings on residential lots.
  • Minimum Parking Requirements
    Parking standards that have been in place since the 1960s are under review. Less parking could mean fewer cars, more walkable streets, and more support for new businesses. The study is looking at parking minimums in Central Ottawa and near rapid stations city wide.
  • Transportation Impact Assessment (TIA) Guidelines Review
  • The City is reviewing the TIA Guidelines - a critical part of the development review and approval process. The Guidelines are the primary tool for identifying the potential impacts on the transportation system from a development proposal.
  • Site Alteration By-law
    A new by-law to regulate site alteration. This initiative responds to policy direction in the City's Official Plan for such a by-law to be established.

Central Ottawa (Wards 12, 13, 14, 15 and 17)

At a Glance – Central Ottawa Nowsee web text

  • Almost a quarter (22%) of the City’s population lives in Central Ottawa, home to 206,100 residents in 2015. Growth has been a modest 2% since 2010, compared with an overall increase of 5% in Ottawa.  
  • In the 2011 census, 15.2% of residents were aged 65 and older, above the citywide share of 13.2%
  • All new housing in the Central Area in recent years was built through intensification and see web textmost new units were apartments. Apartments totalled 94% of all new dwellings between 2010 and 2014. Intensification increases the number of jobs and housing units through redevelopment at higher densities, development of vacant parcels, and conversion or expansion of existing buildings.
  • see web textWith 43% of all the jobs in Ottawa at the last count in 2012, Central Ottawa has the largest concentration of jobs in the city and draws workers from throughout the city every day.  Job growth here is strong, drawing 25% of new jobs between 2006 and 2012.
  • More people walk, cycle or take transit to work here than anywhere else in Ottawa. see web textHalf of residents use these sustainable transportation options for their morning commute, compared with one-third of residents city-wide: 23% take transit to get to work; 20% walk, and; 6% cycle. City-wide figures are 22% transit, 10% walk and 3% cycle. 
  • About half of residents use their cars to get to work (passenger or driver) compared with two-thirds of residents citywide.

Want to know more? Visit Statistics

What else is underway in Central Ottawa?

Intensification

Redevelopment at higher densities—or, intensification—is targeted for:

  • Traditional mainstreets in Central Ottawa such as Wellington, Bank, McArthur, and Beechwood Arterial mainstreets such as portions of Carling Avenue, St. Laurent Boulevard and Montreal Road
  • Key rapid transit stations in Central Ottawa such as Tunney’s Pasture, Billings Bridge and Preston Street.
  • The goal is to create a convenient mix of uses and attractive public areas where walking and cycling support transit use and achievement of city wide targets for sustainable transportation.
  • Outside the areas targeted for intensification, infill and redevelopment that is compatible with the surrounding neighbourhood is supported. A Mature Neighbourhoods Overlay in the Zoning By-law was approved in 2015 to regulate low-rise residential development throughout Central Ottawa so that it complements and reinforces the established neighbourhood character as seen along each street.

Community Design Plans translate the Official Plan at the community level. Recently-completed or ongoing plans include:

