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1.0 - Central Area

Former City of Ottawa Official Plan

1.1 - Introduction

1.1.1 Central Area Secondary Policy Plan

This chapter contains a Secondary Policy Plan for the Central Area which provides more detailed area-based policy direction for a number of geographical areas within the Central Area, referred to as Character Areas and Theme Streets. These areas are designated on Schedule B - Central Area Character Areas and Theme Streets. The Central Area Secondary Policy Plan is contained in this volume. Reference must be made to both the Ottawa Official Plan and the Secondary Policy Plan in Volume 2 for complete guidance on specific sites in the Central Area.

1.2 - Interpretation

1.2.1 Vision / Conceptual Image

The Secondary Policy Plan contains, in addition to objectives and policies, a vision and a conceptual image for each Character Area or Theme Street. The vision describes the desired future of the area and reflects the general intent of the objectives and policies. Each conceptual image serves as a "mental map" which is provided solely to assist in the understanding of the respective vision. Neither the visions nor the conceptual images should be interpreted as policy statements or land use schedules.

1.2.2 Boundaries

The boundaries between Character Areas and/or Theme Streets as shown on Schedule B - Central Area Character Areas and Theme Streets shall generally be considered to be guidelines, except where they may coincide with roads, waterways, or other defined features. Where Character Area and/or Theme Street boundaries come together, an interface will be recognized, and reference to policies of the adjacent areas may be necessary.

1.2.3 Major Policy Elements in Primary Plan

The Major Policy Elements contained in the Primary Plan are issue based and apply universally across the entire Central Area. They represent planning policies which transcend all internal Central Area boundaries, and address important land use related functional issues, including the Central Area Vision and the Strategic Approach, growth management, general land use, urban design, pedestrian circulation, open space, leisure resource, transportation and infrastructure. Reference must be made to both the Ottawa Official Plan and the Secondary Policy Plan in Volume 2 for complete guidance on specific sites in the Central Area.

1.3 - The Core

The Core

1.3.1 Vision

Focus of Employment

The Core's role as the major focus of employment and economic activity within the Region will be strong and secure in the future, partly through the infill of surface parking sites, and the refurbishing and/or redevelopment of older buildings. Head offices of major corporations, financial organizations and diplomatic missions will continue to establish in the Core while some federal government administrative uses gradually relocate to Mixed Use Centres in the City of Ottawa outside the Central Area.

Mixed Uses

The addition of a greater diversity of uses will create a lively, vibrant environment, while the enhancement of the Core's architecture will contribute significantly to its economic vitality and its continued attraction of new businesses and people. The addition of housing in mixed use projects will particularly help to support a growing variety of pedestrian-oriented uses at grade, including entertainment and cultural uses. This diversification will attract residents and visitors outside normal business hours, while ensuring safe streets, as more and more people are drawn to this important destination.

Urban Design Renaissance

The image and identity of the Core will be significantly enhanced through an urban design renaissance. The height of new buildings will ensure the visual integrity and symbolic primacy of the Parliament Buildings and other national symbols as seen from Confederation Boulevard, reflect an increased sensitivity in design, provide a sense of human scale, and create pedestrian interest. Heritage buildings will be protected and enhanced, and nearby new development will respect their heritage features. Significant views from public rights-of-way within the Core will be protected, especially those of Parliament Hill and the Canal. Selected views of the Core skyline will also be visible from important gateways outside the Central Area.

Enhanced Pedestrian Environment

Pedestrians will enjoy a safe, secure, comfortable, enriched, and enhanced street environment. Retail and other vibrant uses will provide direct access to the street along main pedestrian corridors. Metcalfe Street, for example, will have a continuity of weather protection and connect with a variety of attractive, usable open spaces, including the exciting urban park at the World Exchange Plaza. These corridors will also connect with transit services and nearby areas, such as Sparks Street, Parliament Hill, the Canal, Rideau Street, Upper Town, and the Centretown neighbourhood. The addition of abundant street trees in tree planting corridors/areas, green pocket parks, sunlit pedestrian areas, sculptural amenities and water features will enhance and animate these corridors, soften the Core's environment, and reflect the goal of restoring the urban forest.

Reduced Carbon Emissions

A significant increase in the use of non-auto travel to and from the Central Area, especially transit, cycling, and walking will also reduce auto commuting to, and carbon emissions in the Core. The area will benefit from an enhanced pedestrian environment at grade and transitway improvements which result in improved air quality and reduced noise. The transitway improvements will also permit widened sidewalks and abundant street trees along transit corridors.

Monitoring

Employment levels in the Central Business District and traffic and transportation characteristics will also be monitored in recognition of limits to the transportation capacity serving the Central Area.

Vitality

In the future, the Core will remain as the vibrant centre of economic activity, and as an important people-place destination which provides day/night, year-round activity. Its vitality will be based not only on its strong employment function, but equally on its rich diversity of uses and activities, and its significantly enhanced urban environment.

1.3.2 Objectives

Major Employment Economic Focus

  1. To strengthen, promote and secure the Core's role, as designated on Schedule B, Central Area Character Areas and Theme Streets, primarily as the major focus of employment and economic activity within the region, and as an integral part of the Central Business District.

Increased Diversity / Vitality

  1. To increase the diversity and vitality of the Core, and create a lively, vibrant environment which supports a wide variety of working, living, shopping, and leisure activities.

1.3.3 Policies

Mixed Uses

  1. City Council shall ensure that commercial uses which generate employment are predominant in the Core, while promoting a mix of uses which contribute to, and generate vitality and activity in the Core. City Council shall, therefore:
    1. Employment Uses - permit commercial uses, including those uses which primarily involve administrative, professional or clerical activities, such as head offices of major corporations, associations, financial and banking institutions, diplomatic missions, professional offices and other similar uses;
    2. Residential and Complementary Uses - promote and permit residential uses within mixed use development or as a primary use, and other appropriate complementary uses which generate evening and year round activity, such as entertainment and cultural uses; and
    3. Uses at Grade - require pedestrian-oriented uses at grade along pedestrian corridors, including Albert, Slater, and Metcalfe Streets, and along other streets, retail uses at grade, or similar appropriate uses which contribute to pedestrian activity or interest, such as an indoor or outdoor pedestrian amenity area.

Pedestrian-Oriented Uses

  1. City Council shall ensure the following criteria are fulfilled in the implementation of Policy a)(iii) above concerning pedestrian-oriented uses:
    1. the principal entrances to such uses shall be located along the perimeter of a building, and shall be directly accessible to pedestrians walking along public rights-of-way;
    2. such uses shall be provided continuously along the street, shall be designed to give preference to narrow frontages, and their visibility to pedestrians shall be maximized; and
    3. in limited instances, pedestrian-oriented uses with internal access only, may be permitted provided that the predominance of at-grade uses provide direct access to the street.

Building Profile

  1. City Council shall permit primarily high to medium profile development in the Core, particularly in the northern and western areas. Medium profile development that helps transition down from the higher profile buildings to the north to the lower profile residential uses in Centretown should be concentrated along the area’s southern edge. City Council shall also ensure that new development:
    1. respects the visual integrity and symbolic primacy of the Parliament Buildings and other national symbols as seen from the key viewpoints and view sequences depicted Ottawa Official Plan Annex 6 A- Central Area Key Views and View Sequences. In realizing this aim, City Council shall ensure that buildings constructed in the Areas of Height Control as set out on Annex 6 A:
  • do not visually rise above the ridgeline of the roof of the Centre Block when viewed from key viewpoints and view sequences as shown on Annex 6 A, and thus do not visually mar the silhouette of the Parliament Buildings,
  • do not visually dominate the Parliament Buildings and other national symbols; and
  • when located within a block where there is shown an angular height plane(s) on Annex 6 B, do not project beyond the angular height limit identifie
  1. Transition - contributes to an appropriate transition to the adjacent Canal Character Area, and avoids overpowering effects on Confederation Boulevard, by setting back the upper storeys of medium to high profile buildings along Elgin Street. [Amendment 24, May 11, 2006]

Heritage Resources

  1. City Council shall protect, enhance and conserve the Core's heritage resources while ensuring that development complements and respects the character of nearby heritage buildings.

Design Criteria

  1. City Council shall, when reviewing plans for development in the Core, ensure a high quality of design that is worthy of the nation's capital, and the creation of an enjoyable pedestrian environment to ensure the Core's role as a people place. City Council shall therefore ensure the fulfilment of policies c) and d) above, as well as the fulfilment of the Urban Design policies, particularly taking into account the following design criteria:
    1. Roof Treatment - provides an interesting roof treatment or other appropriate design feature within the height limits. The purpose of such treatment will be to sculpt or shape the building at the upper levels, add to the visual interest of the building, and contribute positively to the area. City Council shall ensure the protection of the visual integrity and the symbolic primacy of the Parliament Buildings and other national symbols in the consideration of such proposals, and that such roof treatment does not compete with this aim.
    2. Human Scale - contributes to a sense of human scale, particularly at ground level;
    3. Sunlight - minimizes sun shadowing on public open spaces, and where possible creates opportunities for sunlight on pedestrian corridors;
    4. Weather Protection - provides a continuity of weather protection while maximizing the visibility of storefronts;
    5. Wind - avoids potentially undesirable wind conditions through appropriate building design, including the use of podiums, and ensures wind testing of development proposals on pedestrian corridors;
    6. Barrier-free Design - accommodates the needs of persons with disabilities and other special needs groups;
    7. Art - incorporates, where appropriate, art in public and private places, such as water features, sculpture or other suitable elements; and
    8. Parking - ensures safety, security and visual interest in the design of parking facilities, including bicycle parking.
    9. Lower Floor Articulation - articulates the lower floors of buildings, with a special emphasis on the relationship of the building to the street at grade level;
    10. Entranceways - provides well-defined entranceways with large pedestrian circulation spaces;
    11. Building Frontages - encourages buildings to front on both north-south as well as east-west streets;
    12. Servicing/Parking Entrances - limits servicing and underground parking entrances fronting onto streets. Where possible, they should be accessed from within the building envelope and not the public right-of-way; and
    13. Front Setbacks for Major Buildings - provides deeper front setbacks for major buildings occupying much of a block, in order to accommodate wider sidewalks, street furniture and landscaping. [Amendment 24, May 11, 2006]

Views

  1. City Council shall protect and enhance significant public views as seen from public rights-of-way in the Core, and as shown on Annex 6 A - Central Area Key Views and View Sequences. City Council shall also protect and enhance selected views of the Core's skyline from gateways into, and outside the Central Area.

