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Orléans Industrial Park Land Use & Design Study

1. Summary

The Orléans Industrial Park Land Use and Design Study was initiated due to increasing development pressure on the Innes Road corridor and the desire to shape an overall vision for future development fronting onto Innes Road and within the Industrial Park. The intent of the study is to establish Urban Design Guidelines and development requirements to help direct the visual image of future development.

The guidelines are divided into broad sections dealing with site planning, architecture and the pedestrian environment. The site planning guidelines discuss how development can be sensitively integrated with the existing context, how it can contribute to the visual image of the area, and how it can address functional requirements such as safe and efficient circulation. The guidelines recommend accentuating prominent intersections, corner sites and key gateways through built form and landscape design. Key guidelines recommend reinforcing public streets by reducing setbacks and siting buildings up to the street. They also recommend creating active facades with a high percentage of transparency and architectural detailing.

The architectural guidelines illustrate how, through consideration of aesthetic and functional requirements, new buildings can be designed to address human scale and contribute to an active pedestrian environment. In addition to increasing the visual prominence of buildings, the guidelines recommend reducing the prominence of parking areas by locating at the rear of buildings or effectively screened from adjacent pedestrian areas and public streets. The guidelines discuss the creation of a convenient, accessible and linked pedestrian realm. This should be a barrier-free network of sidewalks and walkways that clearly links development sites within the Industrial Park to each other and to surrounding off-site uses.

Key landscape guidelines discuss the need for street trees on all public boulevards as well as the use of landscaping to highlight entry points, to screen unsightly elements, and to buffer adjacent residential zones from future industrial uses.

In addition to urban design guidelines, the study delineates a collector road network within the Industrial Park area. This network sets the framework for future development and the subdivision of land. The extensions of Vanguard Drive and Belcourt Boulevard are identified as the primary east-west and north-south collectors through the site.

The urban design guidelines are to be used as a framework to direct the preparation of development applications and to evaluate submissions in the development review process. The design guidelines are meant to ensure that future development achieves a consistently high level of site planning, architecture and landscape design.

2. Introduction

Figure 1: The land subject to the Orléans Industrial Park Land Use and Design Study is shown with a hatch pattern.

 The land subject to the Orléans Industrial Park Land Use and Design Study is shown with a hatch pattern.

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Figure 2: The study area boundaries are outlined in red. Mer Bleue Road splits the study area and is the boundary between the former cities of Gloucester and Cumberland.

 The study area boundaries are outlined in red.  Mer Bleue Road splits the study area and is the boundary between the former cities of Gloucester and Cumberland.

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Figure 3: Existing features within the study area.

 Existing features within the study area.

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Figure 4: The Employment Area is shown in the pale green overlay and the Mixed-Use Centre in the rose overlay.

 The Employment Area is shown in the pale green overlay and the Mixed-Use Centre in the rose overlay.

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Figure 5: Existing zoning designations in the study area.

 Existing zoning designations in the study area.

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The Orléans Industrial Park Land Use and Design Study, examines lands south of Innes Road and north of the hydro corridor between Pagé Road and Tenth Line Road. The study area, shown in Figure 1, is approximately 316 hectares (781 acres) in size and is located within both the former Cities of Gloucester and Cumberland.

With increasing development pressure on the Innes Road corridor, an overall vision for future development fronting onto Innes Road and within the Industrial Park is required. This study establishes Urban Design Guidelines and development requirements to help direct the visual image of this development. The study also delineates a collector road network within the Industrial Park area. Both the design guidelines and collector network are meant to ensure comprehensive and sound development of Innes Road and the Orléans Industrial Park.

2.1 Background

As visible in Figure 2, the lands north of Innes Road and east of Pagé Road are predominantly residential. The lands immediately to the east of the study area are retail commercial. A Hydro One Transmission corridor borders the south side of the study area. The lands south of the hydro corridor are yet undeveloped however, a number of applications for residential development have been submitted for the area west of Mer Bleue Road.

Innes Road, through the study area, is currently a two-lane road. The road is designated for expansion to a four lane arterial in 2004. As per the Innes Road Environmental Assessment - completed in 2002, the future right-of-way will be 37.5 to 40 meters wide. To address the ongoing development to the east and south of the study area, Mer Bleue Road and Tenth Line Road are also expected to be widened in the future. The future Cumberland Transitway and Blackburn Hamlet Bypass Extension run south of and generally parallel to the hydro corridor.

