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Section 3 - Designations and Land Use

The previous section of this Plan laid out the City’s broad policies that will govern growth and change in Ottawa over the coming decades. This section of the Plan provides more detailed direction for the use of land within specific areas of the city. These areas are identified by land-use designations. A land-use designation describes an area of land within which a specific set of policies applies. The first policy typically identifies the objective of the designation. Subsequent policies, taken together, provide a framework for making land-use decisions within the designation.

A land-use designation in an official plan is implemented through a range of more detailed land-use zones in a zoning by-law. While the zoning by-law is more detailed, it must conform to the policies in the official plan. The official plan also directly influences the division of land through plans of subdivision or by severance.

In some cases, designations are prescriptive, in that they lay out what is permitted and how development may proceed, while in other cases the designations are permissive in nature and describe the type of changes the City will encourage over time. In areas where little or no new development is desired, such as environmentally-sensitive areas, the zoning will restrict the number and types of uses that are permitted. In areas where growth and change are anticipated, the subsequent zoning may permit a variety of compatible uses.

This section also contains policies related to uses that will be considered appropriate in a number of designations without requiring a zoning by-law amendment. The zoning by-law will contain criteria to ensure that they remain compatible with existing development and take into consideration the characteristics of different communities and the protection of the environment.

The zoning by-law will provide more detail on the specific uses permitted within each zone. When considering the provisions of the following land-use designations, it is important to understand the broad policies outlined in Section 2. In addition, Section 4 contains policies guiding the review of development applications. In many cases, new development, the expansion of existing development or a change in the use of land will necessitate studies and assessments, to be undertaken as part of the City’s review of development applications.

3.1 - Generally Permitted Uses

Certain land uses are considered to be characteristic and supportive of the daily life and functioning of the community. For convenience, these uses have been grouped as generally permitted uses. These uses will be permitted within all land-use designations, subject to the policies set out below and in other applicable sections of this Plan.

Policies

Secondary Dwelling Units and Coach Houses

  1. Where the Zoning By-law permits a detached, semi-detached, duplex or townhouse dwelling, a secondary dwelling unit or a coach house may be established in accordance with this policy.  The Zoning By-law will establish criteria to govern compatibility of these units with the main dwelling and surrounding land uses.  Furthermore, the following criteria and limitations apply:
    1. Where a duplex dwelling is permitted by the Zoning By-law, a secondary dwelling unit will only be permitted in a duplex dwelling that existed as of July 17, 2013.
    2. A coach house in conjunction with a townhouse dwelling will only be permitted where the lot containing the townhouse can provide direct pedestrian access from the coach house to a public street or a travelled public lane. [Amendment #190, August 9, 2017]
    3. A coach house will only be permitted where the primary dwelling does not contain a garden suite, rooming units or a secondary dwelling unit and the primary dwelling is located on:
      1. a lot in a public service area and only where public or communal services for both water and wastewater services are currently provided to the main dwelling, or
      2. a lot that is of sufficient size to support private services and is located in the rural area or village and where:
        1. the primary dwelling is serviced by a private water and wastewater system  and the coach house will share either the water or wastewater system with the main dwelling; or.
        2. the primary dwelling is serviced by one public or communal service (water or wastewater) and one private service, and the coach house will share the public or communal service with the main dwelling; and [Amendment #197, November 8, 2017]
    4. A coach house serviced in accordance with c.ii. will be subject to site plan control except on lots that are less than 0.4 hectares or on lots that are connected to a public or communal water service system. [Amendment #197, November 8, 2017] 
    5. Applications for minor variances with respect to the minimum lot size established in the Zoning By-law to allow coach houses on privately serviced lots in the rural area shall have regard for all applicable policies of this Plan, and comply with the following requirements: 
      1. The proponent can demonstrate that private sewage disposal can be provided to the coach house in accordance with the requirements of the Ottawa Septic System Office;
      2. The proponent can demonstrate that the onsite water is of sufficient quality and quantity to service both the primary dwelling and the coach house and the impact of the septic system has been addressed through the submission of a supporting Hydrogeological and Terrain Analysis Study; and
      3. The proponent can address and satisfy items 3.1 (1)(i)(ii)-(v). [Amendment #197, November 8, 2017]
    6. A coach house must be smaller than the primary home and the Zoning By-law will set forth the appropriate maximum permitted size.
    7. The size, floor area, function and occupancy of a dwelling unit in a coach house in the urban area is not intended to exceed that of a typical two-bedroom apartment.
    8. A coach house may not be severed from the lot accommodating the primary dwelling.
    9. Applications for minor variances with respect to coach houses shall have regard for all applicable policies of this Plan, as well as the following considerations:
      1. The coach house is in no circumstances taller than the primary home;
      2. The proponent can demonstrate that the privacy of the adjoining properties is maintained;
      3. the siting and scale of the coach house does not negatively impact abutting properties;
      4. significant trees and plantings are preserved on the subject property; and
      5. any streetscape character impacts are addressed through the coach house design and siting.
    10. The Zoning By-law will limit the coach house to a height of one storey for lots in the urban area. An application to allow a height of up to two storeys through a minor variance may be considered in accordance with the considerations noted in h. above, only where the coach house contains a garage for the parking of a motor vehicle within its footprint.  [Amendment #10, August 25, 2004] [Amendment #175, October 27, 2016] [Amendment #190, August 9, 2017]


Group Homes

2. Where the zoning by-law permits a dwelling, the by-law will also permit a group home. The zoning by-law may include provisions to regulate the type, size and location of this use.[Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

Rooming Houses

3. Where the zoning by-law permits a dwelling in areas designated General Urban Area, Developing Community, Central Area, Mixed-Use Centre, Mainstreet, Enterprise Area, General Rural Area, and Village, the zoning by-law will also permit a rooming house. The zoning by-law may include area-specific provisions to regulate the size and location of this use. The By-law may provide for the location of larger-sized facilities in areas of higher-density and/or employment or institutional areas, as appropriate. .[Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

Shelter Accommodation

4. Where the zoning by-law permits a dwelling in areas designated General Urban Area, Developing Community, Central Area, Mixed-Use Centre, and Village, the by-law will also permit shelter accommodation. Shelter accommodation shall be designed in a manner compatible with the general area. The zoning by-law may include provisions to regulate the size and location of this use. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

Retirement Homes

5. Where the zoning by-law permits a dwelling in areas designated General Urban Area, Developing Community, Central Area, Mixed-Use Centre, Mainstreet, Enterprise Area, General Rural Area, and Village, the by-law will also permit a retirement home, which is not a residential care facility as defined in the zoning by-law. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

Day Care Facilities

6. Day care facilities that provide daily temporary care of children, seniors and/or the disabled will be permitted in areas designated General Urban Area, Developing Community, Central Area, Mixed-Use Centre, Enterprise Area, General Rural Area, and Village. The zoning by-law may include area-specific provisions to regulate the type, size and location of these uses. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

Garden Suites

7. Where the zoning by-law permits a dwelling, a garden suite may only be permitted subject to a rezoning as a temporary use. A garden suite means a one-unit detached residential structure containing bathroom and kitchen facilities that is ancillary to an existing residential structure and that is designed to be portable.

Home-Based Business

8. Where the zoning by-law permits a dwelling, a home-based business will also be permitted. The provisions of the zoning by-law will contain appropriate regulations to ensure compatibility with residential areas so that home-based businesses do not adversely impact neighbouring properties by virtue of their appearance or function or by attracting large volumes of traffic.

Public Utilities and Municipal Services [Amendment #96, February 22, 2012]

9. A public utility is a public body or private corporation, together with its associated physical infrastructure, that provides services to the public such as hydro, natural gas, communication/telecommunication and cable, but does not include the provision of municipal services. Municipal services are services provided by the City of Ottawa including roads, transit, water, wastewater, drainage, and stormwater management. Wireless Communication Facilities are addressed in policy 12 below. [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, November 25, 2011]

10. Public utility facilities and Municipal Services that are authorized under the requirements of the Environmental Assessment Act may be permitted in all land-use designations of this Plan. Other public utilities and municipal services and facilities are permitted in all land-use designations on Schedules A and B, except in Natural Environment Areas, Significant Wetlands, Sand and Gravel and Limestone Resource Areas, or in Flood Plains and Unstable Slopes shown on Schedule K, provided that: [Amendment #96, February 22, 2012]

a. Such use is necessary in the area and adequate measures are taken to ensure the use and its design are compatible with the surroundings;

b. Adequate off-street parking and loading facilities are provided;

c. The construction of permanent buildings is discouraged where an area, not in one of the identified designations, is found to be environmentally sensitive;

d. The design of the utility or facility meets the intent of the policies expressed elsewhere in this Plan;

e. Where proposed in Agricultural Resource Areas and areas designated Urban Natural Features or Rural Natural Features, the location must be essential for the provision of the utility, service or facility or constitutes a necessary expansion of an existing facility. A study may be required to assess alternative locations outside the designated areas and the environmental impacts on these areas will be mitigated if alternative locations are not feasible.

[Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, November 25, 2011]

Gas Pipelines

11. TransCanada PipeLines Limited operates high-pressure natural gas pipelines within rights-of-way that cross the City of Ottawa. Development adjacent to the pipeline and associated facilities, such as compressor stations, may have implications for the safety and integrity of the pipeline and adjacent development or may necessitate changes to TransCanada PipeLines’ infrastructure or operations. TransCanada PipeLines is regulated by the National Energy Board and both bodies have requirements regulating development and other activities such as excavation, blasting and any movement of heavy equipment in close proximity to the pipe line and compressor stations. The City will:

a. identify the route of the TransCanada Pipeline in the zoning by-law and establish minimum setbacks from the limits of the TransCanada Pipelines rights-of-way for all permanent structures and excavations.

b. require proponents of any development that will be located within 200 metres of a TransCanada Pipeline right-of-way or within 750 metres of a TransCanada Pipeline compressor station to pre-consult with TransCanada Pipelines Limited and will advise and consult with TransCanada Pipelines when undertaking the technical review of any such development that requires approval under the Planning Act.

c. not approve development within 750 metres of a TransCanada Pipeline compressor station unless it is demonstrated that provincial guidelines for noise and vibration can be achieved. TransCanada Pipeline will undertake a noise and vibration study to determine if the provincial guidelines can be achieved and may include recommendations or identify mitigation measures that the City will incorporate as conditions of development approval. [

[OPA #76, OMB File # PL100206, November 25, 2011.]

Wireless Communication Facilities

12. Proponents of new telecommunication facilities must comply with the City of Ottawa’s Municipal Concurrence and Public Consultation Process for Antenna Systems, in accordance with Industry Canada requirements (CPC-2-0-03) [Amendment #98, March 28, 2012]

Wayside Pits and Quarries

13. Wayside pits and quarries, portable asphalt plants and temporary concrete batching plants used on public authority contracts are permitted in all land-use designations except Natural Environment Areas, Urban Natural Features, Significant Wetlands, and in areas abutting the Ottawa and Rideau Rivers and in areas of existing development. A permit for a wayside pit or quarry is granted subject to the provisions of the Aggregate Resources Act and as such, the public consultation process and the rehabilitation of the site must be carried out in conformity with the Act. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

Parks and Leisure Areas

14. Parks and leisure areas are land uses that support the daily life and functioning of a community and are permitted in all land-use designations with the exception of lands designated on Schedules A and B as Significant Wetlands, Natural Environment Areas, Urban Natural Features, and Agricultural Resource Areas. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

15. Where parks or leisure areas are located on land designated Sand and Gravel or Limestone Resource Area, they will be considered as interim uses pending future extraction of the mineral resources.

Agricultural Uses

16. Agricultural uses are permitted in several rural designations, subject to the policies for those designations and application of the Minimum Distance Separation (MDS) formulae. In all cases, agricultural uses must respect the requirements of policy 2 in Section 3.7.3 Agricultural Resource Area, regarding provisions for the establishment and operation of farms. [Ministerial Modification #8, November 10, 2003]

3.2 - Natural Environment

The environmental designations on Schedule A and Schedule B are Significant Wetlands, Natural Environment Area, Rural Natural Features, and Urban Natural Features. The areas identified by these designations make up most of the natural heritage systems of the city. These areas may also be linked by streams and wooded corridors that may or may not be located in the same designations but which allow for the migration of wildlife and the maintenance of natural functions across a large area. [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, April 26, 2012]

The designation of Significant Wetland identifies wetlands that have been evaluated against provincial criteria by the Ministry of Natural Resources and that have been assessed as having provincial significance. The other environmental designations may include other wetlands, plus significant woodlands and significant wildlife habitat that contribute to the City’s natural heritage system and protect biodiversity. Not all significant features are designated in the Plan. These features are protected by other policies within the Plan, including requirements for an environmental impact statement for development proposed within or adjacent to the natural heritage system defined in Section 2.4.2. The natural heritage system is also protected by policies in Section 4 regarding erosion prevention, protection of surface water and groundwater resources, and protection of the significant habitat of endangered and threatened species. [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, April 26, 2012]

The designated lands have been identified through various federal, provincial, and municipal studies and include combinations of the following features:

  • A high level of diversity in terms of features, functions, representation or amount of native vegetation and animal communities;
  • A high level of diversity in the mix of forests, wetlands, and other natural features;
  • Extensive areas of high-quality forests and woodlands;
  • Native vegetation that is rare or uncommon within the province or the city;
  • Endangered and threatened species and species of special concern or regionally rare species; [Ministerial Modification #9, November 10, 2003] [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, April 26, 2012]
  • Fish habitat and significant wildlife habitat, including areas with seasonal wildlife concentrations;
  • Wetlands, springs and other hydrological features or functions, such as seeps and recharge areas.

3.2.1 – Significant Wetlands

Wetlands are essential components of ecosystems that contribute to the high quality of the environment in Ottawa. Wetlands control and store surface water to assist in flood control, act as sediment traps to improve water quality, and provide habitat for a wide variety of plant and animal species and may serve as recharge areas for groundwater resources. The Ministry of Natural Resources has developed a system that evaluates the biological, social, hydrological and special features of wetlands to determine their relative significance in Ontario and has identified certain areas as Significant Wetlands. Other wetlands are not significant at the provincial scale but perform valuable wetland functions that are protected through policies in watershed and subwatershed plans, the requirements of the development review process, and other policies that protect the natural heritage system. These wetlands are often found in association with significant woodlands and are included in Natural Environment Areas and Rural Natural Features. [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, July 21, 2011.]

Policies

  1. Significant Wetlands are designated on Schedules A and B in order to protect these sensitive areas and support their natural functions. Where the Ministry of Natural Resources has identified new significant wetlands or has revised significant wetland boundaries, the City will initiate an Official Plan Amendment and/or a zoning by-law amendment in accordance with Policy 8 below, to recognize the new wetlands or changes in wetland boundaries within 6 months of identification. The identification by the Ministry of Natural Resources of new boundaries or revised boundaries of Provincially Significant Wetlands will be considered in any Planning Act process applicable to the property identified by the Ministry of Natural Resources. Council may consider exceptions to the designation of new wetlands where the lands have current required approvals under the Planning Act or are licensed under the Aggregate Resources Act. [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, Ministerial Modification # 27, April 26, 2012]
  2. With the exception of the provisions in policies 5 and 6 below, no development or site alteration as defined in Section 4.7.8 is permitted within Significant Wetlands. [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, July 21, 2011.]
  3. Within the Significant Wetlands designation, uses which do not adversely affect the natural characteristics of the wetland, such as open air recreation; scientific, educational, or conservation uses associated with the environmental features; agriculture operations existing at the time of adoption of this Plan; and forestry as defined by the Forestry Act are permitted.
  4. A single-detached dwelling and accessory buildings are permitted on lots existing as of the date of adoption of this Plan, where the lot fronts on an existing public road, and where a dwelling is permitted in the zoning by-law. In such a case and where the lot lies partially within the boundaries of a designated wetland area, the new construction and on-site servicing will be located outside the boundary of the feature to the greatest extent possible and disturbance of the natural feature will be minimized.
  5. Development and site alterations will not be permitted within 120m of the boundary of a Significant Wetland unless an Environmental Impact Statement demonstrates that there will be no negative impacts (as defined by Section 4.7.8) on the wetland or its ecological function. The requirements of the Environmental Impact Statement may vary, as described in Section 4.7.8. [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, Ministerial Modification # 28, April 26, 2012.]
  6. The requirements of the Environmental Impact Statement may vary, depending on such matters as the scale of the proposed development, the nature of the site, the availability of comprehensive studies for the area, and those matters identified in Section 4.7.8.
  7. Any change or interference within or adjacent to a Wetland may require a permit from the Rideau Valley Conservation Authority, under the Ontario Regulation 174/06, the Mississippi Valley Conservation under Ontario Regulation 153/06 and the South Nation River Conservation under Ontario Regulation 170/06. [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, Ministerial Modification # 29, July 21, 2011.]
  8. The boundaries of land designated Significant Wetlands are based on a variety of more detailed mapping sources prepared by the Ministry of Natural Resources. However, when more up-to-date information becomes available through such means as detailed environmental studies, functions and an adjustment to the boundary may be warranted. The City’s zoning by-law will reflect the most up-to-date and accurate information and therefore any changes, whether minor or major, will require an amendment to the zoning by-law. However, minor changes to the boundaries will not require an amendment to the Official Plan. Notwithstanding the foregoing, this Plan will be amended to designate new areas as Significant Wetlands, to extend wetlands to include complexes, or to remove wetlands from the designation. In the period between identification of changes to wetland boundaries by the Ministry of Natural Resources and amendment to this Plan, the policies of this section will apply to the Significant Wetlands as identified by the Ministry of Natural Resources. The approval of the Ministry of Natural Resources is required for any refinements other than minor adjustments to the boundary of a Significant Wetland. [OMB decision #1582, June 17, 2005] [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, Ministerial Modification # 30, April 26, 2012.]
  9. Where Significant Wetlands are privately owned, public use and access to these lands for any purpose is not permitted without the consent of the owner. [Amendment #13, September 8, 2004]

3.2.2 – Natural Environment Areas

The Natural Environment Area designation applies to land having a high environmental value as assessed through federal, provincial and municipal studies. The lands within this designation typically contain several components of the City’s natural heritage system, including wetlands, significant woodlands, and wildlife habitat. These areas are among the most significant in Ottawa in terms of maintaining biodiversity and ecological functions. As such, development within and adjacent to these areas could unduly stress significant natural features and their ecological functions and careful management, restoration and enhancement are required. [Amendment #96, February 22, 2012]

The Natural Environment Area designation includes areas identified by the Province as significant Areas of Natural Scientific Interest (Life Science), such as Green’s Creek in the eastern area of the Greenbelt and Torbolton Forest near Constance Bay, as areas that are significant in the larger area that includes the City of Ottawa. [Amendment #96, February 22, 2012]

Natural Environment Areas within the Greenbelt were identified by the National Capital Commission and are owned and managed, for the most part, by the federal government. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

Natural Environment Areas are owned by public bodies and private individuals and may be managed under a variety of arrangements. Land within the Burnt Lands on the western boundary of the city, for example, is owned and managed by the Ministry of Natural Resources and the Nature Conservancy of Canada. A large portion of the Marlborough Forest is owned by the City of Ottawa, which altogether owns and manages more than 10,000 hectares of forest in the rural area.

Restoration and enhancement of natural features and functions are the primary objective of management plans for publicly-owned land. Extensive portions of Natural Environment Areas are owned privately and their protection depends on private stewardship.

Policies

  1. Natural Environment Areas are designated on Schedules A and B. These lands are designated to ensure that the natural features and functions inherent in each area are protected and preserved.
  2. With the exception of the provisions in policies 3 and 4 below, no development or site alteration as defined in Section 4.7.8 is permitted within Natural Environment Areas. [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, July 21, 2011.]
  3. Uses permitted on land designated Natural Environment Area include uses which do not adversely affect the natural characteristics of the area, such as open air recreation; scientific, educational, or conservation uses associated with the features of the environmental area; existing agriculture operations; or forestry as defined by the Forestry Act.
  4. A single-detached dwelling and accessory buildings are permitted on an existing lot of record, which has frontage to a public road. Where new construction is permitted on a lot that lies partially within the boundaries of a designated area, the new construction and on-site servicing will be located outside the boundary of the feature to the greatest extent possible and disturbance of the natural feature will be minimized.
  5. Development and site alteration will not be permitted for:
    1. Any development permitted under the policies of this Plan within the feature;
    2. Any development permitted under policies of this Plan within 120 metres of the feature; unless an Environmental Impact Statement demonstrates that there will be no negative impacts as defined in Section 4.7.8 on the natural features within the area or their ecological functions. The requirements of the Environmental Impact Statement may vary, as described in Section 4.7.8. [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, Ministerial; Modification # 31, July 21, 2011.]
  6. Where Natural Environment Areas are privately owned, public use and access to these lands for any purpose is not permitted without the consent of the owner. [Amendment 13, September 8, 2004]
  7. Where land that is designated Natural Environment Area is in private ownership, the City will acquire the land at the request of the landowner, in keeping with the acquisition policies in Section 5. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]
  8. Land in Natural Environment Areas acquired by the City may be used for:
    1. The protection and enhancement of natural values;
    2. Recreational uses such as cross country skiing, provided that a management plan has been prepared and it has been demonstrated that the uses will not have an adverse impact on significant natural features and functions;
    3. Public use only if it has access from an open right-of-way or from other public land that is itself accessible;
    4. Leasing to another party for a specified purpose permitted in policy 2 above, having regard for the interests of adjacent landowners and in accordance with other objectives and policies in this section.
  9. The boundaries of land designated Natural Environment Area are based on a variety of more detailed mapping sources. When more up-to-date information becomes available through such means as detailed environmental studies, an adjustment to the definition of features and functions and an adjustment to the interpretation of the boundary may be warranted. The City’s zoning by-law will reflect the most up-to-date and accurate information and therefore any changes, whether minor or major, will require an amendment to the zoning by-law. However, minor changes to the boundaries will not require an amendment to the Official Plan. Where boundary interpretation impacts provincially significant Areas of Natural and Scientific Interest, identified on maps prepared by the Ministry of Natural Resources, the agreement of the Ministry will be required. [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, July 21, 2011.]