  • Centretown Community Design Plan
  • Gladstone Community Design Plan
  • Rockcliffe Lands Community Design Plan
  • Uptown Rideau Community Design Plan
  • Preston Street North Traditional Mainstreet Study
  • The Stewart Street Greening Project will see expanded boulevards and installation of rain gardens between King Edward Avenue and Friel Street to improve water quality and reduce run-off from rain and snowmelt. Central Ottawa was developed before measures to control the quality of run-off water were standard requirements.
  • New Edinburgh Heritage Conservation District Plan - City Council, at its meeting of Wednesday, March 23, 2016, passed By-law 2016-95 with reference to the conservation district.
  • Clemow Estate Heritage Conservation District Study Phase II  - The City has started Phase II of the Clemow Estate Heritage Conservation District Study. The area under study includes Clemow Avenue west of Bank Street to Bronson Avenue, Monkland Avenue, and Linden Terrace.
  • Rockcliffe Park Heritage Conservation District Plan - City Council passed by-law 2016-089 to adopt the Rockcliffe Park Heritage Conservation District Plan.
  • Sandy Hill Heritage Conservation District Study Phase II - The City of Ottawa has started Phase II of the Sandy Hill Heritage Study.  The following areas are under consideration for designation as heritage conservation districts:
    • Russell Avenue, Chapel Street and Blackburn Avenue between Laurier Avenue and Osgoode Street
    • Range Road and Marlborough Avenue between Laurier Avenue and Osgoode Street
    • Besserer Street and Daly Avenue between Charlotte Street and the Rideau River
  • Rideau/Arts Precinct Public Realm Plan coordinates improvements to streets and other public spaces as construction proceeds on the Confederation Line, Arts Court redevelopment, and other projects.
  • ByWard Market George Street Plaza Renewal - The City of Ottawa is developing a new public plaza in the ByWard Market in celebration of Canada's 150th anniversary in 2017.
  • The City is amending its Official Plan and Zoning By-law to reflect updated flood plain mapping prepared by the Conservation Authorities. Affected areas in Central Ottawa include the Ottawa River shoreline.
  • A study of the feasibility of a tunnel for trucks downtown linking the Macdonald-Cartier Bridge and Nicholas Street/Highway 417 is underway. The study responds to directions in the Official Plan and Transportation Master Plan to explore alternative means to accommodate interprovincial truck travel to minimize impacts on the Central Area, in particular along King Edward Avenue.
  • Conversions of residential buildings that result in creation of a three-unit building or low-rise apartment are subject to the same Zoning By-law requirements as new buildings constructed for that purpose. The Residential Conversions By-law, adopted in 2014, is under appeal but is being applied to new applications.
  • The Glebe Neighbourhood Cycling Plan has recommended routes and cycling facilities such as bicycle boxes at intersections and new bike lanes throughout the neighbourhood, in keeping with Ottawa’s Cycling Plan.
  • The Trillium Multi-use Pathway (Phase 2) adjacent to the O-Train Trillium Line from Young Street (south of Highway 417) to just south of Carling Avenue, provides a direct connection to the Ottawa River Pathway. This is Ottawa’s first and only pathway to date that has separate spaces for cyclists and pedestrians, including at the signalised Carling intersection.
  • The Trillium Multi-Use Pathway (Phase 3) connecting the Trillium Pathway at Carling Avenue to Dow’s Lake and Prince of Wales Drive. Phase 3 is underway to continue the pathway to the Rideau Canal Western Pathway. 
  • A multi-use bridge over the Rideau River from Donald Street in Overbrook to Somerset Street in Sandy Hill. Both projects will improve connections to the transit system, the University of Ottawa, federal employment in the core, and the existing network of multi-use pathways.
  • A pedestrian and cycling bridge over the Rideau Canal at Fifth Avenue and Clegg Street connecting neighbourhoods, multi-use pathways and Lansdowne. Additional cycling projects will extend the cycling network in this area. (dependent on funding).  Both projects will improve connections to the transit system, the University of Ottawa, federal employment in the core, and the existing network of multi-use pathways.
  • Several projects to complete the East-West Bikeway linking Vanier to Westboro, including improvements on Beechwood, Hemlock and Albert.
  • A new Trillium Line O-Train station at Gladstone Avenue, connecting area residents to Bayview station in the north to Bowesville in the south.  Service frequency will also increase.
  • Transit priority measures on streets throughout the core, including a number of intersection modifications on Bank Street to enhance transit reliability.
  • Extending Preston Street from Albert Street to Vimy Place (at John A. Macdonald Parkway)
  • Proposed twinning of the Airport Parkway just south of the Central Ottawa to create an additional lane for transit and high-occupancy vehicles travelling to the airport.
  • Pedestrian crossing enhancements along Queen Elizabeth Driveway at Queen Elizabeth Place and Commissioners Park.
  • Area traffic management studies are just being initiated or ongoing in three locations: Lowertown Community, Byron Avenue and Brittany Drive.
  • Various Area Traffic Management measures will be implemented in Centretown, on Bayswater Avenue, on Crichton Street, on Riverdale Avenue and Sunnyside Avenue
  • Carling Transit Priority Measures Study, Lincoln Fields to Bronson Avenue

Want to know more?

For more information about plans and studies, see public consultations

To stay current on the latest planning and transportation news, sign up for the Planning and Development e-newsletter:

Learn more about development applications in your neighbourhood.

Inner Urban Area (Wards 7,8,9,10,11,16 and 18)

At a Glance – Inner Urban Ottawa Nowsee web text

  • The Inner Urban Area was home to one-third (34%) of Ottawa residents in 2015, with a population of 323,300. It has by far the largest population of all sub-areas, but actually decreased by 5000 since 2010.
  • 1 in 6 residents was 65 and older at the last census in 2011, making the population of this area the oldest of all areas. see web textThe percentage 65 and older was 16.3% compared with a citywide share of 13.2%.
  • Apartments made up most of the new housing in recent years, at 84% of new units between 2010 and 2014. Most were built through intensification. Intensification increases the number of jobs and housing units through redevelopment at higher densities, development of vacant parcels, and conversion or expansion of existing buildings.
  • see web textThe Inner Urban Area saw the greatest increase in jobs between 2006 and 2012 of all subareas,see web text drawing almost 35% of job growth in the period. The area had more than one-third (36.7%) of the jobs in Ottawa in 2012.
  • During the morning peak period 67% of residents use their cars to get to work (passenger or driver), about the same as for the city as a whole (66%). Another23% take transit (22% citywide); 8% walk (10% citywide), and 2% cycle (3 citywide%).

Want to know more? Visit Statistics.

What else is underway in the Inner Urban Area?

Intensification

  • Redevelopment at higher densities—or, intensification—is targeted for:
  • Traditional mainstreets in the Inner Urban Area such as Richmond Road
  • Arterial mainstreets such as portions of Carling Avenue, St. Laurent Boulevard Merivale Road and Bank Street
  • Key rapid transit stations such as Confederation Line between Blair and Hurdman plus stations on Stage 2 LRT such as Baseline-Woodroffe and Confederation Heights.