The north side of Innes Road is predominantly developed in reverse frontage single detached and row housing. However, there are some homes fronting onto Innes and a limited number of commercial uses. Within the study area, there are a number of existing legal non-conforming residential uses both along Innes Road and Mer Bleue Road. There are some commercial uses along Innes Road; the largest of these being the Builder's Warehouse store just east of Boyer Road. Closer to Tenth Line Road there are additional commercial and business park uses.

Proposed development includes an 18.7 ha snow disposal facility planned for the lands immediately west of Mer Bleue and adjacent to the hydro corridor and a 45,000 square meter commercial development on the south west corner of Innes Road and Mer Bleue. (see Figure 27 for locations).

As visible from Figure 3, the study area also contains a water tower, some existing mature tree stands, and a natural rock outcrop that forms a ridge.

2.2 Planning Context

Under the new Official Plan (adopted May 2003), the majority of the study area is designated Employment Area with a small portion designated Mixed-Use Centre (see Figure 4).

The Employment Area designation identifies areas where commercial, office, and industrial uses are the main land uses. The primary function of Employment Areas is to supply "products and services to the city's office and commercial sectors"; these uses may be supported by complementary non-industrial uses. The Official Plan notes that Employment Areas should accommodate uses totalling over 2,000 jobs.

The Mixed-Use Centre designation "applies to lands that have been identified as strategic locations on the rapid-transit network and lie adjacent to major roads…and have a high potential to achieve compact and mixed-use development". Mixed-Use Centres are to support development that is both locally- and regionally-oriented. The Official Plan establishes employment targets of at least 5,000 jobs in Mixed-Use Centres. The Official Plan also notes that in the case of this Mixed-Use Centre, "development will only be permitted after the adoption of a secondary plan by the City". The geographic boundaries of the Mixed-Use Centre will be fine-tuned through the secondary planning process.

The City of Ottawa's current projections are for 6,700 jobs in the Employment Area and Mixed-Use Centre, of the study area, by 2021.

The study area is regulated by the Zoning by-laws of the former Cities of Gloucester and Cumberland. The primary designations are industrial and business park zones, however, there is some commercial zoning and a small area along Pagé Road zoned residential (refer to Figure 5).

The by-laws permit a variety of industrial and employment-generating uses such as warehousing and distribution, manufacturing, communications, office, institutional, research and development uses. Complementary uses such as commercial, office, service and recreational uses that meet the needs of people working and living in the area are also permitted. The design guidelines will be applicable to all future built form, in the study area, irrespective of the use.

The design guidelines do not propose to change the zones or permitted uses in the zoning by-law. However, the City has recently embarked upon a comprehensive City-wide zoning review, which is scheduled for completion in late 2005. The results of this review may suggest amendments to the range and type of permitted uses.

Within the study area, parkland allocation will be taken in accordance with Planning Act requirements. However, the exact location and type of park space is yet to be determined. The need for a sports field park, within the Industrial Park, has been previously identified in the Gloucester Growth Area Recreation Master Plan (1993) and members of the public have expressed interest in preservation of the tree stand on site. The Orléans Master Plan Update, to be completed in 2004, will re-examine parkland needs, including the nature and location of new parks. It is anticipated that parkland allocation strategy for the study area will be identified subsequent to the Master Plan Update.

2.3 Purpose and Scope of the Guidelines

The purpose of the design guidelines is to ensure that future development in the study area achieves a consistently high level of site planning, architecture and landscape design. Each new development should be sensitive to the existing context, enhance the character of the area, and contribute to streetscapes and pedestrian environments.

The guidelines should be used as a framework to direct the preparation of development applications1 and to evaluate submissions in the development review process. The guidelines are divided into three broad sections dealing with site planning, architecture and the pedestrian environment. These are followed by a final section, which discusses the proposed collector road network for the study area.

1Note that large developments may be required to prepare site-specific design guidelines. This will be determined at the application stage.

3. Site Planning

Figure 6: A 6 m landscaped buffer, located on development land, separates the residential rear yard from the Industrial Park.

A 6 m landscaped buffer, located on development land, seperates the residential rear yard from the Industrial Park.

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Figure 7: The drawing shows the proposed location of two cells for the pond east of Pagé Road, south of Nature Trail Crescent, and adjacent to the hydro corridor.

 The drawing shows the proposed location of two cells for the pond east of Pagé Road, south of Nature Trail Crescent, and adjacent to the hydro corridor.