3.2.3 – Urban Natural Features

Urban Natural Features provide a valuable contribution to biodiversity and wildlife habitat in the urban area and are enjoyed by residents. Urban Natural Features are natural landscapes and may include woodlands, wetlands, watercourses and ravines. These features may occur on City, federal, provincial and privately-owned lands. The Council-approved Urban Natural Areas Environmental Evaluation Study (March 2005) and Addendum Report (March 2006) identified features such as woodlands, wetlands and vegetated ravines throughout the urban area, and established their relative environmental values. Council has approved an Urban Natural Features Strategy under which the City will acquire some of the urban natural areas currently in private ownership. [Amendment #45, September 27, 2006] [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, July 21, 2011.]

Policies

  1. Urban Natural Features are designated on Schedule B. The purpose of this designation is to preserve natural features that are currently managed for conservation or passive leisure uses.
  2. Additional Urban Natural Features may be identified on Schedule B in the following circumstances:
    1. Upon City acquisition under the Urban Natural Features Strategy; [Amendment #45, September 27, 2006] [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]
    2. Upon adoption of subwatershed studies or other environmental studies that identify natural features worthy of protection;
    3. Upon securing natural areas in the urban area for conservation purposes, through the development review process or other means.
  3. Uses that do not adversely affect the natural characteristics of the area, such as open air recreation; scientific, educational, or conservation uses associated with the environmental features; agriculture operations established at the time of adoption of this Plan; or forestry as defined by the Forestry Act are permitted, subject to the policies below.
  4. The boundaries of land designated Urban Natural Features are based on a variety of more detailed mapping sources. When more up-to-date information becomes available through such means as detailed environmental studies, an adjustment to the definition of features and functions and an adjustment to the interpretation of the boundary may be warranted. The City’s zoning by-law will reflect the most up-to-date and accurate information and therefore any changes, whether minor or major, will require an amendment to the zoning by-law. However, minor changes to the boundaries will not require an amendment to the Official Plan. [OMB decision #1582, June 17, 2005]
  5. Development and site alteration will not be permitted within 30 metres of the boundary of a designated Urban Natural Feature unless an Environmental Impact Statement demonstrates that there will be no negative impacts on the natural features within the area of their ecological functions. Definitions of these terms are provided in Section 4.7.8. [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, April 26, 2012]
  6. Where Urban Natural Features are privately owned, public use and access to these lands for any purpose is not permitted without the consent of the owner. [Amendment #13, September 8, 2004]

3.2.4 – Rural Natural Features

Rural Natural Features are natural areas in the rural area that contain significant woodlands, wetlands, and wildlife habitat that were identified by the Natural Environment Systems Strategy in the 1990s. These lands include many components of the natural heritage system defined in Section 2. Any development within or adjacent to these lands must be assessed in terms of its impact on the area’s natural features and functions,, particularly impacts arising from the extent of disturbance and the location of buildings. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

Policies

  1. Rural Natural Features are designated on Schedule A to protect locally-significant natural areas and the city’s tree cover.
  2. The boundaries of the Rural Natural Features are general and may not coincide with the boundaries of significant woodlands and other significant natural heritage features within the designation. [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, July 21, 2011.]
  3. A single-detached dwelling and accessory buildings are permitted on a lot existing as of the date of adoption of this Plan, where the lot fronts on an existing public road, and where a dwelling is permitted in the zoning by-law. Where new construction is permitted on a lot that lies partially within the natural heritage feature, the new construction and on-site servicing will be located outside the boundary of the feature to the greatest extent possible and disturbance of the natural feature will be minimized. [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, July 21, 2011.]
  4. The provisions of Section 3.7.2 for the General Rural Area also apply to Rural Natural Features. [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, July 21, 2011.]
  5. The City will pursue measures as identified in Section 2.4.5, policies 10, 11 and 12 to assist in the protection of Rural Natural Features. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]
  6. Where Rural Natural Features are privately owned, public use and access to these lands for any purpose is not permitted without the consent of the owner.

[Amendment #13, September 8, 2004] [Amendment #14, September 8, 2004] [OMB decision #1754, May 10, 2006][OMB Decision #0724, March 21, 2007]

7. Development and site alteration will not be permitted for:

a. any development permitted under the policies of this Plan within the feature.
b. any development permitted under the policies of the Plan within 120 metres of the boundary of a natural heritage feature.

unless an Environmental Impact Statement demonstrates that there will be no negative impacts as defined in Section 4.7.8 on the natural features within the area or their ecological functions. The requirements of the Environmental Impact Statement may vary, as described in Section 4.7.8. [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, Ministerial Modification # 32, April 26, 2012]

8. Section 5 of this plan identifies those circumstances under which the City will acquire land in the Rural Natural Features designation when requested to do so by the landowner. [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, April 26, 2012]

3.2.5 – Flewellyn Special Study Area

Lands in the vicinity of Flewellyn Road and Conley Road have been identified and designated on Schedule A as the “Flewellyn Special Study Area”. The purpose of this overlay designation is to restrict development until such time as the City has completed three studies required to inform Council’s decision on appropriate land use designations within the area: a cumulative effects study, the Rural Review- Mineral Resources Study, and a re-evaluation of the wetland. The cumulative effects study will identify the changes to the drainage in the area resulting from, but not limited to, the effects of road construction, private drain works, municipal drain maintenance and discharge of water from quarries. The City will follow the cumulative effects study and the Mineral Resources Study with a re-evaluation of the area in 2016 using the Ontario Wetlands Evaluation System. Once the studies and re-evaluation have been completed, and following public consultation, the City will consider the new information and amend this Plan to remove the Flewellyn Special Study Area overlay designation and confirm the appropriate land use designations and policies for the area. [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, April 26, 2012]

The Flewellyn Special Study Area remains subject to the Drainage By-law No. 2007-398 and former Township of Goulbourn Removal of Topsoil By-law No. 45-86.

Policies

  1. Notwithstanding the underlying designations on Schedule A of this Plan, no new development, as defined in Section 4.7.8, will be permitted until the Flewellyn Special Study Area overlay is removed. [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, April 26, 2012]
  2. Uses that lawfully exist on the date that this provision comes into force are recognized and may continue. [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, Ministerial Modification # 33, April 26, 2012]

3.3 - Open Space

Major Open Spaces are large parks such as Walter Baker Park, open space corridors along the Ottawa and Rideau Rivers and the Rideau Canal, parkway corridors and corridors reserved for rapid-transit and major roads. Most Major Open Spaces are already in public ownership. The Rideau River and Canal are national historic sites and development of marinas on adjacent lands requires approval of Parks Canada. Major Open Spaces are a key component of the Greenspace Network (see Section 2.4), which contributes to the quality of life in neighbouring communities as well as to the overall integrity of the natural environment.

Policies

  1. Major Open Spaces are designated on Schedules A and B to protect the larger open spaces in Ottawa that are to be generally available for public use and enjoyment. [Amendment #45, September 27, 2006; in appeal period]
  2. The boundaries of Major Open Space are based upon a variety of maps and sources. When more detailed information is obtained from Federal, Provincial or Municipal studies, or through development agreements, this information may warrant minor adjustments to the interpretation of the boundary. The City's zoning by-law will reflect the most up-to-date and accurate information for these boundaries, and therefore any changes will require an amendment to the zoning by-law. However, minor changes to the boundaries will not require an amendment to the Official Plan. [OMB decision #1582, June 17, 2005]
  3. The following activities and uses are permitted where they do not adversely impact the natural environment, cultural heritage and open characteristics of the area:
    1. Sport, recreation, leisure and cultural facilities including water-orientated facilities and activities along shorelines;
    2. Uses that involve scientific or educational study, conservation, interpretation or restoration of the elements of the natural and cultural heritage, archaeological resource of the area or waterways;
    3. Roads and other infrastructure identified in this Plan where they maintain the overall quality and character of the open space, protect natural and cultural features, and enhance public access and opportunities for leisure use.[Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]
    4. Small-scale commercial activities and institutional uses that contribute to or are ancillary to a use permitted in a) and b) above subject to a zoning by-law amendment. [Amendment #45, September 27, 2006] [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]
  4. In order to preserve what is irreplaceable, where a Major Open Space abuts a river corridor as defined in Section 4.6.3, any activities or uses in policy 3 (above) must be ones that require a waterfront location and require cultural heritage and archaeological resource assessment before development or public works are approved. [Amendment #14, September 8, 2004] [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]
  5. Existing dwellings will be recognized as conforming uses; however, residential infill on vacant lots and the creation of new residential lots will not be permitted.
  6. The City will work with partners such as the City of Gatineau, the National Capital Commission, and river-front neighbourhoods and communities on studies and plans for Major Open Space and the Ottawa River corridor.
  7. Where land designated Major Open Space is privately owned, public use and access to these lands for any purpose is not permitted without the consent of the owner. [Amendment #13, September 8, 2004]

3.4 - Central Experimental Farm

The Central Experimental Farm is a National Historic Site and cultural landscape of national historic significance as well as having significant local heritage value that contributes to Ottawa’s distinct identity. It is owned and operated by the federal government as an active and operating agricultural research station, containing a complex of laboratories, research fields, offices, greenhouses and farm buildings, an arboretum, public gardens and museums. Many of these buildings and sites also have local heritage value.

Policies

  1. The boundaries of the Central Experimental Farm as a National Historic Site and cultural heritage resource are identified on Schedule B. The lands contained within the Central Experimental Farm boundary are subject to a number of land-use designations.
  2. Those lands designated Major Open Space, Urban Natural Features and General Urban Area are subject to the policies of those designations found elsewhere in this Plan.
  3. The interpretation of land-use designation boundaries within, and the design and interpretation of roads within and adjacent to, the Central Experimental Farm will respect the cultural heritage integrity and minimize fragmentation of the historic landscape features and the open space character of the Central Experimental Farm.
  4. Proponents of development proposals or public works in or adjacent to the Central Experimental Farm are required to prepare a cultural heritage impact statement as described in Section 4.6.1. Reference to the Commemorative Integrity Statement prepared by Parks Canada will ensure that the proposed development does not compromise the characteristics that represent and contribute to the Central Experimental Farm’s heritage value.

3.4.1 – Agricultural Research

Policy

  1. On lands designated Agricultural Research, the main permitted uses are farming and associated research, public gardens, agricultural museums, and other related uses. In addition, uses such as leisure, recreation and cultural activities and ancillary commercial uses may be permitted where they conserve the historic structures, historic landscape and open space character of the farm.

3.5 - Greenbelt

The National Capital Greenbelt is a 20,000-hectare rural landscape that is a distinguishing feature of Ottawa, providing a separation between the urban area within the Greenbelt and the urban communities that have been established just beyond it.

The Greenbelt is a mosaic of land uses and facilities. It contains Natural Environment Areas that link environmental features within the urban area to larger natural landscapes in the rural area. Farming continues as a viable economic activity on Agriculture Resource land. Other economic activities include government and private-sector research and development facilities, as well as the Ottawa Macdonald-Cartier International Airport. The Greenbelt also contains large-scale community facilities such as the Nepean Sportsplex, the Queensway-Carleton Hospital and the Ottawa-Carleton Detention Centre as well as several schools and churches.

The policies for the Greenbelt in this Plan implement the provisions of the 1996 Master Plan for the National Capital Greenbelt, prepared by the National Capital Commission.

The rural character of the Greenbelt has been challenged in the past by applications to develop large community facilities, commercial developments and transportation infrastructure. Where these uses are permitted, they should be designed in such a way as to minimize their impact on the rural character.

Policies

  1. The boundaries of the Greenbelt are identified on Schedule B. Within the Greenbelt boundary the land is placed into a number of land-use designations. Some of these designations are also found outside the Greenbelt while others are specific to this area.
  2. Those lands designated Natural Environment Areas, Significant Wetlands and Agricultural Resource Areas are subject to the policies for those designations found elsewhere in this Plan, with the exception that lot creation will not be permitted in Agriculture Resource Areas. [Amendment #76, August 19, 2011]
  3. Roads and other infrastructure will be designed to maintain the rural character of the Greenbelt in order to minimize the fragmentation of farmland and natural areas. Combining infrastructure in a limited number of corridors and utilizing existing rights-of-way wherever possible can help achieve this end. Transportation infrastructure, including lighting, will be designed to a rural standard.

[Amendment #76, August 19, 2011]

3.5.1 – Greenbelt Rural

Policies

  1. Lands designated Greenbelt Rural on Schedule B are to be used for farming, forestry, recreation, and small-scale commercial uses directly related to rural activities within the Greenbelt, such as bed and breakfasts, farm-gate sales, and farmer and artist markets. Lot creation is not permitted.
  2. Notwithstanding policy 1 above, infill development, including lot creation, is permitted in Ramsayville, Blackburn Station and Burkes Settlement. The boundaries of these small historical settlements are identified in the City’s zoning by-law. Infill lots will not be considered where they extend the existing settlements in length or depth.[Amendment #76, August 19, 2011]
  3. Lands designated Greenbelt Rural, and located adjacent to a Greenbelt Employment and Institutional Area, may also be used for operational uses ancillary to the main permitted uses in the Greenbelt Employment and Institutional Area, provided the ancillary uses have limited employment associated with them.

3.5.2 – Greenbelt Employment and Institutional Area

Policy

  1. Lands designated Greenbelt Employment and Institutional Area on Schedule B permit institutional, cultural, recreational and research facilities provided that:
    1. The programming, land use, and landscape character of these facilities respect the Greenbelt’s rural character and benefit from an extensive open area, isolation or a rural environment;
    2. Activities that do not require an extensive open area, isolation or a rural environment, such as office employment, are only permitted as uses accessory to the primary use;
    3. The grounds surrounding such facilities are used for farming, forestry, conservation, recreation, resource management, or other uses compatible with the rural character of the Greenbelt.

3.6 - Urban Designations

Section 3.6 contains policies for the urban designations shown on Schedule B.

3.6.1 – General Urban Area

The General Urban Area designation permits the development of a full range and choice of housing types to meet the needs of all ages, incomes and life circumstances, in combination with conveniently located employment, retail, service, cultural, leisure, entertainment and institutional uses. This will facilitate the development of complete and sustainable communities. A broad scale of uses is found within this designation, from ground-oriented single-purpose to multi-storey mixed-use; from corner store to shopping centre.

While the City is supportive of the establishment of a broad mix of uses in Ottawa's neighbourhoods, this is not meant to imply that all uses will be permitted everywhere within areas that are designated General Urban Area. The zoning by-law will continue to regulate the location, scale and type of land use in accordance with the provisions of this Plan. Within neighbourhoods, the zoning by-law will allow those uses that provide for the local, everyday needs of the residents, including shopping, schools, recreation and services. Uses that also serve wider parts of the city will be located at the edges of neighbourhoods on roads where the needs of these land uses (such as transit, car and truck access, and parking) can be more easily met and impacts controlled. Subject to the policies below, the City supports infill development and other intensification within the General Urban Area in a manner that enhances and complements the desirable characteristics and ensures the long-term vitality of the many existing communities that make up the city.

Policies

  1. General Urban Area areas are designated on Schedule B. The General Urban Area designation permits all types and densities of housing, as well as employment, retail uses, service, industrial, cultural, leisure, greenspace, entertainment and institutional uses.
  2. The evaluation of development applications, studies, other plans and public works undertaken by the City in the General Urban Area will be in accordance with Section 2.5.1 and Section 4.11.
  3. When considering a proposal for residential intensification through infill or redevelopment in the General Urban Area, the City will:
    1. Recognize the importance of new development relating to existing community character so that it enhances and builds upon desirable established patterns and built form;
    2. Apply the policies of Section 2.5.1 and Section 4.11;
    3. Consider its contribution to the maintenance and achievement of a balance of housing types and tenures to provide a full range of housing for a variety of demographic profiles throughout the General Urban Area;
    4. Assess ground-oriented multiple housing forms, such as duplex, triplex and fourplex, as one means of intensifying within established low-rise residential communities.
  4. Major Urban Facilities are permitted in the General Urban Area in accordance with Section 3.6.7.
  5. The General Urban Area permits uses that may generate traffic, noise or other impacts that have the potential to create conflicts with the surrounding residential community. These types of uses are often large and serve or draw from broader areas. The City will ensure that anticipated impacts can be adequately mitigated or otherwise addressed. Such uses will be directed to:
    1. Locations along the rapid-transit system, or an arterial or major collector road with sufficient capacity to accommodate the anticipated traffic generated and where frequent, all-day transit service can be provided;
    2. Suitable locations on the perimeter of, or isolated from, established residential neighbourhoods. In this regard, existing or proposed building orientation, massing and design, and the presence of mitigating circumstances such as distance, changes in topography, or the presence of features such as significant depths of mature forest may be taken into account.
  6. Throughout the General Urban Area, the City will encourage the provision of a variety of small, locally-oriented convenience and service uses that complement adjacent residential land uses, and are of a size and scale consistent with the needs of nearby residential areas. The City will ensure that these uses:
    1. Are compatible and complement surrounding land uses, and can be developed in accordance with Section 2.5.1 and Section 4.11;
    2. Are conveniently located with respect to concentrations of residential development and provide direct access for pedestrians and cyclists from adjacent residential areas;
    3. Are permitted to cluster with other community-oriented uses, such as parks, pedestrian linkages, community centres or leisure facilities, in order to facilitate interaction among residents and contribute to a sense of community;
    4. Are situated to take advantage of pedestrian and cycling patterns;
    5. Are of a size and scale that will not result in the attraction of large volumes of vehicular traffic from outside the immediate area.
  7. Uses requiring large land areas for outdoor storage, sale or service of goods (other than uses that do not operate year-round and can be considered a common component of a permitted use, such as a garden centre in association with a retail use) are generally discouraged in General Urban Areas. Development applications to permit such uses will be considered where the proposal meets the following criteria:
    1. The proposed use is compatible with and complements surrounding land uses, and will be in accordance with Section 2.5.1 and Section 4.11;
    2. Direct access is provided to an arterial road with sufficient capacity to accommodate the proposed use which can provide a safe and efficient circulation;
    3. Main buildings are situated so as to occupy the site’s street frontage;
    4. The visual impact of outdoor storage or parking on adjacent uses and from the street will be minimized through appropriate means;
    5. Motor vehicle sales or leasing establishments will not place their goods for sale or display in the municipal right-of-way.
  8. Industrial uses that exhibit characteristics that are likely to impact negatively on adjacent residential uses by virtue of matters such as noise, fumes, heavy equipment movement or external storage of large amounts of materials will not be permitted in areas designated General Urban Area, but will be directed to an appropriately zoned area within an Employment Area. [Amendment 28, July 13, 2005]
  9. Notwithstanding policy 1 above, a retail/commercial centre with a full range of retail uses will be considered with a maximum of 11,000 m2 of gross floor area on the lands legally described as Blocks 86, 95 and 101 on Plan 4M-1089 and known municipally as 6303 Hazeldean Road. [Amendment #33, August 24, 2005]
  10. The stand-alone retail store permitted on the lands known municipally as 1890, 1900, 1920 Walkley Road, 2980, 3000 Conroy Road, 2500, 2502, 2510 St. Laurent Blvd. and 2425 Don Reid Drive, will be limited to a maximum of 17,500 square metres. [OMB decision #2649, September 21, 2006]
  11. City Council has approved a Community Design Plan for the Barrhaven South Community to guide future development. Development may proceed in keeping with the Community Design Plan and policies elsewhere in this Plan, subject to the following policies:
    1. In order to achieve the intent of the objectives of Section 3.7.4 Mineral Resources, the City will not approve any subdivision, zoning (potential exception could be a holding zone) or site plan control application for lands within the Barrhaven South Community Design Plan study area that are located within 300 metres of the Sand and Gravel Resource Area to the west of the community in the rural area, until the conditions set for these lands in the community design plan have been satisfied. The community design plan presumes that the existing pit will have exhausted its aggregate resources prior the development of the adjacent lands. The Community Design Plan indicates that these lands may be developed once the extraction of the mineral aggregate ceases, or a study is completed to the satisfaction of the City, which demonstrates that proposed development is compatible with the aggregate operations. To demonstrate that the mineral aggregate resource is depleted, an Official Plan Amendment shall be required for an alternate land use on the Sand and Gravel Resource Area. [Amendment #50, June 27, 2007] [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, August 18, 2011]
  12. The City will protect the views of the Parliament Buildings from two locations in Beechwood Cemetery. The view area, or viewshed, and the two locations, the Tommy Douglas Memorial and Poet’s Hill, are identified as Annex 12. A building or structure is deemed to obstruct the view if it visually blocks the foreground view or visually mars the background silhouette view of the Parliament Buildings.
    1. For each property in the viewshed, no zoning by-law amendment or minor variance shall be permitted that would obstruct the view.
    2. Site plan control approval, other regulations and City maintenance practices may also be adjusted to ensure that fences, signs, trees and other elements do not obstruct the view. [Amendment #69, November 26, 2008] [Amendment #28, July 13, 2005]
  13. City Council has approved a community design plan for the Kanata North community (shown on Annex 5-Urban Areas Subject to a Community Design Plan or Policy Plan) to guide future development. Development is therefore to occur in keeping with the community design plan and policies within this Plan, subject to the following:
    1. Residential development is to be at least 30 per cent single detached but not more than 55 per cent single detached dwellings, at least 10 per cent apartment dwellings and the remainder multiple dwellings, other than apartments. 
    2. The overall residential development will meet the minimum average density target of 36 units per net hectare. Net residential density is based on the area of land exclusively for residential use, including lanes and parking areas internal to developments but excluding public streets, right-of-way and all non-residential uses. [Amendment #173,  OMB Order File #PL160875, January 11, 2017]

3.6.2 – Mixed-Use Centres

The Mixed-Use Centre designation in this Plan applies to areas that have been identified as strategic locations on the rapid-transit network and lie adjacent to major roads. They act as focal points of activity, both within their respective communities and within the larger municipal structure. Mixed-Use Centres constitute a critical element in the City's growth management strategy, being areas with high potential to achieve compact and mixed-use development. They are limited in number and represent opportunities for substantial growth. In some cases, development centered on a rapid-transit station will require ambitious reconfigurations of the station lands in order to facilitate options for intensification - for example, the use of air rights over grade-separated infrastructure at Hurdman or Cyrville stations. Certain Mixed-Use Centres, such as Tunney's Pasture and Confederation Heights, are centered on concentrations of employment and these concentrations are likely to continue. However, the area that functions as a Mixed-Use Centre extends beyond the limits of these concentrations.

