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Barrhaven South Community Design Plan

Overview

The Barrhaven South Community Design Plan (CDP) is the Council-approved guide to the long-term growth and development of Barrhaven South. The purpose of the CDP is to create a framework for the future development of these lands, which fulfills the policy directions outlined in the City’s Official Plan and sets the specific objectives for the Barrhaven South community. The CDP provides the land use concept for these lands, as well as the servicing and transportation structure for future development.

The Barrhaven South CDP area is located at the south end of the urban area of the City of Ottawa. Generally, it lies south of the Jock River, east of Highway 416, north of Barnsdale Road and west of Jockvale, Greenbank and the existing Stonebridge community. The land is approximately 500 hectares (1,235 acres) in size and is relatively flat. The key feature is the Jock River, which forms the northern edge of the CDP Study Area.

Chapter 1 - The Lands

1.1 The Site

Figure 3a – Photo of the Jock River
Figure 3b – Photo of the Jock River
Figure 3 – Photos of the Jock River

The Barrhaven South CDP Study Area is located at the south end of the urban area of the City of Ottawa, in the former municipality of Nepean as illustrated in Figures 1 and 2. Generally, it lies south of the Jock River, east of Highway 416, north of Barnsdale Road and west of Jockvale, Greenbank and the existing Stonebridge Community. The land is approximately 500 hectares (1235 acres) in size and is relatively flat. The key feature is the Jock River, which forms the northern edge of the CDP Study Area.

The Jock River, which rises in Lanark County and proceeds roughly northeast, is a tributary of the bigger Rideau River. The river’s first name was the Goodwood, 1 which was the name of the Sussex, England stately home of the 4th Duke of Richmond, Charles Lennox, who was Governor-in-Chief of British North America, 1818-1819. The French, even before the British stamped the Goodwood name on it, called it the Rivière Jacques, after a voyageur who drowned in it. The Scottish settlers to the area converted Jacques to Jock, and the name stuck.

1 Historical notes from text prepared by Phil Jenkins for Brickland Timberlay Corporation

Figure 1 – Location Map

Figure 1 – Location Map
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Figure 2 – Study Area

Figure 2 – Study Area
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1.2 Land Ownership

Early Barrhaven was developed by Mel Barr of Kingston. In 1959, he bought 200 acres from a man with the nickname “Early” Larkin, with the intention of building a racecourse. When the Rideau-Carleton Raceway appeared shortly after his purchase, he abandoned the idea and, noting that a sewer had already been constructed to service the Agriculture Canada complex in the Greenbelt, he subdivided the land. Services went in and Barr sold the lots to various builders.

Currently, there are several landowners within the 500-hectare study area. The single largest landowner is Mattamy Development Corporation which owns 228 hectares or 46% of the land. Tamarack Developments, Monarch Homes and Minto own an additional 125 hectares (25%) between them. The City of Ottawa owns 32 hectares of Major Open Space lands along the Jock River and the remainder of the lands are owned by various groups and individuals. A complete listing of all landholdings is outlined below in Table 1.

Table 1: Barrhaven South Landholdings – March 2006
LANDOWNER Total Landholdings (hectares) 1 Percentage of total area
Mattamy 228.5 45.6%
Tamarack 74.6 14.9%
City of Ottawa 2 45.9 9.2%
Monarch 27.7 5.5%
Minto 22.8 4.6%
Kennedy 22.8 4.6%
Harzena 21.3 4.3%
Leikin Group 19.4 3.9%
Clarke et al 18.3 3.6%
M.T.O. 12.3 2.5%
Others 6.8 1.3%
TOTALS 500.5 ha 100%

1. Landownership is based on a rationalized urban boundary as shown in the Land Use Plan in this CDP.
2. City lands include road rights-of-way.

Chapter 2 - Collaborative Community Building

2.1 Purpose of the Community Design Plan

Photo 1 - A tot lot provides a place for young children to climb and slide
Photo 2 - A wide sidewalk on a street with a distinct identity and a variety of treatments
Photo 3 - A serene setting with homes overlooking a stormwater retention pond
Photo 4 - A well-designed front porch

The purpose of the Barrhaven South Community Design Plan (CDP) is to create a framework for the future development of these lands, which fulfills the policy directions outlined in the City’s Official Plan and sets the specific objectives for the Barrhaven South community. The CDP provides the land use concept for these lands, as well as the servicing and transportation structure for future development. The Official Plan requires the CDP to identify and include all specific Official Plan amendments needed to implement the CDP.

The Official Plan establishes a series of objectives and requirements for

Developing Communities, as follows:

  • A mix of housing that is no more than 60% singles and semi-detached housing, with at least 30% multiples and 10% apartments;
  • An overall density for single, semi-detached and townhouses of 29 units per net hectare, as a minimum;
  • A land use mix that contributes to achieving a balance of 1.3 jobs per household for the larger South Nepean area;
  • A modified grid road network for development; and
  • A development pattern that sets a distinctive identity and a variety of building forms and treatments.

2.2 Supporting Studies

Several supporting studies have been undertaken to provide information and guidance on the structure and components of the CDP and Land Use Plan. These include:

  • The Master Servicing Study which provides technical guidance on the infrastructure requirements for the development of Barrhaven South with respect to water, wastewater and stormwater management.
  • The Transportation Master Plan which provides technical guidance on the new road network for Barrhaven South and the transportation improvements required to facilitate the development.
  • The Jock River Reach 1 Subwatershed Study which investigates the ecological features and functions of the subwatershed and establishes a management strategy to protect and enhance this natural system.
  • In conjunction with the Subwatershed Study, a Conceptual Fisheries Compensation Plan is being prepared detailing measures that will be required through the development of Barrhaven South to create new fish habitat and enhance existing fish habitat in this reach of the Jock River. Further details on these studies can be found in Chapter 5 and Chapter 7 of the CDP.

Further details on these studies can be found in Chapter 5 and Chapter 7 of the CDP.

2.3 The Planning & Consultation Process

2.3.1 Core Project Team

The Core Project Team (CPT) that included key City of Ottawa staff, primary consultants, and participating landowners was established at the onset of the exercise. The CPT met on a bi-weekly basis over the duration of the study to oversee the project, resolve issues and achieve consensus at each step of the process. The members included representatives of the following organizations and companies:

City of Ottawa

  • Urban Design and Area Planning
  • Infrastructure Planning
  • Parks and Recreation
  • Environmental Sustainability
  • Infrastructure Approvals
  • Transportation & Infrastructure Planning
  • Development Approvals
  • Councillor Jan Harder’s Office

Participating Landowners

  • Mattamy Development Corporation
  • Monarch Corporation
  • Minto Developments Inc.
  • Leikin Group
  • Tamarack Developments

Consulting Team

  • FoTenn Consultants Inc.
  • Stantec Consulting Ltd.
  • Niblett Environmental Associates Inc.
  • Delcan Corporation
  • StoneStable Consulting

2.3.2 Technical Advisory Committee

A Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) was also established and met on six (6) occasions to formally review and provide input on key project deliverables throughout the course of the study. In addition, members of TAC were available individually to provide additional input on specific issues related to their particular mandate / function. Representatives of the following organizations participated on the TAC:

  • All CPT Members
  • Ontario Ministry of the Environment
  • Ontario Ministry of Transportation
  • Rideau Valley Conservation Authority
  • City of Ottawa Traffic and Parking Operations
  • City of Ottawa Waste Water & Drainage Services
  • City of Ottawa Infrastructure Services
  • City of Ottawa Utility Services Branch
  • City of Ottawa Transit Services Branch

2.3.3 Public Consultation

During the preparation of the Barrhaven South Community Design Plan the public has had open access to the Core Project Team and has been formally engaged and consulted at regular intervals throughout the process. Up-to-date information on the status and timing of the Barrhaven South CDP project has been included in the Public Consultation section of the City of Ottawa's web page. Four (4) formal public open houses for this project were held at the Walter Baker Centre in the Barrhaven community on:

  • April 14, 2005
  • July 20, 2005
  • January 26, 2006, and
  • March 29, 2006.

Photo 5 - An attentive audience at a public open house presentation

These involved opportunities for the public to review the analysis and work to date and to ask questions of City staff and the full consulting team. Notices for all public meetings addressed both the planning process, as well as all requirements of the environmental assessment processes. CDP, the project team also participated in general open houses hosted by the Ward Councillor in October 2005 and April 2006.

Figure 4a - Photo from Open House #3 - January 26, 2006
Figure 4b - Photo from Open House #3 - January 26, 2006
Figure 4 - Photos from Open House #3 – January 26, 2006
Open House #1 – April 14, 2005

The purpose of the open house was to introduce the CDP process and the parallel Class Environmental Assessments for the subwatershed study, roadways and servicing within the CDP Study Area. The evening consisted of a walk-through open house display, which highlighted the project process and Existing Conditions documentation. There was also a formal presentation that gave an overview of the CDP planning process, study area location, additional ongoing studies in the area, and the existing conditions documentation. City staff and project team consultants were on hand to answer questions from members of the public.

Open House #2 – July 20, 2005

The purpose of the second open house was to review preliminary land use concept plans and receive input. Information was provided on the ongoing Class Environmental Assessments for roadways and infrastructure within the CDP Study Area and the Jock River Reach One Subwatershed Study. The evening consisted of a formal presentation, which highlighted the existing conditions within the Study Area and provided an overview of the three (3) preliminary land use concept plans. Following the presentation, a facilitated workshop was held in which members of the public worked in small groups to provide input on the concepts. Participants were asked to review the concepts and report back to the larger group on which elements of the Concept Plans they liked and those elements they would change. The feedback provided by the attendees was captured in an "as-heard" record, as well attendees were encouraged to submit additional written comments if desired.

Open House #3 – January 26, 2006

The purpose of this Open House was to provide the public with an opportunity to review, discuss and submit comments on the recommended land use concept plan, the conceptual stormwater management solution, the conceptual transportation roadway network, the natural environment system and the conceptual water and sanitary servicing system. The evening consisted of a walk-through open house display with City staff and project team consultants on hand to answer questions from members of the public. There was also a formal presentation that gave an overview of the CDP planning process to date and outlined the evolution of the plan, including summaries of the issues that were addressed and the options that were assessed. The recommended land use plan was described and presented for consideration.

Open House #4 – March 29, 2006

The fourth and final public open house provided the public the opportunity to review, discuss and comment on the recommended land use plan, the draft demonstration plan, the draft design guidelines, as well as the stormwater management solution, the natural environment system, the proposed water and sanitary servicing system and the proposed transportation plan for the road network. The format was similar to the previous open houses, with walk-through open house displays where City staff and project team consultants were on hand to answer questions and explore ideas and considerations with members of the public. A formal presentation was made providing an overview of the entire project and summarizing the details of the land use plan, the demonstration plan and the design guidelines.

Chapter 3 - The Planning Context

This section provides a general overview of the framework for planning the Barrhaven South community. In support of the Barrhaven South CDP, extensive background analysis and investigations have been undertaken. These include an Existing Conditions Analysis which addresses several components including land use policy and planning, open space, natural environment, and engineering considerations related to servicing and transportation.

For greater detail, reference should be made to the Existing Conditions Report (September 2005) and the following supporting draft documentation:

  • The Transportation Master Plan (May 2006),
  • The Master Servicing Plan, and
  • The Jock River Reach 1 Subwatershed Study.

See Chapters 5 and 7 for further details on these supporting documents.

3.1 The Planning Framework

3.1.1 Existing Development

Existing development within the CDP Study Area is limited to a few farms and rural residential homes. Figure 5 illustrates the existing land uses around the edge of the CDP boundary.

Figure 5 - Existing Land Uses Surrounding Barrhaven South

Figure 5 - Existing Land Uses Surrounding Barrhaven South
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North of the Jock River is the existing Barrhaven area, a thriving community which continues to expand rapidly. The South Nepean Town Centre (SNTC), situated north of the Jock River, is being planned as a mixed-use area strategically located adjacent to the future rapid transit network. It will have a mix of land uses in a variety of built forms, such as office, retail, service, institutional and residential. Planning Area 8, located west of the SNTC and abutting the north side of the Jock River, is intended to include a mix of residential and recreational land uses, the latter as floodplain opportunities. Immediately south and west of the Study Area are two sand and gravel extraction operations. West of Highway 416 is the Trail Road Solid Waste Facility. East of Greenbank Road is the low density Stonebridge residential community with a public golf course. Barnsdale Road forms a clear boundary just beyond the southern limit of the CDP Study Area. This arterial currently has a rural cross section and crosses Highway 416 with no interchange. South of the Study Area are additional farm and rural residential uses.

3.1.2 Land Use Policies

The new Official Plan (OP) for the City of Ottawa was adopted in May 2003, and, as seen in Figure 6, designates the subject lands primarily as Developing Community, with portions designated Mixed Use Centre, Town Centre and Major Open Space.

The “Generally Permitted Uses” found in Section 3.1 of the Official Plan, subject to the conditions described therein and other applicable policies of the Plan, are permitted in all land use areas of the Barrhaven South Community.

Figure 6 - City Ottawa Official Plan (May 2003) Land Use Designations

Figure 6 - City Ottawa Official Plan (May 2003) Land Use Designations
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Developing Community

The Developing Community designation is intended for large tracts of land that are expected to develop as comprehensive communities. Generally, these areas are located at the periphery of the City. In order to establish a coordinated framework for development that ensures that the broader City objectives are achieved, development in areas designated as Developing Community may only proceed on the basis of a Community Design Plan. The intent is that the land use designations for these lands will be amended to reflect the plan approved in the Community Design Plan.

To guide the type and form of development for Developing Community lands, the Official Plan sets out a series of policies and targets as follows:

  • A mix of residential dwelling types will be achieved, such that single-detached and semi-detached units will not exceed 60% of the total number of units; multiple units will constitute at least 30% of the total units, and apartments must be at least 10% of the total number of units;
  • Development will occur at increased densities, where at least 29 units per net hectare will be achieved through the development of single-detached, semi-detached and townhouses;
  • Development should occur in a pattern that prioritizes walking, cycling and transit over the automobile to create complete, sustainable communities;
  • A mix of residential dwelling types should be achieved;
  • Communities should have distinctive identities, but not by creating homogeneous neighbourhoods of singular types of units. Instead, the distinctive community identity should be created using various methods, including lotting arrangement, building articulation and setback, architectural design related to building material and colour schemes, façade elements and roofline, and landscaping treatment.
Mixed-Use Centre

The Barrhaven South lands immediately south of the Jock River and adjacent to Half Moon Bay are designated as a Mixed-Use Centre with Town Centre overlay. These lands were originally intended to be included as part of the South Nepean Town Centre. However, when the Town Centre Study commenced, the boundary was defined to include only those lands to the north of the Jock River. This was based on the decision that the rest of the Town Centre designated lands would be incorporated into the land use study for the Barrhaven South Developing Community designated lands. Earlier plans contained in the South Urban Activity Centre Concept Design Report incorporated medium density housing located on the south side of the Jock River. The Study undertaken for the Barrhaven South CDP considered these earlier plans in its review, as well as new background information, other Official Plan policy directions, and surrounding land uses.

Major Open Space

Much of the land adjacent to the Jock River is designated Major Open Space. A range of uses is permitted, including passive and active recreation, conservation areas, required municipal infrastructure, and small-scale, ancillary commercial and institutional uses. The City already owns substantial tracts of land along the river and has plans for a comprehensive park network.

Schedule K - Environmental Constraints

Some of the northerly portion of Barrhaven South lies within the Jock River Flood Plain, the limits of which are determined by the Rideau Valley Conservation Authority. While the Official Plan includes specific policies related to floodplains, development that may pose a risk to personal health and safety and/or the environment is generally prohibited. Some of the area located north and south of Cambrian Road are designated “Organic Soils” and require the submission of a geotechnical study at the time of subdivision to demonstrate that the soils are suitable for development.

Solid Waste Disposal Sites

The Official Plan states that, “development proposals within 500 metres of an active waste disposal site, or other appropriate influence area, must demonstrate that the landfill will not have an impact on the proposed use and that there will be no impacts from the proposed use on continuing landfill operations (e.g., a use that would have the potential of impacting the water table).” On June 1, 2005, the Trail Road facility recently received Province of Ontario approval of its Environmental Assessment to expand its operations within its present area, and its Certificate of Approval was issued on May 16, 2006.

Mineral Resources

To the southwest of the CDP Study Area are two existing sand and gravel pits. These pits are identified on Schedule A of the Official Plan as Sand and Gravel Resource Area. Development of conflicting land uses is restricted within 300 m of the Sand and Gravel Resource Area. [The Official Plan originally restricted development within 150 metres; however, this was increased to 300 metres through Ministerial Modification #26. This modification is currently under appeal.] Examples of conflicting land uses include: dwellings or lodging places (such as nursing homes, motels, and camp grounds), and farming or small-scale business uses where animals, equipment or employees are affected by pit or quarry activities. Limited types of new development may be approved within the 300 metres provided such development does not conflict with future mineral aggregate extraction as demonstrated through an impact assessment study.

Broader City Objectives

The Official Plan (2003) sets out several development objectives that must be considered and accommodated in the planning for Barrhaven South.

Affordable Housing

Affordable housing is defined as housing, either ownership or rental, for which a low or moderate income household pays no more than 30% of its gross annual income. Income levels and target rents and prices are determined on an annual basis by the City. The City will encourage the production of affordable housing in new residential development and redevelopment to meet an annual target of:

a) 25% of all new rental housing is to be affordable to households up to the 30th income percentile, and

b) 25% of all new ownership housing is to be affordable to households up to the 40th income percentile.

Parks and Leisure Facilities

The Official Plan has identified a target for total public greenspace in large urban areas of 4.0 hectares per 1000 population or approximately 16-20% of gross land area. These lands would include stormwater ponds, pathways, school grounds, etc. With respect to parks and leisure areas specifically, the OP targets a minimum of 2.0 hectares per 1000 population (or 8-10% of developable area) in Developing Communities. This would include dedicated parkland, as well as parks owned by the City and other public agencies. In terms of community design, all homes are to be located within 400 metres of a greenspace.

Job-Household Balance

The Plan requires a mix of land uses within Developing Communities that contributes to achieving a balance of jobs and households that is identified for the larger South Nepean area.

3.1.3 Former Official Plan Policies

The City of Ottawa’s new Official Plan was enacted in May 2003. However, several appeals remain outstanding. Until the Plan comes into full force and effect, the Plans of the former municipalities, including the Regional Municipality of Ottawa-Carleton and the City of Nepean, should be considered in the planning of these lands.

The Regional Official Plan designated the Barrhaven South lands primarily as South Urban Centre Future Development, with the balance designated Town Centre and Waterfront Open Space.

Similarly, the City of Nepean Official Plan designated the lands primarily Future Urban Area, with the balance designated within the Activity Centre as Residential and Open Space.

Given the consistency in what has been planned for these lands for a considerable period of time, the CDP planning process focused primarily on the policy framework outlined in the new Official Plan for the City of Ottawa as it relates to Developing Communities.