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Figure 8: The built edges is set back 3-5m from property line. The area between the property line and the building is landscaped.

 The built edges is set back 3-5m from property line.  The area between the property line and the building is landscaped.

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Figure 9: The illustration highlights key intersections in the study area.

  The illustration highlights key intersections in the study area.

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Figure 10: The pedestrian entry on a corner development site is framed by buildings with windows that face both the street and walkway and is highlighted with street trees and planting beds.

 The pedestrian entry on a corner development site is framed by buildings with windows that face both the street and walkway and is highlighted with street trees and planting beds.

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Figure 11: A change of colour and materials is used to highlight the front entry to this building.

  A change of colour and materials is used to highlight the front entry to this building.  

Figure 12: Landscaping is used to define and lead pedestrian to the building entry.

  Landscaping is used to define and lead pedestrian to the building entry.  

Figure 13: The sketches show parking areas at the rear, side and front of buildings. Parking lots at the rear of buildings can be screened by built form.

  The sketches show parking areas at the rear, side and front of buildings. Parking lots at the rear of buildings can be screened by built form.  

Figure 14: A landscaped buffer sets the parking area 7 m back from the property line. A slight berm assists in screening the parking from view of the sidewalk.

 A landscaped buffer sets the parking area 7 m back from the property line.  A slight berm assists in screening the parking from view of the sidewalk.

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Figure 15: The plan and elevation illustrate how stacking lanes can be screened from the pedestrian realm.

 The plan and elevation illustrate how stacking lanes can be screened from the pedestrian realm.

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Site planning principles and guidelines can ensure that future development responds to the existing context, contributes to the visual image of the area, and addresses functional requirements - such as safe and efficient circulation. The following sections discuss site planning in terms of existing context, building location and orientation, and parking area requirements.

3.1 Existing Natural Context

The study area is predominantly flat land that has been previously cultivated, although there are a few contiguous tree stands. The most prominent existing features are the natural ridge and mature tree stand around the water tower. This area is highlighted in Figure 3. A 1992 environmental analysis of the area describes the stand as a mature tolerant hardwood forest that is uncommon in the City and has some environmental significance2 (Gore and Storie 1992, D5-6). The City is currently undertaking an Urban Natural Areas Environmental Evaluation Study that should more precisely define the ecological value of the tree stand. Through sensitive site planning, the locations of future buildings and roads can reflect the natural topography and help protect the mature existing vegetation.

Guidelines:

  • Future road patterns and site layouts must follow the existing contours and should highlight the ridge as a feature. The proposed collector road pattern (see Figure 27) is sited to make this possible;
  • Grading plans should strive to incorporate the existing landforms into site development;
  • Development applications must include a survey of existing vegetation (location, species, size, condition etc.) and identify the location of individual trees having trunks greater than 10cm in caliper;
  • Development applications must strive to protect and incorporate existing mature trees into site and landscape plans and, therefore must identify existing vegetation to be preserved;
  • Grading plans, in support of development applications, must ensure that existing grades are maintained around trees noted for preservation; and
  • Road grades and elevations of the proposed road network must also ensure that existing grades are maintained around trees noted for preservation.

3.2 Existing Built Context

Although there is little existing built context within the Industrial Park, there are established residential uses along Innes Road, adjacent to Pagé Road, and within the Industrial Park. There are also some commercial and industrial uses in the Park; most of which are located along Innes Road and in the vicinity of Lanthier and Vanguard Drives. In all cases it is essential to ensure an appropriate transition between existing and future uses.

The established residential communities north of Innes Road are separated from future development in the Industrial Park by Innes Road (37.5m - 40m right-of-way). This separation can mitigate some of the effects of loading and service areas, light glare, and building shadow effects on the existing homes. However, where a residential zone backs directly onto future development lands it is important to ensure that future development does not adversely affect the quality of the residential area. The following guidelines apply where this condition occurs:

Guidelines:

  • Locate all unsightly and noise-generating elements, such as service lanes, loading zones, dumpsters and outdoor storage, away from adjacent residential properties;
  • Separate existing residential zones which back onto future Industrial Park uses (e.g. along Pagé Rd. and Nature Trail Cresc.) with a landscaped buffer, located on development lands, designed to mitigate unsightly and noise-generating elements;
    • As shown in Figure 6, the buffer should be formed by a 6m wide aesthetic berm, predominantly planted with evergreen trees that retain their lower limbs with age. The planting should create a continuous and dense visual screen.
  • Where the noise generated by future uses is of concern, noise studies can be requested in accordance with City and Ministry of the Environment policies. If deemed necessary, noise walls can be installed in addition to the planted berm.