Pedestrian Movement

  1. City Council shall encourage a rich street life and an enjoyable, comfortable pedestrian environment in the Core in order to promote its vitality and its attraction as a people-place. To achieve this policy, City Council shall:
    1. Priority at Grade - place a priority on pedestrian movement at-grade, especially along pedestrian corridors which provide direct access to pedestrian-oriented uses and mid-block connections, particularly between Sparks and Queens Streets;
    2. Limited Pedways - generally discourage above or below-grade pedways, and undertake to limit them to strategic locations which ensure the prominence of at-grade movement, and ensure the fulfilment of pedway and development design criteria;
    3. Comfortable Pedestrian Environment - ensure minimum clear sidewalk widths and a continuity of weather protection;
    4. Enhanced Pedestrian Corridors - promote and facilitate the enhancement of pedestrian corridors with appropriate co-ordinated streetscaping elements which enhance the character of the Core; and
    5. Pedestrian Links - ensure the provision of identifiable at-grade pedestrian links to the Central Area east of the Canal and surrounding Character Areas and Theme Streets, including Sparks Street, the Canal, Bank Street, and Upper Town, as well as the Centretown neighbourhood. [Amendment 24, May 25, 2005}
  2. City Council shall, together with other governmental agencies, promote and facilitate the enhancement of Elgin, Metcalfe and Kent Streets as distinctive streets and pedestrian promenades linking Centretown with the Core, Sparks Street, and Parliament Hill, and as gateways to the Central Area, and particularly by:
    1. introducing appropriate soft and hard landscaping elements, especially the provision of suitable lighting and abundant street trees along the public right-of-way; and
    2. protecting and enhancing significant views such as those of the Centre Block and Library to the north, as well as to the Museum of Natural Science to the south. [Amendment 24, May 24, 2005]

Open Space

  1. City Council shall promote and ensure the provision of a variety of usable open spaces and pedestrian amenity areas particularly on corners, in the Core, such as, green pocket parks, plazas, rooftop terraces and/or indoor winter gardens. City Council shall also ensure that such spaces are sensitively designed. In the fulfilment of this aim, City Council shall:
    1. Dedication Requirements - maximize the amount of open space lands received under the dedication requirements of the Planning Act as outlined in the Leisure Resources chapter of this Plan;
    2. Between Demolition and Construction - request that vacant lands be landscaped and maintained as usable open spaces for the interim period between demolition and construction; and
    3. Temporary Surface Parking - require that, where temporary surface parking is permitted, that an appropriate amount of usable open space be provided. The visual appearance of such facilities shall also be enhanced and screened through the use of substantial vegetation. Extension of approval for existing temporary surface parking lots shall require appropriate landscaping improvements and taking back of any encroachments onto the public right-of-way; and
    4. Linkage with Bank Street Axis Project - Link future open spaces with the National Capital Commission’s Bank Street Axis Project. [Amendment 24, May 24, 2005]

Transitway Improvements

  1. City Council shall support transitway improvements in the Core, including rapid transit along one of the east-west streets, in order to provide improved transit service, increase transit ridership and reduce auto commuting, and to improve the capacity of the transportation system. Development of rapid transit will require full streetscape restoration. In the implementation of this policy, City Council shall particularly ensure, together with other governmental agencies, the preparation of a Transportation Strategy for the Central Area. [Amendment 24, May 24, 2005]

Targeted Strategies

  1. City Council shall consider undertaking the following targeted strategies (see Annex 10) to implement the Downtown Ottawa Urban Design Strategy:
    1. Urban Open Space Program - as part of the downtown public open space program (in addition to the policies in 1.3.3i), work closely with developers to encourage the inclusion of urban open space in new developments. Priority sites are Kent at Slater, Laurier at Bank; Queen at Kent; and, O’Connor at Gloucester;
    2. Laurier Avenue Beautification - consider Laurier Avenue to be a prime candidate for the demonstration of City-led streetscape improvements along its entire length;
    3. Albert and Slater Streets Beautification - in line with the Rapid Transit Expansion Study recommendations, dedicate funding for improved waiting areas, transit facilities, signage, traffic signals, pedestrian comfort and better integration with existing uses along Albert and Slater Streets. A portion of this funding should be from the Transitway Systems Improvement Program;
    4. The Interface District - establish a civically-inspired Interface District for the area bounded by Queen, Bay, Wellington and Elgin Streets with the following elements:

Canada’s Urban Culture: Bay/Lyon/ Kent/Bank/ O’Connor/ Metcalfe/Elgin Streets

  • in collaboration with the National Capital Commission, a street design program in the north-south streets between Wellington and Queen, featuring the best of art and culture, landscape, architecture, programming, industrial design and regional characteristics from each of Canada’s provinces, territories and major cities; and
  • Sparks Street (see Section 1.13.3h)
  • Queen Street
  • a streetscaping program for Queen Street that is similar in quality and style to the north-south streets of the Interface District. [Amendment 24, May 25, 2005]

1.4 - Parliamentary Precinct

(The Vision and accompanying policies of this chapter are adapted, in part, from the document entitled "The Parliamentary Precinct Area - Urban Design Guidelines and Demonstration Plan for Long Range Development", National Capital Commission, Public Works Canada (du Toit, Allsopp, Hillier).)  Parliamentary Precinct

1.4.1 Vision

Image

In the future, the Parliamentary Precinct will continue to emerge as the Area of Federal Presence for the nation's capital, with Parliament Hill as its symbolic focus. Future development will reinforce the expansive and diverse landscape of the precinct area, with its dramatic topography, overlooking the Ottawa River. This natural setting will be enclosed and defined by the regular pattern of city streets and buildings on its periphery, accentuating the distinctive, free-standing buildings on the plateau of the hill.

Movement

Confederation Boulevard will serve as the primary means of address to the Parliamentary Precinct, with Wellington Street evolving as the premiere avenue of the capital. A distinctive pedestrian promenade will develop on the north side of Wellington Street, while the south frontage will infill and redevelop to form a defined edge of buildings which are sensitive to existing heritage buildings on the street.

Pedestrian Links

Pedestrian crossings of Wellington Street will serve to link the Precinct with the street-related pedestrian network of the Core, and Sparks and Bank Streets. A number of at-grade pedestrian links will establish through, and between buildings along Wellington Street to Sparks Street.

Access to the River

Over the years, pedestrian access from the Grand Esplanade along Wellington Street to the Ottawa River will improve with the provision of a formal sequence of stairs and a meandering pathway descending from Bank Street to the river's edge, and the development of a major pedestrian corridor to the River between the Judicial Triad and the National Library/Public Archives building.

In each location, a reshaping of the landscape will facilitate pedestrian corridors down the escarpment to the river's edge, and will extend the woodland slopes up to Wellington Street.

Environment

The forested slope of the escarpment and associated valley lands will be conserved and rehabilitated in recognition of their environmental sensitivity and will function as a unique landscaped setting for the parliamentary buildings above. New development will locate away from the escarpment's edge in deference to this valuable resource.

Symbolic Primacy

The symbolic primacy and the visual integrity of the Hill will be preserved and enhanced. Building heights throughout the Central Area will be limited, preserving and enhancing the views of the Parliament Buildings and other national symbols. Similarly, the unexpected views of the Hill from downtown streets will be protected, and the established landscape patterns and architectural themes of the Precinct will be continued and strengthened.

Future development, therefore, shall reinforce the qualitative values of the natural and man-made features of the Parliamentary Precinct, enhancing its role as the symbolic and ceremonial heart of both Ottawa and the nation.

1.4.2 Objectives

Historic Seat of Government

  1. To support the evolution of the Parliamentary Precinct, as designated on Schedule B - Central Area Character Areas and Theme Streets, as the historic seat of government in Canada and as the Area of Federal Presence.

Support Federal Initiatives

  1. To support federal initiatives in the planning and development of the Parliamentary Precinct as an emerging urban form, of which Parliament Hill is the focal point.

1.4.3 Policies

Ceremonial Functions

  1. City Council endorses the continuation of, and improvement to, the ceremonial functions associated with the Parliamentary Precinct. In recognition of this function, City Council supports the Confederation Boulevard concept as the primary means of address to the Parliamentary Precinct.

Confederation Boulevard

  1. City Council, supports the concept of Confederation Boulevard and the designation of Wellington Street as a distinctive street, specifically:
    1. a reduction in the number of commuter buses, and the eventual removal of trucks from Wellington Street, as alternative routes become available.
    2. infill development of the frontage sites on the south side of Wellington Street, on the city block west of the Langevin Building, between Metcalfe and O'Connor Streets, which is designed to establish a strong street wall and to contain and complete the parliamentary quadrangle while protecting views of the Parliament Buildings; and
    3. a highly consistent pattern of tree planting and street furniture;
    4. the Grand Esplanade on the north side of Wellington Street to provide a distinctive pedestrian promenade linking national institutions;

Escarpment

  1. City Council endorses the retention of the historical natural setting of the Parliamentary Precinct through the conservation and rehabilitation of the escarpment, which is designated Major Open Space on Schedule B, in its natural state. Additional buildings on the plateau should be sited away from the natural or constructed escarpment edge.

Primacy of Parliament Hill

  1. City Council recognizes the symbolic primacy and visual integrity of Parliament Hill and supports its preservation and enhancement. In this regard, City Council shall protect the visual integrity and symbolic primacy of the Parliament Buildings and other national symbols, and shall ensure the preservation of the scale of Parliament Square by promoting an appropriate building profile on the south side of Wellington Street.

Heritage Buildings

  1. City Council shall support and promote the conservation of the very significant heritage resources in the Parliamentary Precinct, and in particular shall promote the retention and enhancement of existing heritage buildings on the south side of Wellington Street. New infill buildings should be sensitive to, and compatible with existing heritage buildings.

Pedestrian Movement

  1. City Council supports a number of clearly defined pedestrian crossings of Wellington Street which link the Grand Esplanade on Wellington Street with the street-related pedestrian network of the Core, and the Sparks Street and Bank Street Theme Streets. City Council shall encourage identifiable, at-grade pedestrian links through, and between buildings along Wellington Street to Sparks Street.

Improved Access to River

  1. City Council supports improved pedestrian access from Wellington Street to the Ottawa River which is sensitive to the natural setting of the escarpment. In particular, City Council endorses the plans to improve access to the river by reforming the landscape at the Bank Street Valley and on the west side of the Judicial Precinct.

Links to LeBreton

  1. City Council supports uninterrupted pedestrian links from the Parliamentary Precinct to LeBreton Flats, particularly along the shoreline of the Ottawa River.

View from Downtown Streets

  1. City Council shall protect significant views to the Parliamentary Precinct from public rights-of-way in the Core, including the views along Metcalfe, O'Connor, Kent, Bank, Bay and Lyon Streets and the view across Confederation Square. City council shall protect the views of the Parliament Buildings from two locations at Beechwood Cemetery, as identified in Annex 12 in Volume 1 of this plan. [Amendment 69, November 26, 2008]

Underground Parking

  1. City Council supports the reduction of surface parking by incorporating it underground, provided such development respects the environmental sensitivity of the escarpment, the heritage character, and integrity of Parliament Hill.

Open Landscape

  1. City Council supports the concept of pavilion buildings set in an open landscape, particularly the maintenance of the squares in front of the Centre Block and Supreme Court buildings.