Mixed-Use Centres will ultimately develop as "good places" in their own right as components of complete neighbourhoods. They should contain development that is both locally and regionally oriented. Where a concentration of single-use activity occurs, the interface with the surrounding community should be improved through such means as the addition of community-serving uses and improved physical linkages.

Development at Mixed-Use Centres will take advantage of the opportunities offered by transit for both internal and external commuting and ease of access on foot and by bicycle. By virtue of careful attention to design, orientation and a mix of uses, development in Mixed-Use Centres will contribute to the diversity of land use in the immediate area and foster the creation of vibrant centres of activity, particularly within the urban area outside the Greenbelt. This Plan establishes minimum targets for employment in Mixed-Use Centres. It is the intent of this Plan that intensification continue to focus on nodes and corridors (Mixed-Use Centres and Mainstreets) to support the public transit system, to create an essential community focus, to allow for minimum travel and to minimize disruption in existing stable neighbourhoods.

Policies

  1. Mixed-Use Centres are designated on Schedule B. They are strategically located with respect to the transportation system and accessible by transit, walking, cycling and automobile. They are centered on rapid-transit stations and contain one or more arterial roads with all-day, frequent transit service. They offer substantial opportunities for new development or redevelopment and represent a key element in this Plan's strategy to accommodate and direct growth in the city.
  2. Mixed-use Centres should be characterized by a broad variety of uses in accordance with policy 6a below. The City will encourage transit-supportive land uses, such as offices, secondary and post-secondary schools, hotels, hospitals, large institutional buildings, community recreation and leisure centres, daycare centres, retail uses, entertainment uses, services (such as restaurants), high- and medium-density residential uses and mixed-use development containing combinations of the foregoing. Major Urban Facilities are permitted as set out in Section 3.6.7.
  3. Employment targets of at least 5,000 jobs (10,000 jobs in the case of Mixed-Use Centres identified by the symbol “TC” on Schedule B) will be accommodated.
  4. A Community Design Plan will be required for each Mixed-Use Centre based on the criteria contained in this section. Development is generally permitted prior to the approval of a Community Design Plan subject to these policies. However, in the case of the Mixed-Use Centre south of Innes Road and west of Mer Bleue Road, the City will only permit development after the completion of a Community Design Plan and its adoption as a Secondary Plan by amendment to this Plan.
    1. The development of the Innes Snow Disposal Facility, in compliance with the policies under section 3.9 shall be permitted in advance of the Community Design Plan for this Mixed-Use Centre. [Amendment #62, 23 April 2008]
  5. Community Design Plans will require that residential uses be a component in all Mixed-Use Centres.
  6. All development applications and Community Design Plans for Mixed-Use Centres will be reviewed in the context of this Plan and in particular:
    1. Will be evaluated in the context of the Design Objectives and Principles in Section 2.5.1 and the criteria set out in Section 4.11, particularly with regard to achieving a compact, mixed-use, transit-oriented, pedestrian-friendly environment and creating a place with visual interest;
    2. Will, where possible, contribute to a range of housing options in the area.
  7. Mixed-Use Centres will optimize the use of land through provisions for compact mixed-use development. The zoning by-law and community design plans will:
    1. Allow for a mix of uses within a building or in adjacent buildings;
    2. Enable the employment targets of this Plan to be achieved;
    3. Provide for the highest density development such as offices to occur within 400 metres of the rapid-transit station;
    4. Require all development to meet the minimum target densities set out in Section 2.2.2, policy 7. Where development comprising a number of individual buildings is proposed to be built in phases, either on a single parcel of land or as one comprehensive development on a number of parcels of land, each individual phase will not be required to meet the target density where:
      1. the development is subject to a council approved site plan or concept plan that identifies the nature and use of each building in each phase; and
      2. the site plan or concept plan demonstrates that all of the phases once completed achieve or exceed the target density. [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, August 18, 2011]
    5. Require residential uses in the form of apartments and other multiples at a medium and/or high density;
    6. Provide a minimum and maximum parking requirement for development within 600 metres of a rapid-transit station, recognizing that the minimum and maximum may vary in response to the contextual influence of the geographic location of individual Mixed-Use Centres and the stage of rapid transit development; [OMB decision #2649, September 21, 2006]
    7. Provide for the potential for shared parking arrangements among uses that peak at different time periods;
    8. Allow for the potential redevelopment of surface parking areas;
    9. Not permit uses that require the majority of their site to be devoted to the outdoor storage, sale or service of goods to be located within 600 metres of a rapid transit station;
    10. Ensure that an appropriate transition between the Mixed-Use Centre and any surrounding General Urban Area occurs within the Mixed-Use Centre.
  8. Mixed-Use Centres will enhance opportunities for walking, cycling and transit and in particular:
    1. Will have regard for the provisions of Section 4.3 regarding the potential to reduce parking requirements;
    2. Will be evaluated in the context of the pertinent policies in Sections 2.3.1 and 4.3, in particular, achieving transit-oriented development by functionally integrating transit and the surrounding uses, enhancing accessibility to rapid transit stations, and by partnerships with the private sector to develop lands at rapid transit stations;
    3. Will contribute to the creation of a recognizable pedestrian circulation system that connects development with the public transit system, is barrier-free and does not conflict with vehicular movement systems;
    4. Will contribute to the creation of a street network that provides a convenient and pleasant walking and cycling environment which links housing, employment and the rapid transit station;
    5. Where parking lots exist, it is encouraged that the land use(s) they serve be intensified. [OMB decision #2649, September 21, 2006]
    6. If a high-density development cannot be located within 400 metres of the rapid transit station, then it should be located along an arterial road with all-day transit within the Mixed-Use Centre.
  9. Mixed-Use Centres will provide opportunities, when possible, for a variety of activities by:
    1. Establishing usable areas of public space that support and encourage informal social activity, recreation and civic gatherings;
    2. Incorporating community facilities such as schools, libraries, day care centres and leisure facilities that will encourage people to remain for extended periods of time;
    3. Incorporating spaces for retail, entertainment activities and cultural attractions.
  10. In order to demonstrate its commitment to development within Mixed-Use Centres, the City will consider them to be priority locations for considering:
    1. New or relocated municipal buildings and facilities which serve the public, or for leasing space for functions;
    2. The assembly of land to ensure an adequate supply that is strategically located for redevelopment or community improvement purposes;
    3. Infrastructure and public facilities improvement strategies, including measures such as those contained in policy 12 of Section 2.5.5;
    4. The creation of comprehensive traffic and parking strategies;
    5. The creation of brownfield redevelopment strategies;
    6. The use of techniques such as increased height and density provisions;
    7. The use of air rights over rapid-transit stations and other public infrastructure;
    8. The application of financial and regulatory incentives;
    9. Exploring partnerships between the public and private sectors.
  11. Existing developments in Mixed-Use Centres that do not exhibit the characteristics planned for such areas shall be encouraged to redevelop over time in a manner that is more compact, dense, and transit-oriented. For such developments, the use of flexible zoning controls, reduced parking requirements, and other incentives may be considered on a case-by-case basis to assist in facilitating redevelopment that better meets the objectives for Mixed-Use Centres. [Amendment #28, July 13, 2005]
    Site-Specific Exceptions
  12. The Mixed Use Centre at the southwest corner of Tremblay Road and St. Laurent Boulevard (municipally known as 530 Tremblay Road) shall provide for a minimum floor area of 40,000 m2 for employment uses, which will be implemented through the Zoning By-law. [Amendment #113, July 30, 2013] 

3.6.3 – Mainstreets

[Amendment #28, July 13, 2005]

The Mainstreet designation in this Plan identifies streets that offer some of the most significant opportunities in the city for intensification through more compact forms of development, a lively mix of uses and a pedestrian-friendly environment.

Mainstreets are at different stages of development. Each of these streets displays its own distinctive character depending largely upon the period during which it developed. They typically perform a dual role of providing adjoining neighbourhoods with a range of daily goods and services and, because they traverse many communities, they also provide more specialized functions that serve the needs of others living beyond the borders of any one neighbourhood. The policies acknowledge this diversity and provide for change and renewal that takes into account the character of the street and adjacent areas. Over time, it is the City’s intent that Mainstreets will achieve more compact, mixed-use, pedestrian-oriented development patterns. In older mainstreets, these patterns will be reinforced. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

This Plan encourages intensification along Mainstreets. Intensification is most likely to occur through the redevelopment of such sites as vacant lots, aging strip malls, and former automobile sales lots, parking lots and gas stations, as well as through additions to existing buildings.

Two general distinctions can be made:

  • Mainstreets generally developed prior to 1945, designated as Traditional Mainstreets, typically set within a tightly knit urban fabric, with buildings that are often small-scale, with narrow frontages and set close to and addressing the street, resulting in a more pedestrian-oriented and transit friendly environment. They generally have a four-lane cross-section, on-street parking or the potential to provide for it, and limited on-site parking. Land uses are often mixed, with commercial uses at the street level and residential uses on the upper levels.
  • Mainstreets generally developed after 1945, designated as Arterial Mainstreets, typically present an urban fabric of larger lots, larger buildings, varied setbacks, lower densities and a more automobile-oriented environment, often within a divided cross section of four or more lanes. They generally do not provide on-street parking. Parking lots are often located between the buildings and the street, and the predominant existing land use is single-purpose commercial.

While these designations generally match typical conditions, they are also intended to guide future development in cases where the City wishes to see a Mainstreet evolve in a denser, more pedestrian-oriented form. It is also recognized that there are stretches of Traditional Mainstreets that do not entirely reflect the above-noted pre-war vintage description. These inner suburban areas, built in the 1950s and 1960s, display a blend of Traditional and Arterial Mainstreet characteristics. For these areas, this Plan promotes redevelopment in a fashion that locates buildings close to the street and is more pedestrian-oriented. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

Within newly developing ‘greenfields’ areas or within Town Centres there may be opportunities to achieve pedestrian-oriented, mixed-use environments as the preferred model for the development of a new Mainstreet.

On Arterial Mainstreets, development will occur in a way that facilitates the gradual transition to a more urban pattern of land use. This means that, over time, more residential uses will be introduced, where appropriate. On Arterial Mainstreets, development will occur in a way that facilitates the gradual transition to more intensive forms of development. This could mean that, over time, higher density employment and residential uses could be introduced, where appropriate. Uses may be mixed within buildings and/or on the same lot, parking lots between the building and the street could be redeveloped and built upon, and the pedestrian environment will be improved.

The common feature of all Mainstreets is their function as a mixed-use corridor with the ability to provide a wide range of goods and services for neighbouring communities and beyond. Because a high percentage of housing, employment, retail and civic functions lie within easy reach of one another, the vitality of the area is sustained. It is the intent of this Plan that intensification continue to focus on nodes and corridors (Mixed-Use Centres and Mainstreets) to support the public transit system, to create an essential community focus, to allow for minimum travel and to minimize disruption in existing stable neighbourhoods.

Policies

  1. Traditional Mainstreets and Arterial Mainstreets are each designated on Schedule B. The former are planned as compact, mixed-use, pedestrian-oriented streets that provide for access by foot, cycle, transit and automobile. The latter also are planned to provide a mix of uses and have the potential to evolve, over time, into more compact, pedestrian-oriented and transit friendly places. To facilitate this evolution, the zoning by-law may define the portion of the street frontage of an Arterial Mainstreet to be occupied by buildings located at or set back minimally from the sidewalk. Both Traditional and Arterial Mainstreets will fulfill and take advantage of their multi-modal transportation corridor function. Additional Mainstreets may be identified in Developing Communities, the policies and designations for which will be found in the appropriate Community Design Plan.
  2. The boundary of the Traditional and Arterial Mainstreet designation is flexible depending on site circumstance and lot configuration, but generally applies to those properties fronting on the road so designated. It may also include properties on abutting side streets that exist within the same corridor. On lots where development has the potential to develop both adjacent to the street and to the rear of the property, the Mainstreet designation will apply to the entire lot and development situated on the rear portions will not be considered to be non-conforming by virtue of not being located adjacent to the street. Where the depth of lots fronting the road is sufficient to enable development to occur both adjacent to the street and to the rear of the property, and where development is initially unlikely to occupy the entire frontage immediately adjacent to the street, the site should be planned in a coordinated fashion that will facilitate:
    • multi-modal (pedestrian, cycling, transit and vehicular) access between the site and the public street(s),
    • attractive, safe and usable pedestrian and cycle connections between the site and adjacent communities,
    • an enhanced interconnected pedestrian environment that links individual uses on the site, transit stops and continuous public sidewalks on the adjoining streets, and which is generally distinct from internal vehicle routes,
    • measures of sufficient size and quality to relieve the visual impact of surface parking areas,
    • the provision of adequate landscaped areas, particularly trees, along the perimeter of the site and street frontages,
    • the provision of coordinated signage, and
    • over time, a development that is oriented to the Mainstreet.
  3. A broad range of uses is permitted on Traditional and Arterial Mainstreets, including retail and service commercial uses, offices, residential and institutional uses. Uses may be mixed in individual buildings or occur side by side in separate buildings. Where a Mainstreet abuts an Employment Area, the zoning by-law may prohibit noise-sensitive uses on the Mainstreet where appropriate.
  4. Major Urban Facilities are permitted on Arterial Mainstreets as set out in Section 3.6.7.
  5. Traditional and Arterial Mainstreets, or portions thereof, represent important areas for the preparation of Community Design Plans in accordance with the policies of Section 2.5.6. Community Design Plans and development proposals on Mainstreets will be evaluated in the context of the policies in this section and the Design Objectives and Principles in Section 2.5.1, and the Compatibility policies set out in Section 4.11.
  6. New gas bars, service stations, automobile sales and drive-through facilities will not be permitted on Traditional Mainstreets in order to protect and enhance the pedestrian environment. However, there may be exceptional circumstances where a drive-through facility may be located on a Traditional Mainstreet where the intent of this Official Plan regarding Traditional Mainstreets can otherwise be preserved. In these cases, appropriate means such as coordinated tree planting and landscaping, pedestrian amenities and the dimension, location and number of vehicular accesses will be used to minimize the interruption of the Traditional Mainstreet street frontage and ameliorate the impact on the pedestrian environment. Existing gas bars, service stations, automobile sales and drive-through facilities located on Traditional Mainstreets that are permitted under the zoning existing on the date of adoption of this Plan, will continue to be permitted in the zoning by-law as permitted uses and encouraged to redevelop over time in a manner that achieves the street’s planned function and character. New gas bars, service stations, automobile sales, and drive-through facilities are permitted on Arterial Mainstreets and will be evaluated on the basis of the Design Objectives and Principles in Section 2.5.1, any applicable Council-approved design guidelines, and the Compatibility policies set out in Section 4.11. [OMB decision #2649, September 21, 2006]
  7. On Traditional Mainstreets surface parking will not be permitted between the building and the street. The location of surface parking will avoid interruption of building continuity along the Traditional Mainstreet street frontage and will minimize impacts on pedestrians. However, there may be exceptional circumstances, where locating parking adjacent to the street frontage is unavoidable. In these cases, appropriate means such as coordinated tree planting and landscaping, pedestrian amenities and the dimension, location and number of vehicular access will be used to minimize the interruption of the Traditional Mainstreet street frontage and to ameliorate the impact on the pedestrian environment. On Arterial Mainstreets, the location of surface parking will be evaluated in the context of Section 2.5.1 and Section 4.11.
  8. Redevelopment and infill are encouraged on Traditional and Arterial Mainstreets in order to optimize the use of land through intensification, in a building format that encloses and defines the street edge and provides direct pedestrian access to the sidewalk. Any proposal for infill or redevelopment will be evaluated in light of the objectives of this Plan. This Plan supports building heights up to six storeys on Traditional Mainstreets and up to nine stories on Arterial Mainstreets. Greater building heights may be considered in accordance with policies 8 through 14 of s.4.11. [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, August 18, 2011]
  9. On Traditional Mainstreets, the minimum building height will be the equivalent of a two-storey building, except for those existing gas bars, service stations, automobile sales and drive-through facilities identified in policy 6 above.
  10. Where a building is being demolished on a Mainstreet, and no immediate replacement use is proposed, approval of the demolition will be subject to the approval of a Site Plan Application that addresses landscaping and associated site improvements that will contribute to the attractiveness of the Mainstreet environment on an interim basis.
  11. To achieve the vision for Mainstreets, changes within the public environment as well as within the abutting private property environment may be necessary. The function and design of a road may influence the nature of land use along it and changes to the street may be necessary in order to facilitate a more intense, pedestrian-oriented form of development adjacent to it. Where the City is proposing public works within a Mainstreet’s right-of-way, it will consider changes such as the institution of on-street parking, improvements to the pedestrian and cycling environment, streetscape enhancements, lane reductions and measures to enhance transit ridership in the area.
  12. In order to demonstrate its commitment to development on Mainstreets, the City will consider them to be priority locations for considering:
    1. New or relocated municipal buildings and facilities or for leasing space for municipal functions;
    2. The assembly of land to ensure an adequate supply that is strategically located for redevelopment or community improvement purposes;
    3. Infrastructure and public facilities improvement strategies, including measures such as those contained in policy 12 of Section 2.5.5;
    4. The creation of comprehensive traffic and parking strategies;
    5. The creation of brownfield redevelopment strategies;
    6. The use of techniques such as increased height and density provisions;
    7. The application of financial and regulatory incentives;
    8. Exploring partnerships between the public and private sectors.
  13. For the lands known municipally as 3730 Innes Road, the Arterial Mainstreet designation shall extend no greater than 475 metres from Innes Road. [OMB Order/Decision 1360 issued May 14, 2007]
  14. The City will protect the views of the Parliament Buildings from two locations in Beechwood Cemetery.  The view area, or viewshed, and the two locations, the Tommy Douglas Memorial and Poet’s Hill, are identified as Annex 12.  A building or structure is deemed to obstruct the view if it visually blocks the foreground view or visually mars the background silhouette view of the Parliament Buildings.  {Amendment #69, November 26, 2008]
    1. For each property in the viewshed, no zoning by-law amendment or minor variance shall be permitted that would obstruct the view.
    2. Site plan control approval, other regulations and City maintenance practices may also be adjusted to ensure that fences, signs, trees and other elements do not obstruct the view. [Amendment #69, November 26, 2008]
  15. The Arterial Mainstreet designation on Hazeldean Road, between Iber Road and the Carp Road intersection shall extend no more than 150 metres from Hazeldean Road.  Minor variation of this distance may be considered where a clearly recognized physical feature, such as a creek bed or a built boundary, such as an existing residential subdivision provide for a reasonable and small scale adjustment beyond 150 metres.  In addition to the foregoing and notwithstanding the provisions of policy 2 of Section 3.6.3, in the case of lots that extend between Hazeldean Road and the projection of Maple Grove and Rothbourne Road, consideration may be given to extending the Arterial Mainstreet designation more than 150 metres from Hazeldean Road, provided that:
    1. a detailed concept plan is prepared that illustrates how the entire lot will be developed;
    2. the concept plan ensures that the intent of the Mainstreet policies is maintained, particularly with respect to the creation of an urban development pattern along the street; and
    3. any retail uses are located and oriented to directly address Hazeldean Road. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]
  16. Despite the provisions of Section 3.6.3, Policy 6, on lands described as 443, 445, and 447 McArthur Avenue, a limited automobile service station is permitted. [Amendment #148, April 29, 2015] [Amendment #155, October 1, 2015]

3.6.4 – Developing Community

The Developing Community designation in this Plan identifies parts of the city that are undeveloped or substantially underdeveloped. Developing Communities will offer a full range of choice in housing, commercial, institutional and leisure activities within a development pattern that prioritizes walking, cycling and transit over the automobile. The completion of a community design plan will be required prior to any development being approved in a Developing Community.

Policies

  1. Developing Communities are identified on Schedule B as areas that are vacant, or substantially vacant, that offer substantial opportunity for new residential development at increased intensities and opportunities to create complete, sustainable communities, within a development pattern that prioritizes walking, cycling and transit over the automobile.
  2. All development occurring within land designated as a Developing Community will be on the basis of a community design plan for the entire area. Where previously-approved concept plans and/or technical studies exist within an area designated Developing Community, they may be utilized where appropriate to enhance the creation of a community design plan to the extent that they comply with the provisions of this Plan and represent a comprehensive strategy for all the lands within the Developing Community designation.
  3. The area under review for the purpose of creating a community design plan, in a Developing Community, may include adjacent lands not under this designation where this will facilitate achieving the policies of this Plan with respect to compact and mixed-use development.
  4. In its decision to approve a community design plan, City Council may determine that an amendment to this Plan is required in order to implement the community design plan (for example to add a new land-use designation), but such an amendment will not be required in order for development to proceed following the approval of a community design plan. In addition to the provisions of Section 2.5.6, the community design plan will: [Amendment #76, Ministerial Modification #34,OMB File # PL100206, September 07, 2011]
    1. Establish the mix and location of residential dwelling types which, as a minimum, will constitute the following:
      1. No more than 55% single detached, at least 10 per cent apartments dwellings and the remainder multiple attached dwellings other than apartments,
      2. In Developing Communities outside the Greenbelt, overall residential development will meet a minimum density target of 34 units per net hectare. Net residential density is based on the area of land in exclusively residential use, including lanes and parking area internal to developments but excluding public streets, right-of-way and all non-residential uses.

[Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, September 07, 2011]

b. Residential densities for Developing Communities inside the Greenbelt will be similar to those found in residential areas adjacent to the Central Area, commensurate with the greater proportion of multiple dwellings to be located in these areas;
c. Identify how the land use mix contributes to achieving the balance of jobs and households for the larger area, as identified in Figure 2.2;
d. Complete a subwatershed plan or environmental management plan in accordance with Section 2.4.3 should no plan exist for the area. These plans will identify a natural heritage system within the Developing Community and measures to protect this system through public ownership or other means will be included in the community design plan; [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, September 07, 2011]
e. Establish a modified grid system as the preferred alignment of roads serving the area, in order to maximize the number of access and egress points, the permeability of the network, pedestrian and transit accessibility to all areas, and to enhance way-finding and personal navigation within it. Inherent in the modified grid pattern is flexibility to address such matters as preserving existing desirable landform or landscape features or achieving a mix of housing form and density;
f. Identify and illustrate how the development pattern will achieve a distinctive identity and a variety of building form and façade treatments through means such as:

i. Making each unit in ground-oriented development distinct from its adjacent neighbour through the multiple use of elements such as colour, different cladding materials, etc.,

ii. Creating a strong street edge through the use of a uniform building setback,

iii. Dispersing different types of housing throughout a development, rather than concentrating enclaves of the same type of housing in one area, including variations in unit type along the same street (e.g., a single-detached unit next to a row house or ground-oriented apartment),

iv. Considering variations in lotting arrangements such as orienting units around central courtyards,

v. Determine the appropriate amendments to this Plan to facilitate the implementation of the community design plan wherever necessary to accommodate such matters as recognizing environmental features, establishing Major Open Spaces or identifying new Mainstreets.

3.6.5 – Employment Area and Enterprise Area

[Amendment #28, July 13, 2005]

Employment-related land uses are permitted in almost every urban designation in the Official Plan. The Central Area is the foremost employment concentration and will continue that role. Most business activities can integrate well with other land uses and it is the intent that these be focused on nodes and corridors (Mixed-Use Centres and Mainstreets). All three of these designations anticipate a healthy mix of business, retail, housing, institutional and cultural uses.

However, one of the key objectives of this Official Plan is to ensure that, over the long term, sufficient areas of land are reserved primarily for places of business and economic activity. Uses that support this function consist predominantly of offices, manufacturing, warehousing, distribution, research and development facilities and utilities. The maintenance of an adequate supply of suitable employment land is essential to the future economic prosperity of Ottawa and its residents. Employment land provides for a wide range of economic activities, job opportunities and pay scales, from advanced technology to traditional jobs in construction, trucking, and warehousing/distribution. Maintaining a sufficient supply of

land for this range of activities is key to the long-term economic health of the community and its ability to attract and retain new investment. Typically, Employment Areas provide large parcel sizes, reflective of user needs for storage, parking and building floorplate, and they are usually well situated with respect to major roads. These areas often come under pressure from other land uses that also may find it advantageous to locate in areas with these characteristics. The City is concerned that, in the short term, if too wide a range of uses is permitted, employment lands may develop for non-employment purposes, particularly during periods of a weak market for industrial or office uses. This Plan protects some lands primarily for employment use so that they remain affordable for employment purposes and so that they can develop over time without conflict from competing land uses. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

Employment Areas are designated to enable a variety of functions:

  • Noxious industrial uses that impose constraints on other uses locating nearby and require a buffer between these and other uses;
  • Uses that, while not noxious, are incompatible with other uses because of noise, lights and around the clock operation, etc.;
  • Prestigious uses (usually office or combinations of office/clean industrial) with a signature address and a desire to locate among other similar uses.

The decision to designate land as an Employment Area will be determined, in part, by its ability to accommodate at least 2,000 jobs. They will have various locational attributes depending on the type of Employment Area such as key locations on 400 series highways and multi-lane arterials; and locations that have good truck or rail or air access. These are also areas that can provide large parcels of land at affordable prices. Because one of the objectives of this Plan is to balance housing and employment opportunities in all urban communities outside the Central Area, lands designated as Employment Areas are distributed throughout the urban fabric, with at least one in each urban community outside the Greenbelt boundary.

Enterprise Areas are areas of employment that may accommodate the integration of housing without detracting from the objectives outlined above. They must still provide opportunity for a concentration of employment but, by increasing the employment densities, may also be able to support medium and high-density housing. Enterprise Areas have the following characteristics:

  • The potential to provide for at least 2,000 jobs;
  • At least 50% of the land is or will be devoted to employment;
  • The employment uses existing or planned for the area will not negatively impact on residential uses through noise, odour, health concerns or other conflicts;
  • Generally, the employment uses have less stringent locational requirements than those associated with Employment Areas, except that the area should be well served by public transit and may require access to truck routes;
  • Contain business park type employment such as offices, but have the potential to achieve employment densities higher than achieved in traditional park-like settings;
  • Are easily accessible from the surrounding community so that residential uses can be well integrated, both within the Enterprise Area itself and with the adjoining residential area, and can easily access residential amenities and services.

Uses that require large land areas for the external storage of goods or for vehicle sales and service may be carried out in Employment and Enterprise Areas. Incidental activity carried out in combination with a main use, such as showroom space associated with warehousing and storage, is also anticipated in Employment and Enterprise Areas. Complementary uses, such as service commercial, are appropriate in both Employment and Enterprise designations to meet the day-to-day needs of employees and residents and reduce their need to travel outside the area.

Policies

  1. Employment Areas and Enterprise Areas are designated on Schedule B. They provide for the concentration of at least 2,000 jobs at a range of densities and fulfill the projected need for employment land in the city to the planning horizon. The 2,000 job figure represents the minimum number of jobs that warrants the designation of lands on Schedule B; it is intended in virtually all cases that Employment and Enterprise Areas provide for many more jobs than this. Employment and Enterprise Areas must have access to designated truck routes. They are distributed throughout the urban area to support the potential to achieve a balance of housing and jobs especially in communities outside the Greenbelt boundary. They must have access to designated truck routes. They are distributed throughout the urban area to support the potential to achieve a balance of housing and jobs especially in communities outside the Greenbelt. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]
  2. In Employment and Enterprise Areas, the zoning by-law will:
    1. Permit a variety of industrial and employment-generating uses, such as warehousing and distribution, manufacturing, communications, storage, construction, office, institutional, and research and development uses;
    2. Permit uses that store most products outdoors and require large land areas devoted to external storage, sale or service of goods or for vehicle sales and service;
    3. Permit a variety of ancillary uses, such as recreational, health and fitness uses, child care, and service commercial uses (e.g. convenience store, doctor and dentist office, shoe repair shop, coffee shop, restaurant, bank, dry-cleaning outlet, service station or gas bar) consisting of small occupancies on individual pads, within a building containing a permitted use, in groups as part of a small plaza, or on small lots. The purpose of these complementary-type uses is to serve the employees of Employment Areas and Enterprise Areas, the general public in the immediate vicinity, and passing traffic. Ancillary uses are to be clearly incidental to the primary employment-generating uses listed in policy 2.a and will not be of a size or nature that draw clientele from a beyond the local area; [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]
    4. Permit sample and showroom uses, meaning that portion of a building operating only in association with a warehouse or other permitted use in the same building, primarily used for the display of samples, patterns or other goods and wherein orders are taken for merchandise which is stored in bulk in a warehouse in part of the same building for future delivery to its customers, and where the proportion of the gross leaseable area of a building devoted to sample and showroom use is limited in the zoning by-law so that sample and showroom space is secondary and subordinate to the primary use of the building for warehouse storage;
    5. Distinguish uses with characteristics that are likely to impact negatively on surrounding areas (e.g., industrial uses that produce odours, dust, smoke, heavy equipment movement, large areas of outdoor storage, or noise) from those uses that are likely to have negligible such impacts (e.g., offices or research and development facilities);
    6. Not permit industrial uses or development with the potential of restricting visibility at the Ottawa Macdonald-Cartier International Airport, the Rockcliffe Airport or the Carp Airport by virtue of industrial/manufacturing processes generating smoke, dust, or steam as described in the provincial government policy document, Land-use Planning Near Airports, 1978, as amended from time to time, published by the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing;
    7. Notwithstanding policies 2.a), b), c), and d) above or any other provisions of this Plan that prohibit retail uses on lands designated Employment Area, permit retail uses on lands located south of Highway 417, west of Terry Fox Drive, east of the Carp River and north of Palladium Drive, save and except for property with any frontage on Palladium Drive, and provided that adequate road capacity is available;
    8. Notwithstanding policies 2.a) and c) above, an institutional use will be permitted on the south half of Lot 26, Concession A, in the former City of Nepean, shown as Part 5 on Plan 5R-8254;
    9. Notwithstanding policy 2.c) above, the site at 500 Coventry Road may be developed with 100% retail use with a maximum of two stand alone retail stores to a total maximum gross floor area of 7,779 square metres. Alternatively, should the site not be developed with “stand-alone” retail as permitted by this policy, office development within buildings having a height of 5 storeys shall be permitted. Where the site is developed for office use in accordance with this policy, retail uses shall be limited in accordance with the policies of S.3.6.5;
    10. Notwithstanding policy 2.c) above, a stand-alone retail store up to a maximum size of 4,645 square metres gross floor area is permitted at 525 Coventry Road.
    11. in addition to the provisions of the policies set out in this section, S.2.1.1 of the Secondary Plan for Area 1, 2, & 3 in the former City of Nepean set out in Volume 2A of this Plan will apply to the lands described as Parts Lot 19, Concession A, R.F., Nepean: PIN 04733-0055 and 04733-0056 located east of Merivale Road and west of Prince of Wales Drive in the South Merivale Business Park. [OMB decision #2649, September 21, 2006]
  3. Notwithstanding policies 2.a) and c) above or any other provisions of this Plan that prohibit retail uses on lands designated Employment Area, the lands identified as Commercial on Schedule A in the Secondary Plan for South Nepean Urban Areas 9 and 10 in the Former City of Nepean as set out in Volume 2A in this plan may be developed with retail uses, which may also include commercial office use and commercial uses that support the employment use, with a maximum lot area of 12 hectares (30 acres). [Amendment #121, July 10, 2013]
  4. Enterprise Areas are areas of employment are characterized by the presence of a high proportion of higher density offices that potentially offers a positive environment for the integration of housing without detracting from the area’s employment potential. Generally, Enterprise Areas are not characterized by circumstances such as the presence of soil contamination; truck routes or other streets that carry high volumes of heavy equipment; the location of trunk sewer or other infrastructure that would interfere with or raise safety issues; or the presence of industrial uses that by virtue of the generation of noise, fumes, heavy equipment movement, or external storage of large amounts of materials, constitute incompatible neighbours to residential uses. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]
  5. Residential uses are permitted in Enterprise Areas by amendment to the zoning by-law. Applications to provide for residential uses within an Enterprise Area will be considered provided the following criteria are met:
    1. The applicable policies in Section 4 have been satisfied;
    2. A mix of housing is provided but all housing is in the form of townhouses, stacked townhouses or apartments.
    3. The Enterprise Area and particularly the residential uses within it, is linked to adjacent areas by roads and pathways;
    4. The residential uses are functionally integrated with employment uses through such means as sharing sites or buildings occupied by employment uses, occupying sites adjacent to employment uses, provision of common linkages (roads, pathways), strategic location of parks so as to be mutually beneficial, central location of employment uses, opportunities to share parking, convenient transit routing, mutual accessibility to convenience uses, amenities and services, and any other means that may be appropriate;
    5. Any demand that residential uses will create for additional amenities and services has been assessed and the means of addressing such demands has been identified;
    6. At least 50 per cent of the developable land in an Enterprise Area will be devoted to employment uses. The implementing zoning by-law will be supported by a study and will indicate how and where the employment potential established in the zoning by-law will be accommodated; [OMB decision #2649, September 21, 2006]
    7. Where established through pre-consultation with the proponent, the City may require a concept plan indicating how the uses for the whole site could evolve over time;
    8. In the exceptional case of employment lands designated for residential development under Amendment 25 (2002) to the former Regional Official Plan and Amendment 66 (2002) to the former Kanata Official Plan, and notwithstanding policies 5 b), c), d) and e) above, existing minimum density requirements specified under those amendments shall continue for the life of this Official Plan only;
    9. Notwithstanding Policy 5 b) above, lands identified as part of SoHo West, located in the Kanata South Business Park, municipally known as 5271 Fernbank Road, legally described as Part of Lot 31, Concession 10, Geographic Township of Goulbourn, formerly City of Kanata, now City of Ottawa, can accommodate semi-detached dwelling units as part of the housing mix, as long as the zoning by-law prescribed minimum residential density is achieved.
  6. The City will discourage the removal of employment lands for other uses as set out in Section 2.2.2 of this Plan. [Amendment #76, September 09, 2011]
  7. Notwithstanding the policies above development of the Enterprise Area located to the north of Highway 417 at the Huntmar Drive interchange is subject to the following provisions:
    1. retail development is permitted on a maximum of 10.6 net ha of land but the amount of retail shall not exceed the amount of office by more than 8,000 square metres at any time;
    2. retail in a mixed use building shall be included in the calculation of the 10.6 net ha required by this policy;
    3. residential development is permitted on a maximum of 1.3 net ha within the remaining Enterprise Area land; and
    4. development within the remaining Enterprise Area shall provide for a minimum average density of 125 jobs per net ha.
    5. as lands within this area are subject to periodic vibrations of 20 mm/s and sound levels of 134 dBL arising from the nearby bedrock quarries at 2448 Carp Road and 421 Huntmar Drive, all Site Plan Control applications within this area are subject to the submission of a noise and vibration study detailing design compatibility with vibration limits of up to 20 mm/s and sound levels of up to 134 dBL arising from these nearby quarries.  In addition, warning clauses will be inserted in all site plan and subdivision agreements in these areas advising that there will be vibration and noise from time to time and that uses should be avoided where people could be impacted or adversely affected by noise and vibration at these levels.  There will also be obligations on all vendors and landlords to advise purchasers and tenants of the vibration and noise and of the design obligations. [Amendment #142, November 11, 2014]

Special Exceptions

8.  Notwithstanding the provisions of Policy 5 above to the contrary, on the lands identified as 8600 Jeanne d’Arc Boulevard North no residential development will be permitted until          10,000 square metres of office floor space has been constructed.  Residential uses may occupy greater than 50 per cent of the total site where the additional units are included in        one or more mixed-use buildings.  Any building containing residential uses shall be limited in height to a maximum of 10 storeys. [Amendment #168, April 21, 2016]

 3.6.6 – Central Area

The Central Area is the economic and cultural heart of the city and the symbolic heart of the nation, based on its unique combination of employment, government, retail, housing, entertainment and cultural activities. It is also the main tourist destination in the National Capital Region, with 5.5 million visitors yearly. These policies promote the Central Area’s vital role in the city, its distinct identity and heritage character, as well as the primacy of the Parliament Buildings and other national symbols. The Plan also aims to enhance the diversity and attractiveness of the Central Area by encouraging a broad range of land uses and day/night, year-round activities. This aim will be supported by the protection of residential neighbourhoods in and near the Central Area and an increasing number of downtown area dwelling units, including a vibrant urban community on LeBreton Flats.

In order to realize the vision, walking, cycling and transit to and in the Central Area will need to have priority, particularly during peak traffic periods. This will require a safe and comfortable pedestrian/cycling environment on all downtown streets. Central Area policies must consider the needs of all users of usable open spaces, pocket parks, sunlit pedestrian amenity areas and other culture and leisure resources, including an increased urban forest cover, that enhance the downtown experience. Improved access to water-oriented facilities on the Ottawa River and the Rideau Canal will also be important while protecting the waterways’ unique environmental qualities. To minimize car traffic through the downtown and to make transit the preferred choice for residents travelling to the downtown, the City will convert to LRT most of the east-west Transitway inside the Greenbelt, through a downtown tunnel, and upgrade and extend the existing north-south O-Train, to LRT. [OMB decision #1582, June 17, 2005]

New buildings and spaces will reflect a human scale of development, and will be guided by design criteria, which will result in a significantly enhanced pedestrian environment. The Central Area’s unique heritage resources will be protected through heritage conservation, and enhanced through new development which respects and complements nearby heritage buildings. This urban design renaissance will ensure development which is worthy of a nation’s capital and which is conducive to the attraction of people and businesses.

The Central Area is made up of a number of distinct sub-areas, each with its own identity and character. As an example, the By Ward Market’s exceptional heritage character will be protected through its designation as a heritage conservation district and through guidelines that ensure sensitive infill and alterations.

The Core’s employment image and identity will be enhanced through new mixed-use development and refurbishment, which creates a sense of human scale, and contributes to the area’s vitality by providing retail uses at grade and additional hotel and residential uses.

Rideau Street, Bank Street, and Sparks Street will flourish as vibrant shopping streets with enhanced pedestrian environments and office, residential and other uses above the street, which serve as important components of the Central Business District.

The liveability of the residential areas within the Central Area (Upper Town, Lowertown and Sandy Hill West) will be significantly improved, and their heritage resources will be protected and enhanced. They will continue to contribute significantly to the City’s supply of inner-city housing and will support 24-hour activity in the Central Area.

The references to the downtown in this section include the Central Area and the residential neighbourhoods surrounding it. These neighbourhoods give vitality to the Central Area and provide a convenient market for its services. This Plan recognizes the need to ensure that residential intensification and infill development, as it occurs over time, respects and maintains existing neighbourhood character and identity. In addition, the implementation of the Downtown Ottawa Urban Design Strategy 20/20 will help address the challenge of creating well-designed buildings and spaces in both the Central Area and parts of the adjacent neighbourhoods of Centretown and Sandy Hill. These areas are experiencing development activity and design vision and guidance are needed. Finally, the secondary plans for Centretown and Sandy Hill, which provide more detailed policy direction, have been included in Volume 2A. [Amendment #24, May 25, 2005]

[Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

Policies

  1. The boundaries of the Central Area are shown on Schedule B and will not be subject to variation without a comprehensive review and an amendment to this Plan.
  2. The City will support the Central Area’s role as the economic and cultural heart of the city and the symbolic heart of the nation by:
    1. Implementing the Central Area Secondary Plan, which establishes a vision and detailed policies for the desired future of the Central Area as the focus of government, tourism, business, retail, housing, major community facilities, entertainment and cultural activities;
    2. Working with the Business Improvement Areas, Building Owners and Managers Association and other stakeholders to attract commercial development, including unique, specialty, and international-scale retailers, and to seek design opportunities that can accommodate large format retail;
    3. Implementing the Downtown Ottawa Urban Design Strategy to promote the liveability of the downtown, as described in policy 5 below; [Amendment 24, May 25, 2005]
    4. Ensuring development applications and public works have regard for the Central Area Secondary Plan policies to enhance the physical character, identity and unique heritage resources of the Central Area’s distinctive streets (including the symbolic Confederation Boulevard), theme streets, character areas, and heritage conservation districts;
    5. Protecting the visual integrity and symbolic primacy of the Parliament Buildings and other national symbols as seen from Confederation Boulevard and the main approach routes to the Central Area, depicted as key viewpoints and view sequences on Annex 8A – Central Area Key Views and View Sequences of the Parliament Buildings and Other National Symbols. In realizing this aim, the City will ensure that:
      1. Buildings constructed in the areas of height control as set out on Annex 8A do not rise above the ridgeline of the roof of the Centre Block, and thus do not visually mar the silhouette of the Parliament Buildings (Figure 3.1), and do not visually dominate the Parliament Buildings and other national symbols (Figure 3.2),

Parliament Buildings

ii. Buildings constructed in those areas designated on Annex 8A as areas of foreground height control, do not visually obstruct the foreground of views of the Parliament Buildings and other national symbols, as seen from the key viewpoints and view sequences indicated on Annex 8A,

iii. No building, part of a building, or building roof structure exceeds the angular building height limits that are defined by the perimeter above sea-level heights for each block on Annex 8B – Central Area Maximum Building Heights/Angular Planes, without a thorough analysis of the impact of any projection or protrusion, and without an official plan amendment to Annex 8B,

iv. For blocks that do not have angular height planes established on Annex 8B, maximum permitted building heights do not violate the intent and aim of this policy, permitted heights are consistent and compatible with building heights generally in the area where no height planes apply, and permitted heights are in keeping with the intent and aim for those areas that are set out by the Central Area Secondary Policy Plan contained in Volume 2, Annex 8C – LeBreton Flats Foreground View Control Planes and as indicated on Annex 8B – Central Area Maximum Building Heights;

f. Limiting the support of the City to minor variance applications for an increase in building heights provided that:

i. The property is located within a block where an angular height plane, as indicated on Annex 8D – Central Area Maximum Building Heights and Annex 8B – Central Area Maximum Building Heights/Angular Planes does not apply, and
ii. The increased height will not visually mar the silhouette of the Parliament Buildings or dominate the Parliament Buildings and other national symbols, and
iii. The site has not been the recipient of a transfer of floor space index;

g. Working with federal agencies to encourage the federal government to maintain its concentration of administrative functions in the Central Area;
h. Working with the public and private sectors to encourage the location in the Central Area of major facilities to enhance existing retail areas, tourist and convention facilities and amenities, and pedestrian and transit travel;
i. Identifying water and wastewater capacity upgrades to support development in the Central Area as a priority in infrastructure systems rehabilitation.