3.2 The Natural Environment

3.2.1 Existing Environmental Context

The Jock River

The Jock River is the main aquatic feature of the Study Area within a watershed drainage area of 551 square kilometres. For planning purposes, the Jock River watershed has been divided into four reaches. This section of the river system is known as Reach 1 which extends from the west at the point where the river crosses under Highway 416, north to include Cedarview and a portion of Barrhaven, south including the Community Design Area, and east to the mouth of the Rideau River. There are significant biological features and functions in this portion of the river including spawning areas for smallmouth bass, walleye and muskellunge.

In 2001, the Rideau Valley Conservation Authority completed the Jock River Watershed Plan. In the watershed plan, the water quality within Reach 1 was categorized as consistent with the remainder of the Jock River. Bacteria and nutrient levels are high and the level of suspended solids is low. Runoff into the river is high due to urbanization, the relative lack of natural land and riparian cover, the lack of storage areas, and an efficient agricultural drain system. Reach 1 is known to provide habitat for significant fish species and offers recreational opportunities for fishing, snowmobiling and hiking. Tributaries

Figure 7 - Jock River Reach 1 Subwatershed Boundary

Figure 7 - Jock River Reach 1 Subwatershed Boundary
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Tributaries

In 1997, a Master Drainage Plan (MDP) was prepared in support of development in the South Urban Community (south of the Jock River). The MDP identified 5 different tributaries, south of the Reach 1 section of the Jock River. A Subwatershed Study (which was nearing completion at the time of finalizing this document) was undertaken in support of the Barrhaven South Community Design Plan to review the existing conditions of the Jock River and the Reach 1 tributaries in greater detail and identify environmental constraints and opportunities to be considered in the Community Design Plan. Recommendations to improve conditions of the Jock River and some of the tributaries are discussed later in this report.

The following describes the four main drains affected by implementation of this proposed servicing plan.

West Clarke Drain

This tributary was one of two that had some water and fish refugia year round. Water entered this drain from the adjacent woodlot and from agricultural tile drains. Seven fish species were sampled from the drain in June 2005. Three (3) separate reaches were delineated in the West Clarke Drain.

East Clarke Drain

This was the driest of all the agricultural drains surveyed, as evidenced by the large Manitoba maple tree present within the drain at Cambrian Road. Six (6) fish species were sampled from the drain in June 2005. Most of the fish captured were at the confluence with the Jock River. Only one species, the brook stickleback, was found south of Cambrian Road in the upstream section of the drain. Due to the lack of habitat diversity, the entire East Clarke Drain was characterized as a single reach.

Todd Municipal Drain

This tributary was the second drain that had some water year round. Although flows in the summer were low to none, fish were able to find refugia in specific areas that remained wet. A total of five (5) fish species were sampled from Todd Municipal Drain in June 2005. Three (3) separate reaches were delineated in the Todd Municipal Drain.

Corrigan Drain

In July 2004 this tributary was completely dry. In the spring of 2005, an upstream water control structure failed and additional quantities of water were discharged to this drain. It was assumed fish present in the upstream sections of the drain originated from the pond on the upstream golf course. A total of ten (10) fish species were sampled for the Corrigan Drain in June 2005. Two (2) separate reaches were delineated in the Corrigan Drain.

Woodlots & Hedgerows
Photo 6 - The solitude of the Jock River
Photo 7 - A family of ducks on the Jock River

There are a number of woodlots that range in size, age and quality dispersed throughout the Study Area. Through the subwatershed study an investigation and assessment of terrestrial features was undertaken to support the community design plan. It found that the small woodlands scattered across the study area do not allow for connectivity between woodlots or a regional wildlife corridor. The key functions of woodlots have been previously identified for long-term maintenance and preservation. Two (2) of the woodlots (Urban Natural Area #49 and #57) are the most significant, containing reasonably diverse vegetation communities with habitat for birds, small mammals, amphibians, and deer. Please see the Greenspace Plan (Figure 19) for the location of these woodlots.

Farm fields are currently separated by hedgerows, which in most cases are comprised of deciduous trees particularly in the fields just east of Cedarview and east and west of Greenbank. Other hedgerows south of the Jock River are interrupted to the extent that in some locations, only single deciduous trees and/or patches of shrubs define its existence.

Wildlife

The woodland communities harbour a diversity of bird species including forest, edge and wetland species. A total of 88 species were recorded as breeding in the study area. Ten (10) species of amphibians and three species of reptiles were recorded in the Study Area. Most were found in the Jock River, particularly at Greenbank Road and several snapping turtle nests were found along Cambrian Road near the West Clarke Drain. With respect to mammals, 18 species were identified. The woodlands included porcupine, chipmunk, squirrels and deer, while the Jock River is home to beaver, muskrat and mink.

3.3 Transportation

Photo 8 - Ottawa’s O-Train crossing a bridge
Photo 9 - Multi-use pathways provide opportunities for cycling
Photo 10 - An example of bus rapid transit

In general, the major road network in the southwest sector of the urban area of the City of Ottawa, as shown in Figure 8 below, is currently operating in a satisfactory manner with overall peak hour levels of service ranging from ‘D’ at the CNR West Screenline to ‘A’ at the Jock River Screenline. Fallowfield Road and the Jock River are the screenlines that will be most directly impacted by additional urban development in South Barrhaven. The roads that travel through these screenlines currently have considerable amounts of spare capacity, as they are operating at Level of Service (LoS) ‘C’ and ‘A’ respectively.

Figure 8 - Existing/Proposed Transportation Network

Figure 8 - Existing/Proposed Transportation Network
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Although Greenbank Road suffers from a poor alignment crossing the Jock River and is somewhat congested within the Town Centre in the vicinity of Strandherd Drive, the proposed realignment of Longfields Drive along the east side of the Town Centre to a future intersection with Strandherd Drive will provide relief on Greenbank Road. This will enable Greenbank Road to accept a considerable amount of new traffic before the widening and construction of a new bridge over the Jock River will be required.

The arterial phasing plan adopted in the City’s Transportation Master Plan (TMP) identifies a number of arterial upgrades and new roads within the southwest sector that are considered to be adequate to meet the future short to medium-term transportation servicing needs of the proposed Barrhaven Community.

Additional longer-term roadway capacity to service urban growth within the study area can be provided by widening existing roads such as: Greenbank Road south of Cambrian Road; Cambrian Road between Cedarview Road and Jockvale Road; and Cedarview Road south of Strandherd Drive. Further Environmental Assessments will be required for some of these improvements as they are outside the CDP boundaries.

The extensions of the South-West Transitway as a Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) corridor and the North-South Rapid Transit Corridor for Light Rail Transit will provide Barrhaven with a very high level of transit service over the next twenty years.

3.4 Servicing

3.4.1 Water Supply

Currently, a double 406 mm watermain crosses the Jock River and services the Manotick community and the first phases of the Stonebridge development south of the Jock River. This service will be utilized to provide service to the first two phases of the Barrhaven South Community Design Plan Area and the build out of the Stonebridge Community.

3.4.2 Stormwater Management

A developed area of 210 hectares exists south of the Jock River that is serviced by the Jockvale SWM facility. The design of this facility was presented in the Jockvale Servicing Study, 1999 by CH2M Gore & Storrie and Cummings Cockburn Limited. The tributary area was designed using a ‘dual drainage system’ approach whereby the storm sewers (minor system) received a maximum release rate of 70 L/s/ha. Major system storage was provided both in sag storage, at a maximum rate of 135 m3/ha, as well as in a series of golf course ponds located throughout southern portions of the development.

The Barrhaven South study area is currently drained with a number of existing municipal drains. These drains have legal status under the Drainage Act and agreements to abandon these drains will need to be obtained prior to any infrastructure work being undertaken. See Section 5.6.2 for further details.

3.4.3 Sanitary Service

To service the subject lands, the South Nepean Collector Sewer (SNC) has recently been constructed, extending from the West Rideau Collector westerly across the Jock River.

The 2003 Dillon Study included a pre-design of the section of the SNC from the existing West Rideau Collector westerly to approximately Greenbank Road including two river crossings. The report states that the SNC has a reserve capacity to service approximately 319 ha. Within the Stonebridge development, storm, sanitary, and water infrastructure currently exists south of the Jock River.

Figure 9 - Existing Servicing Network

Figure 9 - Existing Servicing Network
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3.5 Parks and Recreation

3.5.1 Jock River

Photo 11 - A narrow channel on the Jock River
Photo 12 - The Jock River

The north side of the river’s edge is buffered from the urban area by rural lands and forests and, as a result, there are numerous vistas. Significant tracts of land along both sides of the length of the river adjacent to the CDP Area are municipally owned. The north edge of the river has open fields, woodlots and proposed residential and parkland. The river offers white water during spring run off and good fishing year-round. To the east of the study area, there is parkland along both shores in the communities of Stonebridge and Hearts Desire and at the confluence of the Jock River and Rideau River (Jock River Landing and Beryl Gaffney Park).

3.5.2 Woodlots

There are a number of woodlots that range in size, age and quality dispersed throughout the Study Area. The City has acquired the major woodlots just outside the study area, namely Hearts Desire Forest and a portion of the woodlot at Half Moon Bay.

3.5.3 City-owned land

Lands situated along the north and south shores of the Jock River were acquired as open space by the City in the 1970’s. These lands remain undeveloped. Just east of the study area, the lands along the south bank of the Jock River (between Jockvale Road and Capital Memorial Gardens), have been developed with trails, a playground, soccer fields and a unique cricket pitch. This park abuts residential development and public roads in the Stonebridge community. The opportunity exists to enhance connections between public lands.

3.5.4 City Parks/Facilities

There are a number of existing and proposed parks in developing areas as shown in Figure 10. These parks and facilities generally provide for the immediate area. Manotick offers the same opportunities to its residents although it is more self-contained as it is a village with evolving amenities. Facilities of a city-wide/district nature that have a bearing for future residents of Barrhaven South include the Walter Baker Sports Centre and the Twin Elm Rugby Park.

Existing Parks/Recreation Delivery System
Sports Field Strategy (report completed by City staff 2003)

The purpose of the Sports Field Strategy Study is to plan for current and long-term sports field needs and to identify capital investment priorities. Key findings include:

  • 65% of organizations have increased registration, 28% have had no change, and the balance has reduced registration (mixed ball)
  • Approximately ½ have had to turn away new players due to lack of fields
  • 76% believe their registration will increase over the next 5 years
  • None foresee a decline over the next 5 years
  • Some of the smaller or newer sports groups feel soccer and ball get preference
  • Most sports organizations are dissatisfied
  • Average use for all ball diamonds during the week and weekend are 77% and 23 %
  • Average use of all soccer fields during the week and weekend are 86% and 31%
  • The preference of most sports groups is during the evening Monday to Thursday

The staff report concluded that a number of steps must be taken to meet the many demands facing the sports field delivery system. One of the steps taken by the City was to create an Application of Strategic Standards of Provision. For example:

  • All ball diamond sports – 1 field/2,700 pop. by 2021
  • Football – 1 field/23,000 pop.
  • Ultimate – 1 field/20,000 pop.
  • Soccer – 1 field/1,850 pop.

This report has identified the shortfalls, the areas where they are most significant and a number of recommendations to deal with provision of land, permitting of fields, maintenance issues and where the money is going to come from. There is a significant shortfall that will require major financial contributions from various sources in order to meet the demand. A mitigating factor that may help with the future provision of sports fields is the direction of Canadian demographic profiles.

There is no doubt that there are fewer children being born. This is evident in schools and will soon affect the demands on sports fields. However, issues such as prime fields, degree of maintenance, and availability are expected to remain.

Figure 10 - Existing Parks Network

Figure 10 - Existing Parks Network
[ Enlarge image ]

The Recreation Infrastructure Strategy and Project Listing – June 2003
Photo 13 - An example of an outdoor sports field for baseball
Photo 14 - Recreation facility with indoor resistance training equipment
Photo 15 - Shooting hoops at an outdoor basketball court

The Facility Strategy has developed a model for future facility provision that balances with financial sustainability. The study reflects the needs of the community, the importance and benefits and opportunities to maximize financial efficiency. Key findings include the need for mid-sized Community Centres.

Existing well-placed facilities will be upgraded and new centres will be provided in rapidly developing areas. There is a requirement for three complexes, one being located in southeast Nepean to service the growth. The time horizon will be dependent on growth patterns and Long Range Financial Planning (fund availability) and is not likely to be funded until at least 2011. While no specific property has been reserved for this facility, the strategy includes the funding to acquire land within the CDP. Any new complex should include a field house for field sports like, soccer, ultimate, rugby. In the short term, one of the district parks could have a field that is lit.

The City requires two new indoor pools in the short term and five to six additional aquatic facilities over the next 10 years to accommodate an anticipated population growth of 200,000. To maintain this ratio based on growth projections, the City requires an additional 8 to 11 arenas by 2014. There is also a need for rehearsal space, performing space, childcare, indoor sports space and a host of minor facilities. The City cannot provide all projects; hence, in order to meet these demands, projects will need multiple partners.

In anticipation of the winter recreational and leisure needs of our residents, the inclusion of accommodations for outdoor rinks should be considered during the planning stages of community parks, sports fields and community centres. In planning for appropriate and feasible locations, the following factors will be taken into consideration:

  • Community demographics and population size
  • Geographic distribution notwithstanding physical barriers between communities (highway, railway, etc.).
  • Site determined by City
  • Winterized and readily accessible water service that does not require specialized training for flooding purposes
  • Hydro services for lighting and protection of the water supply
  • Base which can be utilized without significant damage being incurred
  • Level surface (minimum 65’ x150’ area), easily accessible by foot and vehicles
  • Appropriate lighting
  • Appropriate location / facilities for skate changing and storage if required

Level of community commitment and available funding will dictate the number and locations of outdoor rinks throughout the City.

Chapter 4 - Development of the Plan

4.1 Guiding Principles

The City’s new Official Plan establishes clear direction and vision for the development of new communities in Ottawa. It outlines generally how the City foresees development occurring in growth areas where significant change is anticipated. The intent is to use the land efficiently and wisely and to create complete communities for the new residents.

The CDP is intended to establish a mix of uses and housing types with compact, mixed-use developments that demonstrate good land use and community design principles.

The Guiding Principles – which were prepared through a consultative process involving the Core Planning Team (CPT), the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC),the public and City Council – establish the qualitative framework for the Land Use Plan. They represent value statements about the kind of urban environment that is desired for the community and are described below.

4.1.1 Create unique liveable neighbourhoods

The community will be carefully designed with unique, liveable, urban type neighbourhoods each with their own character, sense of place and distinct identity. The diverse needs of people of different incomes and lifestyles, at various stages in the life cycle, will be met. An emphasis will be placed on human scale design, such that residents will positively perceive, and comfortably relate to the built and natural environment. Each neighbourhood will provide for a range of housing options and opportunity for a choice of housing tenure. Each neighbourhood will also ensure a rich variety of architectural styles, with attention to detail – building massing, proportion, facade articulation, and materials. Successful interfaces will be created between private and public spaces.

4.1.2 Celebrate community focal points

Each neighbourhood will be designed around identifiable focal points – areas of interest that attract residents and become memorable landmarks within the community. These nodes will organize neighbourhoods into legible districts, and may consist of a variety of activities/ amenities, for example, schools, parks, plazas, community facilities, and entrance features. These focal points will be well distributed within the community and easily accessible from homes both on foot or bicycle.

4.1.3 Integrate transportation and land use

The community will be designed for multiple modes of transportation within a development pattern that prioritizes walking, cycling and transit over the automobile. A modified grid system of roads will emerge, with higher densities and community facilities focused around points of high accessibility, especially near public transportation. Land use patterns will also complement and support the evolving South Nepean Town Centre. Design guidelines will be applied that ensure that all road corridors support adjacent land uses, enhance safety, offer supportive environments for walking, cycling and transit use, and maximize greening opportunities. Public transit, including rapid transit, will be systematically extended to serve the community, and to support the Town Centre. Transit will be integrated into the community early in the development process.

4.1.4 Ensure efficient use and phasing of future infrastructure

Alternative development standards will be considered when they complement the efficient and optimal use of land, neighbourhood liveability, and life-cycle operating and maintenance considerations. Both new and existing infrastructure will be considered in achieving this objective. Elements of environmental sustainability will be included in the design of buildings and infrastructure. The Province will be approached to explore the need for and timing of their construction of the future overpass structure at Highway 416/Cambrian Road.

4.1.5 Create a Healthy and Active Community

The development will deliver a hierarchy of parks and recreation infrastructure for all members of the community to actively participate in physical activity. It will develop integrated and flexible opportunities throughout the community which are readily accessible to all residents.

4.1.6 Create an integrated green/blue system

The Jock River corridor and key natural features areas will be protected and enhanced, resulting in the overall greenspace network within which the built environment is set. These natural features will play a valuable ecological role, and will also provide a social amenity function to the community in terms of meeting places, areas for recreation and relaxation, and quality of life. These natural features, watercourses, stormwater management facilities and open spaces will be linked, as appropriate, through the use of sidewalks, walkways and trails, and enhanced through additional landscape design that highlights, or is characteristic of, the individual feature.

4.1.7 Consider future of neighbouring aggregate resource area

The aggregate resource area will evolve over time to a use compatible with the new community. In the interim, it will be considered in the development phasing and when planning future land uses in the CDP.

4.1.8 Flexibility over time

While a clear planning framework is important to influence action, zoning by-laws need to be flexible (e.g., flexible range of uses, performance-based standards) to be able to respond to the market complexities and demand over time. Similarly, adjustments to the boundary of the Developing Community were made through the CDP process to ensure the rational planning of neighbourhoods, land uses, and servicing at a high level for those lands beyond the rationalized urban boundary. The rationalized urban boundary was established on a ‘no net gain’ approach. Any further changes to the boundary will be made by way of amendment to the Official Plan.

4.2 The Land Use Options

As discussed in Part 2, an open house to review preliminary land use concept plans and receive public input was held on July 20, 2005. The evening included a formal presentation which highlighted the existing conditions within the Study Area and introduced three (3) preliminary land use concept plans A, B and C, which are illustrated in Figures 11, 12 and 13.

Following the presentation, a facilitated workshop was held in which members of the public worked in small groups to provide input on the concepts. Participants were asked to review the concepts and report back to the larger group on which elements of the concept plans they liked, and those elements they would change. The feedback provided by the attendees was captured in an "as-heard" record; as well, attendees were encouraged to submit additional written comments if desired.