3.3 Additional Contextual Information

To address servicing issues in the industrial park and surrounding area, stormwater detention ponds are planned for the south-west corner of the study area; this is the area behind the Longwood residential development and adjacent to the hydro corridor (Figure 7). When the pond is built, it will be integrated into the area as a feature of the surrounding community.

The City of Ottawa Official Plan identifies the hydro corridor, which runs south of the study area, as a Major Recreational Pathway linking the industrial area to the existing and future surrounding residential communities. Opportunities for pedestrian and bicycle access to the pathway should exist where the pathway intersects north-south roads - such as at the Belcourt Blvd. extension, Mer Bleue and 10th Line Roads. There should additionally be opportunities to access the pathway, from the industrial park, at regular intervals along the hydro corridor. All development proposals backing onto the hydro corridor will be encouraged to provide connections to the recreational pathway system. To ensure that the primary use of the corridor as a recreational pathway, parking areas and buildings should not extend from the industrial park into the corridor.

The site for the snow disposal facility was purchased by the former Region of Ottawa-Carleton in the early 1990s and was zoned to permit snow disposal prior to amalgamation. The detailed site planning and design began for the facility began in Spring 2003 and the facility will likely be operational by 2005. The design for the facility addresses requirements for stormwater detention and pays special attention to berming and buffering in order to address visibility and noise concerns.

3.4 Building Location and Orientation

Site planning that carefully locates and orients buildings can do a great deal to enhance the functionality and aesthetic value of a development site. It can also contribute to wayfinding and positively influence the streetscape. The following guidelines address the relationship between the building and the street, with emphasis placed on perimeter landscaping.

Guidelines:

  • Reinforce public street fronts by siting buildings up to the street.
  • Set buildings back 3 - 5 m from the front-yard property line in order to create a continuous street frontage. (Figure 8)
  • Set buildings back 3 - 5 m from the side-yard property line where the side yard is adjacent to a public street
  • Landscape the area between the building and the property line with a continuous row of street trees and foundation planting.

It is recognized that certain large development sites will develop with a combination of larger format and smaller out-parcel buildings. In such cases, the large format buildings can be located at the rear of the site. The out-parcel buildings are expected to address the public streets as noted in the guidelines above. It is also recognized that this form of development will have internal parking courtyards located between the large format buildings and the out-parcel buildings.

In some cases a development site may have frontage on three (or four) streets and it would therefore be difficult to achieve a 3-5m setback on each of these sides. In such cases, the 3-5m setback should be achieved on what is deemed to be the key street - or streets in the case of a corner site. Figure 9 identifies key streets and intersections within the study area. In all cases Innes Road and the Belcourt Blvd. extension will be considered the primary focus for built form. Mer Bleue and 10th Line Roads, as they pass through the study area, should be second in priority. The internal east-west collector and remaining north-south collectors should then follow in importance.

  • Accentuate prominent intersections, corner sites, and the entry points to large development sites.
    • High visibility corners include the intersections of future collectors with Innes and Mer Bleue, as well as the intersection of collectors within the Industrial Park. (Figure 9)
    • Accentuate these locations by designing buildings and landscape features that relate to both street fronts and provide pedestrian access to the site and buildings from the corner. (see Section 3 & Figure 10)
    • Where natural features are adjacent to key roads and intersections, preservation of the natural feature can be used to create a landmark within the Industrial Park.
    • Within the study area, create opportunities for focal views to the tree stand from primary intersections along the new north-south collector. (Belcourt Blvd. extension)
    • Preserve the opportunity to create treed central medians, that act as gateways, at the major intersections shown in Figure 9.
  • Front principal building entries onto public streets 3 and reinforce these entries so that they are clearly identifiable. (Figures 11 and 12). Entries can be reinforced by designing extra-height lobby space, distinctive doorways, and distinctive landscaped entry area, and also by changing paving materials, textures or colour.
  • Ensure that all buildings address the street and create active facades. This can be achieved, for example, by facing windows and doors onto the street, through architectural design, and by defining the pedestrian realm. (see Sections 3 and 4)
  • Ensure that site plans that do not maximize permitted density are designed to permit future intensification.
  • Encourage patio uses to front onto collector roads. Patios should be avoided along Innes Road unless noise attenuation issues are addressed.