3. The City will promote the Central Area as a vital and active place by:

a. Encouraging a range of day/night and year-round activities through such means as extended transit service, and supporting the staging and creation of cultural facilities, festivals, theatre, music, public art, commemorations and other activities and special events;
b. In keeping with the Central Area’s role as a main tourist destination, supporting the Ottawa Tourism and Convention Authority, National Capital Commission, Parks Canada and other stakeholder initiatives that maintain and develop tourism and convention attractions, facilities, activities and programming; [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]
c. Working with the National Capital Commission, Parks Canada and other stakeholders to:

i. Provide streets, public open space and amenity areas, including improved access to the Rideau River and Canal, which address the needs of Central Area employees, residents, shoppers and visitors, [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]
ii. Explore the feasibility of preparing an illumination plan;

d. Adopting the principles of multi-use, multiple-time/season and multiple-function for leisure resources in the Central Area, particularly those located within and adjacent to schools, churches and offices, by entering into joint-use agreements where appropriate;
e. Undertaking and implementing a study of leisure resource needs and opportunities, including a strategy that will result in an enhanced distribution and variety of leisure resources in the Central Area;
f. Supplementing and enhancing the urban forest in the Central Area, by providing vegetation and tree planting in open spaces and amenity areas.

4. Residents living downtown serve an essential role in creating a more complete community by supporting its facilities and services. In keeping with the strategic directions set out in Section 2, the City will encourage new infill dwellings in the Central Area and surrounding residential neighbourhoods by: [Amendment #24, May 25, 2005]

a. Providing financial incentives, such as exemptions from development charges, building permit fees or other development fees and levies;
b. Entering into innovative partnerships arrangements for retention of schools, community centres and day-care facilities.

5. The City will enhance the appearance and liveability of the Central Area and the surrounding residential neighbourhoods by:

a. Undertaking the following Downtown Ottawa Urban Design Strategy implementation measures, prioritized on an annual basis:

i. The 41 targeted strategies shown on Annex 9 (with the exception of targeted strategies 1-6, which are part of the National Capital Commission’s core area vision and thus within their jurisdiction to implement) as described in the Central Area Secondary Plan, Centretown Secondary Plan and Sandy Hill Secondary Plan contained in Volume 2A,
ii. Public and/or private partnerships to help realize the Strategy’s objectives,
iii. Streetscape improvements, tree planting, public open space and public art as part of the capital budget for all road and infrastructure renewal and transit improvement programs,
iv. Design and/or public realm performance standards as part of the criteria for the sale of City lands, and
v. A public open space acquisition program (including privately-owned but publicly-accessible open spaces); [Amendment #24, May 25, 2005]

b. Ensuring that all public and private development has regard for the compatibility criteria in Section 2.5.1, the design criteria in policy 6 below and that residential development:

i. Contributes to a sense of a human scale,
ii. Where appropriate, results in a transition from lower-profile to higher-profile buildings, and vice versa,
iii. Minimizes sun shadowing and undesirable wind conditions,
iv. Provides adequate visual privacy for proposed residential units, while respecting that of existing nearby units, through such measures as unit siting or orientation, the use of setbacks, landscaping and/or screening,
v. Maximizes the exposure of residential units to direct sunlight,
vi. Provides usable private outdoor space, such as balconies, as well as usable semi-private outdoor and/or indoor amenity areas, such as meeting and/or exercise rooms, small outdoor landscaped areas, and/or the use of green roof areas for passive outdoor activity,
vii. Creates an identifiable entrance, and a strong transition from the public right-of-way through the use of landscape elements, changes in direction, or lighting, and
viii. Provides appropriate landscape elements;

c. Improving the image of the Central Area and assisting in visitor orientation by enhancing major gateways into the Central Area and Nodes within it. Nodes are points of intensive activity, which provide a focus to public life, such as a marketplace or a significant commemoration landmark. The location of these features are identified on Annex 9 – Central Area Gateways, Nodes and Distinctive Streets; [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]
d. Locating all utilities underground in new developments and in areas or streets of historic merit as identified in the Central Area Secondary Plan;
e. Designating heritage buildings and streetscapes and working with owners to restore and maintain heritage buildings.

6. The City shall improve and enhance the pedestrian environment in the Central Area by:

a. Providing outdoor/indoor green open space and pedestrian amenity areas (including interim green spaces on vacant lands) such as pocket parks, plazas, green rooftops and/or indoor winter gardens;
b. Providing soft and hard landscaping elements, including tree plantings, which contribute and are sensitive to the character of the area;
c. Providing sheltered and sunlit seating areas and comfort stations where appropriate
d. Protecting and enhancing established public courtyards, pedestrian malls and circulation systems in the Central Area;
e. Preserving the established architectural integrity of existing buildings, streets and areas;
f. Ensuring buildings are designed and sited to minimize sun shadowing and provide appropriate wind attenuation, where required, on public open spaces and pedestrian corridors;
g. Ensuring the provision of at-grade street-oriented uses with their principal entrances fronting on the sidewalk and providing a continuity of weather protection;
h. Considering appropriate safety and public security measures, including, design for safety, lighting and site visibility for all development proposals and public improvements.

7. The following streets are recognized as distinctive streets in the Central Area for their unique pedestrian characteristics:

a. Confederation Boulevard which extends through the Central Area and links points of political, historical, cultural, and architectural importance within the National Capital Region, serves as a pedestrian and vehicular promenade connecting the national institutions on the banks of the Ottawa River, and provides an important sequence of views of the Parliament Building;
b. Sussex Drive as the Mile of History and as a part of Confederation Boulevard, with significant heritage buildings;
c. York Street as an entrance to, and promenade through the By Ward Market, with a significant heritage character;
d. Metcalfe Street as a pedestrian promenade linking Centretown with the Core, the World Exchange Plaza open space, Sparks Street and Parliament Hill;
e. Elgin Street as a significant pedestrian promenade and streetscape linking Centretown to the Core, the Canal, and Parliament Hill;
f. Kent Street as an important pedestrian promenade linking Centretown to the Core, Sparks Street and Parliament Hill; and
g. Booth Street, north of Scott/Wellington/Albert Street, as a significant pedestrian promenade and vehicular route, which provides commuter access to and from the Central Area, a link with the existing community, access to the rapid-transit station, and which will serve as the mainstreet focus of LeBreton Flats.
h. King Edward Avenue, also designated a Traditional Mainstreet in its extent beyond the Central Area, as a major entrance gateway into Ottawa from Quebec, with significant potential for residential and other types of intensification and a new role as a unifying element between East and West Lowertown once the truck route is relocated to a new inter-provincial bridge. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

8. To give walking, cycling and public transit priority in the Central Area:

a. Before the five-year review of this Plan, the City will undertake and implement a multi-jurisdictional transportation strategy for the Central Area, including traffic measures in residential areas and a pedestrian circulation plan to designate pedestrian corridors and create predominately at-grade pedestrian links between different parts of the Central Area and leisure, shopping, employment and transit facilities;
b. The Transportation Master Plan will include provisions for a transportation system that reduces the use of automobiles and encourages the use of walking, cycling and public transit as the principal means of access to and mobility within the Central Area, particularly between east and west of the Canal;
c. The City will, working with other levels of government, remove Rideau Street and King Edward Avenue from the City’s identified truck route system upon the completion of a new inter provincial corridor to accommodate trucks; [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]
d. Pedestrian movements will occur primarily at grade along public streets. Above- and below-grade pedestrian connections will be limited to strategic locations that ensure the prominence of at-grade movement and that:

i. Link changes in grade due to topographical features or physical barriers,
ii. Provide direct and identifiable access to rapid-transit stations and major public short-term parking facilities,
iii Provide mid-block connections to pedestrian corridors, where practical.

9. The City will ensure that parking and loading facilities address the unique role of the Central Area and contribute to an enjoyable, safe and secure pedestrian environment by:

a. Facilitating, possibly with partners, the provision of moderately-priced, short-term parking and loading facilities to serve the retail and commercial sectors and the tourism industry and limiting the provision of long-term parking that would be attractive to commuters;
b. Discouraging the provision of temporary surface parking lots on vacant sites, and requiring new temporary surface parking lots within the Central Area to obtain a rezoning to assess their impact on the pedestrian environment, particularly abutting pedestrian corridors or theme streets. Theme streets are predominantly linear shopping streets with associated additional land uses, a unique physical character and a unifying theme. Where temporary surface parking is permitted by a rezoning, the City will require that the visual appearance of such parking areas is enhanced and screened through the use of substantial vegetation, while ensuring adequate public safety;
c. Requiring all permanent parking required by or associated with new development to be located within a parking structure above or below grade;
d. Reclaiming the public right-of-way, where it is encroached upon by existing surface parking lots, for tree planting and landscaping; [Amendment #24, May 25, 2005]
e. Implementing this parking policy, subject to the following design criteria, when reviewing development proposals:

i. Where such parking is provided above-grade within a structure, the exterior design of the development, particularly the lower levels, shall contribute to an enjoyable street environment by creating visual interest through the use of architectural detail, materials, and/or texture, and by respecting the character of nearby buildings,
ii. The interior design of parking areas shall maximize safety and minimize potential crime or vandalism through such measures as the provision of appropriate lighting, visibility, and security features,
iii. For mixed-use developments containing residential units, parking areas should be dedicated for the exclusive use of residents and separated by design or distance from other parking areas or other uses except where parking facilities can be shared with these other uses so as to provide adequate, safe, secure and convenient parking for residential use.

10. The City will protect the views of the Parliament Buildings from two locations in Beechwood Cemetery. The view area, or viewshed, and the two locations, the Tommy Douglas Memorial and Poet’s Hill, are identified as Annex 12. A building or structure is deemed to obstruct the view if it visually blocks the foreground view or visually mars the background silhouette view of the Parliament Buildings. {Amendment #69, November 26, 2008]

a. For each property in the viewshed, no zoning by-law amendment or minor variance shall be permitted that would obstruct the view.
b. Site plan control approval, other regulations and City maintenance practices may also be adjusted to ensure that fences, signs, trees and other elements do not obstruct the view. [Amendment #69, November 26, 2008]

11. Within the Central Area, Zoning By-law amendments for new drive-through facilities will not be permitted in the Official Plan at locations where they would interfere with the intended function and form of the Central Area designation. Proposals for new drive-through facilities within the Central Area designation will be subject to concurrent applications for a Zoning By-law amendment and site plan approval. Such applications will only be considered for approval in circumstances where: the location, design, and function of the drive-through facility, including the associated queues, maintains the intent of the Official Plan and any applicable Secondary Plan; does not change the continuity and character of the existing streetscape; considers the impact on the pedestrian and/or cycling orientation of the land use designation; and, where pedestrian movement into and through the site can be maintained. Additional matters to be addressed may include: the nature of surrounding uses; the character of the area and theme of the street as set out in any applicable Secondary Plan; proximity to heritage resources; and opportunities for the integration of the drive-through facility with other uses within the area. [Amendment #84, April 16, 2010]

Exceptions:

12. Despite the provisions of Section 3.6.6 Policy 2(e) ii relating to the angular building height limits as shown on Annex 8B, within an area measuring 378 square metres at the north west portion of the block on Annex 8B which covers the lands known municipally as 11 Colonel By, may be up to 134.1 metres above sea level in height.  [Amendment #157, October 14, 2015]  

3.6.7 – Major Urban Facilities

[Amendment #28, July 13, 2005]

Certain types of uses, while constituting a legitimate and essential component of the community, share characteristics that require special land-use considerations. These uses are considered appropriate in only a limited number of urban designations. The types of uses that fall within this category include:

  • Hospitals;
  • Universities and community colleges;
  • Major sports, recreational and cultural facilities of a scale similar to Lansdowne Park, Lynx Stadium, Scotia Bank Place, the Canada Science and Technology Museum and Ben Franklin Place; [OMB decision #2649, September 21, 2006]
  • Major shopping centres (over 50,000 square metres gross leaseable area).

These Major Urban Facilities are typically distinguished by a number of unique characteristics. They usually service the entire city or large parts of it, and may even draw from beyond the boundaries of Ottawa. Large numbers of people require convenient access to these facilities. Some exert a concentrated demand on the transportation, water and wastewater systems that may peak at particular "event" times, while others operate more or less continuously over a 24-hour period. They typically require and occupy large sites that may represent a significant source and supply of open space in the city. All have the potential to exert varying degrees of impact upon neighbouring residential areas. Occasionally, there may be merit in combining these uses with other complementary ancillary uses on the same site in recognition of the potential for achieving mutually supportive relationships with other parts of the community.

Due to the scale of Major Urban Facilities and the potential impact that they may have on adjoining areas, the City will ensure that they develop in a form that is compatible with and in a manner that respects their neighbours. Further, there may be benefits to the community as a whole through the provision of a wider range of complementary or ancillary uses on sites of some Major Urban Facilities. Examples of some relationships that could prove to be mutually supportive include such things as an independent research laboratory on a university campus or the addition of residential uses to a major shopping centre. The City will consider supporting such requests on an individual basis.

Policies

  1. Major Urban Facilities are not shown on the schedules of this Plan, but will be permitted by amendment to the zoning by-law within the following designations:
    1. General Urban Area;
    2. Central Area;
    3. Mixed-Use Centre;
    4. Arterial Mainstreet.
  2. This Plan does not support the location of Major Urban Facilities in a rural designation. Any application to amend this section of the Plan to permit such a use in the rural area will be evaluated on the basis of:
    1. Evidence that a suitable site for the proposed use is not available within the urban area;
    2. A transportation impact study;
    3. A study to indicate how water and wastewater services will be provided and to address:
      1. The definition of the Public Service Area boundary and the terms of provision of service,
      2. The mechanisms for financing capital costs, operating costs and infrastructure replacement reserve costs;
    4. An identification and assessment of the potential impacts of the Major Urban Facility upon adjacent land uses and how these impacts will be addressed;
    5. Where the proposed Major Urban Facility is proposed to be located within the Agricultural Resource Area, evidence:
      1. That there are no reasonable alternative locations available in the rural area, and
      2. That there are no reasonable alternative locations in the Agricultural Resource Area with lower priority agricultural lands;
  3. Notwithstanding the above policies requiring that Major Urban Facilities locate in the urban area, in order to facilitate the development of the Central Canada Exhibition on the property known municipally as 4980 Albion Road (being part of Lot 25, Concession 3, Rideau Front), "exhibition" and "fairgrounds" are also permitted in addition to those uses permitted in the General Rural Area designation, at this location.
  4. Notwithstanding the above policies requiring Major Urban Facilities to locate in the urban area, in order to recognize the Rideau Carleton Raceway and Slots facility, located on lands legally described as part of the South Half of Lot 24, Concession 4, Rideau Front, Gloucester, being Parts 5 and 11 on Plan 4R-15731; Parts of lots 23 and 24, Concession 4, Rideau Front, Gloucester, being Part 2 on Plan 4R-15731; and consolidation of various properties: Part of lot 24, Concession 4, Rideau Front, Gloucester, Being parts 3, 4, 6, and 7 on Plan 4R-15731, an exhibition grounds for the viewing of horse racing, gaming premises as defined in the Gaming Control Act and related uses are also permitted in addition to those uses permitted in the General Rural Area designation, in this location; [Amendment #12, September 8, 2004].
  5. New Major Urban Facilities will:
    1. Be located at a rapid-transit station located on the Priority Transit Network shown on Schedule D; and; [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]
    2. Have direct access to an arterial road.
  6. Major Urban Facilities will be established by an amendment to the zoning by-law. In considering such an amendment, or when considering an application to expand an existing facility, the City:
    1. Will require the completion of a transportation impact study;
    2. Will assess the proposal in light of Section 2.5.1 and Section 4.11;
    3. May require the completion of an image analysis of the site, particularly where the proposal is located within the Central Area or in situations where the proposal is to be of medium or high profile. The image analysis will:
      1. Establish the contextual relationship of the proposed development in relation to adjacent buildings, streets and natural or built areas in both a written and 3-dimensional visual format by showing how the proposed development will fit into the existing context,
      2. Document the perceptions of the existing physical environment as held by interested stakeholders, including the community,
      3. Demonstrate that new development will not jeopardize the integrity of features such as heritage buildings or environmental resources,
      4. Recommend appropriate built form solutions that will enhance the context in which the proposal will be built.
  7. The City recognizes the importance of the services provided by universities and colleges, their need for continued growth, and their contribution to the city's economy. The City will work with these institutions to find creative solutions that will provide the flexibility to respond to their changing program, service, research, ownership, partnership, funding and market opportunities.
  8. In considering an amendment to the zoning by-law or other planning applications to establish a new or expand an existing Major Urban Facility, the City will determine:
    1. Minimum/maximum site area requirements;
    2. Maximum density, building height and setback requirements;
    3. The provision of adequate on-site parking;
    4. Traffic circulation patterns, including pedestrian, cyclist, transit and vehicles;
    5. The adequacy of existing water, waste water and stormwater services;
    6. The provision of landscaping and buffering;
    7. How the provisions of Section 4.3 regarding development at transit stations have been met.
  9. The City will identify the implications of the long-term expansion needs of a Major Urban Facility with respect to the matters in policy 8 above and will ensure that the means to address and mitigate the impacts of the Major Urban Facility on the surrounding community and natural features are taken into account.
  10. In considering an amendment to the zoning by-law to permit ancillary uses to be established on the same site as Major Urban Facilities, the City will require that:
    1. The ancillary uses are secondary to and supportive of the primary use;
    2. The addition of ancillary uses does not result in a scale or character of development that is incompatible with adjacent residential uses.
  11. A major shopping centre is defined as a shopping and commercial service facility having more than 50,000 square metres of gross leasable area and that includes:
    1. A group of retail and commercial service establishments that is planned and managed as an operating unit;
    2. Retail concentrations in multiple ownership planned as a unit and which may include free-standing buildings and other forms of development. Approval of a master site plan that addresses matters in common such as orientation to the street, circulation, access and egress and parking will be required.
  12. With the exception of Carlingwood Shopping Centre, major shopping centres will only be permitted on sites located at existing or future stations in the rapid-transit network, where the station is incorporated into the design of the site.
  13. Consistent with Section 2.5.1 and Section 4.11, where major shopping centres are created through redevelopment of existing retail sites, the new development will be encouraged to locate close to the street, provide multiple and direct retail frontages onto sidewalks, and reconfigure parking to occupy the interior of the property. [Amendment #28, July 13, 2005]

3.7 - Rural Designations

3.7.1 – Villages

There are 26 Villages, scattered throughout the city’s rural area, identified on Schedule A. These Villages will continue to vary in size and character. Villages play a significant historical role: they typically developed at the junctions of major roads and railways where they could efficiently provide retail, educational and other services to the surrounding rural communities. Development traditionally occurred on smaller lots serviced by private wells and septic systems.

Many of the larger Villages that have historically functioned as service centres for the surrounding rural areas will continue to do so. In these Villages, the City will encourage the delivery of municipal and community programmes and facilities, the development of residential uses in a variety of forms and modest employment opportunities, in the form of commercial, tourism and small-scale industrial development. Preservation of these Villages and their traditional functions is critical to the continued vitality of the rural area. Smaller Villages may continue to grow at modest levels.

Policies

Locations and Distribution of Villages 

  1. Villages are designated on Schedule A with the intent of permitting a variety of land uses to provide for the daily needs of the rural community and to ensure that they remain distinctly rural in character and scale.
  2. Villages vary in size and function and have different needs with respect to land-use plans. [OPA 76, OMB File # PL100206, November 25, 2011]
  3. Changes to Village boundaries will be considered in the context of Section 2.2.1 of this plan. [OPA 76, OMB File # PL100206, November 25, 2011]

Plans for Villages

4. The intensity and distribution of land uses within a Village will be determined in the context of:

a. Any plan for the Village contained in Volume 2, or a community design plan where such a plan has been undertaken;
b. The ability to support development on private water and wastewater services or on public services where such exist.

5. The City will undertake a review of Village Plans on a five year basis that includes:

a. an analysis of changes in the previous five years;
b. a review of any existing secondary plan or community design plan for the village;
c. at least one public meeting to consider needs and challenges;
d. a report to Council on the Village and any required policy initiatives.