Each of the concept plans was discussed, and participants were asked to review them on the basis of their main building blocks, including:

  • Road network hierarchy and connectivity
  • Transit approach and solutions
  • Community Core location and uses
  • Neighbourhood focal points and uses
  • Residential land use relationship to adjacent uses and density
  • Commercial development locations and amount
  • Overall park locations and integration with the Green/Blue system
  • Integration and effectiveness of the Green/Blue System
  • Flexibility of plan over time
  • Integration of overall community plan with surrounding community

While each group expressed a variety of likes and dislikes, some common themes emerged from the workshop, including general support for:

  • A grid road pattern and porous road system
  • Connectivity of green spaces through school sites
  • Schools in proximity and linked to parks and green space
  • Schools with access on two roads to reduce drop-off congestion
  • Centralizing higher density and transit
  • Mixed use in the community centre
  • A Mainstreet environment versus strip malls or box malls
  • The District Park along the Jock River, but also keep areas natural
  • Separation of sports facilities and built up areas
  • Protection of the UNA woodlots
  • Linking the stormwater ponds and making opportunities for walking trails
  • Longer stream runoffs from storm ponds to the river.

Using this valuable community contribution, together with on-going technical input on matters such as stormwater requirements, park and school needs, and the supporting Environmental Assessments, the final land use concept plan began to take shape. A draft land use concept plan was described and presented to the public on January 26, 2006, as shown in Figure 14.

With input received at this public open house, and ongoing technical revisions with respect to school requirements, park locations, and stormwater strategies, a revised land use plan (Figure 15) was presented to the public at the final public open house on March 29, 2006.

Figure 11 - July 2005, Land Use Option A

Figure 11 - July 2005, Land Use Option A
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Figure 12 - July 2005, Land Use Option B

Figure 12 - July 2005, Land Use Option B
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Figure 13 - July 2005, Land Use Option C

Figure 13 - July 2005, Land Use Option C
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Figure 14 - Proposed Land Use Concept, Open House January 2006

Figure 14 - Proposed Land Use Concept, Open House January 2006
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Figure 15 - Proposed Land Use Concept, Open House March 2006

Figure 15 - Proposed Land Use Concept, Open House March 2006

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Chapter 5 - The Plans for Barrhaven South

5.1 The Land Use Plan

The intent of the Land Use Plan is to create a complete residential community with a distinct identity that contains a full range of housing choices and a broad complement of support services and facilities, as per the Official Plan’s policies for Developing Communities. This Plan is the result of a thorough process that considered the broad policy objectives of the City’s Official Plan for new communities, the opportunities and constraints of the land and natural systems, as well as input from municipal staff, regulatory and advisory agencies, landowners, and the public at large. The result is a set of plans and policies that identify how this new community, and how these lands, should develop over time.

The Land Use Plan for Barrhaven South is illustrated in Figure 16, and Table 2 provides a summary of the distribution of land among these land use categories. There are eleven (11) general land use categories within the Land Use Plan, as follows:

  1. High Density Residential
  2. Medium Density Residential
  3. Low Density Residential
  4. Community Core
  5. Neighbourhood Commercial
  6. Employment
  7. Schools
  8. Park
  9. Woodlots
  10. Floodplain
  11. Stormwater Management

The Land Use Plan provides a higher level of detail and does not identify specific elements such as local road patterns or block patterns. The Land Use Plan is organized so as to not limit flexibility during the neighbourhood design process, while still achieving the main policies and principles of the Official Plan and Community Design Plan. The Demonstration Plan in Figure 17 provides a more specific level of detail in illustrating how the principles, policies, and guidelines could be met, but it should not be interpreted as policy.

Sections 5.1.1 through 5.1.11 detail the purpose, general location characteristics, and permitted uses of each of the land use categories. With respect to permitted uses, the “Generally Permitted Uses” identified and described in Section 3.1 of the Official Plan apply to all land use categories within Barrhaven South. Additionally:

(1) Small-scale convenience retail stores are permitted in all land use categories at the intersection of two collector roads, and at the intersection of a collector road with an arterial road. Convenience stores are permitted at all rapid transit stations or stops throughout the community; and they can be located in a stand-alone building, or included with a dwelling. The intent is to provide convenience shopping within walking distance for all those living and working in the surrounding community.

(2) Places of worship are permitted in the Low Density Residential, Medium Density Residential, Community Core and Employment land use categories, provided such lands are located along arterial roads or major collector roads. The design guidelines set out in Section 6.8 of this Plan apply to all places of worship. The intent is to allow places of worship, which are important facilities in community building, while recognizing the potential impact that the size and operations of such facilities can have on the surrounding neighbourhood.

(3) All municipal facilities and utilities shall be permitted.

(4) Public and private utilities shall be permitted in all land use designations and shall be installed within public road allowances or within appropriate easements, as well as on private property.

Figure 16 - The Land Use Plan

Figure 16 - The Land Use Plan
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Table 2: Land Use Distribution
Land Use Net Hectares Percentage
Residential 183.0 36.6%
Community Core 5.9 1.2%
Neighbourhood Commercial 0.8 0.2%
Employment 11.8 2.4%
Schools 30.7 6.1%
Parks 27.3 5.5%
Woodlots 21.8 4.3%
Floodplains 88.0 17.6%
Stormwater Ponds & Tributaries 11.8 2.3%
Roads 119.4 23.8%
TOTALS 500.5 ha 100%

5.1.1 High Density Residential

The purpose of the High Density Residential land use category is to provide an adequate amount of land for residential dwellings at higher densities and to meet the Official Plan requirement that 10% of all dwelling units in Developing Communities are to be apartments. The High Density Residential land use category is located at major community focal points, such as along arterial and major collector roads, within and adjacent to the Community Core, and adjacent to, or within close proximity to, transit stations.

The High Density Residential land use category can include products such as stacked townhouses, back-to-back townhouses, as well as low and mid-rise apartments. The 10% of dwelling units to be provided in the form of apartments must be located within the areas designated High Density Residential as shown on the Land Use Plan.

It is the City’s policy that only those dwelling units that are separated both vertically and horizontally – so that there are units above one another and side-by-side – will be considered apartments in the context of the Barrhaven South CDP. Therefore, apartment units are defined as those units located in a building, which has a minimum of six (6) units, where the units are separated both vertically and horizontally, and where the units are limited to rental or condominium tenure.

5.1.2 Medium Density Residential

The purpose of the Medium Density Residential land use category is to provide an adequate amount of land to accommodate the majority of the ground-oriented multiple dwellings within the community. The Official Plan requires that at least 30% of all dwelling units within Developing Communities are to be ground-oriented multiple dwellings. The Medium Density Residential land use category is focused along arterial road and collector roads, at the intersection of collector roads within neighbourhoods, and adjacent to neighbourhood focal points and major park facilities. The land use category is dispersed throughout the community to provide for a variety in housing types throughout the various neighbourhoods.

All forms of ground-oriented multiple unit dwellings will be permitted within the Medium Density Residential land use category, which may include triplexes, fourplexes and townhouses (block, stacked, back-to-back, and street). Single-detached, semi-detached and duplex dwellings are also permitted provided the densities established for each of the four (4) sub-planning areas, as set out in Section 5.2 below, are achieved.

5.1.3 Low Density Residential

The purpose of the Low Density Residential land use category is to provide an adequate amount of land that will accommodate the lowest density residential uses within the community. As per the Official Plan, such uses may not contain more than 60% of the total number of dwellings within the community.

Single-detached, semi-detached and duplex dwellings are permitted uses within the Low Density Residential land use category. Street townhouses and other similar ground-oriented multiple dwellings are also permitted within the Low Density Residential land use category in order to accommodate a variety of housing choices, to increase affordability and to create interesting streetscapes throughout neighbourhoods, provided that their location is consistent with the locational criteria identified in Section 5.1.2.

5.1.4 Community Core

The purpose of the Community Core land use category is to provide an area that will be the “heart” of the Barrhaven South community. This area is located where the key transportation routes of the community intersect, and where commercial activities and services will be concentrated. The intent for this area is to meet the commercial and personal service needs of the community in an intimate, human-scale and pedestrian-friendly atmosphere.

A mix of residential and commercial uses will be encouraged to create a lively, urban feel to the core. Permitted uses will include:

  • Commercial and service uses, such as
    • Retail stores,
    • Food stores,
    • Restaurants,
    • Personal service uses,
    • Financial institutions,
    • Business, medical and professional offices, and
    • Entertainment and recreation uses.
  • Civic uses, such as:
    • Community centres,
    • Gymnasiums,
    • Municipal offices, and
    • Libraries.
  • Residential uses, such as:
    • Live/work units, and
    • Low-rise and mid-rise apartments.

Automobile-related uses, such as gas stations or drive-through uses, will not be permitted within the Community Core land use category. Instead, these uses are directed to the Neighbourhood Commercial and Employment land use categories.

5.1.5 Neighbourhood Commercial

The purpose of the Neighbourhood Commercial land use category is to provide opportunities for small-scale commercial areas that would provide commercial and personal uses to the surrounding neighbourhood. The areas identified as Neighbourhood Commercial are located on the southwest corner of Cambrian Road and existing Greenbank Road, and the northeast corner of Cedarview Road and a new east-west collector road.

A range of commercial and service uses will be permitted, such as retail stores, food stores, restaurants, personal service uses, financial institutions, business, medical and professional offices, and entertainment and recreation uses. Automobile-related uses, such as gas stations or drive-through uses, will be permitted within the Neighbourhood Commercial land use category.

The size of the Neighbourhood Commercial parcel at the northeast corner of Cedarview Road and the new east-west collector road can be a maximum of 3.2 hectares, in keeping with the context of the CDP, and subject to approval from the RVCA with respect to cut and fill of the floodplain.

5.1.6 Employment

The purpose of the Employment land use category is to provide enough land for employment generating uses within the community in order to meet the Official Plan’s jobs-to-housing balance targets. The Employment Area land use category is located along the western periphery of the community, with good access to the arterial road network and adjacent to Highway 416. These employment lands will complement the mix of land uses within Barrhaven South and will contribute to the balance of jobs and households for the larger South Nepean area. The intent is to establish a range of uses in a high-quality business park setting that serve the interests of Barrhaven South, as well as those of the larger community. Industrial uses, warehouse uses, automotive uses, offices, and retail uses are all permitted within the Employment land use category.

5.1.7 Schools

The purpose of the School land use category is to accommodate sites for future potential school sites to serve the community. Six (6) elementary schools and two (2) secondary schools, as requested by the four (4) area school boards, have been identified within the School land use category. The location and size of these school sites have been shown to demonstrate the need to balance the distribution of schools throughout the community and to reflect the identified interests of the school boards, in terms of number, type, size, configuration and preferred location for these facilities.

Only schools and their associated uses, such as day care facilities or parks, are permitted within the School land use category.

The second secondary school site, which is located south of Cambrian, is identified by the Ottawa-Carleton Catholic School Board to meet their long-term needs. Should the urban boundary be extended prior to the School Board securing the site, the Ottawa-Carleton Catholic School Board will consider the relocation of the secondary site. Any relocated site will be to the satisfaction of the OCCSB.

School site requirements will be finalized during the subdivision approvals process. Where a school board has confirmed that it does not have an interest in a site that has been identified for it within the CDP, exchanges can be made with other school boards who express an interest. Where no interest is expressed, the lands may be developed as per the Medium Density Residential land use category, provided that the location is consistent with the locational criteria identified in Section 5.1.2.

5.1.8 Parks

The purpose of the Park land use category is to identify lands that accommodate a full range of recreational opportunities, ranging from active spaces such as sports fields and organized play areas, to more passive leisure areas including pathways, trails and seating areas.

Public parks and trails, community centres, washroom and change facilities, parking facilities, canoe launch facilities, and commercial uses in support of the primary park function, are all permitted uses within the Park land use category.

Barrhaven South is comprised of a hierarchy of four levels of parks: District, Community, and Neighbourhood level parks, and Parkettes, with the three (3) higher level parks designated on the Land Use Plan. All four levels of parks contribute to, and form the basis for, the Greenspace Plan as illustrated on Figure 19, and are described below.

District Park

The District Park will be established along the Jock River corridor, connected by a natural linkage trail system running along the south side of the corridor, and linking to Half Moon Bay. The Barrhaven South District Park, when combined with the parkland in the South Nepean Town Centre, Heart’s Desire, W.C. Levesque Fields, Stonebridge on the Jock, and Beryl Gaffney Park, and points beyond, creates a contiguous green space system of City-wide appeal. Facilities to be built on the developable portion of the property may include a covered and lit, all-weather sports field facility (provided there is room outside the floodplain), additional natural turf sports fields (lit and/or non-lit), support facilities such as washrooms/field house and sufficient parking. Considerations will need to be made for additional leisure opportunities such as canoe launches, fishing docks and seasonal picnic areas. The Parks abut arterial and collector roadways and will be well served by future transit. Higher density residential may be located in close proximity to the District Park located in the north central sector.

Community Parks

The four community parks located throughout the different neighbourhoods are generally square or rectangular in shape and are approximately 3.25 hectares in size. They will be fully serviced, well served by arterial and/or collector roads, and have open frontage along the full length of the park on at least two (2) street frontages. The other side(s) should abut residential land uses. Each community park is expected to include at least one full-sized sports field; a children’s play area, a small parking lot, additional hard surface areas, pathways, park furniture, and other special features, such as a community building, a skateboard park, a water play facility, or a tennis court. The locations of these facilities will depend on subdivision design factors such as client market and density, land characteristics and proximity to other similar facilities.

Neighbourhood Parks

Neighbourhood Parks are located within neighbourhoods on either local or collector roads, and are generally around 0.8 hectares in size. Neighbourhood parks contain various park elements geared to a variety of users of all ages, and will vary from one neighbourhood to the next. The City recognizes the potential and unique opportunity for schools to co-locate and share facilities, such as joint use of sports fields, shared parking and entrances with each other. Where co-located with schools, park elements may include intense use facilities such as outdoor rinks, basketball courts, small skate parks or spray pads, parking, and other complementary facilities to existing school yards such as a pre-school play area.

Parkettes

Parkettes are located within neighbourhoods, usually in proximity to higher density residential uses, and are generally 0.2 to 0.4 hectares in size. A variety of elements - some active, smaller play structure, or leisure type uses, at a scale conducive to the size of the park, will be included in the park design. Parkettes will be designed in a manner that fully integrates the surrounding public realm; as such, single-loaded public streets and higher density residential uses are encouraged adjacent to, and fronting on the parkette. Rear lotting is not permitted around parkettes. The land configuration of Parkettes will not be mistaken for traffic islands, or remnant pieces of development land. They will play an integral role in the overall urban design and connectivity of the community.

5.1.9 Floodplain

The purpose of the Floodplain land use category is to protect the lands along the Jock River defined through the Rideau Valley Conservation Authority (RVCA) mapping (2005). These lands will be incorporated into the greenspace network of Barrhaven South. The Jock River will be a major element of the greenspace system in Barrhaven South and will provide critical connections to the broader, citywide open space network. Water-related uses, pathways and recreational trails, parks with sports fields (between the 25- & 100-year flood lines), and passive recreational areas are permitted within the Floodplain land use category.

5.1.10 Woodlots

The purpose of the Woodlot land use category is to protect two areas identified by the Urban Natural Areas Environmental Evaluation Study as significant woodlots. Urban Natural Area #49 (UNA) is located in the northeast corner of the community, adjacent to the Jock River, and is currently owned by the City of Ottawa. UNA #57 is located along both sides of Cambrian Road near the community’s western boundary and is currently in private ownership.

The intent is to retain these two areas in their natural state. Only passive recreation activities such as trails and orientation areas will be permitted in the Woodlot land use category.

As per Part 7 of this CDP, it is anticipated that the City will reach agreement with the owner to acquire the lands within UNA #57. However, if an agreement is not reached, these lands may be developed as per the underlying Medium Density Residential, Low Density Residential, and Employment land use categories in accordance with Sections 5.1.2 and 5.1.3, and 5.1.6.

5.1.11 Stormwater Management Ponds and Tributaries

The purpose of the Stormwater Management land use category is to provide land to accommodate the stormwater management infrastructure requirements to control quantity and quality of runoff generated by the development to meet regulatory requirements. It also includes the open tributaries that will be restored to meet fish habitat objectives as determined by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. This land use category includes three stormwater ponds, one located relatively central to the community that straddles the north and south sides of Cambrian Road, and two others located in each the west quadrant and east quadrant of the CDP planning area, north of Cambrian Road. The general location and pond size are illustrated in the land use plan. However, further technical analysis through the Master Servicing Plan will confirm the sufficient block sizes based upon approved stormwater management design criteria.

In addition to the infrastructure requirements of the stormwater ponds and tributaries, public trails, pedestrian pathways and accessory structures are permitted in the Stormwater Management Pond land use category.

5.2 The Demonstration Plan, Dwelling Unit and Population Targets

5.2.1 Demonstration Plan

The Demonstration Plan, as shown in Figure 17, was prepared for the Barrhaven South community to illustrate one way in which the Land Use Plan could be implemented. It has been an invaluable tool in determining the ultimate Land Use categories illustrated on the Land Use Plan and emphasizes the iterative nature of the planning exercise that was undertaken to-date. This Plan does not require the lands to be developed precisely as shown here. Rather, the purpose and role of the Demonstration Plan is to:

  • Provide guidance on how these lands could develop over time;
  • Demonstrate possibilities and methods for addressing specific development challenges;
  • Illustrate a variety of ways to achieve the urban design guidelines contained within this CDP;
  • Illustrate some specific objectives the CDP is seeking to achieve; and
  • Provide a means for establishing and monitoring the mix of units and density targets in the sub-planning areas over time, as identified on Figure 18.
Figure 17 - The Demonstration Plan

Figure 17 - The Demonstration Plan
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5.2.2 Dwelling Unit, Population & Employment Targets

The Official Plan establishes objectives with respect to the density of development and the job/housing balance for new Developing Communities. Tables 3, 4 and 5 set out:

  • The projected overall density for the Barrhaven South Community,
  • Unit targets and mix for each of the four (4) sub-planning areas,
  • Projected population by sub-planning area, and
  • Employment projections.

Four (4) sub-planning areas have been identified in order to identify and track density targets and unit mix over time. These areas are illustrated in Figure 18. It is important to note that the densities used to calculate unit projections is a weighted density, reflecting the various densities of different developers and the products they are proposing for Barrhaven South. This approach generates a more accurate global unit projection for the overall CDP and reflects that some developers build at higher densities and others at lower densities. The densities used are not target densities for each subdivision. The Developing Community will be required to meet the OP policy of 29 uph net for singles, semis and townhouses.