Community Design Plans translate the Official Plan at the community level. Recently-completed or ongoing plans include:

  • South Keys to Blossom Park: Bank Street
  • The Eastern Subwatersheds Stormwater Management Study will look at a combination of measures, from controls on individual residential lots through to end-of-pipe ponds and wetlands sites to yield a long-term plan to improve the health of the water in the subwatershed and the Ottawa River. The study area is roughly bounded by Trim Road to the east, the Greenbelt to the south, Conroy Road to the west and the Ottawa River to the north. The Eastern Subwatersheds includes all the lands that drain to Taylor Creek, Bilberry Creek, Voyageur Creek, and Green's Creek and its tributaries within the urban area.
  • Area traffic management studies are underway or recently completed in Blossom Park West, on Centrepointe Drive and Hemmingwood Way, and on Viewmount Drive
  • Elmvale Acres Shopping Centre Secondary Plan - RioCan Management Inc., the owner of the Elmvale Acres Shopping Centre, located at 1910 St. Laurent Boulevard, is proposing to redevelop the property to modify the existing commercial footprint and add new mixed-use buildings.
  • Westgate Shopping Centre Secondary Plan - The owners of the Westgate Shopping Centre at 1309 Carling Avenue (RioCan Management Inc.) and the commercial building at 1335 Carling Avenue (Investors Group) are proposing to redevelop their properties. The sites are expected to be redeveloped in three subsequent phases over 20 years.
  • Bells Corners Community Improvement Plan - The City of Ottawa is proposing a Community Improvement Plan (CIP) for the Bells Corners community to stimulate urban renewal, business growth and commercial vitality of the area.
  • Baseline/Woodroffe Stormwater Management Pond - The City of Ottawa has initiated a Municipal Class Environmental Assessment (Class EA) for a proposed Stormwater Management Facility at the northeast corner of Baseline Road and Woodroffe Avenue.
  • A multi-use pathway to complete a missing link along the north-south bikeway through the General Hospital campus. This pathway will connect to the network in the north near Train and Hurdman stations and to the off-road route on Smyth which extends to Walkley and ultimately Hunt Club Road.
  • Enhancement to the pedestrian and cycling facilities along MacFarlane Rd., notably paved shoulders or bike lanes between Merivale Rd. and Deakin St.
  • The Nepean Trail and other local cycling routes to increase connectivity within neighbourhoods such as Tanglewood, Fisher Heights and Borden Farm to adjoining shopping, recreational and community destinations.
  • Cleary and New Orchard Planning Study - The purpose of this study is to undertake a review of the lands in the vicinity of the future Cleary and New Orchard LRT stations to determine appropriate redevelopment in the context of surrounding mature neighbourhoods.
  • Richmond Road Complete Street Implementation - The City of Ottawa's 2013 Transportation Master Plan has a Complete Streets component that aims to redesign certain city streets to ensure they meet the needs of all people, whether they choose to walk, bike, drive or take public transit. It will offer safety, comfort and mobility for all users, while also encouraging healthier, cleaner living by making it easier to walk or bike.
  • O-Train Confederation Line Light Rail Transit (LRT) Stage 2 Station Connectivity - A Connectivity Study was initiated to ensure that there were strong community multi-use pathway and sidewalk connections to each Stage 2 Light Rail Transit (LRT) station to encourage transit use.
  • Byron Avenue Traffic Calming Design - The City is considering improvements to Byron Avenue (Sherbourne Road to Island Park Drive) to improve conditions for all road users. The Byron traffic calming measures have an emphasis on cycling and pedestrian needs, the approved plan will be reviewed and updated to ensure these users are considered and to address other localized concerns along the study corridor. This includes the potential consideration of a new type of cycling facility - advisory cycling lanes.
  • A multi-use pathway along Shefford Road, between Montreal Road and the Sir George Étienne Carter Parkway.
  • A cycling project along Brookfield Road and Hog’s Back Road, between Prince of Wales Drive and the Airport Parkway to improve connectivity. 
  • The Confederation Line West extension project will add 13.5 km of rail and 10 new or converted rapid transit stations to the City’s overall light rail transit (LRT) network at Bayshore, Pinecrest, Queensview, Baseline, Iris, Lincoln Fields, New Orchard, Cleary, Dominion and Westboro.
  • The Confederation Line East Extension, tying in at Blair Road, will have four new stations: Montreal Road Station, situated on the north side of Highway 174 as well as Jeanne d’Arc station, Orléans Boulevard, and Place d’Orléans, which will all be located within the median.
  • The Trillium extension of the O-Train from Greenboro to Bowesville and new rail stations at Gladstone, Walkley and South Keys will improve commutes for residents and provide better access to South Keys, Carleton University, Confederation Heights, Little Italy and Chinatown.
  • A planning and environmental assessment study are in process for bus rapid transit on Baseline Road and Heron Road. Phase 1 from Baseline station to Prince of Wales Drive, targeted for a 2019 construction start, will include sections of dedicated transit lanes and cycling facilities, as well as sections where other measures will give transit priority over other vehicles.
  • Widening of the Airport Parkway and Lester Road between Brookfield and Hunt Club Roads from two lanes to four lanes and between Hunt Club and Macdonald-Cartier International Airport
  • Intersection modifications along Prince of Wales Drive to improve traffic flows and enhance walking and cycling infrastructure in the areas surrounding the Hunt Club Bridge and Riverside Drive. The portion of Prince of Wales from Strandherd to Merivale will be widened.
    • Improvements to cycling and pedestrian conditions along Cyrville Road,
    • Widening of Prince of Wales Drive between Hunt Club Drive and Colonnade Road from two lanes to four lanes
    • A multi-use pathway on Ogilvie Road to complete a missing link between existing bike lanes on Montreal Road and west of Blair Road.
    • Merivale Road Transit Priority Study, Carling Avenue to Baseline Road

Want to know more?