3.5 Parking Areas

Site planning for all future development must ensure that parking areas do not detract from the streetscape or the pedestrian environment. The following guidelines will reduce the prominence of parking lots through sensitive siting and screening.

  • Prohibit parking areas at prominent intersections. These frontages should be reserved for built form and / or landscaped areas.
  • Locate surface parking lots at the rear of buildings so that built form screens the parking field. (Figure 13)
  • Allow parking at the side or front of buildings only when parking at the rear is impossible or where parking at the side or front is an interim use until the land intensifies.
  • Where any portion of a parking area fronts the street, a larger setback from the property line is required and cars must be effectively screened from view.
    • Provide a 7 m landscaped setback from the property line to any parking area facing the street4 . (Figure 14)
    • Landscape the setback with a row of trees, planted to create a continuous canopy, and an understorey shrub planting. Where possible, a second row of trees should be added. Plant spacing and planting choices must meet the intent of these guidelines to screen parking areas from view and to shade the sidewalk for pedestrians. Planting may be combined with aesthetic berms, low fences or walls to achieve the desired screening. The screening must be effective all seasons.
  • Provide a 7 m landscaped setback from the property line where stacking lanes of drive-through facilities face the street. (Figure 15)
    • Landscape the setback with a row of trees, planted to create a continuous canopy, and an understorey shrub planting. Where possible, a second row of trees should be added. Plant spacing and planting choices must effectively screen the stacking lanes at all times of year. Planting may be combined with aesthetic berms, low fences or walls to meet the screening requirement.
  • Ensure safety and security by maintaining eye level visibility to the parking area. (Figure 16)
  • Break up large parking fields into smaller areas through the creation of pedestrian walkways, that link to building entries, and the addition of plant material.
  • Ensure that parking islands are no less than 2.5 m wide and planted with deciduous trees and shrubs. Ground covers, other than grass, can be used in place of shrubs.
  • The number of access driveways should be minimized on all roads. In Innes Road in particular, new access locations should be limited and site access should be encouraged through collector roads, local roads, and shared rights-of-way within the Industrial Park.
  • In order to reduce the number of vehicular entrances, permit shared access to parking areas located between buildings that are located on separate properties. If shared access is to be provided for in the future, the site plan should show the proposed location of the access and the development agreement should make provisions for its future installation.

2Gore and Storrie Ltd. completed an East Urban Community (EUC) Master Drainage Plan for the Corporation of the City of Gloucester in 1992. Appendix D of this report is an Environmental Analysis, which identifies areas of natural significance.

3Due to the speed and volume of traffic along Innes Road and the few north-south connections linking residential areas to future development, new buildings along this edge may, but are not required to have entries facing Innes Road. However as noted in section 3, new buildings along Innes will still be required to have an upgraded façade. Along Mer Bleue, 10th Line, and roads within the industrial park principal entries should front the street. Where principal entries do not front the street, secondary entries fronting the street are encouraged. In all cases, facades facing public streets are required to be upgraded as noted in Section 3.

4Minor encroachments into the 7m landscape setback will be considered on a case by case basis if the encroachment does not reduce the ability to effectively screen the parking area.

4. Architecture

Figure 17: This building contributes to the pedestrian environment by highlighting the intersection and both street fronts.

  This building contributes to the pedestrian environment by highlighting the intersection and both street fronts.

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Figure 18: All four storeys of this commercial structure have a high percentage glazing facing the pedestrian realm.

  All four storeys of this commercial structure have a high percentage glazing facing the pedestrian realm.

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Figure 19: Both facades of this commercial building include significant amount of glazing facing the street on both the upper and lower storeys.

 Both facades of this commercial building include significant amount of glazing facing the street on both the upper and lower storeys.

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Figure 20: The façade of this building steps back allowing for accent plantings adjacent to the public realm.

  The façade of this building steps back allowing for accent plantings adjacent to the public realm.

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Figure 21: Bold imagery and product display help to animate the street.

  Bold imagery and product display help to animate the street.

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Figure 22: The change in material and colour on the façade of this commercial structure breaks up the mass of the wall adjacent to the public sidewalk.

  The change in material and colour on the façade of this commercial structure breaks up the mass of the wall adjacent to the public sidewalk.