1.5 - Byward Market

 By Ward Market

1.5.1 Vision

In the future, the ByWard Market's special heritage, pedestrian-oriented, and commercial character will continue to draw residents from the entire metropolitan area, as well as visitors from across Canada

Farmer's Market

The ByWard Market Square will remain as the vibrant heart and economic cornerstone of this area, containing the colourful, historic outdoors farmers' market, the unique retail food uses in the ByWard Market Building and on the west side of the Square. ByWard Market Street will serve as the core of food selling in the area; and the producer-based farmers' market, which emphasizes locally grown, seasonal foods, will be recognized as the main focus and 'raison d’être' of the ByWard Market area.

Environmental Quality

These combined attractions will serve as a strong reminder of the continued function of the area as one of the oldest, continuously operated open-air produce markets, not only in Ontario, but in all of Canada. Sensitive development near the ByWard Market Square, and elsewhere in the area, will ensure that the exceptional ambience and environmental quality of the Square is protected and that pedestrians will continue to enjoy shopping in an open sunlit environment.

Diversity of Users

The entire ByWard Market area will continue to function as one of Ottawa's favourite meeting places as it has since the nineteenth century. Residents and visitors will be drawn to the unique, primarily owner-operated, small boutiques, specialty restaurants, and entertainment uses which continuously front the area's streets. Residential, as well as office uses above the street will support the retail uses, creating a vibrant, secure environment. An interesting variety of mainstreet retail uses will extend along Dalhousie Street, creating a strong pedestrian link with the Rideau Street business district and delineating the Lowertown higher density residential neighbourhood from the traditional market area. The Mile of History along Sussex Drive will feature significant heritage buildings and function as a shopping street connecting Rideau Street and the ByWard Market with Confederation Boulevard and the National Gallery. Popular outdoor cafés will continue to line Clarence Street, creating a strong east-west link between Sussex Drive and Dalhousie Street. [Amendment 24, May 25, 2005]

Heritage Conservation

The ByWard Market will be designated as a Heritage Conservation District. This grouping of buildings, together with Lowertown West, will represent one of the largest concentrations of heritage buildings in the City, visually reflecting the early development of Bytown. The rich heritage fabric of the ByWard Market, which derives from its distinct architecture, unique street patterns and public courtyards, will be the basis of the area's special environmental quality. The design of new buildings on vacant or infill sites will be guided by special design criteria which will ensure that new development is sensitive to, and compatible with, nearby historic buildings. Alterations to properties within the area will be assessed on their sensitivity to the heritage character of the property and the district as a whole.

Public Movement/Infill

The public courtyards and associated pedestrian circulation system east of Sussex Drive will be protected and enhanced, and will continue to delight visitors and pedestrians with their quiet outdoor cafés, benches and fountains. New infill development will be introduced adjacent to the courtyards, providing boutiques and restaurants, and residential uses or small hotels above, which face onto the courtyards, reminiscent of the past and ensuring a safe environment.

Infill development on the west side of Sussex Drive near the Peacekeeping Monument will create both a new western edge to the ByWard Market, and an important interface between the "Town" and the "Crown". The built form of this development will be sensitive to, and compatible with, the heritage character of the ByWard Market, while enhancing the streetscape of the MacKenzie Avenue ceremonial route. The significant view of the Centre Block and Library from York Street in the ByWard Market will be protected, along with the creation of the "York Steps", which will provide a strong pedestrian link between the ByWard Market and Majors' Hill Park.

Enhanced Pedestrian Corridors

Main pedestrian corridors in the Market will be enhanced in a manner which respects, and is sensitive to, the area's heritage character. Appropriate entrance elements will announce York Street as a major entrance to, and promenade through, the ByWard Market, with its unique historic character, public vending stalls, and unimpeded views of the Parliament Buildings. An animated and enhanced William Street Mall will continue to serve as a vibrant focus for a variety of activities, such as street theatre and outdoor cafés, and will serve as a vibrant entrance to both Rideau Street and the ByWard Market.

Parking

The promotion of cycling as an important means of access to the ByWard Market in the future will help reduce vehicular congestion in the area while reducing carbon emissions. Additional cycle and vehicular parking will be strategically integrated within mixed use development, mainly on the edges of the Market. These facilities will support this popular area and permit the retention of its small scale heritage character, its environmental ambience, and its continuous, pedestrian-oriented nature.

Public Realm Investment

The City will continue to reinvigorate and reinvest in the ByWard Market through a series of co-ordinated public realm improvements that gives priority to the needs of pedestrians and the farmers’ market. [Amendment 24, May 24, 2005]

Protect Character

The expansion of the ByWard Market will be contained in order to protect the character of nearby residential neighbourhoods, and to maintain the compact, pedestrian-oriented heritage character of the Market.

The ByWard Market of the future will retain its unique environmental qualities and its rich heritage fabric. The vibrant farmers' market will continue to serve as the area's centre of attraction, and as the basis for its social function.

1.5.2 Objectives

Pedestrian-oriented Heritage Commercial Area

  1. To protect and enhance the function of the ByWard Market, as designated on Schedule B - Central Area Character Areas and Theme Streets, as a heritage, pedestrian-oriented, predominantly commercial area which focuses on an open-air farmers' market.

Conserve Enhance Heritage

  1. To protect the historical, architectural, social, cultural, and environmental significance of the ByWard Market by conserving and enhancing its heritage features, and by ensuring sensitive development.

1.5.3 Policies

Pedestrian-oriented Uses

  1. City Council shall permit predominantly commercial uses, such as retail, office, service, and hotel, as well as residential uses in the ByWard Market, and shall require continuous pedestrian-oriented uses at grade, such as small boutiques, restaurants, and entertainment uses, particularly those which are owner-operated. City Council shall also encourage the complete use of space along all lanes, courtyards and interiors of blocks. [Amendment 24, May 25, 2005]

Farmers' Market & Core of Food Selling

  1. City Council shall ensure the retention of the producer-based farmers' market and a variety of specialty food retail uses which complement and benefit each other, and, together, provide a unique, quality food shopping experience in the ByWard Market. In support of this goal, City Council shall recognize ByWard Market Street between York and George Streets, as the core of food selling in the ByWard Market area. In the achievement of this policy, City Council shall strive to:
    1. maintain, and ideally increase, the number of food retail uses in the ByWard Market Parking Garage. City Council shall designate this site for a future landmark building.
    2. maintain, and ideally increase, the number of specialty food retail uses on ByWard Market Street, and reintroduce food retail uses on the ground floor of the ByWard Market Building, while ensuring the retention of complementary arts and crafts; and
    3. strengthen the producer-based concept in the outdoor produce market, and increase the number and variety of producer-vendors;

Residential Uses

  1. In support of the producer-based farmers' market and specialty food retailing function of the ByWard Market, City Council shall ensure the provision of predominantly residential uses on the northern edge of the ByWard Market, while promoting residential uses elsewhere in the Market area, consistent with other policies in this Plan.

ByWard Market Square

  1. City Council shall recognize the historical and social significance of the ByWard Market Square, and shall protect its ambience and environmental quality by:
    1. ensuring low profile development immediately abutting the Square.
    2. ensuring the maintenance of direct sunlight on the ByWard Market Square;

Heritage Conservation District

  1. City Council shall designate the ByWard Market as a Heritage Conservation District, under Part V of the Ontario Heritage Act, and in recognition that the area contains one of Ottawa's largest concentrations of heritage buildings, which serve as a source and reminder of its original settlement.

Heritage Character Profile

  1. In support of Policy e) above, City Council shall ensure that:
    1. New Infill - new infill buildings are sensitive to, and compatible with nearby heritage buildings, particularly with respect to scale, size, lot development patterns, setbacks, materials and details.
    2. Alterations - alterations to heritage resources within the designated heritage conservation district are assessed against their sensitivity to the heritage character of the property and the district as a whole; and
    3. the scale of development is predominantly low profile, is of a human scale, is compatible with the heritage character of the area, and protects sunlight patterns and significant views;

Design Guidelines

  1. City Council shall adopt design guidelines to aid in the implementation of Policy f) above to ensure that future private and public sector development is sensitive to the special heritage character of the area.

Advisory Committee

  1. City Council shall establish a ByWard Market Advisory Committee, representing both public and private interests, to review and coordinate public and private sector projects including major reinvestments in the public realm directly affecting the built environment and street activity in the area, in support of Policy e) above.

Pedestrian Interest & Environment

  1. City Council shall ensure that:
    1. Emphasis is placed on the design of buildings, particularly at the base, including main entrances and windows along the street.
    2. identifiable at-grade pedestrian links are provided to surrounding adjacent Character Areas and green spaces; and
    3. pedestrian corridors, including courtyards, are enhanced with high quality urban landscape and streetscaping improvements based on historical precedence, which are compatible with the area’s heritage character;
    4. public open spaces and other spaces adjacent to areas of pedestrian circulation encourage public interest and activity;

Open Space

  1. City Council shall promote the protection and enhancement of the following public open spaces in the ByWard Market area:
    1. William Street Mall - the William Street Mall, located between Rideau and George Streets, to be animated and used for a variety of pedestrian-oriented activities, such as street theatre, outdoor cafés, and business association and other activities and events.
    2. Public Courtyards - the public courtyard and pedestrian circulation system parallel to Sussex Drive between George and St. Patrick Streets, to be used primarily for passive outdoor activity and outdoor cafés; and City Council shall encourage new courtyard spaces that link into and expand the existing system

Overshadowing Effects

  1. City Council shall minimize overshadowing by adjacent development within the ByWard Market, especially in intensely used outdoor areas such as public courtyards, pedestrian malls, pedestrian corridors, and outdoor café areas.

Distinctive Streets

  1. City Council shall designate and enhance York Street as a distinctive street, entrance to, and promenade through the ByWard Market, featuring appropriate landscape and interpretive elements which are sensitive to, and compatible with the historic character of the area, including appropriate entrance features.