Figure 18 - Sub-Planning Areas

Figure 18 - Sub-Planning Areas
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Table 3: Dwelling Unit Projections

Land Use & Densities (net uph)

Area 1

Area 2

Area 3

Area 4

Hectares

Units

Hectares

Units

Hectares

Units

Hectares

Units

Low Density (26)

31.2

812

27.5

715

32.8

853

34.0

883

Medium Density (52)

14.8

768

9.8

509

15.7

815

12.2

637

High Density 1 (82)

0.9

77

0.0

0

1.4

115

0.0

0

High Density 2 (120)

0.8

95

0.9

112

1.0

115

0.0

0

Community Core (60)

1.3

77

1.4

86

3.2

193

0.0

0

Sub-totals

49.0

1829

39.6

1422

54.1

2091

46.2

1520

Total by unit type:
Singles & Semis
Multiples
Apartments


3,263
2,921
678


47%
43%
10%

Total Number of Dwellings Units:

6,862

100%

Overall Residential Density for Singles, Semis and Towns:

34.3 uph (net)

Housing Types

Density Range

Product Type

Singles and Semis

Low Density

Detached & Semi-detached

Multiples

Medium Density
High Density 1

Street & Lane towns
Back-to-back Towns & Stacked Towns

Apartments

High Density 2
Community Core

Low & Mid-Rise Apartments, Sixplexes, Live-Work, Low & Mid-Rise, Mixed-Use

Table 4: Population Projections

Land Use & Person Per Unit

Area 1

Area 2

Area 3

Area 4

Units

Population

Units

Population

Units

Population

Units

Population

Low Density (3.3)

812

2680

715

2360

853

2815

883

2914

Medium Density (2.5)

768

1920

509

1272

815

2038

637

1593

High Density 1 (2.1)

77

162

0

0

115

242

0

0

High Density 2 (1.8)

95

169

112

202

115

207

0

0

Community Core (1.8)

77

139

86

155

193

347

0

0

Sub-totals

1829

5070

1422

3989

2091

5649

1520

4507

Total Population

19,215

Table 5: Employment Projections

Land Use & Employment Rates

Area 1

Area 2

Area 3

Area 4

Employment Lands 1

55 jobs / net ha

N/A

(9.3 hectares)
512 jobs

(2.5 hectares)
138 jobs

N/A

Commercial Core + Neighbourhood Commercial

55 jobs / net ha

(1.3 hectares)
72 jobs

(1.8 hectares)
79 jobs

(3.6 hectares)
204 jobs

N/A

Schools

40 jobs / elem school
80 jobs / second school

40 jobs

40 jobs
80 jobs

80 jobs
80 jobs


80 jobs

Home Occupation

10 jobs/100 units

1787 units
179 jobs

1471 units
147 jobs

2080 units
208 jobs

1531 units
153 jobs

Sub-totals

291 jobs

858 jobs

710 jobs

233 jobs

Total Employment

2,092 jobs

 

1. Employment Land area assumes that the woodlot will be retained and acquired by the City.

Employment Targets

The south area of the City continues to have large areas of land designated and zoned for employment uses to meet the target jobs to household balance as established by the Official Plan. Notwithstanding the fact that the ratio of jobs to household in the Barrhaven South CDP is low – a number that is characteristically reflective of the predominant residential nature of the community – like others in the Barrhaven area, the employment numbers will nonetheless contribute to the overall employment numbers of the broader South Nepean planning area.

5.3 Greenspace Plan

The Barrhaven South greenspace system, as illustrated in Figure 19, will be an integrated network of open spaces, active recreational areas and linkages, and will include:

  • Natural features, such as woodlots, tributaries and floodplain lands along the Jock River,
  • Formally dedicated parkland and linkages,
  • Stormwater management pond areas and trails, as well as
  • Open areas associated with school sites.

This area has an abundance of natural features, particularly the Jock River and the woodlots. One of the overriding goals of this plan is to incorporate as many of these natural features to the extent possible. The Jock River corridor provides a unique opportunity to connect into the greater-Ottawa open space network.

It is clear that the Jock River will be a major element of the open space system for Barrhaven South and will provide critical connections to the broader, citywide open space network. In addition to integrating natural areas into the new Barrhaven South community, the Greenspace Plan must also:

  • Establish an equitable distribution of formal, active parks throughout the area;
  • Establish strong north-south and east-west pedestrian and cycling connectivity throughout by creating a network of linkages within neighbourhoods, between neighbourhoods and out to the broader citywide networks; and
  • Establish a pattern of development that ensures all new residents are within 400 metres of greenspace.

5.3.1 Official Plan Targets and Parkland Requirements

The Official Plan has identified a target of:

  • 4.0 hectares per 1000 population (or approximately 16-20% of gross land area) for total public greenspace, which includes stormwater ponds, pathways, school grounds (Section 2.4.5); and
  • 2.0 hectares per 1000 population (or 8-10% of developable area) for parks and leisure, which includes dedicated parkland, as well as parks owned by the City and other public agencies (Section 2.5.4).

Based on the Demonstration Plan, Barrhaven South will be providing:

  • 2.55 ha / 1000 population (or 11.9% of developable area) for parks and leisure areas.
  • 4.8 ha / 1000 population for total public greenspace, and

These numbers are based on:

  • 412 ha of developable land (500.5 ha, less 88.0 ha for floodplain);
  • 49.1 ha of parkland and woodlots (ie. parks & leisure areas);
  • 91.6 ha of total public greenspace, which includes the parks, woodlots, stormwater management ponds and tributaries, and schools).

It is important to note that the actual greenspace in Barrhaven South will be even greater than indicated here since the floodplain lands – which are substantial – are over and above that calculated here.

Dedicated parkland within the CDP area will be provided in accordance with the alternative standards sets out in Section 42(3) of the Planning Act. The City requires one (1) hectare per 300 dwelling units and 2% of land area for commercial and industrial uses. These dedicated lands are for park or other public recreational purposes.

Based on these alternative standards, the parkland dedication using current unit projections is approximately 23 ha of developable land as follows:

Table 6: Parkland Requirement

Total number of dwelling units:

6862 units

Required parkland:

22.9 hectares

Total acreage of employment & commercial lands:

18.5 hectares

Required parkland:

0.37 hectares *

Total required parkland:

23.27 hectares

 

* Note: To avoid double counting, this number should be reduced since the Community Core is not exclusively commercial. Some of the site will be used for residential purposes and the parkland dedication has already been captured through the number of dwelling units. The extent to which this number will be reduced will be determined through the development approvals process.

5.3.2 Distribution of Parkland

The Official Plan states, “good park and leisure areas are well-distributed within communities, easily accessible from homes and linked to the Greenspace Network.” This is a sensible way to describe the objectives of situating parks within the Barrhaven South CDP. As per the Official Plan, all homes are to be located within the 400m of a greenspace. The distribution of parks shown on the Land Use Plan, more than meet this requirement.

5.3.3 Additional Natural Areas

Wherever possible, opportunities should be provided to link natural areas to the road network through trails and pathways designed for bicycles and walking. The parks will be linked to other greenspaces within the community, such as woodlots, tributaries (linking ponds to the floodplain and the river corridor), and the Jock River and its floodplain. These will all be connected through a series of on-road and off-road routes.

A recreation trail that runs along the south side of the Jock River corridor will be designated as a Major Recreational Pathway on the Land Use Plan. In the long term, it will continue beyond the boundaries of this community to provide pedestrian and cycling connections to all points of the District Park on both sides of the Jock River. Figure 19, the Greenspace Plan, illustrates the network of recreation trails, paths, cycling routes, and walkways, at a refined level of detail.

Figure 19 - The Greenspace Plan

Figure 19 - The Greenspace Plan
[Enlarge image ]

5.4 The Transportation Master Plan

The following is a summary of the detailed transportation analysis completed in the Barrhaven South Transportation Master Plan under separate cover. A brief description of various components of the Plan include, transit servicing, the proposed arterial network and improvements to it, and the pedestrian and cycling plan.

5.4.1 Potential Unit Targets

The build-out target of the Stonebridge community is estimated to be 2875 dwelling units. The number of dwelling units to be contained within the proposed urban boundary of the Barrhaven South Community is estimated to have an upset target limit of approximately 7,000 units at build-out. As a result, the number of dwelling units at build-out is estimated at 10,000 dwelling units in total between the two communities.

5.4.2 Ongoing Environmental Assessments Projects

The City of Ottawa is currently finalizing three Environmental Assessments (EAs) of major relevance to the Barrhaven South Community - the North-South Corridor Light Rail Transit (LRT) Project, the Southwest Rapid Transit Corridor Extension; and the Greenbank Road Widening, including a new structure over the Jock River. The early findings and recommendations being made in these EAs have provided important input into the CDP process for Barrhaven South. The major road network identified in the CDP reflects the direction established in the EA studies, including the preferred location for new Greenbank Road south of the Jock River.

5.4.3 Long-Term Transit Needs

The City’s Transportation Master Plan (TMP) has already addressed the provision of rapid transit to the South Nepean Town Centre north of the Jock River. It has concluded that both the Southwest Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) and the North-South LRT should be extended to that location by 2021. The analysis of future arterial needs that has been carried out in the City’s TMP and the conclusions reached with respect to the additional arterial needs at the critical screenlines in the Southwest Sector have assumed that the transit modal split targets contained in the TMP at the CNR West, Fallowfield and Rideau River South/Manotick Screenlines will be achieved by the time of build-out in Barrhaven South.

Although the TMP does not contain a transit modal split target for the Jock River Screenline, the analysis of future arterial needs has assumed that a minimum of 25% transit share should be achieved at build-out. A 25% transit share has been assumed as a reasonable, minimum future goal for the Jock River Screenline, based on the following factors:

  • Barrhaven will be served by two rapid transit corridors to the Town Centre;
  • Rapid transit south of the Jock River will be extended along the Greenbank Road corridor and potentially extend to the urban boundary with a system end park-and-ride facility. A 25% transit modal split in the peak direction (southbound) at the Jock River translates into a projected peak hour transit ridership of at least 4,000 persons per hour;
  • Local transit service in Barrhaven South will be focused on the new light rail and Transitway stations;
  • Local service will be introduced early in development through early-service agreements with area developers;
  • This modal share has already been exceeded in other outlying suburban locations.

Based on a future bus occupancy rate of 50 per vehicle, the above transit ridership results in a southbound volume of approximately 80 buses per hour, if BRT is to be used. Bus volumes in excess of 60 buses/hr are assumed to justify the provision of an exclusive corridor on which to operate and it is concluded that rapid transit service should be extended south of the Barrhaven Town Centre to south of the Jock River so that the future long-term Barrhaven South/Stonebridge communities will have high quality transit to meet their needs and to minimize additional major arterial requirements.

This finding was also arrived at in the Individual EA for the rapid transit extension south of Barrhaven Town Centre and the conclusion was reached in that study that a rapid transit corridor should be protected within the new alignment of Greenbank Road south to Cambrian Road, as reflected in the CDP.

5.4.4 Pedestrian and Cycling Plan

The major road network, comprised of arterials and major collector roads, and which has been identified in the Land Use Plan, will be the foundation of the planned network of facilities for pedestrians and cyclists. Pedestrian connectivity will be supported by the provision of sidewalks on both sides of arterial and collector roads and on at least one side of most other local roads. The TMP has identified Jockvale Road, Greenbank Road (north of Jockvale), Strandherd Drive, and Prince of Wales Drive to be links in the Primary Urban Cycling Transportation Network, which is to be implemented and maintained in accordance with current City policy. Accordingly, the upgrading of existing, and the construction of new arterials, will include on-road cycling facilities, either by way of exclusive bicycle lanes or shared facilities, as circumstances allow.

As all City roads are considered to be cycling facilities, cycling supportive design and construction will apply to all parts of the new road network as they are implemented. The Jock River corridor is of particular significance with regard to pedestrian and cycling circulation. It has already been identified in the TMP as a location for a major recreational pathway system, and with the emphasis in the draft CDP on the Jock River as a choice location for parks and recreational facilities within an extensive linear corridor, the opportunity exists for a major recreational pathway network to be developed which will link all the major north south crossings of the Jock River between Cedarview Road and Prince of Wales Drive, each with its own pedestrian and cycling amenities.

5.4.5 Transit Servicing Plan

The projected implementation of bus rapid transit in the new Greenbank Road corridor will provide the key element for the provision of high quality transit service to Barrhaven South. Transit service will be reliable, accessible, cost-effective, safe and courteous, and will respond to the needs of residents, businesses, schools and visitors in Barrhaven South. This corridor would extend as far south as the urban boundary, where a park-and-ride facility can be implemented.

Transit vehicles will operate locally on the major collector/arterial network as urban development proceeds and with routes focused on the rapid transit corridor. Detailed transit routing will be determined at the time of subdivision approval.

Refer to Section 7.9 - Interim Transit Service for a more detailed description of the strategy to optimize transit service to Barrhaven South.

5.4.6 Transportation Implications Of Boundary Expansion

The potential implications of any future expansion of the urban boundary south to Barnsdale Road had to be considered in order to ensure the protection of appropriate arterial rights-of-way within the Barrhaven South CDP, primarily in the north-south direction, the direction of maximum travel demand.

Existing Barnsdale Road, which extends from Rideau Valley Drive to Eagleson Road and passes over Highway 416, is one potential long-term future urban boundary. The additional lands between the rationalized urban boundary in the Barrhaven South CDP and an assumed future boundary at Barnsdale Road could contain several thousand dwelling units. An expansion of the urban boundary with such a development potential would result in the need for additional transportation infrastructure over and above that identified in this report, which would be subject to future EA studies.

5.4.7 Key Road and Transit Considerations

The following are the key considerations arising from the Transportation Master Plan. Barrhaven South, in conjunction with Stonebridge, is estimated to contain approximately 10,000 dwelling units at build-out within the rationalized urban boundary. This represents an increase in number of dwelling units assumed in the City’s TMP by 2021, and will generate a need for additional transportation infrastructure over that currently identified in the City’s TMP.

Transit Modal Split

The adoption of a minimum transit modal split target of 25% in the peak direction of travel at the Jock River Screenline will result in a transit ridership of at least 4,000 passengers/hour at build-out. A peak hour ridership of this magnitude can justify the extension of rapid transit southwards from the South Nepean Town Centre to the heart of the new Barrhaven South community, south of the Jock River.

Assuming the achievement of the transit modal split targets at the other critical screenlines in the Southwest Sector (CNR West, Fallowfield Road) a limited amount of additional arterial capacity will be required, over that already identified in the TMP north of Fallowfield Road, to service the additional development proposed in Barrhaven South. This can be provided by four-laning Greenbank Road through the Greenbelt. No additional arterial lanes are required at the Rideau River South/Manotick screenline over that already identified in the TMP.

Arterial Network

The additional development proposed in Barrhaven South will require the four-laning of Cedarview Road and the four-laning of Cambrian Road in addition to the arterial road widenings already included in the City’s TMP (four-laning of each Greenbank Road, Jockvale Road and Prince of Wales Drive).

The recommended arterial road network at build-out within, and in proximity to,

Barrhaven South should be composed of:

  • Cedarview Road: Strandherd Drive to Cambrian Road;
  • Greenbank Road (new): Strandherd Drive to Cambrian Road;
  • Greenbank Road (existing): Cambrian Road to Prince of Wales Drive;
  • Jockvale Road (existing/relocated): Strandherd Drive to Prince of Wales Drive; and
  • Cambrian Road: Cedarview Road to Jockvale Road.
Figure 20 - Arterial Road Network

Figure 20 - Arterial Road Network
[Enlarge image ]

The ongoing EA of Greenbank Road has identified a “preferred” alternative location to the west of existing Greenbank Road, including a new location of a bridge over the Jock River. This new Greenbank Road corridor should be protected for a four-lane arterial road cross-section as far south as Cambrian Road. Combined with the rapid transit corridor requirement, the total recommended right-of-way is 41.5m.

South of Cambrian Road, existing Greenbank Road should be protected for a four-lane arterial cross-section to Barnsdale Road with a right-of-way of 37.5m.Ultimately, a right-of-way somewhere between 32.0m and 37.5m for a four-lane undivided roadway, is the likely scenario, as the arterial function of this roadway is expected to change in the long-term.

The future right-of-way of Cedarview Road between Strandherd Drive and Cambrian Road should be protected for a potential four-lane arterial cross-section in a 37.5m right-of-way.

The future right-of-way of Cambrian Road between Cedarview Road and Jockvale Road should be protected for a potential four-lane arterial cross-section in a 37.5m right-of-way. Both the City’s TMP and the Official Plan should be amended to reflect the arterial widenings identified in this study.

In order to accommodate the potential of an urban boundary expansion beyond that currently rationalized in the Barrhaven South CDP, the right-of-way of new Greenbank Road south of Cambrian Road, as a potential future arterial, should be protected to accommodate four arterial lanes and two rapid transit lanes, all in a 41.5m right-of-way.

West of Cedarview Road, a right-of-way should continue to be protected along Cambrian Road for the future construction of the overpass of Highway 416. An EA study is recommended to consider the implications of opening up this corridor as far as Moodie Drive.

Cedarview Road south of Cambrian Road is recommended to remain as a major collector road with a right-of-way of 26.0m.

5.4.8 Required Network Improvements

Development will start in the northeast sector of the CDP. The road system in the vicinity of these lands south of the Jock River – Cambrian Road, Jockvale Road and Greenbank Road, have low traffic volumes at this time and have a considerable amount of spare capacity to accommodate on-going development in the near future. This is in spite of the fact that both Jockvale Road and Greenbank Road have less than satisfactory alignments at the Jock River. However, north of the Jock River where Jockvale Road and Greenbank Road intersect, there currently exists a constraint for any major short-term development to the south of the Jock River.

Photo 16 - Traffic counts at the intersection of Jockvale Road and Greenbank Road

The Jockvale/Greenbank Road intersection requires improvements in order to facilitate development both in the Town Centre and south of the Jock River. Near-term intersection improvements should be implemented through the City’s Intersection Improvement Program.

There are also two medium-term strategies that would rectify the problem. One must be implemented in the near-to-medium-term to enable urban growth to continue south of the Jock River.

  • Construct an east-west link between Jockvale Road and Greenbank Road just north of the High School along the Chapman Mills alignment identified in the Town Centre Plan, extend the four-laning of Greenbank Road south of Market Place, and provide traffic signals and a double left-turn lane at the new intersection location.
  • Implement the proposed realignment of Longfields Drive north of the Jock River east of the Town Centre to the Strandherd Drive/Longfields Drive intersection. This realignment would remove the majority of existing (and future) Jockvale Road traffic away from the Greenbank Road corridor and would enable the existing Greenbank/Jockvale Road intersection to be decommissioned in its

Chapter 6 - Community Design Guidelines

6.1 Purpose & Intent of the Design Guidelines

Photo 17 - A large organized public event takes place at a popular park in the city
Photo 18 - Children playing on a sidewalk help contribute to a sense of community
Photo 19 - A well-designed interior courtyard
Photo 20 - A walkable, human-scaled commercial main street
Photo 21 - A landscaped median enhances the public realm

Good urban design is a key objective of the City, with policies designed to “create attractive and liveable communities, to build in harmony with nature, to allow for ease of movement, and to meet diverse needs.” The Official Plan notes that “urban design is not only concerned with buildings, but equally important, the spaces between them, including green and open spaces, courtyards, parking areas, and all the elements of public infrastructure, including sidewalks and streets, street-lighting, street trees and street furniture.” [Policy 2.5.6 Official Plan 2003].

Historically, the focus of development in suburban settings has been on the private realm and creating personal refuges for homeowners. The sense of common spaces and the opportunities for human movement and interaction within communities was given less attention.

Today, there is a renewed emphasis on creating a public realm that is inviting, functional and open to everyone. The way in which people move through their neighbourhoods – whether by foot, bicycle or car – should create an impression of the community and “a feel” for the place.