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Figure 23: Changes of materials and colours are used to highlight a distinct base, second and third storey middle section, and upper storey in this commercial structure.

 Changes of materials and colours are used to highlight a distinct base, second and third storey middle section, and upper storey in this commercial structure.

New buildings along Innes Road and within the Industrial Park must be designed to address human scale and contribute to an active pedestrian environment5. The following architectural guidelines address both aesthetic and functional requirements of future built form.

  • Create distinctive building entries that highlight façades and enhance key intersections. (Figure 17)
  • Accentuate corner sites by designing buildings that relate to both street fronts and provide pedestrian access to the building from the corner. (Figure 17)
  • Ensure visibility into buildings from ground level facades facing public streets and the pedestrian realm. Walls should be highly transparent with windows and doors making up at least 50% of the façade. (Figure 18).
  • Ensure that large blank, unarticulated walls do not face the street and pedestrian realm. Blank walls include both windowless walls and walls with reflective or highly tinted glass facades.
  • It is recognized that certain buildings will include programmatic uses that do not lend themselves to a highly transparent façade (e.g. loading areas, warehouse and storage functions). These buildings should be designed so that such uses are located along walls that face away from public streets and the pedestrian realm. The external surface of these walls must be designed to break up the visual size of the wall's façade; this can be achieved through the architectural detailing of façades noted above. In addition, the developer will be required to increase the amount of and detail in landscape planting in front of the wall.
  • In order to successfully achieve these guidelines, developers are encouraged to pre-consult with the City prior to developing the site plan and building design.
  • Ensure the highest level of architectural detailing on facades facing public streets and the pedestrian realm. A high level of architectural detailing should be achieved by:
    • facing windows and doors onto the street and public realm (Figure 19);
    • modulating the façade - stepping back or extending forward a portion of the façade (Figure 20);
    • changing the roofline to reinforce the façade modulation;
    • incorporating merchandising display windows into the façade (Figure 21)
    • changing materials, colours, patterns, and textures within the building plane (Figure 22);
    • designing buildings with distinct bases, middles, and upper storeys (Figure 23).

5Architectural guidelines are applicable to all types of buildings including gas stations and drive-thrus.

5. The Pedestrian Environment

Figure 24: Generous landscaping effectively highlights the building entry and leads visitors from the public realm.

  Generous landscaping effectively highlights the building entry and leads visitors from the public realm.

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Figure 25: Street trees and planters highlight the pedestrian entrance to a group of commercial establishments.

 Street trees and planters highlight the pedestrian entrance to a group of commercial establishments.

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Figure 26: The trellis structure is used both to define a public gathering space and to lead pedestrians from the building to the street. The addition of street furniture enhances the pedestrian realm.  

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As the Industrial Park develops, it is essential to ensure the creation of a well-defined pedestrian environment along all public roads and within development sites. Future development also presents the opportunity to maximize pedestrian accessibility to the proposed transitway extension, Mixed-Use Centre, and residential developments south of the hydro corridor. The following guidelines are intended to ensure a convenient and linked pedestrian environment.

The pedestrian system must:

  • be barrier-free and designed for safety and security;
  • ensure continuous sidewalks and safe crossing points;
  • connect all uses within a development (buildings, parking areas, pad buildings etc.);
  • clearly link public sidewalks with all internal walkways;
  • clearly link the development sites within the Industrial Park to each other and to surrounding off-site uses (mixed-use and residential areas); and
  • be defined with landscaping, paving, and pedestrian scaled lighting.

Pedestrian circulation plans are required with each large lot development. These plans must emphasize connectivity through sidewalk design, traffic circulation, landscaping, and lighting.

5.1 Landscape Features

All sites should be enhanced with generous landscaping. The following guidelines build upon those given in Sections 2.2 - 2.4 which describe requirements where planting is used to screen parking areas and blank walls, or create buffer areas.