[OPA 76, OMB File # PL100206, November 25, 2011]

6. Community design plans for Villages will be consistent with Section 2.5.6 of this Plan. First and foremost, the participants will develop a vision for the village and identify the qualities and characteristics of the village that should be preserved while recognising that other aspects may change. [OPA 76, OMB File # PL100206, November 25, 2011]

Permitted Uses in Villages 

7. Permitted uses will include: residential and retail and commercial service facilities of up to 10,000 square metres gross leaseable area, restaurants, offices and personal service establishments light industrial uses, institutional uses such as schools, community meeting and recreational buildings and facilities, places of worship, and public open space. Notwithstanding this limit, the Manotick Mews, as identified in the Manotick Secondary Plan, may accommodate up to 11,000 square metres gross leasable area. [Amendment 12, September 8, 2004; [Amendment #28, July 13, 2005] [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010] [Amendment #162, March 3, 2016]

8. The zoning by-law will establish zones that are consistent with the distribution of uses provided for in the Village plans found in Volume 2. The zoning by-law will also support development that reinforces the historical character of Village core areas and mainstreets by permitting a mix of land uses, encouraging a pedestrian-friendly streetscape and regulating the scale of development. [Amendment #28, July 13, 2005] [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

9. Industrial uses with characteristics that are likely to impact negatively on adjacent residential uses by virtue of matters such as noise, fumes, heavy equipment movement or external storage of large amounts of materials will not be permitted in a Village, but will be directed to an appropriate urban location or General Rural Area. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

Building Liveable Communities

10. A wide range of housing forms to meet the needs of the Village’s population will be permitted in Villages. The form and scale of development will be limited by the available servicing methods and subject to the policies of Section 4.4 on water and wastewater servicing. [Amendment #14, September 8, 2004] [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

11. The City will encourage the achievement of affordable housing targets in villages, as defined in Section 2.5.2, to the extent that servicing methods allow for a variety of housing forms. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

12. When reviewing development applications, the City will consider:

a. Those matters addressed in Section 2.5.1 and Section 4.11 related to compatibility and community design;[Amendment #28, July 13, 2005];
b. For development in the core area or mainstreet, how the development or use impacts the viability of these areas and enhances the typical mixture of residential, community and commercial uses;
c. Whether the proposed development is located on a road with sufficient capacity to accommodate the anticipated traffic generated;
d. How the development supports a pedestrian and cycling environment and links the site to the surrounding neighbourhood;
e. How the application of good design is used to ameliorate the effects of a higher intensity use of land on the surrounding uses;
f. The extent to which greenspace targets in Section 2.5.4 are met;
g. In the case of retail, commercial proposals:

i. The extent to which community-serving uses will be provided as part of the development,
ii. The orientation of multiple building entrances and storefront windows to the street,
iii. The use of minimal or no building setbacks from the street and location of parking to the side or rear of the building,
iv. The feasibility of achieving development of more than one storey. Where the predominant form of development is two storeys or more, single-storey development will be discouraged;

h. In the case of uses requiring large land areas for outdoor storage, sale or service of goods, other than uses that do not operate year-round and can be considered a common component of a permitted use, such as a garden centre in association with a retail use: [Amendment 28, July 13, 2005]

i. Such uses are only located on an arterial road but not located in identified core area or mainstreet locations,
ii. Most of the site’s street frontage is occupied by buildings,
iii. The visual impact of outdoor storage or parking on adjacent uses and from the street is minimized through appropriate means;

i. The demand that the use will raise to extend Public Service Areas or expand capacity in public water and wastewater services; and
j. Any other applicable policies found within the Official Plan related to development review.

[Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

13. Consistent with village rural character, drive-through facilities and principal use parking lots will not generally be permitted in Village Core areas. However, there may be exceptional circumstances where these uses may be located in a Village Core through concurrent applications for zoning by-law amendment and site plan control approval where the intent of the policies for the Village designation and all other policies in the Plan can otherwise be maintained. Under these circumstances, surface parking and drive-through facilities will not be permitted between the building and the street. When reviewing such applications to permit a drive-through facility or principal use parking lot, consideration must be given to the dimension, location and number of vehicular accesses, and appropriate means such as coordinated landscaping, tree planting and pedestrian amenities must be provided to minimize the interruption of the Village Core streetscape. The location of driveways and queuing lanes will also be considered with regard to minimizing impacts on adjacent uses, and fencing and landscape buffers abutting property lines will be used to address impacts on adjacent uses. Consideration will be given to the siting and design of buildings or structures and the location of driveways and queuing lanes when a drive-through facility or principal use parking lot is proposed in a heritage context.

14. The design of parking areas that are accessory to a permitted use in a Village Core that are subject to site plan control approval will be reviewed according to the same design considerations as a principal use parking lot in policy 3.7.1.13. [Amendment #101, July 17, 2012] 

[Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

3.7.2 – General Rural Area

The General Rural Area contains a variety of land uses, such as farms, rural housing, wood lots and forests, small industries, golf courses, and in many places, small clusters of residential and commercial development. The intent of this designation is to accommodate a variety of land uses that are appropriate for a rural location and a limited amount of residential development where such development will not preclude continued agricultural and non-residential uses.

Policies

Purpose

  1. General Rural Areas are designated on Schedule A with the intent to provide:
    1. A location for agriculture and for those non-agricultural uses that, due to their land requirements or the nature of their operation, would not be more appropriately located within urban or Village locations;
    2. For a limited amount of residential and other rural and tourist service uses that do not conflict with a) above.

Environmental Impact Statement

2. Development proposals within the General Rural Area may impact on natural heritage features that are not designated in this plan. Development and site alteration as defined in Section 4.7.8 will not be permitted for :

a. Any development permitted under the policies of this plan within the feature;
b. Any development permitted under the policies of this plan within 120 metres of the boundary of a natural heritage feature ;

unless an Environment Impact Statement demonstrates that there will be no negative impacts as defined in Section 4.7.8 on the natural features within the area or their ecological functions. The requirements of the Environmental Impact Statement may vary, as described in Section 4.7.8.

[Amendment #76, Ministerial Modification #36, August 17, 2011]

3. Section 5 of this plan identifies those circumstances under which the City will acquire land in the General Rural Area designation when requested to do so by the landowner. [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, April 26, 2012]

Permitted Uses

4. The following uses will be permitted within the General Rural Area without requiring a zoning by-law amendment:

a. Agricultural uses, forestry and conservation, and natural resource management activities;
b. Residential uses on existing lots of record and on new lots created by severance as provided for by this Plan;
c. Animal boarding, breeding, and training facilities, including stables;
d. Bed and breakfast establishments;
e. Open space;
f. Cemeteries.

[Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

5. A zoning by-law amendment will be required where any of the following uses are proposed in General Rural Areas or by country lot subdivision as provided for in policy 7 below:

a. New industrial and commercial uses, such as farm equipment and supply centres, machine and truck repair shops, building products yards, landscape contractors, and nurseries;
b. Uses that are noxious by virtue of their noise, odour, dust or other emissions or that have potential for impact on air quality or surface water or groundwater, such as salvage or recycling yards, composting or transfer facilities; concrete plants; the treatment of aggregate products; and abattoirs;
c. New recreational commercial and non-profit uses, such as golf courses, driving ranges, mini putt operations, campgrounds, outdoor theme parks, sportsfields or similar uses that do not constitute Major Urban Facilities as described in Section 3.6.7; [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]
d. New sand and gravel pits and underground mining for any mineral resources, subject to Section 3.7.4;
e. Other new non-residential uses that would not be better located within a Village and which are in keeping with the rural character or those uses that meet the needs of the travelling public, such as a restaurant, gas station, motel, retail of up to 1,000 square metres gross leaseable area or similar use; [Amendment 28, July 13, 2005]
f. New institutional uses such as places of worship and schools should ideally be located within a Village but may be considered in close proximity to a Village where Village land is insufficient or inappropriate.  The expansion of existing institutional uses will be evaluated on their merits and by those matters included in policy 6 below; [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]
g. Country lot subdivision as provided for in policy 6 below. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

6. When considering an application to amend the zoning by-law to permit a new use indentified in policy 5 of this subsection, the following matters must be considered: [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

a. The use would not be better located in a Village or the urban area;
b. If the use is to be located on a local road, it must be demonstrated that the volume and pattern of traffic flow anticipated from the development will not interfere with the proper functioning of the local road network;
c. The privacy of adjacent landowners or the amelioration of potential adverse impacts from lighting, noise, odour, dust or traffic can be achieved by separating the land uses, buffering or other measures as part of the development;
d. The potential for reducing possible impacts on neighbouring agricultural uses or nearby rural residential or Village communities, where relevant;
e. The development is in keeping with the surrounding rural character and landscape;
f. All those requirements of Sections 2 and 4 related to transportation, servicing, design and compatibility and environmental protection;
g. Noxious uses will only be considered where suitable screening and buffering can be provided and generally these uses will not be considered in locations within groundwater recharge areas or immediately adjacent to residential areas, Scenic-Entry Routes, or waterfront areas;
h. The impact that the development will have on the protection of tree cover and local wildlife movement, as result of proposed site clearing and grading, fencing, security lighting, and other similar site plan matters.

Subdivisions

7. When creating more than three lots for rural industrial or highway commercial purposes, development will be by plan of subdivision in accordance with the following criteria:

a. Development will be subject to site plan control and particular attention will be given to physical design including signage, buffering, landscaping and fencing of the sites;
b. All of the applicable requirements of Section 4 will be satisfied. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

8. Country lot subdivisions will be considered within the General Rural Area designation subject to the following criteria. The extent to which any of these apply will be determined through pre-consultantion with the applicant:

a. All development will conform with the requirements from Section 4 of this Plan, including, but not limited to, protection of vegetative cover, water and wastewater services, erosion prevention and so on;
b. All development will be evaluated within the context of any existing subwatershed studies or groundwater studies approved by the City;
c. The minimum lot size shall be 0.8 ha but studies may indicate the requirement for larger lots; [Amendment #76, Ministerial Modification #37, August 04, 2010]
d. Subdivisions may not impede the ability of Villages and urban areas to expand over the planning period, and; may not located within 1 kilometre of an approved urban and Village boundary; Notwithstanding the foregoing, a plan of subdivision is permitted on lands municipally known as 1175 Manotick Station Road and 471 Sangeet Place. [Amendment #85, May 26, 2010][Amendment #114, May 28, 2013]
e. Subdivisions will not create conflicts with non-residential uses that need to locate in the rural area, and the proposed location of country lots will be evaluated relative to:

i. Agricultural operations and Agricultural Resource Area designations in the context of the Minimum Distance Separation guidelines,
ii. Mineral operations and Mineral Resource Area designations,
iii. Adjacent non-residential uses such as rural industrial subdivisions, whose expansion potential may be impeded by the presence of residential uses,
iv. Avoiding locations at existing or planned interchanges with Highways 7, 416 and 417 which will be better suited to non-residential uses in the long term;

f. Subdivisions will develop where there is the least impact on municipal operations, and:

i. May not have direct access to an arterial road where there is the possibility of accessing a local road,
ii. May not locate where their construction will require the City to pave or upgrade an existing road,
iii. May not require the construction of a new public road on an unopened road allowance;

g. Subdivisions will be planned on the basis of assessments of sufficient detail to ensure the long- term quality and quantity of the groundwater:

i. Development will not be permitted where studies prepared by the City indicate that the aquifer is considered to be of high vulnerability to contamination (e.g. areas of very thin overburden),
ii. All development will be on the basis of a hydrogeology study and a terrain analysis in accordance with Section 4.4,
iii. Information from the hydrogeology study and terrain analysis will be enhanced through the evaluation for the performance of private systems in the vicinity and in the same sort of geology, including drawing from the same aquifer, as the proponent;

h. Notwithstanding policies 6, c and d, the properties known as 800 and 848 Cedarview Road and 4497 O’Keefe Court, located abutting the urban boundary, can be developed as a Country Lot Subdivision (with a golf course component), with one (1) acres lot sizes, with a larger number of lots than 40, subject to appropriate studies and municipal approvals. [Amendment #57, November 28, 2007]

Conservation Subdivisions

9. Conservation subdivisions are intended to reduce the footprint of residential development while at the same time conserving existing areas of the natural environment and open space, preserving rural character and enhancing ecological linkages and networks. To achieve these environmental goals the City may consider subdivisions with lots that are smaller than 0.8 ha, as required by Policy 8(c) above, and provided the following requirements are met:

a. The lots are part of a subdivision that contains a component of the natural heritage system or a feature of the landscape of the rural area, which is to be preserved and zoned accordingly;
b. The development has an average lot size of not less than 0.8 ha per dwelling unit when averaged over all of the land in the development, including the lot that contains the conservation feature;
c. The development satisfies the policies for country lot subdivisions except for policy 8c.
d. Where the conservation feature is part of the natural heritage system, an Environmental Impact Statement is required in accordance with Policy 2 above.
e. The City may require a management plan that identifies who is responsible for the ongoing maintenance of the conservation feature and ensures that mitigation measures are implemented. The City may secure such arrangements by an agreement, covenant or other similar mechanism.
f. The City will monitor these subdivisions and may alter or remove this policy if it does not achieve the desired results.

[Amendment #76, August 19, 2011]

10. The City will monitor the residential development activity in the rural area on an annual basis to determine if Villages are remaining as the primary focus of rural development. Based on the assessment, City Council may revisit these policies for country lot subdivisions.

Moratorium on Country Lot Development

11. Notwithstanding policies 7, 8 and 9 permitting the creation of country lot subdivisions and conservation subdivisions, a moratorium is placed on the creation of any new ones, which moratorium shall end at the earlier of five years from the date of adoption of this Plan or the coming into force of an official plan amendment that removes this moratorium and reinstates the existing policies or replaces them with new policies. Any changes will be based on a critical review of country lot subdivision policies and in particular the proposal to cluster country lot subdivisions and will examine, but not be limited to:

a. The impact on existing villages;
b. The potential impact on groundwater;
c. The development potential in these clusters;
d. The implications for the demand for communal services;
e. The costs to taxpayers;
f. The impact on rural character. [OPA 76, OMB File # PL100206, November 25, 2011]

Notwithstanding the foregoing, a plan of subdivision is permitted on lands municipally known as 1175 Manotick Station Road. [Amendment #85, May 26, 2010]

12. To be consistent with the Provincial Policy Statement the critical review referred to in policy 11 shall also take into consideration that New Country Lot Subdivisions must be limited in scale, both in the context of the amount of development in the Rural Area as a whole and in the context of specific proposals for individual sites. [OPA 76, OMB File # PL100206, Ministerial Modification # 38, November 25, 2011]

Severances

13. The severance of a single lot for residential purposes will be permitted, subject to the following criteria:

a. Only one lot will be created from any lot in existence at the date of adoption of this Plan and no further severance will be permitted from either the severed or retained land; [Amendment #76, August 17, 2011]
b. The retained land will have a minimum area of 10 hectares;
c. The severed lot will not be less than 0.8 hectares in area; however, a larger minimum lot size may be required in some areas to ensure no adverse effects on the quality or quantity of ground water and the safe operation of wastewater disposal systems;
d. The proposed lot does not have access to Provincial highways;
e. Where the lot has frontage on both an arterial road and a collector or local road, the proposed lot should not front on the arterial road;
f. The creation of any new lot must also conform to the Minimum Distance Separation as amended from time to time. In this instance, the separation distance is intended to reduced the likelihood of adverse impacts from new residential development on the operation of existing adjacent farm operations in either the General Rural or Agricultural Resource designations; [Ministerial Modification 18, November 10, 2003]
g. The lot will not impact on land designated Limestone Resource Area, and will respect the separation distances from land designated Sand and Gravel Resource Area as required by Section 3.7.4, policy 10 except as provided for in Section 3.7.4 policy 14.[Amendment # 58, December 07, 2007] [Amendment #76, August 17, 2011]
h.The house and private services are located in an area that will minimize the removal of mature vegetation.

14. Notwithstanding policy 13b.above where the lot being severed is located within a registered plan of subdivision the minimum size for the severed and retained parcels will be 0.8ha and the applicant must demonstrate that both the severed and the retained lots can be adequately serviced. When reviewing the severance application the City will consider those matters, related to subdivisions, identified in policy 8 above. [Amendment #76, August 19, 2011]

Development near Village and Urban Boundaries

15. Development proposals within 1 kilometre of a Village and/or urban boundary will be reviewed with respect to lot size, type of use and other characteristics, to ensure that they do not adversely limit potential expansion of the boundary at that location or create a long-term demand for the extension of municipal services. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010] Notwithstanding the foregoing, a plan of subdivision is permitted on lands municipally known as 1175 Manotick Station Road  and 471 Sangeet Place. [Amendment #85, May 26, 2010] [Amendment #114, May 28, 2013]

Restriction of Normal Farm Practice

16. Nothing in this plan is intended or may be applied to restrict a normal farm practice carried on as a part of an agricultural operation on lands designated Agricultural Resource Area in accordance with the Farming and Food Production Protection Act, as amended from time to time. [Amendment # 58, December 07, 2007]

17. All new farm and non-farm development, including severances, will comply with the Minimum Distance Separation (MDS) formulae, as amended from time to time, as described in policies 12 and 13 of Section 3.7.3. Agricultural uses must respect the requirements of policy 2 in Section 3.7.3 Agricultural Resource Area, regarding provisions for the establishment and operation of farms.

[Amendment #76, August 19, 2011]

Infill in Historical Settlements [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

18. Limited residential and non-residential infill, including the severance of lots, will be permitted within small historical settlements, which typically comprise clusters of housing and in some cases, non-residential and institutional uses, and exist at a number of crossroads and other locations. Some of these settlements are identified by names but do not include rural residential subdivisions typified by large residential lots (0.8 hectares or larger). The boundaries of these clusters will be defined in the zoning by-law and in making this determination the City will be guided by the extent of existing development.

19. Notwithstanding the provisions of policy 13 above, the minimum lot size shall be in keeping with adjacent lots or the requirements of the Ministry of Environment to support private services. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

20. Lot creation that has the effect of extending development beyond the boundaries of existing development as defined in the zoning by-law will not be permitted.

21. Any rezoning to permit a new non-residential use within an area defined in policy 18 will be considered in light of the criteria of policy 6 above. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

Infill Outside of Historical Settlements

22. Limited residential infill through the severance of lots, will be considered in areas meeting the following criteria:

a. The proposed severance has road frontage on a paved and maintained public road; and
b. The proposed severance is opposite residential lots with frontage on the same road; and
c. The lot to be created is between two existing dwellings that are situated on the same side of the road and are not more than 250 metres apart; and
d. The lot(s) created, including the retained parcel, must be at least 0.8 ha in size

[Amendment #76, August 19, 2011]

23. In reference to policy 22, no more than two lots will be created from any lot in existence on 13 May 2003, or from a lot that was approved by Council under its grandfathering policies after that date. In addition, no further severances will be permitted from either the severed lot or retained lot.

[Amendment #76, Ministerial Modification #39, August 19, 2011.]

Exceptions

24. Despite the provisions in this official plan, on lands described as Part Lot 2, Concession 4, Osgoode (PIN 04319-0593) a mobile home park shall be permitted provided that Council shall not pass a zoning by-law permitting this use until Council has considered, but not limited to the following; [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

a. the satisfactory provision of communal sewage and water systems; and
b. satisfactory traffic impact study. [OMB decision #253, Februrary 9, 2005]

25. Notwithstanding policies 7c, 7d and 7e, the properties known as 800 and 848 Cedarview Road and 4497 O’Keefe Court, located abutting the urban boundary, can be developed as a Country Lot Subdivision (with a golf course component), with one (1) acre lot sizes, with a larger number of lots than 40, subject to appropriate studies and municipal approvals. [Amendment #57, November 28, 2007] [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

3.7.3 – Agricultural Resources

Farmland is an important land use in Ottawa, occupying about 40 per cent of the municipality’s rural lands. Located on these extensive areas of good soil – totalling more than 120,000 hectares – is a mixture of cash crop and livestock farms producing agricultural products with a value in 2001 of over $150 million. The approximately 1300 farmsteads in Ottawa also create economic activity for related businesses, such as agricultural supplies, equipment stores and processing plants for farm products.

In order to protect this resource for future generations, the City will protect prime agricultural areas from loss of lands to other uses. This protection entails policies that strictly limit permitted land uses and lot creation on all lands identified as Agricultural Resource Areas. These lands are shown on Schedules A and B. Their identification is based on the Ottawa-Carleton Land Evaluation and Area Review (LEAR) evaluation system. The LEAR system uses four factors to determine the agricultural potential of land:

  • Soil capability for agriculture (large areas predominantly of soils of Classes 1, 2 and 3);
  • Land use (existing use of individual properties);
  • Parcel size (flexibility of parcel size to accommodate different farm activities);
  • The presence of conflicting land uses in the area (e.g., adjacent to Villages or residential uses).

Farm operators need to be assured that their investment in and commitment to agricultural production will not be adversely affected by conflicting land uses. For example, non-farm residences in agricultural areas may create problems for farmers, such as unleashed dogs, increased traffic volumes that conflict with slow-moving farm machinery, and uncontrolled growth of noxious weeds. Conversely, non-farm households may find farm odours and noises objectionable. While the City recognizes that there is a right to farm on farmlands, certain types of agricultural operations will be subject to a greater degree of regulation due to their potential impact on neighbours and the natural environment. [Amendment # 58, December 07, 2007]

Within Agricultural Resource Areas, clusters of non-farm houses occur at crossroads and other locations. Some of these small hamlet-like collections of residences are identified with place names such as Leonard, Bear Brook, Dalmeny, Baxters Corner and Woodlawn. They often have histories dating back to the 19th century or earlier when they originated to serve the needs of the rural population, providing not only housing but also services like a post office, school house or small cheese factory. In other locations these clusters of lots are of more recent origin and consist only of residential uses. In the future, growth in these clusters will be limited to new development on existing lots of record only. [Amendment #76, OMB File #PL100206, Ministerial Modification #40, November 25, 2011]

Policies

  1. Lands designated Agricultural Resource are shown on Schedules A and B with the intent of:
    1. Protecting major areas of agricultural and other lands suitable for agriculture from loss to other uses;
    2. Ensuring that uses, which would result in conflicts with agricultural operations, are not established in productive farming areas.