The public focal points of the community should mean something to those who live there. They should create a sense of place, foster a sense of belonging and form a physical setting that actually encourages the community to flourish.

While many of the community design guidelines outlined here are common to all developing communities, they have been interpreted in the context of Barrhaven South, addressing its unique physical context and setting, the range of proposed uses and the opportunities that exist to capitalize broadly on the amenities and features of this new community.

To this end, the design guidelines have been organized in layers that address the broadest aspects of the public realm first:

  • The overall community identity,
  • Streets,
  • Parks and greenspace, and
  • The community core.

These broad, community-wide considerations are then followed with design guidelines related to specific land uses:

  • The Residential Areas,
  • Employment and Retail Areas, and
  • Institutional Uses.

6.2 Overall Community Identity

What is the essence of Barrhaven South? What makes this place special? This new community should be more than a collection of individual subdivisions. Collectively, they need to provide a cohesive community while retaining some form of individuality and sense of neighbourhood. While each subdivision will be unique, there should be a series of common, high-level design themes and approaches that permeate through all of the developments. These common strategies can provide a sense of cohesiveness for the overall community, which will identify Barrhaven South for both residents and visitors.

General Guidelines for Overall Community Identity

6.2.1 The two overarching themes for Barrhaven South are:

    1. Development should capitalize on the abundant natural features of the site – both existing and proposed.
    2. Development should create a more urban, intimate environment.

These two themes will inform all design decisions whether it’s the placement of buildings, the density of development, the nature and function of parkland, the standards for roads and infrastructure, or the integration of transit.

6.2.2 The Jock River will be a major public focus of the community by such means as orienting local streets with views of the Jock River (and floodplain lands) at the ends of these streets; also by providing easy and extensive public access through a variety of connections, including public roads, pathways and parks.

6.2.3 Existing natural features, such as significant trees and hedgerows, should be incorporated into the new development through such means as street design and individual lotting patterns, grading patterns, and large lot developments such as schools and parks, or tributary corridors. Building setbacks can be adjusted to accommodate tree preservation.

6.2.4 Gateway features should be developed on such lands as municipal parks and stormwater facilities to reinforce the natural theme for the community. The significant woodlands will also be a major gateway feature to the community and will link to other natural amenity areas in the community. Development adjacent to the woodlands will be planned to ensure the features and functions of the woodland are maintained in concert with building and roadway design.

6.2.5 Figure 25 illustrates the key community gateway locations for Barrhaven South, where special design and landscaping attention will be required to reinforce the overarching themes of the community. Where possible, prominent mature trees should be incorporated.

6.2.6 Stormwater ponds and tributaries should be sited and designed to be focal points for neighbourhoods and serve as public linkages through communities to the broader open space network along the Jock River.

6.2.7 Buildings will be designed to address major transportation routes such as arterial and collector roads by fronting onto the street to enhance the streetscape and to create a sense of the community for travellers along these routes.

6.2.8 Neighbourhood and building design should consider and incorporate, where possible, measures that promote accessibility. This can be done through the planning and design of linkages and the parks network, and the design and construction of commercial, industrial, institutional and residential buildings.

Figure 25 - Key Community Gateways

Figure 25 - Key Community Gateways
[Enlarge image ]

6.2.9 Cycling will be encouraged through the design of neighbourhoods and buildings, by providing pathway alternatives to reach schools, parks, shopping and transitway stations and by providing safe and convenient storage for bicycles at places of employment, commercial areas, institutions and places of worship.

6.2.10 While not restricting the creativity of individual landowners and subdivision designers, but having regard to city policies for same, a common palette of materials and options should be used for key design elements of the community, including:

  • Fencing and landscaping standards for arterial roads,
  • Neighbourhood gateway features,
  • Street lighting,
  • Landscaping and street tree planting,
  • Wayfinding signage.

6.2.11 The placement of all utilities to service development will be arranged to support the built form and urban design objectives of the CDP. Larger utility infrastructure such as trunk lines should be underground, particularly along Greenbank Road. The City will work with Hydro Ottawa regarding the delivery of underground servicing and the required main utility infrastructure, to determine such elements as costing and utility location space requirements.

6.2.12 The City will encourage, wherever possible, utility coordination and location within an initial common trench to avoid unnecessary over digging and disruption of the municipal right-of-way.

6.2.13 The City will encourage utility providers to consider innovative methods of containing utility services on or within streetscape features (such as lamp posts, transit shelters, or other structures) in consideration of the overall aesthetics of the streetscape.

6.2.14 Developers should consult with utility providers in the early stages of development to determine appropriate locations for large utility equipment, or utility clusters, such as above ground walk in cabinets, to promote a coordinated approach among utility providers, and to locate such facilities in targeted areas.

6.3 Streets

Streets are the major element of the public realm in communities. Safety is the key consideration; however, the design of streets – in terms of the widths, the landscaping, the relationship with buildings – are fundamental in establishing the character of a community.

The Official Plan directs that new communities should be designed using a modified grid road pattern in order to:

  • Maximize the number of access and egress points,
  • Increase permeability of the network,
  • Increase pedestrian and transit accessibility,
  • Enhance way-finding and personal navigation.

Single-loaded roads are used at key areas throughout the community to provide:

  • Views to, and along, the Jock River,
  • Better public accessibility to the open space network along the Jock River and to the parks network throughout, and
  • Buffers between street-oriented housing where the housing fronts onto arterial roads.

There are three (3) street types in the road network hierarchy: arterials, collectors and local roads. The design parameters for each of these roads will flow to a large extent from their function.

Arterial Roads

Arterials are “the major roads of the City that carry large volumes of traffic over the longest distances... To best provide access to arterials, block lengths and intersections should be spaced and designed to accommodate all controlled to minimize turning movements and to reduce conflicts between travel modes; and arterial road corridors should provide a high degree of connectivity between land uses and places along and across the route.” [Section 1, Annex 1, City of Ottawa Official Plan]

Figure 26 - Arterial Road Network

Figure 26 - Arterial Road Network
[Enlarge image ]

The arterial network for Barrhaven South is illustrated in Figure 26 and includes:

  • Cambrian Road (37.5 m right-of-way)
  • Cedarview Road (37.5 m right-of-way)
  • Jockvale Road (37.5 m-42.5 m right-of-way)
  • New alignment of Greenbank (41.5 m right-of-way)
  • Old alignment of Greenbank, south of Cambrian (32 m-37.5 m right-of-way).

The following diagrams illustrate the cross-sections for each of the proposed rights-of-way widths for the arterials.

Figure 27 - Cross-Section 41.5 m Arterial Right-of-Way

Figure 27 - Cross-Section 41.5 m Arterial Right-of-Way
[Enlarge image ]

Figure 28 - Cross-Section 37.5 m Arterial Right-of-Way

Figure 28 - Cross-Section 37.5 m Arterial Right-of-Way
[Enlarge image ]

Figure 29 - Cross-Section 32 m Arterial Right-of-Way

Figure 29 - Cross-Section 32 m Arterial Right-of-Way
[Enlarge image ]

Guidelines for Arterial Roads:
Intersections

6.3.1 Full-movement intersections along arterials will be signalized and appropriately spaced. Other intersections along arterials will be minimized and limited to right-in/right-out movements only.

Parking

6.3.2 On-street parking will be encouraged on new Greenbank Road in off-peak hours as a way of providing traffic calming and contributing to a more intimate, pedestrian setting for the community core.

Pedestrians

6.3.3 Sidewalks will be provided on both sides of the street except where a multi-use recreational pathway is provided on one of the sides.

6.3.4 Pedestrian-scale lighting should be provided at all intersections and, where possible, continuously along arterials.

6.3.5 All pedestrian crossings should be clearly marked through the use of lighting and changes in pavement materials, texture and/or colour.

Cycling

6.3.6 Where the cycling route is on street, the right-of-way should incorporate appropriate bicycle lanes in accordance with City standards.

6.3.7 The arterial road design should consider the construction of 3.0 metre wide multi-use recreational pathways on one side to create a safer environment and to contribute to the overall connectivity being established within the community.

Landscaping

6.3.8 Landscaping along arterials will include tree plantings, planted at 7.0 to 10.0 metres apart on centre, using species that will form a continuous canopy at maturity. The location of trees should be coordinated with the location of utilities and infrastructure that share the right-of-way.

Sound Barriers

6.3.9 In order to limit the need for noise attenuation fencing along arterial roads, alternatives to rear lotting should be used. This would include single-loaded window streets, cul-de-sacs, flanking side lots, rear-lane townhouses and/or other design solutions acceptable to the City.

6.3.10 Where noise attenuation fencing is required, it should be limited to short stretches of frontage and the impact of it will be mitigated through the use of berming, upgraded fence design and planting.

Transit
Photo 22 - This arterial street provides space for landscaped medians and boulevards, dedicated left turning movement, cyclists, pedestrians, vehicles and parking

6.3.11 In order to improve the speed and reliability of transit service, transit priority measures may be provided to lessen delays on transit vehicles caused by other traffic and traffic control signals at opportune locations.

6.3.12 Bus stops, along with waiting amenities, should be provided at designated intersections or as needed with sufficient space to include a concrete waiting area, shelter or bench.

Collector Roads

Collector roads “connect communities and distribute traffic between the arterial system and the local road system. These roads tend to be shorter and carry lower volumes of traffic than do the arterials. Direct access to collector roads from adjacent properties will be permitted where such access will not introduce traffic safety or capacity concerns. The design and construction of collector roads will accommodate the safe and efficient operation of transit services.” [Section 1, Annex 1, City of Ottawa Official Plan]

While the arterial network provides the skeletal framework for the overall community, the collector roads provide organizational structure for the internal workings of the community. They establish routes into and between the various neighbourhoods, and provide routes to integrate transit into the community.

Guidelines for Collector Roads

6.3.13 Collector roads in Barrhaven South should be designed using a 24-metre right-of-way, as illustrated in Figure 30.

6.3.14 In addition to the paved road surface, collector road rights-of-way should include a boulevard and sidewalk on both sides of the street, except where the alternative in section 6.3.21 is preferred.

6.3.15 Boulevards will be sodded and planted with deciduous trees, using species that will form a canopy at maturity. Trees should be planted on the centerline of the boulevard, at regular intervals along the roadway. The location of trees should be coordinated with the location of utilities and infrastructure that share the right-of-way.

6.3.16 Street lighting, signs and aboveground utilities located in the boulevard should be aligned with the tree plantings to establish coordinated streetscapes.

6.3.17 Street lighting should accommodate the needs of pedestrians.

6.3.18 Community mailboxes, bus stops, newspaper boxes, and municipal waste containers should be consolidated in common areas, preferably adjacent to open spaces.

6.3.19 On-street parking will be permitted on either side of collector roads, although restrictions may be put in place in school zones where warranted.

6.3.20 Collector roads may be designed to accommodate traffic circles at intersections of two collectors.

6.3.21 Collector road design should consider the construction of a 3.0-metre wide, multi-use recreational pathway on one side to create a safer environment and to contribute to the overall connectivity being established within the community.

6.3.22 Bus stops, along with waiting amenities, should be provided at designated intersections or as needed with sufficient space to include a concrete waiting area, shelter or bench.

6.3.23 Rear lotting shall not be permitted along collector roads.

Figure 30 - Cross-Section 24 m Collector Right-of-Way

Figure 30 - Cross-Section 24 m Collector Right-of-Way
[Enlarge image ]

Local Roads

Photo 23 - A local road provides a sidewalk along one side of the street
Photo 24 - The location of trees, light standards and utilities are coordinated along the street

Local roads “are found within communities and distribute traffic from arterial and collector streets to individual properties, typically over short distances.” [Section 1, Annex 1, City of Ottawa Official Plan] Local streets are the most intimate type of residential road.

Figure 31 - Cross-Section 16.5 m Local Right-of-Way

Figure 31 - Cross-Section 16.5 m Local Right-of-Way
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Figure 32 - Cross-Section 14 m Local Single-Loaded Right-of-Way

Figure 32 - Cross-Section 14 m Local Single-Loaded Right-of-Way
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Guidelines for Local Roads

6.3.24 Local roads should be designed with a 16.5 to 18-metre right-of-way, as illustrated in the cross-sections below. Single-loaded roads may have rights-of-ways of 14 metres.

6.3.25 Boulevards should be provided on both sides of the street and should be planted with deciduous trees 7.0 to 10.0 metres on centre that will form a canopy at maturity.

6.3.26 Sidewalks will generally be provided on one side of the street and located at the curb.

6.3.27 On-street parking will be permitted on either side of local roads.

6.3.28 The location of trees should be coordinated with the location of utilities and infrastructure that share the right-of-way.

Lanes

Photo 25 - An example of a “green” driveway; grass replaces most of the concrete parking pad
Photo 26 - An example of a rear laneway that provides access to garages

Lanes help to improve neighbourhood streetscapes by eliminating the dominance of garages and paved parking areas in front of residential units and consolidating service areas to the rear of development.

Figure 33 - Cross-Section 8.5 m Lane

Figure 33 - Cross-Section 8.5 m Lane
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Guidelines for Lanes

6.3.29 Lanes should be designed within an 8.5 m right-of-way.

6.3.30 Private property adjacent to lanes should incorporate landscaping to soften the environment and create an attractive lane-scape.

6.3.31 Where possible, utilities should be located along lanes.

6.4 Parks & Greenspace

Photo 27 - A park offers passive recreational opportunities, like reading under a tree
Photo 28 - A park provides an opportunity for a children’s soccer game
Photo 29 - Multi-use pathways provide opportunities for cycling
Photo 30 - A tot lot provides a place for young children to play
Photo 31 - A large organized public event takes place at a popular park in the city
Photo 32 - A family enjoying a community park
Photo 33 - Two cyclists enjoying a leisurely ride along a trail
Photo 34 - A lone canoeist enjoying a peaceful moment
Photo 35 - Two girls enjoy a game of ultimate Frisbee

As outlined earlier in Section 5.3 of this Plan, the major focus of the parks system in Barrhaven South is the Jock River. The District Park, which extends along the entire south shore, provides extensive opportunities for active recreational, as well as passive leisure pursuits. The Land Use Plan for Barrhaven South ensures continuity throughout this river corridor and establishes linkages into this open space from the rest of the community through a variety of means, including: strategic placement of parks, the use of the stormwater management linear tributaries to provide additional corridors, the road network and multi-use recreational pathways.

The intent is to provide parkland throughout the Barrhaven South community that:

  • Capitalizes on the abundant natural resources of this area,
  • Is easily accessible to all residents of the community,
  • Enhances north-south and east-west pedestrian connectivity,
  • Provides active recreational space to fulfill the City’s mandate,
  • Creates interesting, well-designed communities.

Guidelines are included for the District Park, community parks, neighbourhood parks, parkettes, linkages and trails, woodlots, and stormwater management facilities.

General Guidelines for Parks

6.4.1 Pedestrian access to parks should be clearly defined using public sidewalks, landscape and/or architectural elements to ensure an appealing park presence from the road.

6.4.2 To provide definition, trees should be planted along the edge of parks, selecting species and planting locations that do not screen views into the parks. Parkland design will incorporate existing healthy trees where compatible.

6.4.3 Community design should encourage ‘eyes on parks’ for both safety and aesthetic reasons. This can be achieved by various means including providing street frontage along parks, and where possible fronting housing – rather than flanking or rear lotting – onto parks. To this end, parks shall provide full frontage on at least two public streets.

6.4.4 Where yard fencing adjacent to parks is required, the design should be consistent for all perimeter fencing. This will be a condition of subdivision approval and a requirement for its installation by the developer.

6.4.5 Parks provide active, public, community spaces and by their nature are areas where activities could disturb neighbouring residents. Privacy for neighbouring properties – both visual and noise-related – should be addressed through park design, landscaping and the placement of active park facilities. As well, there shall be a condition placed in the draft subdivision approval, requiring any prospective purchaser of property abutting parkland to sign-off in the Purchase and Sale Agreement their awareness that their lot is in proximity to a park, which often includes activities that generate noise.

6.4.6 Residential design near or adjacent to parks should be sensitive to the purposes of the park. Park uses should be considered when designing the orientation of both roadways and the residential lots.

6.4.7 Park design should coordinate the location and design of street lighting, community mailboxes, waste and recycling receptacles.

District Parks

The District Park is located adjacent to the Jock River corridor with connections around Half Moon Bay to the City-owned woodlot at Jockvale Road. This park will provide:

  • Extensive, active recreational facilities to the Barrhaven South community, as well as the greater south urban community,
  • Linkages and trails throughout its length, connecting the Barrhaven South Community and beyond, and
  • Opportunities to preserve and enhance water-related recreational activities, such as fishing docks, canoe launches and picnic areas.
Guidelines for District Parks

6.4.8 The District Park for Barrhaven South will be primarily established on City-owned land adjacent to the Jock River.

6.4.9 Privately owned lands will be dedicated, as part of the parkland dedication, to provide adequate tableland for facilities that cannot be located within the 100-year flood line and to provide public access and views at Half Moon Bay. The lands to be dedicated are shown on the Land Use Plan and generally located at Cedarview, at the new Greenbank bridge, and adjacent to Half Moon Bay.

6.4.10 Residential uses with increased densities should be located near, or with easy access to, the District Park in order to maximize the use of this major City facility provided they are in proximity to the transit corridor.

6.4.11 Rear lotting of ground-oriented residential dwellings onto sportsfields in the District Park (such as sportsfields) should be avoided.

6.4.12 In the few cases where residential development abuts the park, it will be mitigated by:

  • Designing the development to relate to the park, through the clustering of higher density buildings with common spaces linking to the park, or
  • For lower density development, the use of additional landscaping and/or berming on private properties to buffer the park.

6.4.13 Public roads alongside the District Park should provide visual sight lines and easy public access to the park. To this end, single-loaded roads will be encouraged through a majority of the park frontage between Jockvale Road and Cedarview Road, with the exception of limited locations where double-loaded roads will be considered, generally as shown on the Demonstration Plan.

6.4.14 Community design, lotting and road patterns should capitalize on views to the Jock River corridor through the use of north-south street orientation, with view or sight lines of the Jock River and District Park lands.

6.4.15 Similarly, District Park design should extend these views by avoiding the placement of parking lots, or community buildings at these junctions, and by providing connections to link with City sidewalks and pathways.

Community Parks

Photo 36 - A play structure that offers more challenging adventures in a neighbourhood park
Photo 37 - A neighbourhood park offers a tot lot and a play structure for older children
Photo 38 - Children enjoying the swings in their neighbourhood park
Photo 39 - A children’s soccer game held at a community park
Photo 40 - Homes overlooking a neighbourhood park, depicting a design principal referred to as ‘Eyes on the park’
Photo 41 - Focal points for neighbourhoods

Focal Points for neighbourhoods
Photo 42 - Respite areas

Respite areas
Photo 43 - Homes that front onto a parkette create a visual edge to the space
 

Community parks are intended to be the focus of the community in terms of active recreation opportunities and facilities. The majority of the community’s multi-use sports fields will be located in these parks, as will a variety of other recreation opportunities, both active and passive.