Sussex Drive

  1. City Council shall recognize and support Sussex Drive as a distinctive street, known as the Mile of History and as part of Confederation Boulevard. The street shall feature significant heritage buildings and shall function as a shopping street, linking Rideau Street and the ByWard Market with the National Gallery. In collaboration with the National Capital Commission, City Council shall encourage that the design and finish of the rear of the buildings facing onto the courtyards behind Sussex Drive are also addressed. [Amendment #24, May 25, 2005]

Views

  1. City Council shall protect and enhance significant views as seen from public rights-of-way, such as those of the National Gallery, the ByWard Market Building, the Notre Dame Basilica, and east along York Street from MacKenzie Avenue, and St. Brigid's Church. In particular, City Council shall protect views of the Centre Block and Library as shown on Schedule B- 1 - Central Area Key Views and View Sequences. City council shall protect the views of the Parliament Buildings from two locations at Beechwood Cemetery, as identified in Annex 12 in Volume 1 of this plan. [Amendment 69, November 26, 2008]

Parking

  1. City Council shall recognize that the provision of sufficient and appropriate cycle and vehicular parking is critical to maintaining the vitality, ambience, and continuous pedestrian-oriented heritage character of the ByWard Market by:
    1. promoting cycling as an important means of access to the ByWard Market by ensuring the provision of cycle parking in municipally controlled facilities in the area, as well as other appropriate cycle parking in the area.
    2. ensuring the replacement of existing short-term parking spaces in public parking structures, should pedestrian-oriented uses replace such parking at grade; and
    3. wherever possible, ensuring that the balance of existing on-street parking is retained within the area;
    4. ensuring that the development of additional parking is provided primarily in mixed use development along appropriate edges of the area;
    5. encouraging cash-in-lieu of parking in the ByWard Market, except where the provision of on-site parking would not conflict with ensuring retention of the pedestrian-oriented heritage character of the area, while having regard to the Transportation and Parking Policies of the Primary Plan for the Central Area;

Outdoor Patios

  1. City Council shall support the provision of outdoor patios on public rights-of-way in the ByWard Market area while ensuring the fulfillment of appropriate design criteria, including among others the following:
    1. the provision of a compatible relationship of patio design and construction with the heritage character of the area and adjacent streetscape elements; and
    2. the maintenance of the primacy of the public rights-of-way for pedestrian and vehicular movement.
  2. City Council shall protect the pedestrian-oriented heritage commercial character and function of the ByWard Market, as well as the residential function of adjacent neighbourhoods by ensuring that the boundaries of the ByWard Market do not expand beyond those shown on Schedule B - Central Area Character Areas and Theme Streets, without:
    1. a special study of the transitional area along the entire edge of the adjacent area affected by the proposed expansion, including a full assessment of all potential impacts that may be created by such a change, such as impacts on the retail vitality of other Character Areas and/or Theme Streets in the Central Area, as well as impacts affecting residential neighbourhoods; and
    2. an amendment to the Official Plan.

Targeted Strategies

  1. City Council shall consider undertaking the following targeted strategies (see Annex 10) to implement the Downtown Ottawa Urban Design Strategy:
    1. a restoration of Guigues Avenue in Lowertown West as a neighbourhood-scale street with street-oriented low profile residential uses.
    2. a redesign of Parent Avenue to reduce the pavement width and landscape the boulevard areas; and
    3. Heritage Restoration Program: St Patrick and Murray Streets, Parent and Guigues Avenues - a co-ordinated program of traffic calming, tree planting, paving and street furniture along Murray and St. Patrick Streets using historically accurate designs and materials;
    4. Conversion/Removal/Remodeling of the ByWard Market Parking Garage - designation of the ByWard Market parking garage as the future site of a landmark public building, while maintaining the parking garage’s existing and proposed supply of specialty food retail space and public parking on the site;
    5. ByWard Market Branding and Theming - in partnership with the ByWard Market BIA, ByWard Market Management Group and other stakeholders, the development of a more high profile and visible ByWard Market brand/theme to improve the area’s overall appearance while maintaining its informal ambience and vernacular character;
    6. Public Realm Design Competition - a design competition for the enhancement of the ByWard Market’s public realm in order to improve the quality of the Market experience;

1.6 - Rideau/Congress Centre

 Rideau/Congress Centre

1.6.1 Vision

Tourism Focus

In the future, the Rideau/Congress Centre area will play an important role in Ottawa's Central Business District as a centre for visitor activity and special events, welcoming and accommodating area residents, tourists and convention delegates to the Capital City.

Activity in this mixed use area will continue to focus on the interconnecting Ottawa Congress Centre, Westin Hotel, and Rideau Centre, with a shared rooftop terrace and parking facilities. The area will also feature the City's vibrant regional-level arts centre, Arts Court, which will be the focal point of the block bounded by Daly Avenue, MacKenzie King Bridge, Nicholas and Waller Streets, featuring predominantly heritage buildings, with sensitive infill development. These two local venues will be supported by surrounding hotel, office and other complementary uses, including residential uses. All development will continue to benefit from a high level of transit service, which will be further improved with the addition of a below-grade transit system which will serve this area.

At street level, inviting retail outlets, such as restaurants and specialty shops will cater to visitors and passersby. Courtyard cafés and bistros will be popular après performance destinations for the patrons of Arts Court and the Congress Centre, imparting a festive atmosphere.

Heritage and Arts

Attractive development will reflect a new era of urban design in the Central Area. Buildings will follow a range of profiles while contributing to a sense of human scale, from higher profile hotels and office uses to the low profile cluster of heritage buildings in the vicinity of Daly Avenue and Nicholas. The distinct heritage ambience of this significant group of buildings will be protected and enhanced in a manner that retains its historic context and character and increases its visibility. A sense of Ottawa's civic heritage will be captured as the Carleton County buildings and the City Registry are restored and sensitively integrated with the Arts Court block redevelopment and the expansion of the Congress Centre, respectively.

Congress Centre and Rideau Centre

The expansion of the Congress Centre and the Rideau Centre, which will respect and contribute to an enhanced pedestrian environment and heritage ambience along Nicholas Street, will serve as a catalyst for economic growth and development, not only in the Rideau/ Congress Centre area, but along Rideau Street and within the entire Central Business District east of the Canal.

Linkages

The Arts Court block will feature a small, attractive open space and will play a key role in establishing an inviting, sensitively landscaped pedestrian circulation and open space system that will make the Rideau/Congress Centre area more livable. This system will connect the University of Ottawa, Arts Court, the Congress Centre, Rideau Centre, Rideau Street, and the Central Area west of the Canal.

Access to the rooftop terrace above the Rideau Centre, which was formerly under-utilized, will be improved and animated. This open space will be the focus of a variety of pedestrian-oriented activities, similar to those of the National Arts Centre terrace nearby, and will continue to offer some of Ottawa's best views of Parliament Hill, the Canal area and its events, Arts Court and the cluster of heritage buildings.

Pedestrian Environment

The pedestrian environment of the Rideau/Congress Centre area will be greatly enhanced as improvements to traffic circulation in the Central Area, east of the Canal, are effected, including: the reintroduction of mixed traffic on Rideau Street; the redesign and narrowing of Colonel By Drive between the MacKenzie King Bridge and Rideau Street; the restoration of the street grid; and the removal of through truck traffic from the area. The maintenance of pedestrian links to and through the Rideau Centre, and the promotion and enhancement of other identifiable pedestrian links will be an integral part of achieving an improved pedestrian environment within the Rideau/Congress Centre area. [Amendment #24, May 25, 2005]

Providing a variety of visitor-oriented activities and special events in an attractive environment with a heritage focus, the future Rideau/Congress Centre area will reflect well on Ottawa and encourage many return trips to the City.

1.6.2 Objectives

Centre for Visitor Activity

  1. To strengthen and promote the Rideau/Congress Centre area, as designated on Schedule B - Central Area Character Areas and Theme Streets, as a centre for visitor activity which features a vibrant mix of uses and plays a key role in Ottawa's Central Business District.

Promote Uses

  1. To promote tourist, convention, arts and cultural, shopping, and entertainment uses and activities in this area.

Enhance Heritage/Pedestrian Movement

  1. To protect and enhance the significant heritage resources of this area, and to enhance the pedestrian environment.

1.6.3 Policies

Visitor-oriented mixed uses

  1. City Council shall permit and promote a mix of uses within the Rideau/Congress Centre area, having particular regard to the following:
    1. residential uses as a component of mixed use development, as well as office uses.
    2. appropriate retail uses at grade which complement the primary visitor-oriented uses, such as galleries, restaurants, boutiques and personal services; and
    3. a regional centre for arts and culture, including venues for innovative arts and culture entrepreneurs, which will be the focal point of the Arts Court block, bounded by Daly Avenue, MacKenzie King Bridge, Waller and Nicholas Streets;
    4. visitor-oriented uses, such as hotel, convention, shopping, arts, cultural and entertainment uses;

Heritage Cluster

  1. City Council shall recognize the City Registry, the Albion Hotel, and the Carleton County Courthouse, Registry and Gaol buildings as a very significant cluster of heritage buildings east of the Canal which serves as an important source and reminder of local civic history. Accordingly, City Council shall ensure that these heritage resources are protected and enhanced in a manner which respects their heritage character, context, and collective relationship, while maximizing their public exposure.

Rideau Centre/Congress Centre Expansion

  1. In considering any expansion of the Ottawa Congress Centre, and the Rideau Centre, City Council shall ensure the fulfillment of all relevant policies of this section and Plan, particularly, but not limited to:
    1. the minimizing of potential vehicular impacts on the pedestrian environment in accordance with Policy h) below. [Amendment #24, May 25, 2005]
    2. the optimization of the use of the roof of the Rideau Centre, in accordance with Policy e) below; and
    3. the provision of improved pedestrian access across Colonel By Drive as per the Targeted Strategy for Colonel By Redesign below;
    4. the restoration of the relationship to the adjacent streets and the Rideau Canal by opening large sections of these facilities to the street and reversing the internal orientation of retail and other uses as per the Targeted Strategy for Colonel By Redesign below;
    5. the provision of a human scale and the fulfillment of the urban design criteria in Policy f) below, especially the avoidance/minimizing of blank walls;
    6. the creation of an appropriate building profile transition to the cluster of heritage buildings in the vicinity of Daly and Nicholas and the protection and enhancement of these heritage resources in accordance with Policy b) above;

Building Profile

  1. City Council shall permit a range of building profiles, while ensuring an appropriate transition to the adjoining Sandy Hill West, Rideau Street and Canal areas. In particular, City Council shall ensure that new development respects, and creates a sensitive transition to the cluster of heritage buildings addressed in Policy b), above.

Pedestrian Environment

  1. City Council shall encourage the enhancement of the pedestrian environment in the Rideau/Congress Centre area through such measures as:
    1. the optimization of the use of the Rideau Centre rooftop terrace, through such measures as animation of external access points to ensure identifiability, and the programming of such space with appropriate pedestrian-oriented activities.
    2. the provision of small pedestrian amenity areas, such as green pocket parks and courtyards, especially along pedestrian corridors and within the Arts Court block addressed in Policy a) ii) above; and
    3. the maintenance of pedestrian links between the Rideau Centre and the By Ward Market and the promotion and enhancement of identifiable pedestrian corridors and links, particularly pedestrian links to Rideau Street, the University of Ottawa and the Central Area west of the Canal, while ensuring appropriate streetscape treatment which complements the architectural context of adjoining development and particularly respects the character of the cluster of heritage buildings addressed in Policy b) above;
    4. the removal of through truck traffic as appropriate alternative routes become available, which will provide new opportunities for open spaces;;

Urban Design

  1. City Council shall, when reviewing plans for development, ensure a high quality of design in keeping with the character of the area and its high profile image as a centre for arts, culture and other visitor-oriented activity. City Council shall, therefore, have regard to the Urban Design policies outlined in Ottawa Official Plan Sections 2.5.1 and 3.6.6, and shall particularly ensure that new development:
    1. minimizes or avoids blank walls and creates visual interest through such measures as appropriate architectural detail, articulation of facades, the use of texture/materials, and landscape treatment.
    2. minimizes undue impacts of wind; and
    3. maximizes opportunities for sunlight;
    4. is of a human scale and especially avoids overpowering effects;
    5. is sensitive to, and respects the character of nearby heritage buildings in accordance with Policy b) above;
    6. provide an interesting roof treatment or other appropriate design feature at the upper levels, within the height limits, that adds visual interest to the building;

Views

  1. City Council shall protect, and/or maximize and enhance significant public views, particularly those of Parliament Hill, the Canal, and the cluster of heritage buildings and the Arts Court block identified in Policy a) ii) and b) above, as seen from the Rideau Centre rooftop terrace and/or the MacKenzie King Bridge.