  • Plant the public boulevard of all streets in the Industrial Park with street trees. Where possible the trees should be planted between the curb and the sidewalk.
  • Use landscaping to highlight building entries and pedestrian connections to the street where building entries front onto the street. (Figure 24)
  • Accentuate key intersections at public streets with additional landscaping and co-ordinate landscaping with the architectural treatment of corner sites.
  • Mark the entry points of development sites with additional landscape features. (Figure 25)
  • Select plant species that are non-invasive, tolerant of urban conditions, and drought resistant.
    • Preference should be given to native species that can meet these conditions.
    • Tree spacing will vary with species selection. In all cases the intent is to create a continuous canopy or continuous screen. Trees may be planted in groupings - instead of rows - to achieve a similar effect.
  • Complement planted areas with hard landscaping elements such as special pavements (colour, texture, pattern etc.), architectural features (trellises, screen walls, planters etc.), and site furniture. (Figure 26)
  • As development backing onto the hydro corridor will be visible from the future recreational pathway, establish a 3m planting strip on private property abutting the hydro corridor. Planting in the 3m strip should be designed to enhance the interface between development sites and the pathway corridor.

5.2 Signage, Lighting, Mechanical and Service Areas

The design and siting of signs, lighting, and service areas all influence the quality of the pedestrian environment. The following general guidelines should be addressed in all future development.

  • Design signage to facilitate the orientation of both pedestrians and people in vehicles
  • Ensure that signage is incorporated within the architectural design of buildings
  • Consolidate site signage in order to reduce visual clutter
  • Ensure that signs are designed and placed in a manner that is safe for vehicular and pedestrian circulation
  • Locate signage in a manner that will be contiguous throughout the area (e.g. above principle entrances, at vehicular and pedestrian entranceways etc.) so that the public can easily find their destination
  • Prohibit temporary or portable signs such as, but not limited to, billboards, revolving signs, gas-filled inflatable devices, roof signs, sandwich boards etc.
  • Ensure that lighting provides sufficient visibility for safety and security. A lighting plan may be required for large development sites
  • Design lighting to minimize the impact on adjacent land uses, in particular on existing residential development
  • Use shielding and /or sharp cut-off lighting where necessary and appropriate to reduce glare and light spillover
  • Locate all mechanical, service areas, and utility areas as well as unsightly and noise-generating elements, such as service lanes, loading zones, dumpsters and outdoor storage, rooftop mechanical units, away from the pedestrian realm, public streets, and residential areas.
  • Where mechanical and service areas are away from the public realm but, can still be seen, they must be screened from view on all sides in a manner that complements the buildings. Planting should be incorporated to enhance the screening effect.

6. Proposed Collector Road Pattern

Figure 27: The drawing illustrates the proposed collector road network through the industrial park and highlights current development proposals.

  The drawing illustrates the proposed collector road network through the industrial park and highlights current development proposals.

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Figure 27 shows the concept plan for a preferred collector road pattern through the Industrial Park. This pattern is a refinement of two previous conceptual options. The preferred pattern was determined in conjunction with the EUC Master Servicing Plan Update. It was also based on information from the Innes Road Environmental Assessment, public consultation, and knowledge of future developments to the south and east of the study area.

The concept plan identifies a proposed major and minor collector road network. This network sets the framework for future development and the subdivision of land. The concept plan identifies the extension of Vanguard Drive as a primary east-west collector through the site. As given in the Gloucester Official Plan Amendment #35, the extension of Belcourt Boulevard is shown as a primary north-south collector. The concept plan does not show a local road pattern, as this will develop out of the subdivision process. If necessary, the alignment of the proposed collector roads may be fine-tuned in the subdivision process. Depending on site conditions and future development, there may be a need for an additional north-south connection, between Lanthier Drive and Mer Bleue Road. This connection would take on the character of a local road and not a collector. All collector roads should be designed with sidewalks on both sides of the street and future local roads should include sidewalks on one side. As noted in Section 4.1, all public boulevards should be planted with street trees.

The proposed location of a new water tower and servicing blocks required for the future development of the Industrial Park and surrounding area are shown on Figure 27.

Figure 27: The drawing illustrates the proposed collector road network through the industrial park and highlights current development proposals.

7. Implementation

This document reflects Council's vision to guide future development fronting on Innes Road as well as within the overall Industrial Park and is referenced on Annex 3 to the City's Official Plan. The urban design guidelines and development requirements contained herein shall be used as a framework to direct the preparation of development applications as well as an evaluation tool to review submissions in the development review process.

It is understood that some flexibility in interpreting the guidelines is permitted, provided the general intent and overall vision is maintained.

Following Council adoption of the guidelines, staff will initiate a review of the zoning provisions for all lands within the study area to recommend amendments to key zoning provisions (e.g. landscape provisions, building setbacks) to ensure that the built form and aesthetic images suggested in the document are achievable without the need for proponent initiated variances and zoning amendments.