Guidelines for Community Parks

6.4.16 The preferred size for Community Parks is approximately 3.25 hectares and they should be square or rectangular in shape. The actual size of each park will be confirmed at the time of plan of subdivision and will be determined in consideration of the specific context of each community where they are situated.

6.4.17 Vehicular parking will be provided in Community Parks. Landscaped areas in parking lots may incorporate features such as bioswales, bioretention areas, and concave medians to capture runoff before it leaves the site.

6.4.18 Community Parks will be designed to provide a focus for the entire community through landscape design and pedestrian meeting areas.

6.4.19 Each park will include at least one sportsfield, a children’s play area, pathways, park furniture, and a special feature such as a community building, a water play facility, tennis court or other facility to be determined by the City.

6.4.20 Community Parks may be located with community facilities such as community centres, but will not be co-located with school properties.

Neighbourhood Parks

Neighbourhood parks will be the focus of a neighbourhood and will provide opportunities for active and passive recreation for immediate residents.

Guidelines for Neighbourhood Parks

6.4.21 Neighbourhood Parks will be approximately 0.8 ha and they should be square or rectangular in shape. The actual size of each park will be confirmed at the time of plan of subdivision and will be determined in consideration of the specific context of each Neighbourhood Park.

6.4.22 Each Neighbourhood Park will include elements such as play structures, informal playgrounds, seating, hard surface areas, and will incorporate one intense use facility such as an outdoor rink, basketball court, small skate park, spray pad or other facility to be determined by the City.

6.4.23 The park’s landscaping features should reinforce the urban street edge by such means as coordinating with, or enhancing already approved, street tree planting.

6.4.24 Landscaping within the park should incorporate indigenous species for trees, shrubs, and ground cover planting. The design of the park should include the provision of shaded respite areas, naturally through the use of tree selection and placement, for park benches overlooking a play area, or picnic tables as examples.

6.4.25 Streets abutting Neighbourhood Parks will be used to accommodate parking. In certain cases, the City will provide on-site parking, depending on need.

Parkettes

Parkettes provide an additional element to the open space and parks network of a community. In addition to the recreational opportunities provided within the park, these spaces can improve connectivity through neighbourhoods, provide interesting focal points, enhance the community built form and help to establish the character of neighbourhoods.

Guidelines for Parkettes

6.4.26 Parkettes have a role in the hierarchy of the parks network and play an important function in community building and creating pleasant, human scaled public places within neighbourhoods. However, the extent to which parkettes will be included as dedicated parkland must be balanced with the need to provide larger parks and active recreational spaces.

6.4.27 Parkettes will be approximately 0.2 to 0.4 hectares in size and will be configured to allow for the functional design and placement of neighbourhood-type facilities. The actual size and shape of each Parkette will be confirmed at the time of plan of subdivision and will be determined in consideration of the specific context of each Parkette.

6.4.28 Parkettes should be located as neighbourhood focal points and should terminate view corridors and pedestrian sight lines into the space, by such means as having full street frontage on at least two sides and preferably three or more.

6.4.29 The adjacent street and lotting pattern will provide built form which fronts onto the Parkettes, creating the visual edges to these spaces. Rear lotting will not be permitted. See Figure 34 for example.

6.4.30 The residential built form abutting and adjacent to Small Parks should be sited with their primary façades facing the park and/or with enhanced elevations oriented to the park.

6.4.31 Entry/access points should be conveniently located leading directly off the public sidewalk or walkway and should incorporate community and/or civic design elements.

6.4.32 Parkettes could include such features as a community garden, a lookout point to a stormwater management pond, a quiet respite area, as well as an active play feature such as a small water play area, half court basketball, or small skateboard facility. The City will determine the facilities in parkettes.

6.4.33 Parkette landscaping features should reinforce the urban street edge by such means as coordinating with, or enhancing already approved, street tree planting.

6.4.34 Landscaping within the Parkette should incorporate indigenous species for trees, shrubs, and ground cover planting. The design of the park should include the provision of shaded respite areas, naturally through the use of tree selection and placement, for park benches overlooking a play area, or picnic tables.

Figure 34 - Demonstration of Possible Parkette Design

Figure 34 - Demonstration of Possible Parkette Design
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Linkages & Trails

Photo 44 - A wide trail accommodates a range of users
Photo 45 - A manicured, well-landscaped walkway connection
Photo 46 - A boardwalk is provided alongside a waterway
Photo 47 - A family of in-line skaters

Open space linkages are one of the major structuring elements in community building. In a way, they are the skeleton of the community, providing a network to all reaches of the community and providing connectivity from home to amenity spaces, schools and shopping areas, as well as natural features. Trails and walkways will be provided alongside stormwater management ponds and tributaries, along the Jock River, alongside or through woodlots, through all parks and link up with schools, community centres, the community core, and transit stations. Required walkway connections, for example, through mid-block developments, will not be calculated as part of the parkland dedication.

Guidelines for Pathways and Trails

6.4.35 The blocks of land utilized to provide linkages will be dedicated to public ownership, either the municipality or school boards, as appropriate.

6.4.36 Trails will be designed to accommodate a range of users and abilities. Slopes are preferred to be 5% or less. Curb-cuts must be provided at intersections where trails or pathways have street crossings.

6.4.37 Trail design and type will be based on each site’s sensitivity to minimize environmental impacts.

6.4.38 Trails for pedestrians and cyclists are preferred to be 3.0 m wide; trails for pedestrians are preferred to be 2.0 m wide. In both cases, the minimum width of the block will not be less than 6.0 metres.

6.4.39 Wayfinding signage shall be provided throughout the trail network. As well, interpretive signage should be provided at various locations along the trails to promote stewardship initiatives that will protect and enhance the features and functions of the natural environment.

6.4.40 Design of the trail or pathway amenities should coordinate the placement and design of benches, signage, waste/recycling receptacles, and access to drinking water where feasible. They should be clustered and provided at regular intervals along the route.

6.4.41 Where a trail or pathway is considered to be a part of the ‘greenway network’ as illustrated on Figure 19 - The Greenspace Plan, and is included within a City right-of-way, more emphasis will be placed on the pedestrian and cycling facilities to meet the needs of users of all ages through the provision of extra design characteristics. These could include any of the following:

  • The provision of one wider boulevard area on one side of the street (unequal centerline of street) to accommodate a 3.0 m wide pathway, that is not necessarily parallel to the curb line;
  • The provision of a 2.0 m wide sidewalk on one side of the road, and a 3.0 m pathway on the other side of the road;
  • The provision of dedicated on-road cycle lanes rather than signed routes or shared-use lanes;
  • Explicit direction for wide boulevard and coordination of services to allow for an avenue of trees;
  • Opportuni ties for other streetscape elements including enhanced bus stop areas, benches, and landscape features;

6.4.42 Where streets are proposed with alternative ROW widths, an alternate street to provide for a greenway pathway or trail should be selected. In this way, ‘green’ streets may be created as a key means to create continuity in the Greenspace Network.

6.4.43 Where the modified grid street network has not provided direct access to a bus stop, a pathway is to be included to provide the necessary pedestrian link to a designated transit route.

Stormwater Ponds & Tributaries

Stormwater ponds and tributaries are designed to serve specific engineering functions; however, they also contribute enormously to the natural environment of a community and the open space network. The location, size and design of such facilities should recognize that they are important natural features of the landscape and should be incorporated as integral components in community building.

Guidelines for Stormwater Ponds and Tributaries
Photo 48 - A stormwater management pond with naturalized landscaping and a link to the nearby residential community
Photo 49 - Stormwater facilities in a park-like setting, complete with walkways, trails and respite area, contribute to the greenspace system and linkage network
Stormwater facilities contribute to the greenspace system and linkage network

6.4.44 Where possible, ponds should be located to provide green gateways to the community.

6.4.45 Street frontage will be provided along the ponds and tributaries through such means as single-loaded roads to promote public access to these natural areas.

6.4.46 Generally, ponds shall not be fenced. However, when the City requires fencing (i.e., between the pond and a sidewalk abutting an arterial road), it shall be decorative in nature and in keeping with the theme of the streetscape.

6.4.47 Ponds should be designed to be naturally shaped and tributaries should be designed to be sinuous.

6.4.48 Grading of stormwater ponds shall ensure natural and variable side slopes; additional planting will be used in areas of steeper slopes.

6.4.49 Where possible, local materials should be used in the construction of stormwater ponds.

6.4.50 Planting should be comprised of indigenous species and flood tolerant water’s edge plants should be used to stabilize banks. Landscaping along the street frontages should complement other park landscaping in the neighbourhood and augment any arterial streetscaping or tree-planting plan.

6.4.51 Walking and cycling trails should be provided around ponds and along the tributaries, where needed, and as determined by the City, to enhance open space linkages through the community. These trails, which are in addition to the constraint lands associated with the tributary, will be included as dedicated parkland.

6.4.52 Tributaries should be restored and enhanced using natural channel principles. Their corridors should be planted with native species along both sides of the creek to enhance aquatic habitat. The corridor width and development setback requirements will be established in the Jock River Reach 1 Subwatershed Study. Trail systems along the tributaries will be encouraged as part of the Greenspace Plan.

Photo 50 - Stormwater facilities in a park-like setting, complete with walkways, trails and respite area, contribute to the greenspace system and linkage network

Woodlands and Adjacent Development

6.4.53 The provision of trail systems in woodlands will be assessed and determined through the completion of a Community Woodland Management Plan.

6.4.54 Interpretative signage should be provided adjacent to the woodland to promote an understanding of the importance of woodlands and foster stewardship initiatives that will protect and conserve the features and functions of the woodland in an urban setting.

6.4.55 An Environmental Impact Statement will be required for any development within 30 metres of Half Moon Bay Woodland or Cambrian Road Woods. The EIS will identify mitigation measures that will ensure overall integrity of the woods is maintained.

6.4.56 Development near or adjacent to the woodlands should be sensitive to the features and functions of the woodland when designing the orientation and layout of roadways and residential lots.

6.4.57 Street frontage will be encouraged along the woodlands through such means as single-loaded roads to promote a gateway function, as well as to minimize encroachments.

6.4.58 Aerial mapping should be used in the preliminary design of subdivisions, to locate existing features such as hedgerows, and determine the potential for their integration into plans.

6.5 Community Core

Photo 51 - Mixed-use buildings close to lot lines and tight to the street
Photo 52 - Mixed-use buildings close to lot lines and tight to the street
Photo 53 - Mixed-use buildings close to lot lines and tight to the street
Mixed-use buildings close to lot lines and tight to the street
Photo 54 - A low-rise building uses symmetry to make an interesting architectural statement
Photo 55 - Architecture to address corner lots in Community Core

Architecture to address corner lots in Community Core
Photo 56 - Active, inviting uses at grade
Photo 57 - Active, inviting uses at grade

Active, inviting uses at grade

The Community Core is the heart of the Barrhaven South community – where the key transportation/transit routes of the community intersect and where the people of this community will gather for commercial activities and services. The intent for this area is to meet the commercial and personal service needs of the community in an intimate, human-scale and pedestrian friendly atmosphere.

A mix of residential and commercial uses will be encouraged to create a lively, urban feel to the core. As detailed in Section 5.1.4, permitted commercial uses include retail stores, restaurants, and personal service uses, as well as civic uses and housing.

Development shall reinforce a high quality urban identity, distinct from conventional suburban development. This will be achieved through well-planned spaces, landscape design and enhanced architecture. Site planning, built form and landscaping shall be coordinated within the Community Core to create a vibrant, visually attractive meeting place in the community.

Prior to any development in the Community Core, an overall “Community Core Concept Plan and Design Framework” must be prepared. This document will establish the architectural structure for the core and will provide specific design guidelines for its development. This document will detail:

  • The distribution and location of buildings, including building setbacks;
  • The arrangement of parking and service areas;
  • The strategic location of public spaces;
  • The linkages through the site, to the surrounding areas, and to the greenspace network;
  • The architectural details of the buildings, including materials and window glazing;
  • The palette of common materials for use throughout the development;
  • The landscaping requirements along street frontages, within the site and along the perimeter adjacent to neighbouring properties; and
  • Coordinated utility requirements.

See Section 7.2.8, with respect to how the Community Core Concept Plan &Design Framework will be implemented at the time of development. The following guidelines provide overall direction for the community core and establish the foundation upon which the detailed design and architectural guidelines in the Community Core Concept Plan and Design Framework will be based.

Buildings and Architecture

6.5.1 Create a strong architectural statement throughout the Community Core, in particular for those buildings framing the intersection of Greenbank Road and Cambrian Road.

6.5.2 Building setbacks are intended to be close to lot lines with direct access from the sidewalk adjacent to the street.

6.5.3 Specific setback requirements will accommodate:

  • The provision of active at-grade uses such as outdoor patios;
  • Appropriate landscaping along arterial street frontages; and
  • Transit and utility requirements.

6.5.4 Ensure that corner buildings have similarly articulated façades on both streets. Increased massing is desirable at corner locations.

6.5.5 Window glazing shall be maximized along street frontages while avoiding spandrel, reflective or tinted glass along arterial roads.

6.5.6 Complementary architectural treatment of buildings within the Core, such as finish/colour/materials should be encouraged.

6.5.7 Development shall be two to six functional storeys in height, particularly along the street edges.

6.5.8 The design of buildings shall be human scale. This will be achieved by animating the ground level - through uses and design - and by avoiding the overpowering effects of upper floors.

6.5.9 Active, inviting uses such as shops and restaurants at-grade are encouraged, with pedestrian friendly amenities such as outdoor seating areas and patios in the front and sides of buildings.

6.5.10 Primary building entrances will be oriented to the street, with defining architectural elements such as entrance canopies, lighting and awnings. Building projections such as bay features, patios, and porches are encouraged.

6.5.11 Overall visual interest should be coordinated through the use of plantings, decorative paving, site furniture, signage and lighting.

6.5.12 Expanded hard surface waiting areas, with associated seating and feature planting, will be provided at bus stops. Where appropriate, transit-waiting amenities should be integrated into adjacent building design.

Vehicles and Parking

6.5.13 Parking should be obscured from view from arterial streets, primarily through the placement of building façades, and by locating parking to the rear of the development.

6.5.14 Where limited surface parking adjacent to arterial roads is unavoidable, parking will be visually screened from the public street through parking lot design and through the use of coordinated architectural/landscaped features such as low walls, fencing and vegetation.

6.5.15 Reduced parking standards will be applied by taking into account the proximity of rapid transit, the potential for shared-use parking during off-peak times (i.e. abutting park or school), and the availability of on-street parking during off-peak hours.

Pedestrians and Cyclists

Photo 58 - Generous and inviting sidewalks for pedestrians
Photo 59 - Generous and inviting sidewalks for pedestrians
Generous and inviting sidewalks for pedestrians
Photo 60 - Convenient and safe bicycle storage
Photo 61 - Convenient and safe bicycle storage

Convenient and safe bicycle storage

6.5.16 All development at grade will be pedestrian-oriented and barrier-free.

6.5.17 To create an active pedestrian environment along street frontages, main façades and primary doors will face the street and be accessible from the public sidewalk. This requirement should not limit the opportunity for additional entry for upper floors of mixed use buildings on other façades.

6.5.18 Sidewalk depths should be maximized along storefronts to enhance the pedestrian environment and accommodate building projections and amenities.

6.5.19 Create inviting, safe pedestrian walkways and public spaces that:

  • link rear parking areas to the public sidewalk and street;
  • provide significant connections to the adjoining school site;
  • integrate and connect the community park into the community core.

6.5.20 Bicycle parking will be located close to building entrances, linked to internal pedestrian walkways and public sidewalks, and be visible from inside the building through informal observation. Bike fixtures should complement building architecture.

Signage and Lighting

6.5.21 Signage should complement the architectural style, scale and proportions of the building(s).

6.5.22 Lighting should be designed to ensure pedestrian comfort and safety.

6.5.23 Street lighting should be augmented with lighting affixed to the buildings in order to accentuate and animate buildings and spaces.

6.5.24 The height of light standards and intensity of fixtures in the parking areas will be sufficient to light the parking area without intruding or spilling over onto adjacent residential uses.

Servicing and Utilities

6.5.25 Consider the sharing of facilities in order to reduce the number of service and loading areas.

6.5.26 Service and loading areas should be located so that they are not visible from the street and will be screened from the public realm. Waste and recycling receptacle areas ideally should be located within buildings.

6.5.27 Rooftop mechanical equipment should be screened from the street and adjacent residential uses and should complement the building roof design through the use of materials similar to the building.

6.5.28 Conflicts between pedestrians and service vehicles should be minimized through a clear delineation of the pedestrian right-of-way.

6.5.29 All utility, transformers and HVAC equipment should be screened from the street and adjacent properties.

6.6 Residential Neighbourhoods

Photo 62 - Various gateway features
Photo 63 - Various gateway features
Photo 64 - Various gateway features
Various gateway features
Photo 65 - Strong architectural & landscape treatment of corner units

Strong architectural & landscape treatment of corner units
Photo 66 - Building to address the street and create a strong street edge

Building to address the street and create a strong street edge
Photo 67 - Variations in design along streets
Photo 68 - Variations in design along streets

Variations in design along streets
Photo 69 - Encourage shared driveways to minimize pavement

Encourage shared driveways to minimize pavement
Photo 70 - Dwellings facing parkland require particular attention to perimeter fencing, landscaping and parking arrangements
Photo 71 - Dwellings facing parkland require particular attention to perimeter fencing, landscaping and parking arrangements
Photo 72 - Dwellings facing parkland require particular attention to perimeter fencing, landscaping and parking arrangements
Dwellings facing parkland require particular attention to perimeter fencing, landscaping and parking arrangements

6.7 Employment Areas

The new City of Ottawa Official Plan identifies a ratio of 1.3 jobs per household for developing communities outside of the Greenbelt. In keeping with the policies of Developing Communities and Mixed-Use Centres, the Barrhaven South Community Design Plan provides a balance of areas for living and working. A total of approximately 11.8 ha of employment lands are proposed adjacent to Highway 416 at the intersection of Cambrian and Cedarview Roads.

General Guidelines for Employment Areas

6.7.1 Employment uses may include a mix of industrial, warehouse, office, retail and institutional uses, excluding ‘sensitive’ land uses as defined by MOE Guidelines D-1 and D-4.

6.7.2 The employment areas should be developed using high quality architecture, with careful attention to building placement and landscaping so as to create visually appealing streets that reflect an identity consistent with the balance of the Barrhaven South community.

6.7.3 Because the Employment Area is adjacent to Highway 416, the “Scenic- Entry Routes” policies of the Official Plan will apply.

6.7.4 Gateway features into Employment Areas should be developed and designed to reinforce the overarching themes of the community. Where possible, prominent mature trees should be incorporated into such features.