Transportation Requirements

  1. City Council shall ensure that the transportation requirements of this area are appropriately addressed through such measures as:
    1. undertaking a targeted road reconstruction program to normalize the street pattern once through truck traffic can be removed as per Policy e) above; [Amendment #24, May 25, 2005]
    2. ensuring that parking, loading and other vehicular requirements are recognized in the development of buildings and associated uses in the area while minimizing their potential impacts on the pedestrian environment wherever possible.
    3. providing a high level of transit service which provides convenient access to the Arts Court block; and

Targeted Strategies

  1. City Council shall consider undertaking the following targeted strategies (see Annex 11) to implement the Downtown Ottawa Urban Design Strategy:
    1. Heritage Asset Protection and Street Theming - support for the important cluster of heritage buildings in accordance with the Policy h) above by providing incentives and funding for a maintenance plan and by a program of heritage theming on Nicholas and Daly Streets, including public art installations.
    2. Colonel By Redesign - as part of a downtown transportation study and in collaboration with the National Capital Commission, a redesign and narrowing of Colonel By Drive between MacKenzie King Bridge and Rideau Street to facilitate widening of sidewalks, introduction of new street furniture and the planting of street trees;
    3. Rideau Centre/Congress Centre Façade Improvement Program - requiring a program of façade improvements as part of the Rideau Centre and Congress Centre expansion as per Policy c) above;

1.7 - The Canal

 The Canal

1.7.1 Vision

Image

In the future, the greenway system, waterway corridors, historic buildings, and cultural institutions of the Canal area will attract residents from throughout the Ottawa metropolitan area, tourists from across Canada, and employees from local government facilities, as well as the nearby Core. This unique historical open space environment will continue to provide an attractive, enjoyable setting for an increased variety of year-round activities which optimize its use and celebrate Ottawa's identity as the nation's capital.

Outdoor Activity

In the winter, for example, thousands of residents and tourists will share the excitement of the Winterlude Festival, including such activities as skating on the Canal, carving ice sculptures, and watching harness races on the ice. In warmer months, the Festival of Spring, Canada Day celebration, Ottawa's Jazz Festival, and special ceremonial activities will continue to draw visitors and residents to the banks of the Canal, the rooftop terraces of the National Arts Centre, Confederation and Major's Hill parks, and Nepean Point, where they will enjoy spectacular views of the Canal, the Parliament Buildings, the Ottawa River, and the National Gallery.

Agriculture Entertainment

Theatre patrons of the National Arts Centre will enjoy views of the Canal from quiet outdoor cafés next to the Canal. Visitors to the National Gallery, War Museum, Mint, and Museum of Contemporary Photography will enjoy shopping and eating in the nearby By Ward Market after a walk along Confederation Boulevard across the Interprovincial Bridge to the Museum of Civilization in Hull.

Linkages

Sparks Street shoppers will be drawn to an attractive usable pedestrian amenity area and sidewalk I in front of the Conference Centre on the south side of Wellington Street which will provide views of the Canal, the War Memorial, and Parliament Hill. This feature, the addition of a restaurant on the ground floor of the Conference Centre, and safe, at-grade pedestrian access across Elgin Street on both sides of Confederation Square, will promote pedestrian movement between the areas east and west of the Canal. Improvements to the plaza west of the Conference Centre will also result in improved and enhanced pedestrian access to the restored historic Canal locks north of Wellington Street, permitting greater enjoyment of these valuable heritage resources. A variety of historical interpretation activities such as stone masonry demonstrations and heritage walking tours, will optimize the use and appreciation of this area.

Water Focus

Pedestrians will particularly be drawn to the Sterling Wharf 'marina' at the edge of the Ottawa River near the entrance to the Ottawa Locks, where a pedestrian ferry will provide an enjoyable water link between the National Gallery, the Museum of Civilization, and the Islands adjacent to LeBreton Flats. This facility will respect the environmental sensitivity of the shoreline and the escarpment, as will the enhanced Riverside Walk which will connect LeBreton Flats with the Canal locks along the River's edge and will accommodate both pedestrians and bicycles. In addition, a comprehensive area plan undertaken in collaboration with the National Capital Commission and Parks Canada, will examine how Confederation Park, Festival Plaza and adjacent open spaces can be better oriented to the Rideau Canal. [Amendment #24, May 25, 2005]

Focal Point

The Canal's valuable historic and cultural resources, abundant green spaces, greenway linkages and memorable views will be protected and enhanced, ensuring the enjoyment of this focal part of the Central Area for future generations.

1.7.2 Objectives

Historical Open Space Environment

  1. To recognize and enhance The Canal, as designated on Schedule B of this Plan, Central Area Character Areas and Theme Streets as a focus for primarily leisure, cultural, institutional, judicial, and government uses, set in a unique and historical open space environment which is conducive to ceremonial, leisure and tourism activities at both the national and local level.

Year-Round Focus

  1. To protect and enhance the unique environmental, historical, architectural, and cultural resources and features of the Canal area consistent with the Greenway System policies as outlined in the Environmental Management chapter of this Plan.

Enjoyment of Waterway Corridors

  1. To promote increased enjoyment of the waterway corridors of the Canal and the Ottawa River while ensuring the protection and enhancement of their unique heritage features and environmental qualities.

1.7.3 Policies

Users and Development Compatible with Unique Environment

  1. City Council shall support predominantly leisure, ceremonial, cultural, institutional, judicial, conference and government uses within the Canal Character Area. City Council shall also support and promote limited appropriate commercial and complementary uses, particularly those which contribute to the enjoyment of the waterway corridors of the Canal and the Ottawa River, such as outdoor cafés or small restaurants. City Council shall ensure, together with other governments, that development within the area:
    1. minimizes potential vehicular impacts on the predominantly pedestrian-oriented character of the area.
    2. respects existing significant views from, within and through the area, particularly those of the Parliament Buildings and other significant resources as identified in the Central Area Secondary Policy Plans; and
    3. is predominantly low to medium profile, and respects and is sensitive to the unique historic open space environment of the Canal area, and to nearby heritage resources, in accordance with Policy c) below;

Year-Round Focus

  1. City Council shall support and participate with other levels of government in initiatives resulting in the optimal and continued use of the Canal Character Area as a year-round focus for ceremonial and leisure activities including the provision of well distributed amenities for both special events and regular park users.

Heritage Resources

  1. City Council shall promote and ensure the protection, enhancement and conservation of the heritage resources and features of the Canal Character Area, including its historic buildings, sites, structures and/or landscape elements, and in particular, the national historic significance and unique heritage character of the Rideau Canal waterway corridor. In support of this policy, City Council shall:

Rideau Canal

  1. ensure, together with other governmental agencies, that proposed activities and development in the vicinity of the Canal respects, and is sensitive to its unique historic setting and environmental and visual qualities, in accordance with Policies a) and b) above;

Access

  1. support enhanced and safe pedestrian and cycle access to the Ottawa Locks area, subject to I) above; and

Activities

  1. support the provision of heritage awareness activities which interpret the Canal's historic features.

Enhancement of Open Spaces

  1. City Council, shall in support of Policy a) above, promote and support:
    1. the creation of a more distinctive network of public spaces around the existing institutional buildings, including: integration of Festival Plaza with Confederation Park; better access and animation to the canal edge; and, expanding the existing park space along the western edge of the Character Area. [Amendment #24, May 25, 2005]
    2. the coordination and improvement of the visual quality and distinctive image of major open spaces, streets and buildings in the area through such features as improved streetscaping, enhanced vegetation, lighting and ceremonial features in accordance with Section 3.6.6-Central Area of Volume 1 of the Official Plan;
    3. the continued use of the waterfront of the Rideau Canal waterway corridor for leisure activities and uses subject to Policy c) above and as outlined in the environmental policies of this Plan; and
    4. the retention and use of existing open spaces within the Canal area as the focus for major celebrations and public events;

Confederation Boulevard

  1. City Council shall support the concept of Confederation Boulevard which extends throughout the Canal Character Area, as a significant pedestrian promenade with distinctive streetscaping elements linking national institutions.

Escarpment

  1. City Council endorses the retention of the historic natural setting of the Canal area adjacent to the Ottawa River through the conservation and rehabilitation of the escarpment in its natural state in accordance with Policy 1.4.3 c) of this chapter.

Vantage Points

  1. City Council shall encourage the protection of existing vantage points, and significant views from public rights-of-way in the Canal Character Area, as shown on Annex 6 A -Central Area Key Views and View Sequences. City council shall protect the views of the Parliament Buildings from two locations at Beechwood Cemetery, as identified in Annex 12 in Volume 1 of this plan. [Amendment 69, November 26, 2008]

Pedestrian Movement

  1. City Council shall, together with other governmental agencies, explore alternatives to improve pedestrian movement from the Core and Sparks Street, across Confederation Square to Character Areas and Theme Streets east of the Canal with an emphasis on at-grade movement. City Council shall, in the implementation of this policy, promote:
    1. the protection and enhancement of the unique environmental, historical, and leisure features of the Canal consistent with the Greenway system policies outlined in the Environmental Management chapter and with Policy c) above, while minimizing the potential negative impacts of vehicular access/exit.
    2. the enhancement of the plaza on the west side of the Conference Centre to create an enjoyable, usable landscaped pedestrian amenity area which permits street-vending activity and incorporates safe pedestrian access to the Locks area at the Canal level;
    3. the use of a portion of the Conference Centre at grade for appropriate pedestrian - oriented use or activity which will animate the building and assist in promoting pedestrian movement between the east and west sides of the Canal;
    4. the provision of safe, identifiable at-grade pedestrian crossings across the east and west sides of the Square;
    5. the protection and enhancement of the visual integrity and historic character of Confederation Square;

Pedestrian Ferry Service

  1. City Council shall endorse and support the use of the Ottawa River waterfront as a focus of leisure activities and uses. In support of this policy, City Council shall, in consultation with other levels of government, support, promote, and investigate the feasibility of the following, while ensuring the protection of the Ottawa River shoreline and water quality, and the escarpment, in accordance with Policy c) and f) above, and the environmental policies of the Official Plan:
    1. enhancing the pedestrian circulation system and cycle network between the Canal and LeBreton Flats along the Ottawa River waterfront consistent with the environmental policies as outlined in the Official Plan.
    2. developing docking facilities and limited appropriate commercial use, such as a restaurant, near the entrance to the Canal while protecting the visual integrity of Parliament Hill as seen from Confederation Boulevard; and
    3. establishing a pedestrian ferry service which connects the National Gallery, the Museum of Civilization, and the Islands/LeBreton Flats for tourism and potentially commuter purposes;