For more information about plans and studies, see public consultations

To stay current on the latest planning and transportation news, sign up for the Planning and Development e-newsletter.

Learn more about development applications in your neighbourhood.

Orléans (Ward 1, parts of Ward 2 and parts of Ward 19)

At a Glance - Orléans Nowsee web text

  • Orléans was home to 113,300 residents in 2015, 12% of Ottawa’s population. With a 7% increase since 2010, growth in Orleans surpassed the 5% citywide rate but fell behind increases in Barrhaven and Kanata – Stittsville.
  • Like all urban communities outside the Greenbelt, Orléans has a smaller share of people aged 65 and older compared with the city as a whole—9.9% in Orleans compared with 13.2% citywide at the last census in 2011.see web text
  • More apartments were built in Orleans between 2010 and 2014 than in any of the other suburban communities outside the Greenbelt—1560 units or 31% of the total in Orleans.  As in the other suburban communities, row houses were the largest share of housing, at 40% of the total.
  • About 27% of new housing in Orleans was built through intensification between 2010 and 2014. Altogether, 29% of intensification units citywide were built in the urban communities outside the Greenbelt. Intensification increases the number of jobs and housing units through redevelopment at higher densities, development of vacant parcels, and conversion or expansion of existing buildings.
  • see web textThe 2012 employment survey found an increase of 3500 jobs in Orleans since the 2006 survey, an increase of 17%. Employment gains were primarily tied to population growth, with increases in such areas as retail, health care and social assistance, and accommodation and food.
  • Orléans has the largest share of residents who take transit to work or school, compared with any other areasee web text of the city.  During the morning peak period 65% of residents use their cars to get to work (passenger or driver) compared with 66% citywide, followed by 27% for transit (22% citywide); 7% walk (10% citywide), and 1% cycle (3% citywide).  

Want to know more? Visit Statics.

What else is underway in Orleans?

Intensification

Redevelopment at higher densities—or, intensification—is targeted for:

  • Mainstreets such as portions of St. Joseph Boulevard and Innes Road
  • Key rapid transit stations such as Orléans Town Centre and the mixed-use area centred on Mer Bleue south of Innes
  • The Official Plan also supports increased residential densities in suburban communities by setting a minimum density and requiring a mix of single-detached and other housing types.  In response to these policies and other pressures, suburban Ottawa has seen a 70 per cent increase in residential densities in less than 15 years.

Community Design Plans translate the Official Plan at the community scale. Recently-completed or ongoing plans in Orléans include:

  • Mer Bleue Expansion Area CDP, east of Cardinal Creek
  • East Urban Centre’s Mixed Use Centre CDP, south of Innes Road

 

  • The United Counties of Prescott and Russell in partnership with the City of Ottawa are undertaking Environmental Assessment study for Ottawa Road 174 and Prescott-Russell County Road 17 corridor from Highway 417 to County Road 8 (Landry Road).
  • The Eastern Subwatersheds Stormwater Management Study will look at a combination of measures, from controls on individual residential lots through to end-of-pipe ponds and wetlands sites to yield a long-term plan to improve the health of the water in the subwatershed and the Ottawa River, including fewer closures of Petrie Island Beach. The study area is roughly bounded by Trim Road to the east, the Greenbelt to the south, Conroy Road to the west and the Ottawa River to the north. The Eastern Subwatersheds includes all the lands that drain to Taylor Creek, Bilberry Creek, Voyageur Creek, and Green's Creek and its tributaries within the urban area.
  • Area traffic management studies are ongoing or recently completed in five locations: Jeanne D’Arc Boulevard, Grey Nuns Drive, Viseneau Drive and Barrington Street, Merkley Drive, and Forest Valley Drive.
  • Montreal Road Transit Priority, Cumming Bridge to St. Laurent Boulevard – improving transit service.
  • A new multi-use pathway built as part of the Brian Coburn Boulevard extension between Navan and Mer Bleue.
  • Small-scale improvements to local roads to help build the Orléans east-west greenway bike route, planned as a well-connected, low-stress route through the community.
  • The Confederation Line East Extension will have four new stations: Montreal Road Station, situated on the north side of Highway 174; as well as Jeanne d’Arc station, Orléans Boulevard, and Place d’Orléans, which will all be located within the median. Priority at traffic signals and queue jump lanes to give buses priority over other vehicles on feeder routes to the new light rail stations. Similar measures will speed connections to the station at Blair Road from Innes Road.
  • The future expansion of the Millennium Park & Ride lot, as well as a new Park & Ride lot at Chapel Hill. An environmental assessment is underway for the Chapel Hill Park and Ride between Navan Road and Pagé Road, north of the future Brian Coburn Boulevard.
  • Blackburn Hamlet Bypass extended to new four-lane road between Orléans Boulevard Extension and Navan Road and Bypass Road and Navan Road.
  • Brian Coburn Boulevard extended to new two-lane road (ultimately four-lane) between Navan Road and Mer Bleue Road.
  • Widening of Mer Bleue Road between Brian Coburn Boulevard and Renaud Road from two lanes to four lanes.
  • Widening of Tenth Line Road between Brian Coburn Boulevard and Wall Road

Want to know more?