Buildings

6.7.5 Front yards should be landscaped.

6.7.6 Building façades that face the street should display unique and appealing architectural design through the use of high quality building materials, articulation of expansive façades, and a minimum of 50% glazing at grade.

6.7.7 Building lot coverage should not exceed 35% of the total lot area.

6.7.8 Maximum building height should not exceed 20 metres.

6.7.9 Whenever possible, buildings shall be located with minimal setback to adjacent roadways so as to animate and articulate streetscapes, screen parking and loading areas, and facilitate pedestrian connectivity.

Parking

6.7.10 Employment sites with frontage along Highway 416 should avoid locating parking and service facilities where they can be viewed from the highway. Where this is not possible, the impacts shall be mitigated through the use of extensive landscaping and screening.

6.7.11 Surface parking should be located where it is not visible from public streets. Where buildings do not screen parking areas, the impacts should be mitigated with substantial screening and heavily planted landscaped areas at least 4.0 metres in width.

6.7.12 Parking areas should be segmented into small sections with sufficient, site-contained lighting, substantial landscaping, and designated pedestrian walkways.

6.7.13 Walkways should generally be at least 1.5 m in width and be lined on at least one side with a 3-metre area planted with shrubs and trees. These walkways will be designed to provide clear and unencumbered direct access to building entrances for the convenience and safety of users.

6.7.14 Shared parking opportunities and on-street parking shall be considered in calculating required parking.

6.7.15 All development sites shall provide a sufficient number of safe and accessible bicycle parking spaces. These will be located close to building entrances and linked to internal pedestrian walkways and public sidewalks, and be visible from inside the building through informal observation.

Loading and Servicing

6.7.16 Servicing and loading areas will be screened from the street and from other adjacent uses. Screening may include walls and/or coniferous landscape material. Screen walls should be constructed with material consistent with associated buildings.

Landscape Treatment

6.7.17 Trees, shrubs, and groundcover should be planted in wide, continuous planting beds generally 3-metres in width. These will be used to define parking sections, pedestrian pathways and key entrances to the building. A mix of deciduous and coniferous vegetation should be used.

6.7.18 Signage shall be clearly visible and complementary to the associated building architecture.

6.7.19 Wherever possible, the coordination of landscaping across multiple development sites is encouraged to create a unified image within the employment area.

6.7.20 Employment Areas that are adjacent to residential areas are required to provide a landscaped buffer of at least 4 metres in width.

Lighting

6.7.21 Lighting should be designed to ensure pedestrian comfort and safety.

6.7.22 Street lighting should be augmented with lighting affixed to the buildings in order to accentuate and animate buildings and spaces.

6.7.23 The height of light standards and intensity of fixtures in the parking areas will be sufficient to light the parking area, but should not intrude or spill over onto adjacent residential uses.

6.7.24 Similarly, lighting should not interfere with Highway 416.

6.8 Institutional Uses

General Guidelines for Institutional Uses

6.8.1 Primary entrance doors to institutional uses will face the street and be connected to the public sidewalk.

6.8.2 Institutional buildings should be set back 3.0 to 6.0 metres from the front property line, and from the side property line for corner sites.

6.8.3 Building façades facing public streets will have a minimum of 50% clear glazing at the first floor level. Architectural projections, recesses, arcades, awnings, colour and texture should be used to reduce the visual size of any unglazed walls/wall sections.

6.8.4 All institutional sites will be planted with street trees placed 7-10 metres on centre.

6.8.5 Parking will not dominate the streetscape and will not be located in front of an institutional building. Where surface parking adjacent to the street is unavoidable, all parking must be visually screened from the public street with landscaped features such as walls and/or fences and planted landscaped areas of at least 3 metres in width.

Schools

6.8.6 Schools should address the street with primary building entrances oriented to the street.

6.8.7 School sites should have frontage on at least two (2) streets.

6.8.8 Where appropriate, strong pedestrian linkages to public transit will be provided.

6.8.9 On-site bus lay-bys and car drop-offs will be designed to avoid pedestrian/vehicular conflicts and, where appropriate, should be located at the side of the school.

6.8.10 The location and size of school sites are shown conceptually on the Land Use Plan and refined further in the Demonstration Plan. The assignment of sites to the School Boards will be finalized through the Plans of Subdivision, based on their defined needs at that time.

6.8.11 At the time of the preparation of the Community Design Plan, the School Board requirements were identified as set out in Table 7.

6.8.12 Street lay-bys shall be provided for buses and cars. On-site drop off areas should be carefully designed to avoid pedestrian/ vehicular conflicts, and should preferably be located at the side of the building.

Table 7: School Board Requirements

School Board

Elementary

Secondary

No. of Schools

Size

No. of Schools

Size

Ottawa Carleton District Board

3

2.8 ha

1

7.5 ha

Ottawa Carleton Catholic Board

2

2.8 ha

1

8.0 ha

CECLFCE 1

1

2.0 ha

0

-

CEPEO 2

0

-

0

-

 

1. Conseil des écoles catholiques de langue française du Centre-Est
2. Conseil des écoles publiques de l’Est de l’Ontario

Places of Worship

6.8.13 Places of worship shall be permitted in all neighbourhoods, but only on arterial roads and/or collector roads at the intersection of an arterial road.

6.8.14 Parking should be screened from view to the greatest extent possible. Where buildings do not screen parking areas, the impacts should be mitigated with substantial screening and heavily planted landscaped areas at least 3.0 metres in width.

6.8.15 Similarly, the impacts of required parking on neighbouring residential areas shall be mitigated through berming and/or landscaping.

6.8.16 Lighting should be designed to ensure pedestrian comfort and safety.

6.8.17 Street lighting should be augmented with lighting affixed to the buildings in order to accentuate and animate buildings and spaces.

6.8.18 The height of light standards and intensity of fixtures in the parking areas will be sufficient to light the parking area without intruding or spilling over onto adjacent residential uses.

6.8.19 Places of worship located in the Community Core shall comply with the guidelines set out in Section 6.5.

Chapter 7 - Implementation of the Plan

7.1 Interpretation & Changes to the Community Design Plan

The Community Design Plan will guide the form and character of Barrhaven South. The Plan will guide the zoning, subdivision and site plan control processes, as well as capital expenditures in this area. While the end product may differ in detail from the various plans contained within this CDP document, it is intended that development will have a framework consistent with the policies and guidelines that are described in this CDP.

In this regard, the following considerations are important when interpreting the CDP:

7.1.1 Minor changes to the Land Use Plan component of the CDP proposed prior to subdivision or site plan approval – such as adjustments to the location of low and medium density residential, minor changes to the configuration of the community core to high density residential areas, minor changes to the residential mix, minor adjustments to stormwater management pond block size and location, and minor adjustments to tributary corridor locations and widths – may be made at the discretion of the Director of Planning and Infrastructure Approvals. Subdivision and/or site plan approval by the City reflecting these changes constitute approval of the changes to the CDP.

7.1.2 Substantive changes to the Land Use Plan proposed prior to subdivision or site plan approval – such as to the pattern of the major road network, to the number and location of high density residential, community core or employment area, or the relocation of school and park sites, major change to the Jock River corridor width, major change to tributary location or corridor width, major change in number of stormwater management ponds and open tributaries or major change to stormwater management pond size – will be subject to approval by Planning and Environment Committee and external agencies as required. As in the case of minor changes to the Land Use Plan, subdivision and/or site plan approval by the City reflecting these changes constitute approval of the change to the CDP.

7.1.3 To initiate the review and approval of substantive changes, the proponent shall prepare and submit to the City a composite plan comprised of the proposed change(s) and including subdivision and site plan (s) within the neighbourhood (or the broader community if affected) that are approved or about to be approved. Where the proposed change affects land not subject to an approved or about to be approved plan, the composite plan shall also include the design as shown on the Land Use Plan of the surrounding neighbourhood, or broader community as may be required.

7.1.4 The City will circulate copies of the composite plan as may be required to owners of development and redevelopment land directly affected by the proposed change(s) for comment. Disagreements will result in referral of the subdivision and/or site plan(s) to Planning & Environment Committee for approval. Where a proposed change affects the broader community, a public open house to present the proposed changes to the CDP and to receive input may also be required.

7.1.5 Updates to the studies supporting the CDP, such as the Master Servicing Study, Transportation Master Plan, Conceptual Fisheries Compensation Plan, etc., may also be required in support of a substantive change and would include reconfirming necessary external agency approvals, Class EA addenda, etc., as required.

7.1.6 Each successive change to the Land Use Plan must reflect prior revisions as approved through the composite plan/subdivision approval process. The City will keep all approved changes on file.

7.1.7 Staff initiated changes to the Land Use Plan and to the text of the CDP may be made at the discretion and approval of the Director of Planning and Infrastructure Approvals and shall involve notice to owners of affected development and redevelopment parcels as may be required. Where changes are substantive or there is disagreement between staff and the landowners affected by such proposed changes, approval by Planning & Environment Committee may be sought.

7.1.8 The principles and objectives of the Official Plan and of the CDP must be reflected in any proposed change to the Land Use Plan and to the text of the CDP. Variations that require an amendment to the City of Ottawa Official Plan will also require a corresponding formal amendment to the Community Design Plan.

7.1.9 Landowners are not required to develop their lands precisely as shown on the Demonstration Plan. The purpose and role of the Demonstration Plan is to:

  • Provide guidance on how these lands could develop over time;
  • Demonstrate possibilities and methods for addressing specific development challenges;
  • Illustrate ways to achieve the design guidelines for various land uses;
  • Illustrate some specific objectives the CDP is seeking to achieve; and
  • Provide a means for establishing and monitoring density targets over time.

7.1.10 Where lists of examples of permitted uses are provided in Chapter 5 of this CDP, they are intended to illustrate the possible range and type of uses that are to be considered. Specific uses not listed, but considered by the City to be similar to the listed uses and to conform to the general intent of the applicable land use designation may be recognized as a permitted use in the implementing zoning by-law.

7.2 Development Review and Applications to Rezone and Subdivide Land

7.2.1 Before the approval of any development applications, the final Jock River Reach 1 Subwatershed Study and the Master Servicing Study for the Barrhaven South community must be approved through the Class Environmental Assessment process and City Council. In addition, an approved Conceptual Fish Compensation Plan is required before any development can proceed. (See details in Section 7.5 and 7.6 of this Chapter).

7.2.2 Applications to rezone and subdivide land should be submitted concurrently, together with a brief Planning Report, in addition to other studies that may be required, which should include:

  • A description and illustration of how the proposed zoning, subdivision, building setbacks and elevations, land uses, and minimum densities meet the overall intent and urban design guidelines of the CDP for the subject lands;
  • An indication of the residential uses and density proposed, by units per net hectare, consistent with the targeted densities set out for Developing Communities in the Official Plan, and as discussed below;
  • An overall plan that illustrates the road and block pattern for the lands that are the subject of the development application(s) in addition to road and block pattern for surrounding lands, by showing either actual roads and blocks from approved development applications where they exist, or conceptual road and blocks from this CDP where an approved development application does not exist.

7.2.3 Section 7.2.1 does not apply to those Stonebridge lands at the southern extreme of the CDP and east of the existing Greenbank Road, which can be fully serviced (ie. water, sanitary and stormwater) through the existing Stonebridge community.

7.2.4 The urban design guidelines in Chapter 6 will be used by the City to inform the development review process and provide detailed guidance for the implementation of the Land Use Plan as detailed in Chapter 5.

7.2.5 Notwithstanding Section 7.2.4, the lands at the southern extreme of the CDP and east of the existing Greenbank Road are recognized as being an integral part of the Stonebridge Golf Course Community. As such, the design framework for these lands will be consistent with that applied throughout Stonebridge, namely former Nepean Secondary Plans (Areas 12 and 13).

7.2.6 Development Agreements may be required by the City as a condition of the approval of the development application. Such agreements will be based on this CDP and the findings of any supporting studies and shall address:

  • Parks, open space and environmental features
  • Water, wastewater collection and stormwater management
  • Transit and road infrastructure and widenings
  • Other utilities.

7.2.7 Development agreements shall ensure that the necessary approvals and the required contributions of funds, lands and commitments for services will be in place and operative prior to, or coincident with, occupancy and use of land, without adverse impact on the City’s financial capability. This may require front-ending agreements to advance the timing for the required infrastructure, and to address any acceleration in associated costs.

7.2.8 Prior to the approval of development applications in the Community Core, the Community Core Concept Plan and Design Framework must be prepared to the satisfaction of the Director of Planning and Infrastructure Approvals. Where there is disagreement between staff and the landowners affected by the Concept Plan, approval by Planning & Environment Committee may be sought.

7.2.9 Public roads shall be dedicated to the City through the initial plan of subdivision for lands, or another means that is acceptable to the City, as a condition of development approval (regardless of whether the roads are required for traffic purposes at that time) in order to create the overall road structure, and to ensure the logical routing of early transit service.

7.2.10 During the preparation of the Demonstration Plan assumptions were made that cut and fill of the floodplain would occur in certain locations to regularize development parcels where appropriate. This does not imply any approval of changes to the floodplain by the RVCA. Any such changes will be considered by the RVCA and the City, through the normal course of reviewing plans of subdivisions.

7.3 Achieving and Monitoring Residential Types & Density

7.3.1 The Official Plan (2003) requires the CDP to establish the mix and location of residential dwelling types for Barrhaven South which, as a minimum:

  • Constitutes, on a community-wide basis, no more than 60% single detached and semi detached, and at least 30% multiple dwellings and 10% apartments; and
  • Establishes an overall average for single-detached, semi-detached and townhouses of 29 units per net hectare. Net residential density is based on the area of land in exclusively residential use, including lanes and parking areas internal to developments but excluding public streets, rights-of-way and all non-residential uses.

7.3.2 For the purpose of achieving the Official Plan target of at least 29 units per net hectare, ground-oriented units including single-detached, semi-detached, townhouse and ground-oriented stacked townhouse dwellings will be counted.

7.3.3 The Land Use Plan sets out the location and extent of various forms of housing for Barrhaven South. Table 9 identifies overall targets by percentage of single-detached and semi-detached dwellings; multiple, and apartments. It shows that, on the basis of the current Demonstration Plan, the required mix of units and density targets in the Official Plan are met over the entire Plan area.

7.3.4 To monitor how these Official Plan policies are achieved at build out, the CDP has been divided into four (4) Sub-Planning Areas. While the overall CDP will achieve the desired mix of uses, each Sub-Planning Area and each subdivision may not. The Land Use Plan sets out the location of the various types of uses. For example, not all areas are appropriate for apartments, given their location relative to transit or community services and amenities.

7.3.5 The total number and mix of residential units will be tracked on a neighbourhood and community-wide level at the time of development approval. Minor variations in the expected average density for each housing form are permitted, provided it can be demonstrated that both the total number of residential units and the mix of residential unit types can be reasonably achieved by adjusting density and/or mix on remaining vacant lands within each neighbourhood.

7.3.6 It must be demonstrated within each Sub-Planning Area that:

  • The density for single-detached, semi-detached and townhouses will achieve the requirement of at least 29 units per net hectare, on a community wide basis, and
  • The mix of single-detached and semi-detached, multiple dwellings and apartments, is to be generally consistent with the percentage breakdown as set out in Table 9.
Table 8: Overall Unit Targets and Density
Total by unit type:
Singles & Semis
Multiples
Apartments

3,263
2,921
678

47%
43%
10%
Total Number of Dwellings Units: 6,862 100%
Overall Residential Density for Singles, Semis and Towns:
34.3 uph (net)
Table 9: Unit Count and Mix by Sub-Planning Area
  Area 1 Area 2 Area 3 Area 4
  Units Split Units Split Units Split Units Split
Singles & semi-detached 812 44% 715 50% 853 41% 883 58%
Multiples 845 46% 509

36%

930 44% 637 42%
Apartments

172

10% 198 14% 308 15% 0 0%
Totals 1829 1422 2091 1520

Photo 84 - The four Sub-Planning Areas
[Enlarge image ]

7.4 Phasing

Figure 35 illustrates the phasing of development and the associated transportation and servicing improvements. The timing of development will be controlled primarily by the availability of required infrastructure – roads and services – to support growth. It should also be noted that the timing of the proposed improvements set out in the following tables will be influenced by a variety of factors, such as municipal budgeting priorities, and front-ending agreements.

Development will proceed from the northeast sector of the CDP in Phase 1 as shown below. Total build out in this phase is expected to yield approximately 1700 units. Phase 2 developments will then proceed in the areas shown on Figure 35. This will progress both west and south of Phase 1 concurrently, consistent with the transportation and servicing phasing set out in the following tables.

Figure 35 - Phasing Plan

Figure 35 - Phasing Plan
[Enlarge image ]

Transportation

The servicing of the Barrhaven South CDP will occur in three (3) primary phases as follows:

Table 10: Key Transportation Improvements Enabling Development Phasing
Improvement Result
PHASE 1
1 Intersection improvements at Greenbank/Jockvale. Initiate Phase 1: Barrhaven South and facilitates continuing development of Stonebridge.
2 Implementation of the Jockvale/ Longfields Link extension south to the existing Jockvale Road. Facilitates Phase 1: Barrhaven South and continued development of Stonebridge.
3 Interim improvements to existing Greenbank Bridge to address pedestrian and cycling safety, and the northbound approach. Facilitates Phase 1: development and continued development of Barrhaven South.
4 Relocation and widening of Greenbank Road, including new structure over Jock River; plus implementation of first phase of rapid transit. Facilitates the completion of Phase 1: Barrhaven South and the initiation of Phase 2: Barrhaven South, west of new Greenbank Road, and the completion of Stonebridge.
PHASE 2
5 Upgrading / widening Cambrian Road: Jockvale to new Greenbank Road. Facilitates continued development of Phase 2: Barrhaven South, west of Greenbank and south of Cambrian.
6 Upgrading Jockvale Road including new four-lane structure over Jock River. Facilitates continued development of Phase 2: Barrhaven South and the initiation of Phase 3: Barrhaven South west of existing Greenbank Road and south of Cambrian.
PHASE 3
7 Upgrading existing Greenbank Road to four-lanes south of Cambrian (phased construction in conjunction with development). Facilitates the ongoing Phase 3: Barrhaven South development southwards.
8 Upgrade Cambrian Road west of new Greenbank and Cedarview north of Cambrian. Facilitates the completion of Phase 3: Barrhaven South west of new Greenbank Road north and south of Cambrian Road.