Laurier Avenue Ramps

  1. City Council shall consider in the longer term, as part of a downtown transportation study, the minimization or removal of the Queen Elizabeth Driveway on and off ramps from/to Laurier Avenue and the implementation of traffic calming measures, including safer pedestrian crossings between City Hall and Confederation Park. [Amendment #24, May 25, 2005]

Targeted Strategies

  1. City Council shall consider undertaking the following targeted strategies (see Annex 10) to implement the Downtown Ottawa Urban Design Strategy:
    1. Elgin Street Beautification - beautification of Elgin Street through a co-ordinated program of: landscaping; tree planting in the medians and boulevards; removal of traffic islands to allow for expansion of the open space south of Laurier; higher quality finishes (e.g., granite) and paving; and street furniture, all of similar quality to Confederation Boulevard;
    2. Lisgar Street Beautification - beautification of Lisgar Street by converting it to two-way traffic; reclaiming City-owned right-of-way along its edges being used for surface parking on adjacent properties; and undertaking a major reinvestment in the streetscape and public realm and adjacent frontages to match improvements to the City Hall site as per the Targeted Strategy for Central Park on the Canal Design Competition below;
    3. Open Space Expansion and Narrowing of Elgin Street - in collaboration with the National Capital Commission, narrowing of Elgin Street from Lisgar Street towards Laurier Avenue in order to create an expanded green space in front of the City Hall Heritage Building and Knox Church;
    4. The following targeted strategies will be examined as part of a comprehensive area plan and implemented as determined by that area plan, in collaboration with the National Capital Commission and Parks Canada:
    5. Heritage District Open Space Expansion - heritage area open space improvements including consideration of the following:
  • redirection of Queen Elizabeth Driveway traffic to Cooper Street in order to facilitate the creation of a Canal front open space, an enhanced setting for the heritage buildings and a waterfront edge to Confederation Park;
  • enhancement of the cultural heritage landscape character of Queen Elizabeth Driveway between MacKenzie King Bridge and Somerset Street;
  • creation of a connected series of public squares and civic spaces between the important heritage buildings;
  • landscaping of the site to accentuate the public realm improvements and better frame the heritage buildings; introduction of an expanded network of pedestrian paths through the site;
  • co-ordination of street furniture and lighting;
  • planting of street trees along the Lisgar Street and Laurier Avenue edges;
  • ensuring that buildings along the eastern edge to open up to the Canal.
  1. Canal Edge Treatment - following reconsideration of the alignment, form and function of Queen Elizabeth Driveway, development of a multi-level pedestrian priority promenade along both edges of the Canal from Wellington Street to the proposed Somerset Street pedestrian bridge. Council shall encourage the National Capital Commission and Parks Canada to explore opportunities for providing mooring bays along the Canal south of Laurier as a longer-term priority.
  2. Re-imaging and Integration of the Queen Elizabeth Driveway Arrival Sequence – as part of a downtown transportation study, reduction of the impact that Queen Elizabeth Driveway has on adjacent open spaces by:
  • establishing Cooper Street as a two-way street east of Elgin and connecting it to Queen Elizabeth Driveway;
  • returning the Driveway to a parkway image and potentially narrowing the roadway width to one lane in each direction;
  • reconsidering some of the landscaping as the Driveway enters downtown to provide stronger views of important civic buildings and create a more urban atmosphere;
  1. Central Park on the Canal Design Competition - consider holding a Central Park on the Canal design competition, in order to establish a major destination park space for the Nation’s Capital, centered on Confederation Park, the open spaces surrounding City Hall and the edges of the Rideau Canal. [Amendment #24, May 25, 2005]

1.8 - Lowertown

 Lowertown

1.8.1 Vision

Residential Predominance

It is envisioned that Lowertown will evolve, over time, into an attractive pedestrian-oriented predominantly residential urban village neighbourhood, with a significant heritage component.

With housing remaining as the predominant use, the Lowertown will feature a mix of uses within heritage and sensitively designed newer buildings, which respect the character and scale of nearby heritage buildings. Under utilized and vacant sites will infill, consolidating and revitalizing the neighbourhood. This trend to intensification will also include much needed community-serving uses which will support housing and help to create a sense of neighbourhood for the area. With its pedestrian orientation, residents of Lowertown will support, and enjoy convenient access to the shopping, entertainment and employment opportunities offered by the nearby ByWard Market, Rideau/Congress Centre and Rideau Street areas.

The Scale

The scale of development in the northern part of the Lowertown will be predominantly low profile, respecting individual heritage buildings and the scale and texture of traditional lot development patterns in the area. Some attractive medium to higher profile buildings will develop within the southern part of the Lowertown, between the south side of York Street and Rideau Street, and along its eastern edge. This will create a transition to the high profile commercial node envisioned at the east end of Rideau Street, and an edge along King Edward Avenue, which will frame this future gateway and Lowertown.

Mixed Uses

Predominantly residential uses will be provided within Lowertown, including the residential-only enclave along Clarence Street, while a compatible mix of residential, commercial and street-level retail uses will evolve in the areas to the south and east, and along arterial roads. More vibrant activity, such as popular entertainment uses and restaurants, will be focused at street-level in the southerly area, providing a sense of vitality and an area of transition to similar uses in the ByWard Market and Rideau Street areas.

A limited number of neighbourhood commercial uses will exist at grade on Cumberland, Murray and St. Patrick Streets, mainly in heritage buildings, offering a mix of quiet pedestrian-oriented uses serving primarily local needs and providing opportunities for neighbours to meet. Uses which have a wider community focus, such as a grocery store, will be oriented mainly south of York Street on Cumberland.

York Street

York Street will serve as an important pedestrian promenade and entrance way to the ByWard Market, with distinctive streetscaping in keeping with its historic context. This attractive streetscape will particularly be oriented to the needs of the Lowertown as it passes through the neighbourhood, with area residents taking full advantage of casual seating and landscaped areas.

Support Facilities Community Amenities

Lowertown will continue to serve as a model of community support and integration. A relatively high level of social service facilities and housing which serve the needs of small households will be maintained and protected. However, facilities and amenities will also be established which serve the needs of, and promote interaction among the entire community. For example, small green landscaped open spaces and gathering places, like courtyards and pocket parks, will provide community meeting places for casual interaction and organized events.

Street Environment

The area's harsh street environment will soften through abundant tree planting and streetscape improvements which respect heritage resources in the area, stemming from a growing sense of neighbourhood identity and pride, and a conscious effort to preserve and enhance the urban forest. Secure, inviting, pedestrian corridors will result, creating a sense of cohesiveness with neighbouring areas. In particular, efforts will focus on improving pedestrian safety and access across King Edward Avenue, thus reuniting the Lowertown community, along with significant enhancement of the street and reforestation along the boulevard. In addition, the Waller Street mall pedestrian link to Rideau Street will be animated and connected to pedestrian corridors in Lowertown. Striking public views, such as those of St. Brigid's Church and the Parliament Buildings, will be maintained and enhanced.

Traffic Calming

The liveability of the area will be enhanced through traffic calming measures which discourage inappropriate traffic movement within the predominantly residential part of the neighbourhood, thus reducing carbon emissions, and promoting an enjoyable pedestrian and cycling environment.

A concerted effort will also be made to ensure adequate safety and security in the area, particularly in the public environment.

Integrated Developments

Along suitable edges of the area, a limited number of sensitively integrated mixed-use developments with short-term parking facilities may develop which also support adjacent areas while traffic impacts are controlled.

As exciting redevelopment and environmental improvements are introduced, and a social framework established, Lowertown will come to be regarded as an ultimate neighbourhood for a variety of residents.

1.8.2 Objectives

Predominantly Residential Neighbourhood

 

  1. To encourage the evolution of the Lowertown as designated on Schedule B - Central Areas Character Areas and Theme Streets, as a distinct, predominantly residential, pedestrian-oriented neighbourhood, which contributes to the vitality of the Central Area.
  2. Protect Heritage
  3. To protect and enhance the heritage character and features of the area and ensure sensitive new development.

Improve Liveability

  1. To improve the liveability of the Lowertown and permit the provision of social services in the area.

1.8.3 Policies

Residential Emphasis

  1. City Council shall permit predominantly residential uses within Lowertown, as well as limited commercial uses while having regard to the following criteria:
    1. public and institutional uses, especially in heritage buildings, which serve neighbourhood needs, and where appropriate, wider needs.
    2. mix of uses in the southern part of Lowertown, featuring residential uses, and more vibrant commercial uses at grade, such as retail, restaurant and entertainment uses, which provide an appropriate transition to similar uses in the ByWard Market and Rideau Street areas; and
    3. predominantly residential mixed use development on the eastern edge of Lowertown;
    4. limited pedestrian-oriented neighbourhood commercial uses at-grade on Cumberland, Murray, and St. Patrick Streets, especially in heritage buildings which serve primarily local needs and do not attract large volumes of vehicular traffic, such as confectioneries, personal and business services and small stores;
    5. residential only along Clarence Street with the exception of mixed-use development at 138-140 Clarence Street;]

Heritage Conservation and Enhancement

  1. City Council shall protect and enhance the heritage resources, character and features of Lowertown, and shall ensure sensitive development which respects the character and scale of nearby heritage buildings.

Profile of Development

  1. City Council shall permit infill development, in accordance with the following building profile criteria:
    1. medium, and where appropriate, limited high profile development in the eastern and southern parts of Lowertown, which creates an edge along King Edward Avenue and complements the high profile node in the vicinity of King Edward Avenue and Rideau Street.
    2. predominantly low profile development within the northern part of Lowertown, which respects its heritage scale and character in accordance with Policy b) above; and

Residential Design Criteria

  1. City Council shall take into account the design criteria identified in Ottawa Official Plan Section 2.5.1 and 3.6.6, and in particular as reflected below, when reviewing proposals for residential development within the Lowertown:
    1. the provision of a tree planting corridor/area.
    2. the provision of adequate privacy and sunlight for residential units; and
    3. the provision of usable private and common outdoor landscaped amenity areas;
    4. minimizing sun, shadowing, and undesirable wind conditions at-grade;
    5. the creation of an identifiable entrance and a strong transition from the public right-of-way;
    6. where appropriate, providing a transition from lower profile to higher profile buildings, and vice versa;
    7. setting back the upper storeys of high to medium profile buildings to create a human scale and minimize overpowering and overshadowing effects;
    8. treatment of the lower floors of high to medium profile buildings to create visual interest;

Heritage Sensitivity

  1. City Council shall ensure that regardless of profile, residential development respects, and is sensitive to nearby heritage buildings and maintains a sense of human scale.