For more information about plans and studies, see public consultations

To stay current on the latest planning and transportation news, sign up for the Planning and Development e-newsletter.

Learn more about development applications in your neighbourhood.

Kanata and Stittsville (Wards 4,6 and 23)

At a Glance – Kanata and Stittsville Now

  • Solid growth between 2010 and 2015 has made Kanata and Stittsville the largest community outside the Greenbelt,see web text second only to Orleans. With a population of 115,600 in 2015—12% of the Ottawa total-- Kanata and Stittsville grew by more than 13,000 residents since 2010. 
  • Like all urban communities outside the Greenbelt, Stittsville and Kanata had a smaller share of people aged 65 and older compared with the city as a whole—10.7% compared with 13.2% citywide at the last census in 2011.
  • Kanata and Stittsville had the largest increase in housing of all urban communities outside the Greenbelt between 2010 and 2014.see web text With 6430 new units, the area stood second only to the Central Ottawa, where there was a net increase of 8200 units.
  • Row houses dominate the new housing mix in urban areas outside the Greenbelt, at 41% of new housing between 2010 and 2014. Kanata and Stittsville had the largest share of singles citywide (36%) and the smallest share of apartments (18%) compared with other communities outside the Greenbelt.
  • see web textAbout 23% of new housing in Kanata and Stittsville was built through intensification between 2010 and 2014. Altogether, 29% of intensification units citywide were built in the urban communities outside the Greenbelt. Intensification increases the number of jobs and housing units through redevelopment at higher densities, development of vacant parcels, and conversion or expansion of existing buildings.
  • Kanata and Stittsville had almost 10% of all the jobs in Ottawa and 57% of the jobs in urban centres outside the Greenbelt at the last employment survey in 2012. About half the jobs in Kanata were in high-tech in 2012.see web text
  • During the morning peak period 76% of residents use their cars to get to work (passenger or driver)  compared with 66% citywide, followed by 14% for transit (22% citywide); 9% walk (10% citywide), and 1% cycle (3% citywide).

Want to know more? Visit Statistics.

What else is underway in Kanata and Stittsville?

Intensification

  • The Official Plan also supports increased residential densities in suburban communities by setting a minimum density and requiring a mix of single-detached and other housing types.  In response to these policies and other pressures, suburban Ottawa has seen a 70 per cent increase in residential densities in less than 15 years.

 

  • The Kanata North Community Design Plan translates the Official Plan and master plans at the community scale.
  • Feedmill Creek Subwatershed Management Study is re-examining stormwater management measures to ensure that impacts of new development on the creek are mitigated.
  • Jock River Reach 2 Subwatershed Study is developing environmental management actions to improve the health of Reach 2 of the Jock River, which includes the community of Bridlewood and the south portion of Stittsville.
  • The South March Highlands Conservation Forest Management Plan is identifying opportunities for people to enjoy the area while protecting the natural features and functions that make it special.
  • The City is amending its Official Plan and Zoning By-law to reflect updated flood plain mapping prepared by the Conservation Authorities. Affected areas in Kanata Stittsville include portions of the Carp River and Poole Creek.
  • Akerson Subdivision Pathway and Cycling Corridor will link the Bridlewood Pathway with the Trans Canada Trail in Kanata South by means of a new pathway and new bike lanes.
  • An extensive multi-use pathway network through the Carp River restoration project.
  • High-quality on- and off- road cycling facilities in conjunction with new development, including connectivity to existing routes such as Poole Creek and the Trans-Canada Trail.
  • Completion of missing links on Terry Fox and Campeau.
  • Urban Expansion Study Area Kanata Highlands - A comprehensive study is required to identify and determine the site’s suitability for urban development.
  • A median-running bus rapid transit (BRT) on March Road between Eagleson and Carling, with four new stations, to provide better connections within the community and to other destinations. The BRT will be further supported by new bus priority measures on Eagleson.
  • Light rail and rapid transit improvements inside the Greenbelt will improve access to the downtown and other employment areas
  • New four-lane road at Campeau Drive between Didsbury Road and new North-South arterial in Kanata West
  • Underpass of Terry Fox Drive at Earl Grey Drive to improve access to Kanata Centrum and Stittsville
  • Widening Old Richmond Road/West Hunt Club Road from two-lanes to four lanes between Hope Side and Highway 416 to support growth areas in Kanata
  • New two-lane road between Abbott Street and Fernbank Road.
  • Klondike Road’s existing two-lane rural cross section between March Road and Sandhill Road. - Construction of a multi-use pathway from March Road to Sandhill Road.
  • Realign Palladium Drive in vicinity of Huntmar Road to new north-south arterial.