Permitted Uses

2. The primary use of land in Agricultural Resource Areas will be agriculture. Additional permitted uses are forestry and those activities related to the conservation or management of the natural environment. Farm uses should respect the provincial Guide to Agricultural Land Use, and applicable provincial regulations governing farm operations. [Ministerial Modification 20, November 10, 2003] [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

3. Residential uses will be permitted either in the form of farm housing or as a detached dwelling on a lot fronting on an existing public road. Accommodation for farm help is also permitted. It may be located on the same lot as the farmhouse and should preferably take the form of a mobile home that can be removed once the farm help is no longer required. If more than one farm-help dwelling is required, the second and subsequent dwelling(s) must be mobile homes. Alternatively, the farm help may be permitted on a separate parcel but, in this case, must always take the form of a mobile home. To ensure that mobile homes for farm help are removed once they are no longer required, the farmer may be required to enter into an agreement with the City. Housing may be restricted in the case of the severance of a surplus dwelling as per policies 10 and 11. [Amendment 14, September 8, 2004] [Amendment # 58, December 07, 2007]

Secondary Uses

4. In addition to a house and accessory buildings, the City will permit further secondary uses and agriculture-related uses provided they are compatible with, and do not hinder, surrounding agricultural operations. These uses shall be limited in scale and include: [OPA 76, OMB File # PL100206, November 25, 2011]

a. Uses secondary to the principle use of the property including but not limited to; home-based businesses, home industries, and uses that produce value-added agricultural products from the farm operation on the property. [OPA 76, OMB File # PL100206, November 25, 2011]
b. Farm-related commercial and farm-related industrial uses that are small scale and directly relatedto the farm operation and are required in close proximity to the farm operation. These uses will require a rezoning and should be located on areas of poor soils wherever possible. [OPA 76, OMB File # PL100206, November 25, 2011]
c. Market Gardens that involve the small scale growing of produce such as fruits, vegetables and flowers as cash crops that are subsequently sold directly to consumers and restaurants. [OPA 76, OMB File # PL100206, Ministerial Modification #41, November 25, 2011]

5. Policies for generally permitted uses, such as secondary dwelling units, are found in Section 3.1. [OPA 76, OMB File # PL100206, November 25, 2011]

Wayside Pits and Quarries

6. In the Agricultural Resource Areas, the City will permit pits, wayside pits and quarries and portable asphalt plants as interim uses. Rehabilitation of the site must be carried out so that substantially the same areas and same average soil quality for agricultural are restored. The policies of Section 3.7.4 on Mineral Resources will apply. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

Farm-Related Severances

[Deleted as per Amendment #58, December 07, 2007]

Farm Retirement Lots

[Deleted as per Amendment #58, December 07, 2007]

Boundary Adjustment

7. The City will permit lot adjustments in Agricultural Resource Areas for legal or technical reasons. For the purposes of this section, legal or technical reasons include severances for purposes such as easements, corrections of deeds, quit claims and minor boundary adjustments, which do not result in the creation of a new lot. Subject to proper planning considerations, minor boundary adjustments may occur between farms, between a farm and a non-farm lot, or between two non-farm lots.

[Amendment #58, December 07, 2007]

Severances of a Surplus Dwelling due to Farm Consolidation [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

8. Farm consolidation means the acquisition of additional farm parcels to be operated as one farm holding. A severance may be granted by the City for the creation of a new lot on which is located a dwelling and immediately adjacent farm buildings made surplus through farm consolidation. Where the property with the surplus house is abutting the main farm property, the recommended method of separation of the surplus house from the land is the use of a boundary line adjustment between the two properties as this avoids the creation of a new lot.

9. Where an application to sever a surplus dwelling is made, for lands that abut the main farm or not, the City will require the following:

a. To avoid land speculation, applications for severance will be considered after the purchase of the lands to be consolidated by the farm operator, or where a legally binding offer of purchase is demonstrated;
b. The vacant agricultural parcel so created be rezoned to prohibit any residential use and no subsequent rezoning to allow a new dwelling unit will be permitted. This housing restriction is intended to limit a pattern of lot creation in Agricultural Resource Areas that would see a new residence being constructed on a vacant farm property, the house being declared surplus and severed from a lot and the pattern so repeated. [Amendment #58, December 07, 2007]
c. The severed lot be of a size that minimizes the loss of agricultural land. [Amendment #58, December 07, 2007] [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

Severance of Two Dwellings on One Lot

[Deleted as per Amendment #58, December 07, 2007]

Farm Help

[Deleted as per Ministerial Modification #42, December 24, 2009][Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

Severances in Areas of Poor Soils

10. The severance of lots for small-scale farm-related industrial and farm-related commercial uses, and market gardens described in policy 4b and 4c above, will be permitted in areas of poor soils where all of the following criteria are met: [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010] [Ministerial Modification #43, December 24, 2009]

a. A site-specific zoning by-law amendment permits the use. A rezoning will be required as a condition of consent where the use is not permitted at the time of severance;
b. The soils have a capability rating for agriculture predominantly of Class 4 or poorer as determined from the soils maps of Ottawa as shown in Ontario Institute of Pedology, The Soils of the Regional Municipality of Ottawa-Carleton Excluding the Ottawa Urban Fringe – Report 58 and the Soils, Capability and Land Use in the Ottawa Urban Fringe – Report 47, as amended;
c. The land is part of an identified poor pocket of at least 10 hectares in area and is identified on soil maps of Ottawa as shown in Ontario Institute of Pedology, The Soils of the Regional Municipality of Ottawa-Carleton Excluding the Urban Fringe – Report 58 and the Soils, Capability and Land Use in the Ottawa Urban Fringe – Report 47, as amended;
d. The land is not being used or capable of being used as part of an adjacent agricultural operation;
e. The lot has frontage on a public road;
f. The land is sufficiently wooded with trees so that development can be buffered from adjacent farm operations. Where sufficient tree cover does not exist, tree planting will be required as a condition of development;
g. The new lot will be limited to a minimum size needed to accommodate the use.

[Ministerial Modification #22, November 10, 2003] [Amendment #58, December 07, 2007]

Severance of a New Farm Holding

11. The City will permit the severance of a lot creating a new farm holding that will be used exclusively as an agricultural operation. The lot proposed to be created and the remaining parent parcel must both be of sizes that are sufficiently large to maintain flexibility for future changes in the type and size of agricultural use. In this regard, the minimum lot size will be approximately 36 hectares for each of the severed and retained parcels. [Ministerial Modification #44, December 24, 2009] [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

Infill in Hamlets

[Deleted as per Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

Minimum Distance Separation

12. All new farm and non-farm development, including severances, will comply with the Minimum Distance Separation (MDS) formulae, as amended from time to time, except in the case of:

a. the development of an existing lot of record that falls almost all or completely within a calculated MDS I separation distance from a neighbouring livestock facility; or
b. the creation of a new lot containing an existing dwelling and that dwelling falls partially or completely within a calculated MDS I separation distance from an existing livestock facility on a neighbouring parcel of land. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

13. The City may consider a variance to the Minimum Distance Separation MDS II required for new or expanding livestock operations on a case-by-case basis where the intent if not the precise separation distance of the MDS II formula is achieved. The Circumstances in which a variance may be considered apply to the expansion or replacement of existing structures and:

a. the variance aids in the reduction of potential odour conflicts; or
b. the variance allows for the mitigation of other environmental impacts (e.g. water quality, flood plain issues, adjacent natural heritage features); or
c. the variance is to a lot line or road allowance and allows the MDS setback requirements from a neighbour's dwelling or other type of land use to be achieved.

[Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

Restriction of Normal Farm Practice

14. Nothing in this plan is intended or may be applied to restrict a normal farm practice carried on as a part of an agricultural operation on lands designated Agricultural Resource Area in accordance with the Farming and Food Production Protection Act, as amended from time to time.

Site Specific Policies

15. Notwithstanding policies above regarding permitted uses in Agricultural Resource Areas, a self-storage warehouse will be permitted on the property known municipally as 2775 Moodie Drive. [Amendment 75, April 08, 2009]
16. Notwithstanding the policies above regarding permitted uses and new lot creation in the Agriculture Resource Area, a residential care facility will be permitted at 1883 Bradley Side Road provided it is generally located in the area of the property at the northeast corner of Bradley Side Road and Oak Creek Road, and the severance of a 10 hectare lot at 1883 Bradley Side Road along the corner of Oak Creek Road and Bradley Side Road for this use will also be permitted.  [Amendment #151, June 12, 2015]

Exceptions

17. Notwithstanding policies above regarding permitted uses in Agricultural Resource Areas and policies in this section regarding new lot creation, the severance of a 0.8 hectare lot and development of an institutional use at 2761 Moodie Drive will be permitted. [Amendment 34, September 14, 2005] [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

3.7.4 – Mineral Resources

The major mineral aggregate resources in Ottawa are limestone, sand and gravel. Aggregate resources are used to build and repair houses, schools, shopping centres, factories, roads, sewers, and water pipes. They may be used in a relatively natural state for fill or as a road base, or they may be processed into materials for the construction industry, such as concrete, asphalt, or brick.

Aggregates are a non-renewable resource that the City will steward for future generations. Lands identified as Sand and Gravel Resource Area and Limestone Resource Area have deposits of aggregates that may be viably extracted because they are:

  • Of a good quality and quantity;
  • Located sufficiently close to local markets;
  • Situated in relation to existing residential development such that they can be extracted with minimal impacts on most residential uses.

Since hauling costs are a significant component of the final price of aggregates, protecting resources close to local markets will help ensure the availability of the resource at reasonable prices. Keeping hauling distances short will also minimize the environmental and community impacts of this traffic. Care must be taken to ensure that the environmental and social impact of mineral resource extraction is minimized. To this end, extractive operations must maintain good operating standards as well as have a viable rehabilitation plan.

Existing licensed extraction sites make up much of the future supply of aggregate. The City will protect their continued operation and expansion by preventing any new development in their vicinity that would preclude or hinder aggregate extraction.

In Ottawa, sand and gravel pits are generally smaller-scale and shorter-term operations than limestone quarries. They do not involve drilling, blasting or rock crushing and therefore pits do not need to be as widely separated from incompatible uses as quarries. Sand and gravel pits are permitted in the Sand and Gravel Resource, the Limestone Resource, the General Rural and the Agricultural Resource Areas. Whenever reference is made to permitting mineral aggregate extraction elsewhere in this Plan, Section 3.7.4 will apply.

A deposit of high-grade silica sand has been identified in the former City of Kanata (Lot 20, Concession 3). Silica is a mineral used in the manufacture of glass and artificial abrasives and in foundries and smelters. Silica is also used in the production of skid-resistant asphalt. At present, the need to designate the particular deposit in Ottawa is not clearly established. Nevertheless, any proposed development that would preclude the possibility of future extraction of the deposit will be reviewed before deciding whether or not development should proceed. [Ministerial Modification #24, November 10, 2003] [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, July 21, 2011.]

Policies

  1. Sand and Gravel and Limestone Resource Areas are designated on Schedules A and B with the intent to:
    1. Protect non-renewable mineral aggregate resources, located close to markets, for future use;
    2. Protect mineral aggregate resource and aggregate operations from incompatible activities;
    3. Minimize community and environmental disruptions from aggregate extraction activities.

Permitted Uses in Sand and Gravel Resource Area

2. The City will permit pits and wayside pits as the main land uses for those lands identified as Sand and Gravel Resource Areas subject to the provisions of the Aggregate Resources Act. Additional related uses are also permitted, such as portable asphalt plants and other uses associated with sand and gravel extraction operations. Existing or new farming, forestry, small-scale open-air recreational uses and conservation and natural resource management activities are permitted provided they do not create difficulties for the future extraction of mineral aggregates from any lands in the designation. Temporary non-residential uses and recycling uses may be permitted if they can be demonstrated not to preclude or otherwise render the site unusable for future mineral extraction. All of these non-aggregate related uses will only be permitted if any issues of public health, public safety and environmental impact are addressed to the City’s satisfaction. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

3. In recognition of existing lots of record, the City will permit the construction of a detached dwelling and accessory buildings subject to the following conditions:

a. The lot fronts on a public road;
b. The lot was created under the Planning Act prior to July 9, 1997;
c. The use is shown as permitted in the zoning by-law;
d. All requirements for private servicing requirements are met;
e. New development will be sited on existing lots in order to minimize the impact upon future extraction of mineral aggregate resources.

Permitted Land Uses in the Limestone Resource Areas

4. In addition to the uses allowed in Sand and Gravel Resource Areas, in Limestone Resource Areas, the following uses are also permitted: quarries, wayside quarries subject to policy 12 in Section 3.1, and underground mining. Secondary uses directly related to the extraction operation are also allowed, such as a portable asphalt plant or concrete batching plant.

5. The use of space created by underground mining for storage of non-hazardous substances is permitted, subject, among any other requirements, to satisfying any concerns of the City relating to waste disposal and to the provision of water, wastewater treatment and transportation.

Zoning of Pits and Quarries

6. The City requires that all pits and quarries licensed under the Aggregate Resources Act be zoned for mineral extractive use in the City’s zoning by-law. This applies whether the pit or quarry is located in a Sand and Gravel Resource, Limestone Resource, Agricultural Resource, General Rural or other designation. All or part of properties with a licensed pit or quarry may also be zoned for aggregate-related uses, such as asphalt and concrete plants. As stated in Section 3.1, wayside extraction of aggregates, portable asphalt plants and temporary concrete batching plants used on public authority contracts will however be permitted without the need for a rezoning. Wayside pits and quarries will be subject to the Aggregate Resources Act and as such the public consultation process and the rehabilitation of the site must be carried out in conformity with the provisions of that Act.

7. The City will require that all lands in the Sand and Gravel Resource or Limestone Resource Areas not presently licensed for a pit or quarry be zoned in the City’s zoning by-law so that it is clear that extraction of mineral aggregate use may occur on these lands. Prior to the establishment of any new pit or quarry, the City requires that the lands be rezoned to specifically permit the mineral extraction use. The rezoning requirement and policy 9 below apply to wholly new proposed pits or quarries or proposed expansions to existing ones. In certain circumstances, there may exist lands already zoned and licensed for a pit or quarry but none is yet in operation or not in operation on all portions of a property.

8. The City requires the completion of an Environmental Impact Statement as per Section 4.7.8 prior to making a decision on any application for rezoning or commenting on a licensing request to establish a new or expanded pit or quarry that may potentially affect the significant features or ecological functions of the environmental designations shown on Schedule A.

Establishing New Pits or Quarries

9. Any new pit or quarry will be licensed and operate in accordance with the Aggregate Resources Act, which is administered by the Ministry of Natural Resources. Studies and the site plans required under the Aggregate Resources Act are reviewed to ensure that the effects on the natural environment and other resources and existing development are fully considered prior to the Ministry approving a license for the establishment of new or expanded pit or quarry and the City approving any required zoning modifications. The areas of influence generally are 500 metres around quarries, 150 metres for pits above the water table and 300 metres for pits below the water table. The required studies, as are determined to be appropriate considering the type of extraction proposed, will provide information on: [Ministerial Modification 25, November 10, 2003]

a. Anticipated noise, dust and vibration levels that illustrate that the Ministry of Environment guidelines and criteria will be satisfied;
b. Rationale for proposed haul routes, expected traffic volumes and entrance/exit design to show that the road system can safely and efficiently accommodate the proposed truck traffic. This may include provision for upgrading of local City roadways leading to an arterial road and on-going maintenance requirements along such route so long as the pit or quarry is in operation;
c. Impact on neighbours from noise, dust, vibration, truck traffic, etc., due to the duration of the extraction operation in hours per day and number of days per week;
d. The elevation of the groundwater table on and surrounding the site;
e. Any proposed water diversion, water taking, storage and drainage facilities on the site and points of discharge to surface waters. An impact assessment will address the potential effects on the following features on or adjacent to the site, where applicable:

i. Water wells,
ii. Springs,
iii. Groundwater,
iv. Surface watercourses and bodies;
v. Wetlands, woodlands, and fish and wildlife habitat;

f. Adjacent and nearby land uses and an assessment of the compatibility of the proposed development with existing land uses. This includes possible completion of an Environmental Impact Statement as referenced in Section 4.7.8;
g. If within an Agricultural Resource Area on Schedule A, the agricultural classification of the proposed site and the proposed agricultural rehabilitation techniques if the site is Class 1, 2 or 3 soils and extraction is not below the water table;
h. The proposed after-use and rehabilitation plan.

Development Restriction on Adjacent Lands-

10. Limited types of new development may be approved within 500 metres of a Limestone Resource Area or within 300 metres of a Sand and Gravel Resource Area, provided such development does not conflict with future mineral aggregate extraction. Examples of conflicting land uses that will not be considered include the creation of new lots or rezoning to permit dwellings or lodging places (motels, camp grounds, nursing homes, etc.) and farming or small-scale business uses where animals, equipment or employees are affected by pit or quarry activities. Where applicable, the policies for the construction of a detached dwelling on an existing lot of record will continue to apply as per Section 5.3. [Ministerial Modification 26, November 10, 2003] [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

11. Where there is an existing licensed pit or quarry, development may be approved within the area of potential impact, referenced in policy 10, where an impact assessment study is completed and demonstrates that the mineral aggregate operation, including future expansion in depth or extent, will not be affected by the development. The Ministry of Natural Resources will be consulted in review of the impact assessment study. [Ministerial Modification 27, November 10, 2003]

12. Where the City approves the development of land in accordance with policies 10 and 11 above, the City may impose conditions to ensure the development provides adequate buffering and/or separation between the new proposed use and the mineral aggregate area/operation.

Lot Severance Policies

13. The City will permit the creation of new lots in the Sand and Gravel and Limestone Resource Areas and on land within the influence areas, identified in Policy 10, where the following criteria are met::

a. The intention is to severe a lot for a house existing as of July 9, 1997; and
b. The vacant parcel that remains within the Sand and Gravel Resource Area, the Limestone Resource Area or within an influence area identified in Policy 10, is rezoned to prohibit the construction of a new residential building; and
c. Where the severance is within an influence area identified in Policy 10 it must also be permitted by and be consistent with the policies of the underlying designation of the land.
[Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

Rehabilitation and New Use of Depleted Sites / Sites Not Suitable for Exploitation

14. Where the sand, gravel or limestone aggregate resources of a property have been fully extracted, the property may be used for other purposes. Similarly, if a technical study demonstrates that the aggregate resources of a site are not suitable for exploitation, then alternative land uses may be permitted pursuant to policy 15 and 16 below. .The City will not require the proponent to amend the Official Plan; instead the Plan will be amended to accurately reflect the new use at the time of the next comprehensive Official Plan update or through a general Official Plan amendment. However, in either scenario, the City requires that ; [Ministerial Modification 45, December 24, 2009]

a. A person qualified to assess the condition of the aggregate resources and to provide an impact assessment shall undertake the technical study. The technical study must demonstrate that the resource has been fully extracted from the lands or that it is not suitable for exploitation. The impact assessment component will demonstrate that the proposed use will not limit the possibility of mineral aggregate extraction from other adjacent lands including the future expansion in depth or extent of any licensed pit or quarry;
b. Any license applying to the land has been surrendered or modified so as not to apply to the land and it can be demonstrated that the land has been suitably rehabilitated to permit the development.
c. Any issues of public health, public safety and environment impact are addressed. This may necessitate the submission of other supporting information such as, geotechnical and groundwater studies.
d. The City may impose conditions to ensure the development provides adequate buffering and/or separation between the new proposed use and any mineral aggregate area/operation.

[Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

15. In Sand and Gravel Resource Areas that are depleted or not suitable for exploitation, the property may be used for purposes listed in Section 3.7.3 or additional new uses as follows: [Ministerial Modification 28, November 10, 2003]

a. If the lands are predominantly surrounded by an Agriculture Resource designation, the uses identified in Section 3.7.3 for Agricultural Resource Areas may be permitted. Where a pit licence has been surrendered and the pit was located on prime agricultural lands, the site will be rehabilitated for productive agricultural use except where extraction has occurred below the water table; or if the lands are predominantly surrounded by designations other than Agricultural Resource, the uses in Section 3.7.2 for the General Rural Area, including farming, may be permitted;
b. In all cases, a rezoning to an appropriate zone will be required;

16. In Limestone Resource Areas that are depleted or not suitable for exploitation, the property may be used for purposes listed in Section 3.7.3. Other new uses, except residential, are permitted, subject to Section 3.7.2. A rezoning to an appropriate zone will require that: [Ministerial Modification 29, November 10, 2003]

a. The proposed use will not limit the possibility of mineral aggregate extraction from other lands designated Sand and Gravel Resource Area or Limestone Resource Area,
b. issues of public health, public safety and environmental impact are addressed to the satisfaction of the City.

Silica Sand

17. Notwithstanding the General Rural Area designation, the City will seek the advice of the Ministry of Northern Development and Mines, the Ministry of Natural Resources and other appropriate agencies when reviewing any development applications affecting land in or within 450 metres of Lot 20, Concession 3, in the former City of Kanata as shown on Schedule A, to determine whether or not the proposal should be permitted having regard to the importance of the silica sand deposit on the property compared to other deposits in eastern Ontario. [Ministerial Modification 30, November 10, 2003] [Amendment 14, September 8, 2004] [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

Dunrobin Road Setback

18. The City will require a minimum 150 metre buffer between Dunrobin Road and any extraction activity, for the Limestone Resource Area designated in Concession 3, Lots 22 and 23, former City of Kanata.

Site Specific Policies

19. Notwithstanding policy 10 above, City Council may consider an application for a country lot subdivision deemed to be complete by December, 2008 on parts of lot 14 and 15 Concession IX Goulbourn that are within 500 m of a designated Limestone Resource Area, subject to studies that include hydrogeology, blast design and impact, and noise that demonstrate that:

a. The opportunity to extract the limestone resource in the future will not be restricted by the proposed development;
b. The design of the proposed development mitigates the anticipated impacts of noise, vibration, and dust to an appropriate level;
c. The quality and quantity of groundwater on the site proposed for development will not be compromised by future extraction activities. [OMB decision #1582, June 17, 2005]

[Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

3.7.5 – Carp Road Corridor Rural Employment Area

[Amendment 7, June 9, 2004]

Due to its strategic location and accessibility (anchored by the Highway 417 interchange in the south and the Carp Airport in the north), the Carp Road Corridor Rural Employment Area offers a unique and diverse range of employment and industrial opportunities. This is evident with the presence of a full range of industry sectors, which includes, but is not limited to, manufacturing, mining (aggregates), retail trade, construction, agriculture, transportation as well as personal, professional and business services. Also, new industries such as high technology businesses, environmental services, some value-added processing, wood and metal fabrication, and other activities choosing to relocate in rural employment areas will add to the diversification of both the urban and rural economies. The Carp Road Corridor provides opportunities for attracting industries that favour large amounts of land and the openness of a more rural site.