Liveability

  1. City Council shall ensure that the liveability of Lowertown is improved by enhancing the pedestrian environment and/or through the provision of community-serving uses, through such measures as the following:
    1. Social Services - providing social services such as emergency shelters and drop-in centres.
    2. Community Uses - providing community and leisure facilities and open spaces such as social activity centres, sports facilities, rooftop terraces, and green pocket parks linked to pedestrian corridors; and
    3. Animate Waller Street Mall - animating and enhancing the Waller Street mall pedestrian link and connecting it with pedestrian corridors in Lowertown;
    4. Pedestrian Environment - identifying and enhancing pedestrian corridors and links with appropriate streetscaping treatment, including tree planting corridors and elements which complement the architectural context of abutting properties, particularly heritage sites;

Gateways and Distinctive Streets

  1. City Council shall ensure the revitalization and enhancement of gateways and distinctive streets in Lowertown; in particular, Council shall ensure that:
    1. York Street - York Street is enhanced as a distinctive street and entrance to, and promenade through, the ByWard Market, while ensuring that where it passes through Lowertown, it is oriented to the needs of the neighbourhood, such as through the provision of pedestrian amenity space in keeping with Policy m) ii. below. [Amendment 24, May 25, 2005]
    2. King Edward Avenue - King Edward Avenue is developed as a boulevard and major gateway into the Central Area, with prominent streetscaping, secure and visible pedestrian crossings and strong visual links to Ottawa City Hall; and
  2. City Council shall treat Dalhousie Street as a mainstreet with local and destination retail, services, restaurants and boutiques.

Parking

  1. City Council may permit, within mixed use development along suitable edges of the Village, sensitively integrated short-term public parking facilities which may also serve adjacent areas. Council shall ensure that traffic generated by such parking does not exceed the capacity of connecting roadways, and shall minimize potential vehicular impacts on nearby residential uses.

Traffic Calming

  1. City Council shall investigate the potential use of traffic calming methods in the Lowertown, particularly in the central part of the area, in order to improve the liveability of the neighbourhood, in support of Policy f) above.

Views

  1. City Council shall protect and enhance significant public views. In particular, Council shall ensure that the York Street view corridor, and views of St. Brigid's Church and Parliament Hill are maintained. City council shall protect the views of the Parliament Buildings from two locations at Beechwood Cemetery, as identified in Annex 12 in Volume 1 of this plan. [Amendment 69, November 26, 2008]

Safety and Security

  1. City Council shall ensure the review of all development proposals and public improvements within the Lowertown to take into account appropriate safety and public security considerations, including adequate street lighting.

Targeted Strategies

  1. City Council shall consider undertaking the following targeted strategies (see Annex 10) to implement the Downtown Ottawa Urban Design Strategy:
    1. Dalhousie as a Mainstreet - as part of the Eastern Market area plan, reinforcement of Dalhousie Street as a mainstreet, with: all new development fronting onto the street and maintaining the existing low-profile building scale; the removal of surface parking lots; and streetscape enhancements, including soft landscaping. [Amendment 24, May 25, 2005]
    2. Re-image York and George Streets - as part of the Eastern Market area plan, a York and George Streets streetscaping plan to help create a unique street-related open space image that emphasizes their key role in the re-urbanization of the Eastern Market area;
    3. Eastern Market Re-Urbanization Area - an area plan for the Eastern Market Area (bounded by Dalhousie, St Patrick, King Edward and Rideau), to provide design guidance for future development and investment in the public realm, including streetscape improvements along Cumberland Street and a re-image of York and George Streets;

1.9 - Sandy Hill West

 Sandy Hill West

1.9.1 Vision

Heritage Residential Neighbourhood

In the future, Sandy Hill West will remain an attractive, heritage residential predominantly low profile neighbourhood which integrates well with the Central Area east of the Canal and with the adjacent Sandy Hill neighbourhood. Residents of this neighbourhood will be attracted by, and enjoy he ambience of its heritage setting, as well as the benefits of its convenient location abutting Rideau Street and the Central Business District, and the nearby Rideau/Congress Centre and Lowertown (By Ward Village) areas.

Heritage Focus

The rich heritage fabric of Sandy Hill West will serve as the focus of this special neighbourhood, and will be protected and enhanced through its designation as a Heritage Conservation District. New infill development will be sensitive to the low profile character and unique features of nearby heritage buildings, protecting the ambience and livability of the area.

Transition

Along the north side of Besserer Street, medium to higher profile mixed use development will provide an appropriate transition between the heritage district to the south and the node of higher profile development along the east end of Rideau Street. This infill development will be sensitively designed and contain a mix of uses, including a theatre district on the north side of Besserer Street which connects the Ottawa Little Theatre with the Arts Court arts and cultural centre and visitor-oriented uses in the Rideau/Congress Centre area.

Pedestrian Environment

Pedestrians walking through Sandy Hill West will enjoy striking views of heritage buildings and churches along a pleasant system of enhanced pedestrian corridors, identified with attractive landscaping and streetscape elements which are sensitive to the architectural character of the area. Improved pedestrian links, including an enhanced urban experience along Cumberland Street with new streetscaping and traffic management improvements, and inviting, safe crossings of Waller Street and King Edward Avenue, will promote pedestrian movement between Sandy Hill West and surrounding areas such as the Rideau/Congress Centre Area, the University of Ottawa, and Sandy Hill east of King Edward Avenue. People will enjoy strolling along Daly Avenue; its fine streetscape of heritage buildings connecting with a similar heritage streetscapes in Sandy Hill. [Amendment 24, May 25, 2005]

Heritage Landmarks

The concentration of religious institutions will continue to be a focal point for Sandy Hill West, with the four striking heritage churches serving as visual landmarks and playing an important role in this small neighbourhood's exemplary provision of social services, such as drop-in centres.

Leisure Uses Spaces

A special emphasis will be placed on reforestation, by protecting and significantly adding to the area's street trees, while establishing new green open spaces and pedestrian amenity areas which are lacking in Sandy Hill West. The provision of small open spaces in association with new development particularly in the southeast part of the area, and along pedestrian corridors, will be considered a priority. The neighbourhood will also continue to rely upon the community centres, health clinics, parks and sports fields of nearby neighbourhoods, as well as the open space amenity of the nearby Canal Area.

Improved Traffic Circulation

Improvements to traffic circulation in the Central Area east of the Canal, such as the opening of Rideau Street to accommodate automobiles, will reduce traffic impacts within Sandy Hill West and improve its livability. In particular, the removal of through truck traffic when appropriate alternative truck routes become available, will result in a quieter, safer environment.

Infill development on the south side of Stewart Street in the adjacent University of Ottawa area will recognize the special character of Sandy Hill West by providing street-oriented development that contributes to a better integration and an effective transition between the two areas. Sandy Hill West will continue to be a popular residential neighbourhood for primarily small households who appreciate its heritage ambience, its enhanced livability and its convenient location near the University of Ottawa, Rideau Street, and the Rideau/Congress Centre. [Amendment 24, May 25, 2005]

1.9.2 Objectives

Predominantly Heritage Residential Neighbourhood

  1. To strengthen and promote Sandy Hill West, as designated on Schedule B - Character Areas and Theme Streets, as a low profile, heritage residential neighbourhood.

Protect Heritage

  1. To protect and enhance the heritage residential character of Sandy Hill West and ensure that new development is sensitive to, and complements the heritage residential qualities of the area.

Improve Liability

  1. To improve and enhance the residential livability of Sandy Hill West, by providing leisure-serving open spaces and amenity areas and ensuring appropriate environmental improvements.

1.9.3 Policies

Residential Neighbourhood

  1. City Council shall permit and favour all types of residential uses in Sandy Hill West, including bed and breakfast facilities, in order to contribute to the vitality of the Central Area east of the Canal.

Limited Commercial

  1. City Council shall limit the extent of commercial uses in Sandy Hill West in accordance with the following criteria in order to maximize the area's residential function and to protect its residential character:
    1. in the heritage commercial area on the north side of Laurier Avenue East between Cumberland Street and Ring Lane, limited commercial uses which serve the surrounding neighbourhood.
    2. in the heritage commercial area at Daly and Waller Streets, limited commercial, and optional residential and public uses; and
    3. on the south side of Besserer Street, predominantly residential uses shall be provided, with limited commercial uses, such as professional offices; and
    4. on the north side of Besserer Street, commercial, residential and other appropriate uses which complement the Rideau Street Central Business District and provide a transition to the residential uses to the south; and

Theatre District

  1. City Council shall support the evolution of a theatre district and/or arts/cultural district along the north side of Besserer Street, which connects, and creates a transition between the Ottawa Little Theatre and Arts Court in the Rideau/Congress Centre area. In support of this concept, City Council shall respect the residential character of Sandy Hill West and the Central Business District uses of Rideau Street, while encouraging visitor-oriented uses at grade.

Protect Heritage

  1. City Council shall ensure the protection, enhancement and conservation of the heritage resources in Sandy Hill West, by ensuring that new development respects, and is sensitive to nearby heritage. City Council shall pursue the designation of buildings in Sandy Hill West as a Heritage Conservation District, and the adoption of design guidelines.

Profile of Development

  1. City Council shall ensure that development in Sandy Hill West respects its low profile heritage character, contributes to a sense of human scale, and provides an appropriate transition to individual heritage buildings and to surrounding areas. In particular, City Council shall:
    1. permit medium to high profile development on the north side of Besserer Street which provides transition to the node of high profile development permitted at the east end of Rideau Street.
    2. permit medium profile development on the south side of Besserer Street, which provides an appropriate building profile transition to the predominantly low profile heritage area to the south; and
    3. ensure predominantly low profile development which respects, creates a building profile transition, and is sensitive to, nearby heritage buildings;

Residential Livability

  1. City Council shall undertake to improve and ensure the residential livability of Sandy Hill West and shall, when reviewing plans for development, have regard to the design criteria in Ottawa Official Plan Sections 2.5.1 and 3.6.6. In particular, City Council shall take into account the following in the implementation of this policy:
    1. the creation of an identifiable entrance, and a strong transition from the public right-of-way.
    2. the provision of a tree planting corridor/area; and
    3. the provision of usable private and common outdoor and/or indoor amenity areas;
    4. the provision of adequate privacy and sunlight for residential units;
    5. the creation of a human scale, and setting back the upper stories of high to medium profile buildings in accordance with Policy e) above;

Leisure Resources

  1. City Council shall promote the retention and improvement of existing leisure resources. Wherever possible, the addition of pedestrian amenity areas and green open spaces shall be provided. In the fulfillment of this policy, City Council shall promote, and take into account the following:
    1. the provision of small pedestrian amenity areas, through the site plan control approvals process, linking the area generally on a southeast/northwest diagonal and connecting with adjacent Character Areas and Theme Streets.
    2. the enhancement of Ring Street with hard and soft landscaping as a pedestrian link to the above recreation space, while accommodating necessary vehicular movement; and
    3. the promotion, negotiation and facilitation of a joint-use active recreation space on the southern portion of the St. Joseph's Elementary School site, and the St. Joseph's Church site located in the central portion of the block bounded by Wilbrod, Cumberland, Laurier, and King Edward Avenue, together with the Separate School Board and the appropriate Oblate officials;

Pedestrian Environment

  1. City Council shall promote the enhancement of the pedestrian environment in Sandy Hill West, through such measures as:
    1. traffic calming focused around Laurier Avenue and Waller Street. [Amendment 24, May 25, 2005]
    2. the introduction of small pedestrian amenity areas and open spaces in accordance with Policy g), above.
    3. the designation and enhancement of pedestrian corridors with appropriate streetscaping treatment and elements which are sensitive to, and complement the heritage character and architectural context of the area; and

Views

  1. City Council shall protect and enhance significant views from public rights-of-way in Sandy Hill West, such as those of existing churches in the area, St. Brigid's Church in Lowertown (By Ward Village), and Arts Court in the Rideau/ Congress Centre area.