Future road investments will also include:

  • Widening of Carp Road between Highway 417 and Hazeldean Road from two lanes to four lanes to provide capacity for growth in Stittsville. A notice of completion of the Environmental Assessment Study for the project was filed in 2015.
  • Widening of Eagleson Road between Cadence Gate and Hope Side Road from two lanes to four lanes to support growth and provide continuity from the four-lane Eagleson road to  Hope Side Road
  • Widening Kanata Avenue between Highway 417 and Campeau Drive from two lanes to four lanes to support urban design initiative in the Kanata Town Centre
  • New two-lane road between Palladium Drive and Abbott Street and Palladium Drive and Maple Grove Road.
  • Widening of Hope Side Road between Eagleson Road and Richmond Road from two lanes to four lanes, to provide capacity for growth areas in Kanata and network continuity
  • Widening of Huntmar Drive between Campeau Drive Extension and Cyclone Taylor Boulevard from two lanes to four lanes to accommodate Kanata West development.
  • Widening of Kanata West Mainstreet between Palladium Drive and Maple Grove Road from two lanes to four lanes.
  • Various Area Traffic Management measures will be implemented on Knudson Drive
  • A new multi-use pathway replacing the existing sidewalk on Campeau Drive between Knudson Drive and Teron Road.

Want to know more?

For more information about plans and studies, see public consultations

To stay current on the latest planning and transportation news, sign up for the Planning and Development e-newsletter.

Learn more about development applications in your neighbourhood.

 

Riverside South and Leitrim (Wards 3 and 22)

At a Glance –Riverside South and Leitrim Now:

  • Riverside South and Leitrim grew by 50% between 2010 and 2015 but, with a 2015 population of 22,300,see web text are the smallest urban communities outside the Greenbelt.
  • Only 6.7% of residents in Barrhaven, Riverside South and South Nepean are aged 65 and older, well below the citywide share of 13.2%. These communities have the smallest share of seniors in Ottawa.
  • Row houses dominate new housing mix in urban areas outside the Greenbelt, at 41% of new housing between see web text2010 and 2014. In Riverside South and Leitrim, the shares were row houses (42%), singles (34%), apartments (13%), and semi-detached (10%).
  • Most growth occurs on vacant, undeveloped land in these communities and there is little intensification. Citywide, 29% of intensification units were built in the urban communities outside the Greenbelt between 2010 and 2014. Intensification increases the number of jobs and housing units through redevelopment at higher densities, development of vacant parcels, and conversion or expansion of existing buildings.
  • see web textJobs increased by 790 jobs (28%) in Riverside and Leitrim between 2006 and 2012, with the largest gains in construction in Leitrim and education in Riverside South.
  • During the morning peak period: 79% (Leitrim) and 85% (Riverside South) of residents use their see web textcars to get to work (driver and passenger) – (66 city wide).  Another 17% (Leitrim) 13% (Riverside South) take transit (22% city wide); 2% (Leitrim) 1% (Riverside South) walk (10% city wide), and 0 - 1% cycle (3% city wide).

Want to know more?  Visit Statistics.

What else is underway in Riverside South and Leitrim?

Intensification

  • The Official Plan also supports increased residential densities in suburban communities by setting a minimum density and requiring a mix of single-detached and other housing types.  In response to these policies and other pressures, suburban Ottawa has seen a 70 per cent increase in residential densities in less than 15 years.
  • The Riverside South Community Design Update will better position the community for future growth with updated plans for a new district park, new Park & Ride facilities, rapid transit stations, and stormwater management facilities.
  • The Trillium O-Train extension will bring new stations to Riverside South, approximately 150 m east of Bowesville Road,  and to Leitrim, adjacent to the existing Park & Ride lot.  In addition, a new transit priority service will connect Riverside South and Leitrim across the Strandherd-Armstrong Bridge to Barrhaven Town Centre. From there, the Southwest Transitway provides access to Baseline station, a major transfer hub in the rapid transit network.
  • New Park & Ride facilities will improve access to rapid transit. The Park & Ride lot at Leitrim will be expanded to 460 spaces for opening day with 925 spaces planned for the ultimate configuration. At Bowesville, the Park & Ride lot will accommodate 400 spaces on opening day with the potential to accommodate 3,100 spaces.
  • Airport Parkway & Lester Road Widening Environmental Assessment is developing a preferred design to meet increasing demand from Barrhaven, Riverside South and Leitrim as well as other communities and the airport.
  • New roads in Riverside South, Leitrim and neighbouring Barrhaven include:
    • New four-lane Greenbank Road extension between Jockvale Road and Cambrian Road
    • Widening of Strandherd Drive between Fallowfield Road and Maravista Drive from two lanes to four lanes
  • Future road projects will also include:
    • Widening of Bank Street between Leitrim Road and Earl Armstrong Road Extension from two lanes to four lanes
    • Widening of Lester Road between Airport Parkway and Bank Street from two lanes to four lanes.
    • Widening of Earl Armstrong Road between Limebank Road and Bowesville Road from two lanes to four lanes and new two-lane road between Bowesville Road and Bank Street.
  • Leitrim Road Realignment and Widening – Rideau River Road to Bank Street
  • Intersection improvements north of the Greenbelt, for example at Prince of Wales Drive and Hunt Club Road, will improve travel to and from Riverside South and Leitrim.