The Carp Road Corridor Rural Employment Area plays an important role in the development and well-being of the local economy. The diversity and the ability to attract a wide variety of industries has been one of the strengths of the Corridor. In order to remain successful in the future, this area must maintain the ability to allow for a diverse range of industrial uses while developing an appealing environment for those new industries willing to expand or relocate.

Policies

  1. The Carp Road Corridor Rural Employment Area is designated on Schedule A with the intent to reserve the land for rural industrial and commercial uses.
  2. New development applications will conform to the policies in the Community Design Plan.
  3. The Community Design Plan for the Carp Road Corridor shall provide direction to the zoning by-law for future land uses.
  4. New industrial development will generally be by way of plans of subdivision/business parks. [Amendment #7, June 9, 2004]

3.8 - Solid Waste Disposal Sites

Operating and non-operating Solid Waste Disposal Sites are landfills, dumps, incinerators and any other facilities providing for the long-term storage or destruction of municipal solid waste. Composting, recycling and transfer facilities are considered processing operations. In addition to operating its own facilities, the City has jurisdiction in regards to enacted consents for private waste disposal facilities. The City's criteria in granting consents for these facilities include an assessment of the impact on waste types and quantities, landfill capacity in Ottawa and consistency with the City’s integrated Waste Management Master Plan. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

Human health and safety may be affected within the area of influence of an operating or non-operating solid waste disposal site. The most significant contaminant discharges and visual problems normally occur within 500 metres of the perimeter of the fill area. The actual area of influence will vary for every waste disposal site. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

Policies

  1. Operating Solid Waste Disposal Sites are designated on Schedules A and B in order to recognize their function and their potential impact on surrounding land uses. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]
  2. The City will require an official plan amendment for the establishment of any new Solid Waste Disposal Site. The City will evaluate applications based on the following:
    1. The proponent has completed an Environmental Assessment or an Environmental screening Report under the Environmental Assessment Act considering such items as the:
      1. Rationale for the undertaking,
      2. Potential impact on the City's commitment to waste reduction, reuse and recycling,
      3. Potential community, public health, transportation, environmental, visual, financial and land use impact of the facility,
      4. Use of mitigation measures, such as buffers and setbacks, to address potential land-use conflicts,
      5. Potential impacts and mitigation measures related to air traffic,
      6. Potential impacts and mitigation measures related to roads and haul routes to the facility;
      7. Environmental monitoring of the facility,
      8. The end use of the facility;
    2. Compliance with a Terms of Reference for the Environmental Assessment, as approved by the Minister of the Environment under the Environment Assessment Act; or in the case of a project using the Environmental Screening Process, the submission of a Notice of Completion to the Ministry of the Environment.
    3. Does not duplicate the requirements of the Environmental Assessment Act.

[Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

3. The zoning by-law will restrict the location of Solid Waste Disposal facilities to specific sites. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

4. Expansion of operating solid waste disposal sites will require a zoning by-law amendment. The City will consider the amendment based on the criteria listed in policy 2 above. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

Development adjacent to solid waste disposal sites

5. Land within 500m of an operating or non-operating solid waste disposal site boundary is consideredto be the influence area of the site. However, where the City or the owner of the site, has determined through an Environmental Assessment, Hydrogeological analysis or similar study that significant ground, surface or air-bourn impacts occur at a distance greater than 500m the greater distance willestablish the influence area. [OPA 76, OMB File # PL100206, November 25, 2011]

6. Proponents for any development that requires planning approval on land within the influence area of an operating or non-operating solid waste disposal site, will undertake a study, in consultation with the owner/operator of the disposal site, to demonstrate that the solid waste disposal site will not have unacceptable any adverse effects on the proposed development and will not pose any risks to human health and safety. Particular attention will be required for those proposals that will accommodate people or include animal husbandry or food production. Where an operating solid waste disposal site is involved the City must be satisfied that the development will not impact the continuing operation of a solid waste disposal site (e.g., a use that would have the potential of impacting the water table). [OPA 76, OMB File # PL100206, November 25, 2011]

7. The study must be undertaken by a qualified professional and must also conform to the policies of Section 4.8.4 on contaminated sites. The study will be consistent with provincial regulations and address the presence and impact of the following: contamination by leachates, surface runoff, ground settlement, visual impact, dust, noise, soil contamination and hazardous waste, and landfill-generated gases. Particular attention shall be given to odour and the production and migration of methane gas. [OPA 76, OMB File # PL100206, November 25, 2011]

8. Notwithstanding the requirement for a study in policy 6 above the following compatible uses may not require a study: utilities, waste-processing facilities, above-grade transportation routes, forestry activities, and gravel pits, quarries and other mining activities, provided that the solid waste disposal site water table is not affected and excavations will not result in landfill gas migration or removal of a visual screen buffering of the landfill from the public view. [OPA 76, OMB File # PL100206, November 25, 2011]

9. Notwithstanding polices 6, 7 & 8 above no new land use will be permitted within 30 metres of:

a. the licensed perimeter of an operating site or
b. the ‘fill area’ of a non-operating solid waste disposal site. For the purpose of this policy the ‘fill area’ means the area of a waste disposal site that was set aside for land filling or dumping.

[OPA 76, OMB File # PL100206, November 25, 2011]

Reuse of non-operating sites

10. No reuse of a non-operating solid waste disposal site may occur within 25 years of closure, unless approved by the Minister of the Environment under the Environmental Protection Act. [OPA 76, OMB File # PL100206, November 25, 2011]

3.9 - Snow Disposal Facilities

Ottawa is a winter city, resulting in the need for public and private, permanent and temporary snow disposal sites. Such disposal facilities include only those lands on which snow is placed after being brought to the site from elsewhere and not areas in which snow is simply moved to one portion of a site after being cleared from the rest of the site.

Policies

  1. Snow disposal facilities are not designated on the schedules of this Plan.
  2. Existing snow disposal facilities will be recognised in the zoning by-law. A new snow disposal facility will require an amendment to the zoning by-law. New Snow Disposal Facilities will only be permitted in areas where it can be demonstrated that the impacts of trucking and any other negative impacts can be minimized and subject to a zoning by-law amendment.
  3. Snow disposal facilities will not be permitted in Natural Environment Areas, Significant Wetlands, flood plains, unstable slopes, Rural Natural Features and Urban Natural Features. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]
  4. The impacts of snow disposal facilities for existing or committed sites shall be mitigated through urban design and site plan control measures which include locating landscaping, road allowances, open space uses, utility installations, commercial uses, etc. in any intervening separation distance between the snow disposal facilities and a sensitive land use.
  5. The appropriateness of new Snow Disposal Facilities, expansions to existing facilities, and existing facilities which have not been engineered for this purpose, will be evaluated on the basis of the following criteria:
    1. Appropriate setbacks from residential uses and neighbouring properties in accordance with Ministry of Environment Guidelines for setbacks from residential uses and for recommended acceptable noise levels;
    2. Safe and secure access which does not encourage truck traffic on local roads;
    3. A grading and drainage plan that shows all melt water can be handled in an environmentally- acceptable fashion; and,
    4. The preparation of a study that addresses:
      1. Existing soil and water quality conditions to establish baseline levels of soil and water components,
      2. Presence of any contaminants and the potential for accumulation of any contaminants that could migrate or be made more dangerous as a result of the snow disposal facility,
      3. Proximity to drinking wells and impact on them,
      4. Soil stability,
      5. Sub-surface drainage and impact on surrounding properties,
      6. Proximity to any open water courses and potential impacts on them,
      7. Noise and vibration,
      8. Aesthetics,
      9. Seagull control,
      10. Air quality. [OMB decision #1474, May 17, 2006]
  6. On an on-going basis, the City will monitor water quality and soil conditions in and surrounding existing and proposed Snow Disposal Facilities and implement measures to mitigate any impacts in these areas.

3.10 - Airports

The City of Ottawa is home to three airports: the Macdonald-Cartier International Airport; Carp Airport; and Rockcliffe Airport.

The Ottawa Macdonald-Cartier International Airport is centrally located within the National Capital Greenbelt and, relative to other Canadian airports, enviably situated within 13 km. of the city’s central business district. As the city’s sole full service commercial aviation airport it operates 24/7 to meet the needs of leisure and business travelers and the service and facility requirements of airlines and cargo carriers. The airport also supports a general aviation function in the north field that serves flight schools, private aviation activity, fixed base operators and businesses requiring access to the airfield system.

Airports at Carp and Rockcliffe are primarily used by general aviation. The Carp Airport operates to meet the needs of private aviators, flight schools and fixed base operators while the Rockcliffe Airport operates to support a flight school, private aviation activity and programs related to the Canada Aviation Museum.

[Amendment #76, September 09, 2011]

3.10.1 – Ottawa Macdonald-Cartier International Airport

The Ottawa Macdonald-Cartier International Airport is a significant economic and employment generator within the National Capital region and an important contributor to Ontario’s economy. The airport links Ottawa to other major Canadian and American cities and serves as the National Capital’s international gateway to the world, offering regular scheduled service to key air transportation hubs in the United Kingdom and Western Europe. The passenger terminal building, airfield system and surrounding lands within the total 1800 hectare airport premises are operated and managed by the Ottawa Macdonald- Cartier International Airport Authority under a long-term lease with Transport Canada. The Airport Authority is a Non-Share Capital Corporation that manages the airport on a ‘not-for-profit’ basis, reinvesting earnings in the improvement of passenger and aircraft facilities and services. For information purposes the lands leased by the Ottawa International Airport Authority within the urban area are shown on Schedule B. Some additional leased parcels south of the airport are in the rural areas.

The diversity of aviation and business activity at the airport and on airport lands stabilizes the financial viability of airport operations through economic downturns and shocks to the aviation industry, and directly enhances the airport’s role as a key economic multiplier within the City. The ‘Ottawa Macdonald- Cartier International Airport’ incorporates a wide range of land uses including a passenger terminal building, the airfield system, aviation support facilities, ground transportation infrastructure, government installations, environmental areas and commercial aviation and non-aviation employment sectors.

The Ottawa International Airport Authority has prepared a Master Plan for all of the land leased by the

Authority. The primary objective of the Airport Master Plan is to provide strategic direction and planning

focus for the future development of the airport. The Plan identifies employment areas, airport

operational/terminal areas, and environmental areas. Future development of employment uses will

require the development of concept plans to:

  • identify the type, density and location of land uses;
  • establish land use, environmental and design guidelines;
  • set out an implementation strategy for the proposed development.

Ottawa Macdonald-Cartier International Airport is located within the National Capital Greenbelt and the

National Interest Land Mass, which is defined as lands essential to the long term functioning and

experience of the Capital.

[Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, September 27, 2011]

Policies

  1. On land designated Ottawa Macdonald–Cartier International Airport on Schedule B, the following uses will be permitted:
    1. Civilian or military airport with a broad range of aviation related uses including: a commercial civilian airport; a general aviation aerodrome; air cargo distribution centres; [Amendment #76, September 09, 2011]
    2. Uses permitted in Employment Areas, as described in Section 3.6.5; [Amendment #14, September 8, 2004]
    3. Hotels and related commercial uses.

[Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, September 27, 2011]

2. Proposed commercial aviation/ non-aviation, industrial and employment uses, outside of the areas reserved for core aviation functions and environmental protection shall proceed on the basis of more detailed land-use plans prepared by the proponent in consultation with the City, the National Capital Commission and other airport stakeholders. Design guidelines and technical studies will also be required, as appropriate, prior to development. The land-use plans will be prepared in accordance with the framework established in Figure 2.5.6 of the Official Plan. Specific terms of reference will be developed for each plan to the satisfaction of the City of Ottawa. In turn the City will consult with impacted communities and interest groups as part of its input into the draft concepts for development. [Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, September 27, 2011]

3. Notwithstanding Policy 2 above, development proposals may be considered on a case- by-case basis in advance of the formulation of concept plans provided:

a. Site-specific issues and constraints are adequately addressed;
b. The uses are consistent with the direction provided in the Ottawa Macdonald-Cartier International Airport Land-Use Plan and the Greenbelt Master Plan.

[Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, September 27, 2011

4. For lands leased by the Airport Authority outside the Ottawa Macdonald-Cartier International Airport designation, any change in the designations will require an Official Plan amendment that:

a. Is supported by studies prepared by the Airport Authority in consultation with the City, the National Capital Commission and other airport stakeholders; or
b. Implements land-use changes recommended through the NCC Greenbelt Master Plan Review process.

[Amendment #76, OMB File # PL100206, September 27, 2011]

3.10.2 – Carp Airport

Policies

The Carp Airport is a general aviation airport used by pilots and frequent users of aviation services, businesses with corporate plans and businesses that provide aviation products and services. Originally a military training airfield, Carp Airport was converted to civilian and some commercial aviation uses after the war and in 1997 it was transferred to municipal ownership.

The City supports the local employment and economic development role of the Carp Airport. In 2005, the City approved a master land use and servicing plan for Carp Airport that provided for protection and development of the core airport area, and development of aviation related land-use components that included an aerospace business park and an accessory residential fly-in community. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

Policies

  1. The Carp Airport is designated on Schedule A with the intent of providing airport facilities that serve the general aviation needs in Ottawa. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]
  2. The land uses permitted in the designation are aviation and other land uses associated with an airport including an aerospace business park and an accessory residential fly-in community consistent with the Carp Airport master land use and servicing plan. [Amendment #76, August 04, 2010]

3.11 - Urban Expansion Study Area

The designation of Urban Expansion Study Area on Schedule B contributes to the provision of sufficient urban land to support the residential demands of the projected population to 2031. These lands will develop primarily for residential purposes, although minor, non-residential uses to meet the needs of a neighbourhood may also be located here. A comprehensive study will be required prior to bringing these lands into the urban area.

  1. Lands are designated on Schedule B as ‘Urban Expansion Study Area’ with the intent that these lands will be evaluated for development primarily for urban residential uses, once the policies of this section have been satisfied. An Official Plan amendment will be required to provide a General Urban Area designation. The amendment may also be required to implement infrastructure, environmental and open space provisions of plans approved for individual areas.
  2. Prior to an Official Plan Amendment to designate lands for urban land uses, the City shall consider:
    1. whether the lands to be designated are required in order to maintain a 10-year supply of lands designated and available, for a full range of housing types through residential development and residential intensification;
    2. the status of the City’s implementation strategy as set out in Section 2.2.2 Policies 11 and 12; and,
    3. the achievement of intensification targets in Section 2.2.2, Policy 5.
  3. If the assessment in Policy 2 indicates the need for additional residential lands, the City shall commence the comprehensive study process, in accordance with the policies of this section
  4. The type of study and development plan required to achieve the policies of this section will be agreed to in advance and may be a community design plan or a concept plan. Either process will require a comprehensive consultation process with the community to identify issues and potential solutions.
  5. Where the development plan impacts multiple landowners, it is their responsibility to collaborate on the preparation of the plan and to agree on how parks, stormwater ponds and any other facilities will be located and costs shared. The City will require a landowners’ agreement addressing these matters prior to the review of development applications.
  6. Proponents of development will complete, to the satisfaction of the City, studies and a plan of sufficient detail to:
    1. Identify the location, timing and cost of roads and transit facilities, water and wastewater services, public utilities, stormwater management facilities, etc. required on-site and off-site to service the area; and
    2. Identify the natural heritage system on the site independent of the potential developable area. Typically an environmental management plan as described in Section 2.4.3 will be prepared where a subwatershed study does not exist or does not provide sufficient guidance to identify the environmental features on the site and their functions, which together constitute the natural heritage system. The components of this system are generally described in Section 2.4.2, with the exception that significant woodlands are to be further evaluated consistent with the Urban Natural Areas Environmental Evaluation Study. No development is permitted within this system, which is to be conveyed to the City for public use before development of the area is approved; and  [Subject to amendment #179, December 14, 2016]
    3. Identify Recreational Pathways on the site; and
    4. Evaluate the adequacy of community facilities existing or planned for the area in consultation with School Boards and other providers of community facilities;
    5. Establish the mix and location of residential dwellings which, as a minimum, will constitute the following: 
      1. At least 45% single detached but not more than 55% single detached, at least 10 per cent apartment dwellings and the remainder multiple dwellings, other than apartments. 
      2. In Urban Expansion Study Area designations, overall residential development will meet a minimum average density target of 34 units per net hectare. Net residential density is based on the area of land in exclusively residential use, including lanes and parking areas internal to developments but excluding public streets, rights-of-way and all non-residential uses; and
    6. f.Show how the plan will achieve other policies of this Official Plan including, but not limited to, affordable housing and design; and
    7. g.Meet the requirements of Phase 1 and 2 of the Environmental Assessment Act where required
  7. Proponents of development will prepare a Financial Implementation Plan and commit to providing:
    1. The on-site and off-site servicing systems described above through development charges or at the expense of the developer; and
    2. The natural heritage system as non-developable lands to be transferred to the City for $1; and
    3. The Recreational Pathways as identified in this Plan through development charges or at the expense of the developer.

[Amendment #76, Ministerial Modification # 46, OMB File # PL100206, September 07, 2011]

3.12 - Developing Community (Expansion Area)

The designation of Developing Community (Expansion Area) on Schedule B and Urban Area on Schedule A contributes to the provision of sufficient urban land to support the residential demands of the projected population. These lands, none of which is very large, will develop primarily for residential purposes, although minor, non-residential uses to meet the needs of a neighbourhood may also be located here.

  1. Lands designated on Schedule B as ‘Developing Community (Expansion Area)’ and ‘Urban Area’ on Schedule A contributes to the provision of sufficient urban land to support the residential demands of the projected population to 2031. The intent is that these lands will be developed primarily for urban residential uses, once the policies of this section have been satisfied.
  2. The policies of this section will be achieved through the preparation of a plan of subdivision.
  3. Proponents of development will complete, to the satisfaction of the City, studies and a plan of sufficient detail to:
    1. Identify the location, timing and cost of roads and transit facilities, water and wastewater services, public utilities, stormwater management facilities, etc. required on-site and off-site to service the area; and
    2. Identify the natural heritage system on the site independent of the potential developable area. Typically an environmental management plan as described in Section 2.4.3 will be prepared where a subwatershed study does not exist or does not provide sufficient guidance to identify the environmental features on the site and their functions, which together constitute the natural heritage system. The components of this system are generally described in Section 2.4.2, with the exception that significant woodlands are to be further evaluated consistent with the Urban Natural Areas Environmental Evaluation Study. No development is permitted within this system, which is to be conveyed to the City for public use before development of the area is approved; and
    3. Identify Recreational Pathways on the site;
    4. Establish the mix and location of residential dwelling which, as a minimum, will constitute the following:
      1. At least 45% single detached but not more than 55% single detached, at least 10 per cent apartment dwellings and the remainder multiple dwellings, other than apartments.
      2. In Developing Community (Expansion Area) designations, overall residential development will meet a minimum average density target of 34 units per net hectare. Net residential density is based on the area of land in exclusively residential use, including lanes and parking areas internal to developments but excluding public streets, rights-of-way and all non-residential uses; and
    5. Show how the plan will achieve other policies of this Official Plan including, but not limited to, affordable housing and design; and
    6. Meet the requirements of Phase 1 and 2 of the Environmental Assessment Act where required.
  4. Proponents of development will prepare a Financial Implementation Plan and commit to providing:
    1. The on-site and off-site servicing systems described above through development charges or at the expense of the developer; and
    2. The natural heritage system as non-developable lands to be transferred to the City for $1; and
    3. The Recreational Pathways as identified in this Plan through development charges or at the expense of the developer.
  5. An amendment to this Plan will not be required to remove the designation of Developing Community (Expansion Area) and replace it with General Urban Area, but an amendment may be required to implement infrastructure and open space provisions of plans approved for individual areas. Development may proceed once the City is satisfied that the requirements of this section have been met and the City has approved the plan of subdivision.[Amendment #76, Ministerial Modification # 46, OMB File # PL100206, September 07, 2011]
  6. A Special Study Area referring to the floodplain identified on Schedule K shall be shown on any Draft of Subdivision submitted for 2405 Mer Bleue Road and 2496 Tenth Line Road to prohibit development on this area until the floodplain is removed through the appropriate review and evaluative process. [Amendment #139, October 24, 2014]

3.13 - Carp River Restoration Policy Area

Policies

  1. Lands in the vicinity of the Carp River between Hazeldean Road and a point north of Campeau Drive, are designated „Carp River Restoration Policy Area' on Schedules A and B of this Plan. The Restoration Policy Area is an overlay over urban land-use designations. The extent of the flood plain lands to which the Carp River Restoration Policy Area applies will be determined by the consulting the implementing zoning by-law and Conservation Authority Flood Plain maps. The purpose of the Restoration Policy Area designation is to recognize that proposed channel modifications and restoration works will occur and allow for development of part of this area following implementation. However, a number of conditions must be met before development is allowed to proceed:

Conditions

a. The Minister of the Environment will have approved the Carp River, Poole Creek and Feedmill Creek Restoration Class EA;
b. The Kanata West Landowners Group, or the City, will have commenced the physical construction of Phase I of the Carp River restoration works;
c. Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority will have issued a permit under Section 28 of the Conservation Authorities Act for the placement and removal of fill in accordance with the Carp River Restoration Plan and the EA;
d. Filling of the property and an as-built survey will have been completed to demonstrate that the area is entirely removed from the flood plain; and
e. At all times, the flood storage capacity of the corridor will be maintained at or above existing conditions.

2. Once all five conditions have been met, the zoning by-law may be amended (holding provision lifted) on the basis of the underlying designation on these lands. An Official Plan Amendment will not be required to revert to the underlying designation provided the conditions listed in Policy 1 have been met. [Amendment #104, August 16, 2012]