Servicing

The servicing of the Barrhaven South CDP will occur in three (3) primary phases as follows:

Table 11: Servicing Phasing Requirements 1
PHASE 1
Description Trigger
Abandonment of East Clarke and Todd Drain Development of any affected land between existing Greenbank Road and the future realigned Greenbank Road.
Fish Habitat Compensation to allow enclosure of Corrigan Drain, East Clarke Drain and partial enclosure of Todd Drain The construction of any storm pond or closure of any of the existing drains will require the completion and acceptance of a fish compensation plan. Approval of the plan is required from the Department of Federal Fisheries, Rideau Valley Conservation Authority and the City. The Compensation plan will address phasing of proposed works and associated compensation works for each phase. Erosion and sediment control works will be required to the satisfaction of the City and RVCA for all works. Approval of erosion and sediment control is required before any works are initiated.
Tributary restoration and construction of Corrigan Pond and enclosure of Corrigan Drain Development of any land between existing Greenbank and Jockvale Road.
Construction of Todd Pond Development of any land between existing Greenbank and the western limits of Phase II.
Extension of 305mm watermain from Jockvale at Riverstone to Greenbank at Cambrian Road Initiation of Phase 1 development beyond 50 units.
Extension of 406 mm watermain on Cambrian Road to western limits of Phase II Initiation of Phase 1 development beyond 50 units.
Extension of the sanitary collector sewer from the existing Nepean Collector to existing Greenbank Initiation of Phase 1 development.
Amend area specific development charge for SWM ponds / drainage systems and fish compensation works Phase 1 development approvals.  

1. Proposed servicing requirements are preliminary and subject to final approval of the Master Servicing Study.
As required, the development charge by-law will be amended to reflect the required capital projects.

PHASE 2
Description Trigger
Abandonment of West Clarke municipal drain Initiation of Phase II development between existing Cedarview and the future realigned Greenbank Road
Extension of trunk storm sewers from the Corrigan Pond & Todd Pond, south to accommodate development Initiation of Phase II development between existing Greenbank and the future realigned Greenbank Road
Extension of the sanitary collector south from existing Greenbank Road Initiation of Phase II development between Greenbank and the future realigned Greenbank Road
Fish habitat compensation to allow partial enclosure of the West Clarke Drain Construction of West Clarke Pond
Construction of West Clarke pond and restored tributary Initiation of development west of the realigned Greenbank Road
Extension of collector sanitary sewer from existing Greenbank to future realigned Greenbank adjacent to the Jock River 100 year flood plain Initiation of Phase 2 development west of realigned Greenbank Road
Construction of 610mm trunk main from 406mm main on Cambrian Rd. north to Jock River Initiation of Phase 2 development west of realigned Greenbank Road
PHASE 3
Description Trigger
Construction of 610mm trunk water main across Jock River in the realigned Greenbank Road corridor Population in Barrhaven South and Nepean Town Centre reaching 25,100 equivalent pop. (full development of Monarch lands including CDP lands (9,000 equivalent people) provided in excess of the 25,100 stated above)
Extension of storm trunks To accommodate Phase 3 development
Extension of sanitary trunk sewers To accommodate Phase 3 development
Extension of trunk watermains To accommodate Phase 3 development

7.5 Completion of Supporting Studies

In conjunction with the land use planning undertaken for this CDP, master-planning studies for road transportation, water, wastewater, storm drainage, stormwater management, and natural environment have also been undertaken for lands within the Barrhaven South study area. These infrastructure studies have been prepared as Master Plans in accordance with the requirements of Phases 1&2 of the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment (June 2000).

7.5.1 Transportation Master Plan (TMP)

The road and transit network for Barrhaven South is being identified, planned and approved through the Official Plan Amendment process under Section 17 and 21 of the Planning Act in a manner that fulfills Phases 1&2 requirements of the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment (Section A.2.9) process. The Barrhaven South Transportation Master Plan is following the Master Plan Approach #2 whereby Phases 1 and 2 of the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment process have been fulfilled. However, no specific projects are being identified for final approval, as Phases 3 and 4 still need to be fulfilled, as the roadway projects are Schedule C undertakings. The Transportation Plan is being approved as part of the CDP and Official Plan Amendment. Once approved by City Council, notification of the Official Plan Amendment and the Transportation Master Plan will be advertised through a notice of adoption and there will be an opportunity to appeal to the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) as per Section 17 and 21 of the Planning Act.

7.5.2 Master Servicing Study

The servicing study has been undertaken concurrently and has provided preliminary direction to the preparation of the land use plan and CDP. It identifies the preferred water, wastewater, stormwater drainage and stormwater management systems to service the Barrhaven South community. It follows the Master Plan Approach #2 fulfilling Phases 1 and 2 of the Municipal Class EA process. Once complete, the Master Servicing Plan will identify Schedule B projects for approval through the Class EA process and City Council. As outlined in Section 7.2.1, development approvals cannot be approved until the Master Servicing Study is completed and approved.

7.5.3 Jock River Reach 1 Subwatershed Study

The Jock River Reach 1 Subwatershed Study is another supporting technical document to the Barrhaven South CDP. It follows the Master Plan Approach #1, fulfilling Phases 1 and 2 of the Municipal Class EA process at a broad level of assessment. Once complete, it will establish a Natural Environmental Plan and conceptual Stormwater Management Plan for the drainage area. In addition, a Conceptual Fisheries Compensation Plan (CFCP) will be prepared to identify fish habitat enhancement plans to compensate for fish habitat losses proposed within the CDP area. Further details on the CFCP are described in Section 7.6. As outlined in Section 7.2.1, development proposals cannot be approved until the Subwatershed Study and the CFCP are completed and approved. 7.5.4 Future individual projects identified in the Master Servicing Study and the Transportation Master Plan can/will be subject to Part II order requests to the Minister of the Environment.

7.5.4

Future individual projects identified in the Master Servicing Study and the Transportation Master Plan can/will be subject to Part II order requests to the Minister of the Environment.

7.6 Conceptual Fisheries Compensation Plan

7.6.1 The proposed Community Design Plan for Barrhaven South includes alterations to, and losses of, existing fish habitat (i.e., Harmful Alteration, Disturbance or Disruption – HADDs) associated with the West and East Clarke Drains, the Todd Drain and the Corrigan Drain. Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) has indicated that these particular HADDs can be compensated for by the creation of a sufficient quantity and production capacity of new fish habitat in combination with the enhancement of remaining fish habitat within Reach 1 of the Jock River.

7.6.2 A Conceptual Fisheries Compensation Plan (CFCP) that details proposed compensation measures is currently being developed. To date, agencies including Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO), Rideau Valley Conservation Authority, the Ministry of Natural Resources and the City of Ottawa have provided input to the proposed plan. Subject to further details confirming that adequate compensation can be provided by the proposed measures, the proposed loss of habitat through enclosure/partial enclosure of the drains on site will be permitted.

7.6.3 The CFCP will form part of the information package used by DFO to conduct a screening-level environmental assessment of infrastructure works associated with the Barrhaven South development. The Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA) screening is a pre-requisite for DFO to provide Authorizations for subsequent alterations to any of the on-site drains or for the creation/enhancement of fish habitat. In addition to a successful CEAA screening, adequate detailed engineering designs for storm ponds, rehabilitated channels, and newly created fish habitat will be required in order to obtain final Authorization from DFO, and in order for projects to proceed through to construction.

7.7 Waste Disposal Site

The Trail Waste Facility (TWF) landfill was opened in 1980 and was expected to reach capacity by 2008. In response to this, an Environmental Assessment was completed by the City of Ottawa in 2002 to provide long-term, environmentally safe, solid waste disposal capacity for the City of Ottawa. The expected additional site life of the expansion is 10 to 30 years depending on the extent of diversion from the landfill in the future.

The proposed fill pattern for the TWF is to proceed in five (5) stages, from east to west. See Figure 36 below. Over time the 500-metre influence area, as currently established by the Official Plan, is expected to recede away from the Barrhaven South community as activities at the landfill proceed in a westerly direction. The impact on the 500-metre influence area will be greatest during the filling of Stage 1. Similarly, development in Barrhaven South will also proceed from east to west, with the last phases of development occurring in the western portions of the CDP.

Figure 36 - Trail Waste Facility Staging Plan

Figure 36 - Trail Waste Facility Staging Plan
[Enlarge image ]

With this in mind, the following implementation criteria will apply:

Lands within the 500-metre influence area

7.7.1 Land uses within the 500-metre influence area from the landfill site, as identified on the Land Use Plan, will be limited, and include commercial and employment type uses, but exclude sensitive uses such as schools, outdoor play grounds, nursing homes and housing.

7.7.2 Conditions of development approval will include the provision of warning notices on title, noting the site’s proximity to the landfill and the potential for odour and litter impacts; and the requirement for sealed, air-conditioned work place units.

7.7.3 The current 500-metre influence area may recede over time as the landfill staging progresses. Therefore, a development proposal to permit sensitive land uses within the current 500-metre influence area of the Trail Waste Facility, will only be considered on the basis of a study which demonstrates, to the satisfaction of the City, that the influence area has receded and the landfill no longer has an impact.

7.7.4 The appropriateness of the 500-metre influence area to the Trail Waste Facility may also be reviewed by the City of Ottawa as part of its five (5) year Official Plan review.

Lands beyond the 500-metre influence area

7.7.5 Development of sensitive land uses between 500 and 1000 metres of the landfill site will be subject to draft plan of subdivision conditions, including ‘warning notices on title’ noting the proximity of the landfill operation and its potential impacts, particularly odour impacts, and the requirement for fully sealed units with installation of ‘air conditioning units’.

7.7.6 It is noted, that over time, the need for sealed air-conditioned units, and/or warning clauses may be reduced or eliminated depending on the timing of development within the 1000 metres. As the landfill operations move further west, the impacts are reduced. Depending on the timing of development and where the landfill is filling, there may not be a need for any restrictions, but this would be subject to a future study.

7.8 Sand and Gravel Resource Area

7.8.1 As per the Official Plan, limited types of new development may be approved within 300 metres of a Sand and Gravel Resource Area, provided such development does not conflict with future mineral aggregate extraction. Dwelling units are currently included in the list of prohibited uses. Where there is an existing pit, development may be approved within the area of potential impact, where an impact assessment study is completed and demonstrates that its operation will not be affected by the proposed development. [As noted in Section 3.1.2 the 300-metre impact area established in the Official Plan is currently under appeal.]

7.8.2 An ‘Aggregates Resource Designated Lands Study’ (February 2006) was submitted to the Ministry of Natural Resources for its review and input. The purpose of the study was to assess the viability of the lands currently subject to the Sand and Gravel Resource designation within the CDP Study Area. The report confirms that the resource existing within this area is not of sufficient quality and quantity to justify the continued designation of these lands. Based on the conclusions of the study, portions of the Sand and Gravel Resource Area within the CDP area, will be redesignated General Urban on Schedules A and B of the Official Plan.

7.8.3 In terms of the phasing of the development of Barrhaven South, from the northeast quadrant, and progressing in a westerly fashion, the presumption is that the existing pit will have exhausted its aggregate resources prior to the development of the adjacent lands. Any rezoning of lands adjacent to and within 300 metres of an existing pit will have a holding zone until such time as:

    1. The extraction of the mineral aggregate ceases, or
    2. A study is completed to the satisfaction of the Ministry of Natural Resources and the City, which demonstrates that proposed development is compatible with the aggregate operations.

7.8.4 As urbanization occurs, any suitable aggregate material remaining on these lands should be used to advantage in cut and fill operations on site. Prior to the development of these lands, a grading plan – together with a description of how and where the marketable aggregate materials will be used on site – must be submitted to the Ministry of Natural Resources to confirm that the extraction resources is by definition “on site” and does not require a license pursuant to the Aggregate Resources Act.

7.9 Interim Transit Service

In order for transit to reach the citywide 30% modal split targeted within the Official Plan, transit will be accommodated as an integral part of the community structure.

7.9.1 During the initial development of Phase 1, when development is limited to the northeast section of the community, transit service will be provided on Route 186. This route currently serves the Stonebridge Community, east of Barrhaven South. Service will be provided on Cambrian Road, between Jockvale Road and the existing Greenbank Road.

7.9.2 To achieve the required level of transit ridership at full development, the transit corridor should be extended and in place from the South Nepean Town Centre to the Cambrian Road Station. During the initial phases of development and at such time when population reaches approximately 1,500, Transitway Route 95 will be extended along Greenbank Road from the South Nepean Town Centre to two new stations within the Barrhaven South community. A sheltered passenger waiting area, transfer platform, and turnaround facilities for both the Transitway route and the future connecting local routes are to be included at each station. At the southernmost station, a bus lay-up area will also be provided.

7.9.3 To capture transit ridership in the initial phases of development, area developers will be required to enter into an early transit service agreement. Service will be provided in new residential and employment areas in advance of the time when ridership would be high enough to meet the financial performance standard set by OC Transpo. The cost to provide a basic peak-period service is to be paid by the developer of the area until the number of units occupied is at a level when ridership would normally be high enough to meet the minimum financial performance standard. The City will enter into agreements with developers for this funding as part of the development approval process.

7.9.4 As development continues and when there are at least 250 new housing units beyond a five-minute walk (400 metres) to either the Transitway route or service in Stonebridge, a separate peak service route will be implemented. At least 500 new housing units, that are located more than a ten-minute walk (800 metres) will be required for the provision of all day transit service. The exact routing within the community will be dependent on the phasing of residential development but limited to operate on arterial and collector roadways. Routing, bus stop locations and appropriate turning locations will be determined when subdivision plans are submitted.

7.9.5 The long-term network anticipates having two local routes providing service in the community. These routes will connect the Barrhaven South community to South Nepean Town Centre and the Woodroffe Light Rail Station via Cambrian Road, Jockvale Road and Chapman Mills Drive. One route will provide service for the Barrhaven South and the Chapman Mills communities. The second route will provide service for the Barrhaven South and Stonebridge communities.

7.9.6 All arterials, major collectors and collector roadways will be designed to accommodate buses to provide OC Transpo with maximum flexibility with regard to on-site bus routing and connections to the Transitway stations on Greenbank Road. All new roads and widening of existing roads will include the accommodation for pedestrians and cyclists.

7.9.7 Eventually the Transitway will be extended further south beyond the current urban area boundary and will include another station and future park-n-ride facilities.

7.10 Affordable Housing

Affordable housing will be required in accordance with Section 2.5.2 of the Official Plan which defines affordable housing as rental or ownership housing, for which a low or moderate-income household pays no more than 30% of its gross annual income. The Official Plan directs that 25% of all new housing development and redevelopment is to be affordable to households at or below the 30th income percentile for rental and at or below the 40th income percentile for ownership. For the current year, the rent at the 30th income percentile is $1,100 and the price of a home at the 40th income percentile is $207,800. (These numbers will be adjusted over time in accordance with inflation and the consumer price index.) Therefore, within the Barrhaven South CDP area:

7.10.1 Approximately 25% of all housing within the CDP area should be within the above-noted affordability range, assessed at the time of subdivision approval.

Social Housing

Development of ‘social housing’ for low/moderate income households by social housing providers, with or without City funding or incentives, is included within the total 25% of affordable housing in the community. Approximately 7% of all homes in the City are social housing. It is a municipal expectation that a similar percentage of units will be provided in Barrhaven South. These homes should be affordable to households at or below the 20th income percentile for Ottawa, that is, households earning $31,500 or below. Therefore, assuming a mix of townhouse and apartments will be built, and that federal/provincial funding is available:

7.10.2 City Council or a social housing provider may acquire land to build social housing units equivalent to approximately 7% of the total units anticipated (i.e. approx. 7,000 units).

7.10.3 The housing type and appropriate location for social housing in the community will be decided as part of the technical circulation process at the time of development approval, subject to Council allocation of funds. The preferred location for social housing will have convenient access to public transit, shopping and community services.

7.10.4 To support the development of affordable housing, the City will negotiate the use of the following municipal incentives and direct supports, including but not limited to:

  • Deferral or waiver of fees and charges;
  • Density incentives or transfer, flexible zoning, alternate development standards;
  • Other incentives to be negotiated depending on the depth of affordability achieved.

7.10.5 When incentives are provided to support affordable housing, the City will enter into agreements with developers to preserve the level of public interest in affordable housing. Agreements will reflect the level of public investment required, with more investment resulting in greater levels of affordability. Agreements will include mechanisms to maintain affordability, will specify the mix of units to be provided, and will typically be registered on title and / or become a municipal housing facilities by-law.

7.11 Parks and Recreation

Land Banking and Compensation

7.11.1 Prior to the approval of the first plan of subdivision within the CDP area, an agreement will be executed among the landowners to establish a mechanism that allows for the compensation of parkland that may be inequitably distributed across ownership throughout the entire CDP. For the purposes of implementing the Barrhaven South Community Design Plan, the City will track all revenues and expenditures generated within this growth area. In order to preserve the integrity of the fund, cash-in-lieu revenues generated in Barrhaven South will be spent in Barrhaven South up to final build-out within the CDP planning area.

Parks Development Implementation Strategy

7.11.2 As a general rule, park development will follow the phasing of development established by this CDP, with the greatest priority placed on district, community and neighbourhood parks as shown on the Land Use Plan, followed by linkages and parkettes.

7.11.3 The City is responsible for the design and development of the parks shown in this Community Design Plan. All costs associated with such implementation are attributed to the parks portion of the City’s development charge by-law. As such, the City will track all development charge revenue generated in Barrhaven South for expenditure within the Barrhaven South CDP planning area.

7.11.4 Should a developer wish to advance development of a particular park within a subdivision, different from a City priority, discussions will occur during the subdivision approval process.

Parkettes

7.11.5 Parkettes have not been designated on the Land Use Plan. The location and size of parkettes will be determined through the plan of subdivision process, in accordance with the design guidelines set out in Chapter 6.

7.11.6 During the subdivision process, any land efficiencies found in the siting and design of larger parks, or any surplus land dedication that is realized across the CDP area, may be used toward the establishment of parkettes.

7.12 Woodlot Acquisition

7.12.1 Throughout the Barrhaven South CDP process City staff has given clear indication of its desire to preserve the core area of the Cambrian Woods UNA #57 through acquisition. Two (2) acquisition mechanisms are currently being explored:

  • Allocation of Municipal funds, or
  • Land Exchange for City owned-lands outside Barrhaven South.

7.12.2 Once the appropriate acquisition mechanism is confirmed, the acquisition of the woodlot will be subject to Corporate Services Committee and City Council approval. In the event that the subject woodlot cannot be preserved through acquisition, development of the lands will be permitted on the basis of the underlying ‘Employment‘ and ‘Residential’ designations on the Land Use Plan.

7.13 Official Plan Amendment

The Community Design Plan will be approved by City Council, and will be adopted by an amendment to the Official Plan, but only as it relates to the following amendments:

7.13.1 Schedules ‘A’ and ‘B’ - Land Use to reflect the changes to the rural and urban land uses as a result of the rationalizing of the urban boundary, and to remove the Developing Community, Town Centre and Mixed Use designations, and to replace with General Urban, Major Open Space and Urban Natural Features designations.

7.13.2 Schedules ‘C’, ‘D’, and ‘E’ - Cycling, Transit and Roads, to reflect the addition of/revision to major cycling, transit and road corridors shown on these schedules.

7.13.3 The amendment will include a statement that prohibits approval of any development proposal located anywhere within the boundary of the Community Design Plan until such time that the Subwatershed Study Jock River Reach 1, the Master Servicing Study for Barrhaven South and the Conceptual Fish Compensation Plan have received approval. Once these studies are approved, the City will initiate removal of this clause from the Official Plan.