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Barrhaven (parts of Ward 3 and 22)

At a Glance –Barrhaven Nowsee web text

  • With a population of 82,500 in 2015, Barrhaven is the third-largest urban community outside the Greenbelt after Kanata-Stittsville and Orleans, and home to 9% of Ottawa’s residents. Barrhaven attracted the most growth of all areas of the city between 2010 and 2015, adding 14,300 newcomers in the period.
  • Only 6.7% of residents in Barrhaven, Riverside South and South Nepean are aged 65 and older, well below the citywide share of 13.2%. These communities have the smallest share of seniors in Ottawa.see web text
  • Row houses dominate the new housing mix in urban areas outside the Greenbelt, at 41% of new housing between 2010 and 2014. In Barrhaven, the shares were row houses (39%), singles (34%), apartments (21%), and semi-detached (6%).
  • Almost one-quarter (22.9%) of new housing in Barrhaven was built through intensification between 2010 and 2014. Altogether, 29% of intensification units citywide were built in the urban communities outside the Greenbelt. Intensification increases the number of jobs and housing units through redevelopment at higher densities, development of vacant parcels,
    see web textand conversion or expansion of existing buildings.
  • Barrhaven showed the largest job growth of all urban communities outside the Greenbelt in the 2012 employment survey, with 4850 new jobs since 2006. RCMP jobs plus population-related growth in jobs in such areas as health care and education accounted for the increase.
  • During the morning peak period 74% of residents use their cars to get to work (passenger or driver) see web textcompared with 66% citywide, followed by 19% on transit (22% citywide); 7% walk (10% citywide), and 1% cycle (3% citywide).

Want to know more? Visit Statistics.

What else is underway in Barrhaven?

Intensification

  • The Official Plan also supports increased residential densities in suburban communities by setting a minimum density and requiring a mix of single-detached and other housing types.  In response to these policies and other pressures, suburban Ottawa has seen a 70 per cent increase in residential densities in less than 15 years.

 

  • Community design plans translate the Official Plan at the community level. Area landowners and the City are preparing the Barrhaven South Expansion Area Community Design Plan for undeveloped land between Barnsdale Road and the current boundary of Barrhaven, west of Greenbank Road.
  • The Kennedy-Burnett Stormwater Management Plan will expand this stormwater management facility, retrofit it to meet current standards and provide better protection of water resources. The Kennedy Burnett facility receives and treats runoff from Barrhaven West (Old Barrhaven) and ultimately discharges it to the Jock River.
  • An environmental assessment study is underway to establish the alignment and complete the functional design of the Chapman Mills Drive Extension (Longfields Drive to Strandherd Drive) and bus rapid transit link (Greenbank Road to west of Cedarview Road).
  • As the northern terminus of the Southwest Transitway from Barrhaven, the new Baseline station will operate as a major BRT/LRT transfer terminus connecting Barrhaven residents to all destinations on the rapid transit system. To the east, the Bowesville station terminus of the Trillium Line O-Train will connect residents to the central area, with stations at major shopping and employment destinations en route. A transit priority corridor will connect the Barrhaven Town Centre across the Strandherd-Armstrong Bridge to Riverside South and the Bowesville station.
  • Access to the Trillium Line will be enhanced by increased Park & Ride facilities. The Park & Ride lot at Bowesville will accommodate 400 spaces on opening day with the potential to accommodate 3,100 spaces. The Park & Ride lot at Leitrim will be expanded to 460 spaces for opening day with 925 spaces planned for the ultimate configuration. An expansion is also planned for the Park & Ride at Woodroffe and Strandherd.
  • Greenbank Road Watermain - The City of Ottawa has initiated a Municipal Class Environmental Assessment (Class EA) and Functional Design Study for the construction of a new 610mm diameter transmission water main on Greenbank Road between Jockvale Road and south of the Jock River.
  • An extension to the multi-use pathway along Woodroffe Avenue for pedestrians and cyclists, between Longfields Drive and Stoneway Drive
  • Facilities for cyclists and pedestrians include a new Barrhaven rail corridor multi-use pathway will be constructed concurrent to work on Greenbank Road, to address a missing link in the off-road path network and connect the paths east of Jockvale with the Transitway corridor path.
  • New roads in Riverside South, Leitrim and neighbouring Barrhaven include:
    • New four-lane Greenbank Road extension between Jockvale Road and Cambrian Road
    • Widening of Strandherd Drive between Fallowfield Road and Maravista Drive from two lanes to four lanes
  • The Airport Parkway & Lester Road Widening Environmental Assessment is developing a preferred design to meet increasing demand from Barrhaven, Riverside South and Leitrim as well as other communities and the airport.
  • Future road projects will also include:
    • Widening of Bank Street between Leitrim Road and Earl Armstrong Road Extension from two lanes to four lanes
    • Widening of Lester Road between Airport Parkway and Bank Street from two lanes to four lanes.
    • Widening of Earl Armstrong Road between Limebank Road and Bowesville Road from two lanes to four lanes and new two-lane road between Bowesville Road and Bank Street.
  • Intersection improvements north of the Greenbelt, for example at Prince of Wales Drive and Hunt Club Road, will improve travel to and from Riverside South and Leitrim.

Want to know more?

For more information about plans and studies, see public consultations

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Learn more about development applications in your neighbourhood.

Rural (Wards 5,20,21 and parts of Ward 19)

At a Glance – Rural Ottawa Nowsee web text

  • One in 10 Ottawa residents lived in the rural area in 2015, for a total of 94,000 residents.
  • Adults aged 65 and older were 12.3% of the population at the last census in 2011, close to the citywide share of 13.2%.
  • 70% of the housing built between 2010 and 2014 were single-detached, followed by apartments (21%), row (7%) see web textand semi-detached (2%).
  • The rural area accounted for 4.5% of jobs in the 2012 employment survey, up from 4.2% in 2006. Half the job increase since 2006 was in construction.
  • During the morning peak period 84% of residents use their cars to get to work (passenger or driver)  compared with 66% citywide, followed by 11% on transit (22% citywide), and 4% walk (10% citywide).

Want to know more? Visit Statistics.

The Official Plan and master plans for transportation, infrastructure and greenspace work together to build a see web textmore sustainable, liveable Ottawa over the next 20 years. In the rural area, this means building complete communities in rural Villages, preserving land for farming and resource development outside Villages, and forging critical linkages within the natural heritage system.

The Official Plan focuses rural growth in Villages where there is good access to facilities and services. The need for more land will be based on supplies in the three largest villages (Manotick, Greely and Richmond) and in nine medium-size Villages (Carp, North Gower, Metcalfe, Cumberland, Vars, Osgoode, Navan, Munster and Constance Bay). If more land is needed, priority will be given to adding land to well-served Villages with access to municipal water and wastewater services.

Housing development outside Villages is limited because it potentially conflicts with agriculture, quarries, and sand and gravel operations. Also, the natural landscape is fragmented as building sites are cleared and graded. Residential subdivisions are no longer permitted outside Villages, although the number of severances allowed from a single lot has increased. Two new lots can be severed from a single parcel, provided each new lot is a minimum of 0.8 ha and the retained parcel is a minimum of 10.0 ha.  Previously, only one new lot could be created through severance.

What else is underway in the rural area?

  • Four reviews are underway in the rural area or slated to begin in the near future, to make sure the Official Plan is based on the best information available. These are:
    • The Ottawa-OMAFRA Soil Mapping Pilot Project, to update the soils data needed to complete the Land Evaluation and Area Review (LEAR) project.  LEAR is a tool developed by the Province to help municipalities identify prime agricultural areas and protect them in their Official Plans. 
    • A review of the mapping used to identify bedrock, sand and gravel resources that are protected through the Official Plan
    • Revisions to the areas identified as significant forest in the natural heritage system based on new Provincial criteria
    • Amendments to the Official Plan and Zoning By-law to reflect updated flood plain mapping prepared by the Conservation Authorities. Affected areas include the Ottawa River shoreline; the Carp River; Pool, Green, and Cardinal Creeks; and the John Boyce/Boundary Municipal Drain and the Osgoode Garden/Cedar Acres Municipal Drain. Affected villages include Fitzroy Harbour, Constance Bay, Cumberland and Greely.
  • Jock River Reach 2 Subwatershed Study is looking at potential impacts of development and other land uses on the subwatershed, how to mitigate them, and how to improve natural systems in the subwatershed. The subwatershed contains all the lands that flow into Flowing Creek, Monahan Drain, Faulkner Drain, and Leamy Creek, and includes the villages of Richmond and Fallowfield.
  • North Island Link - The City of Ottawa has initiated the North Island Link (NIL) Class Environmental Assessment (Class EA) and Functional Design Study. The main objective of this study is to link the existing water main on Rideau Valley Drive to the proposed Manotick Watermain Link at the north end of Long Island.
  • The Mud Creek Subwatershed Study will identify actions to improve the environmental health of the creek, which drains into the Rideau River just north of Manotick.
  • The Manotick secondary plan update has led to a new plan that includes direction on future central services, pedestrian and cycling networks, access to the Rideau River and expansion of commercial services.
  • Paved shoulders for cyclists will be added to rural roads as sections come up for renewal, including as current priorities Albion Road from High Road to Mitch Owens, Apple Orchard and Parkway, as well as Old Prescott Road from stagecoach to Mitch Owens.
  • Widening of Old Richmond Road and West Hunt Club Road from Hope side Road to Highway 416, which will help residents in the southern rural areas better access services and facilities in other areas of the city.
  • The Greenbank Road Extension, a new four-lane road between Cambrian and Jockvale Roads, will maximize the use of the Strandherd-Armstrong Bridge and enhance connections to Limebank Road and Riverside Drive, the planned commercial area in Riverside South, as well as the rural southern areas, and the Minto Recreation Complex.
  • Future road investments will also include widening of Bank Street between Earl Armstrong Road extension and Rideau Road from two lanes to four lanes.

Want to know more?

For more information about plans and studies, see public consultations

To stay current on the latest planning and transportation news, sign up for the Planning and Development e-newsletter.

Learn more about development applications in your neighbourhood.