Through Truck Traffic

  1. City Council, in support of Policy f) above, shall ensure the eventual removal of through truck traffic as appropriate alternative routes become available, in order to achieve a quieter and safer living environment.

Short-term Parking

  1. City Council may permit, on the north side of Besserer Street west of Cumberland Street, sensitively designed short-term parking facilities integrated within mixed use development which may serve the adjacent Rideau Street and/or Rideau/Congress Centre areas. City Council shall ensure that traffic generated by such facilities does not exceed the capacity of connecting roadways, and shall also minimize potential vehicular impacts on nearby residential uses.

Targeted Strategies

  1. City Council shall consider undertaking the following targeted strategies (see Annex 10) to implement the Downtown Ottawa Urban Design Strategy:
    1. Urban Grid Reconstruction Area: Nicholas/Laurier/ MacKenzie/ Waller/Rideau - as part of a downtown transportation study, traffic calming and intersection treatments along the southeastern edge of the Character Area (including Nicholas/ Waller to improve the pedestrian environment and access through the area. [Amendment 24, May 25, 2005]
    2. Cumberland Street Beautification - a streetscaping plan for Cumberland Street, including paving, lighting, street furniture, street tree planting, landscaping and a special intersection treatment at Laurier, in order to enhance the street’s role as the main pedestrian and cycling route to Rideau Street from the University;
    3. King Edward South Beautification - a streetscaping plan for King Edward Avenue adjacent to the Sandy Hill West Character Area (as part of a larger streetscaping plan extending from Rideau Street to Mann Avenue), including street tree planting, lighting, landscaping, sidewalk enhancement, public art, street furniture and landscaping;

1.10 - Upper Town

 Upper Town

1.10.1 Vision [Amendment 122, August 16, 2013]

Residential Predominance

In the future, Upper Town will contribute significantly to the vitality of the Central Area and especially the Core, as an attractive, liveable urban residential neighbourhood which focuses on a unique heritage district and enjoyable pedestrian environment. Housing will be the predominant use, including ground-oriented housing at the base of high-rise buildings, while a limited number of pedestrian-oriented uses will co-exist at-grade, such as retail food stores, convenience stores, restaurants or outdoor cafés which cater mainly to local residents. In the northern part of the area there are a few low-rise heritage buildings containing uses such as bed and breakfasts, and a limited number of small hotels that will contribute to the pedestrian ambience of the area and provide a transition to nearby hotels in the western part of the Core and Sparks Street. These heritage buildings may merit special consideration for their historic qualities.

Heritage Conservation

The Cathedral Hill Heritage Conservation District, near the Garden of the Provinces on the north-western edge of the area, creates a unique transitional entry to Upper Town and the Core. The architectural integrity and cultural identity of this significant historic grouping of buildings will be protected and enhanced. The Roper House, for example, an Ottawa landmark, will be visible above the prominent historic limestone cliff from gateways in LeBreton Flats, and from Confederation Boulevard. Pedestrians walking along the western part of Sparks Street will be drawn to the special heritage character of this area, as well as to the panoramic views of LeBreton Flats, the Ottawa River, and Hull from an aesthetically landscaped pedestrian amenity area which interprets Ottawa's early geologic history from atop the limestone cliff and leads down to the lower levels of an escarpment area park. [Amendment 24, May 25, 2005] [Amendment 122, August 16, 2013]

Building Height

Predominantly medium and high rise development which creates a human scale and respects occasional heritage buildings will be featured in the remainder of Upper Town, south of the Cathedral Hill heritage conservation district. New residential buildings will be sensitively designed to contribute to an enjoyable pedestrian streetscape and a liveable environment, through design features which avoid overpowering effects, minimize shadowing and wind, enhance the urban forest and provide usable indoor and outdoor amenity areas.

Pedestrian Movement

An identifiable pedestrian pathway system in the area will link the Garden of the Provinces, the Cathedral Hill district, Sparks Street, LeBreton Flats, the Core, and open spaces in Upper Town. Attractive streetscape elements with abundant landscaping will be sensitive to the architectural character of the area, and will create opportunities for socializing. The block containing the former Ottawa Technical High School and playing fields will contain public and significant infill residential uses, as well as enhanced open space which will serve as the focus of the southern part of Upper Town, and will be used for a variety of shared-use leisure activities. [Amendment 24, May 25, 2005] [Amendment 122, August 16, 2013]

Escarpment Area District Plan Community Design Plan (CDP)

The Escarpment Area District Plan CDP, approved by City Council on December 10, 2008, will be the guiding policy document for the future development of the Upper Town area south of the Garden of the Provinces, west of Bay Street and north of Laurier Avenue. The document provides a framework for change and urban design guidelines that will see the area become a diverse and attractive downtown community celebrated for its natural features, the quality and character of its open spaces, public realm and new buildings. New high quality mixed-use development and an enhanced greenspace network will help bridge the gap between the emerging LeBreton community and the downtown core.

Transportation

Transitway improvements and the introduction of rapid transit will contribute to improved residential liveability in Upper Town, providing an enhanced street environment, reduced noise and improved air quality, while continuing to provide a high level of transit service.

A multi-use pathway route through the new central community park will link the Laurier Avenue segregated bicycle lanes with the existing multi-use pathway routes to the west as part of the City's East-West Cycling Facility.

Through a combination of public and private measures, the Upper Town of the future will be an attractive liveable urban neighbourhood whose convenient location next to the Core will attract not only residents, but visitors who will enjoy its special historic ambience and its enjoyable pedestrian environment.

1.10.2 Objectives

Predominantly Residential Uses

  1. To strengthen and protect Upper Town as designated on Schedule B - Character Areas and Theme Streets as a predominantly residential neighbourhood which contributes to the vitality of the Central Area.

Enhance Livability Protect Heritage

  1. To improve the residential livability of Upper Town, and preserve and enhance its heritage resources.
  2. To create a new central park, as a focus of community activity, on the western portion of the block bounded by Bronson Avenue, Slater Street, Bay Street and Laurier Avenue.

1.10.3 Policies

Predominantly Residential Neighbourhood [O.M.B. Decision, March 24, 1998]

  1. City Council shall permit predominantly residential uses, including bed and breakfast establishments, within Upper Town in order to contribute to the vitality of the Central Area, and especially the adjacent Core. City Council may also permit:
    1. limited commercial uses at grade within the area, such as confectioneries, restaurants, personal services, provided that such uses primarily serve the needs of local residents and that they do not:
      • attract large volumes of automobile traffic,
      • generate excessive noise and/or fumes,
      • require large areas for on-site outdoor storage of goods or vehicles;
    2. a limited number of other uses within the area which are complementary to, and compatible with the residential character of the area consistent with the criteria in I) above, such as leisure and public uses, and limited offices, provided that residential uses remain dominant in the area.

Heritage Conservation

  1. City Council shall ensure the protection, conservation and enhancement of the heritage resources and features of Upper Town. In realizing this aim, City Council shall have regard for the design criteria in Official Plan Sections 2.5.1 and 3.6.6 to ensure that new infill development, alterations to existing heritage buildings, and/or public improvements within this area are sensitive to, and complement its special heritage character  .

Height of Development

  1. City Council shall permit predominantly medium and high-rise development within Upper Town provided that development:
    1. creates a transition to the existing residential neighbourhoods to the south. [Amendment 24, May 25, 2005] [Amendment 122, August 16, 2013]
    2. where appropriate, creates an effective transition between lower and higher profile forms; and
    3. regardless of height, contributes to a sense of human scale;
    4. achieves a transition from the historic limestone cliff and the Cathedral Hill heritage conservation district to the predominantly medium and high-rise forms in the remainder of Upper Town. This transition shall create a unique transitional entrance to the Central Area which respects the heritage character of the Cathedral Hill area and the prominence of the historic limestone cliff;
    5. within the Cathedral Hill heritage conservation district retains the prominence of the historic limestone cliff as provided below and is sensitive to the heritage character of the district;

Redevelopment of the Former Ottawa Technical High School Site 

  1.  City Council shall consider the redevelopment of the former Ottawa Technical High School site to create a community park, as described in Section 1.10.3 g) iv., and high-density residential development parcels (with active ground floor commercial or residential uses along the street frontage), provided that the:
    1. land for the community park is transferred by the Ottawa-Carleton District School Board to the City at no cost and include an exemption from parkland dedication for the development; 
    2. development has regard for the 2013 heritage assessment of the existing school building for the Technical High School site north parcel bounded by Albert, Slater and Bay Streets. Four development options for this site include entirely residential, residential and office towers, residential and auditorium and residential, office and auditorium;
    3. development has maximum building height limits of 83 metres and 67 metres for the development parcels, which corresponds to the maximum building heights of 72 metres and 56 metres respectively as shown in the Escarpment Area District Plan CDP. Buildings will be in the form of point towers and connecting podiums, with a minimum 20 metre separation distance between towers, to help preserve views and access to sunlight, reduce shadow impacts, maintain privacy, and avoid blank walls and inanimate facades. A strong podium base of three to six storeys will be pedestrian-scaled and articulated, with a minimum 3-3.5 metre setback from all property lines, in order to help animate the street and reduce the impact of taller buildings;

Block North of Slater Street, West of Former Ottawa Technical High School

  1. City Council shall consider the redevelopment of the block bounded by Slater Street, Bronson Avenue and Albert Street, west of the former Ottawa Technical High School site, provided that a comprehensive development plan is prepared, consolidation of parcels is considered, and a heritage assessment is undertaken to determine the heritage value and integrity of the existing structures on this block. 

Residential Liveability

  1. City Council shall undertake to ensure and improve the livability of Upper Town and shall accordingly take into account the design criteria in Ottawa Official Plan, Section 2.5.1 and 3.6.6 when reviewing proposals for residential development within the area, in particular:
    1. the provision of a tree planting corridor/area.   [Amendment 24, May 25, 2005] [Amendment 122, August 16, 2013]
    2. the provision of adequate privacy and sunlight for residential units; and
    3. the provision of usable private and common outdoor landscaped amenity areas;
    4. minimizing sun shadowing and undesirable wind conditions at-grade;
    5. the creation of an identifiable entrance and a strong transition from the public right-of-way;
    6. where appropriate, providing a transition from low-rise to high-rise buildings, and vice versa;
    7. setting back the upper storeys of high to medium rise buildings, including the use of podiums, to create a human scale and minimize overpowering and overshadowing effects;
    8. treatment of the lower floors of high-to-medium rise buildings to create visual interest;

Pedestrian Environment and Open Spaces

  1. City Council shall ensure the improvement and enhancement of the pedestrian and open space environment in Upper Town through such measures as:
    1. Streetscape Improvements - the provision of streetscape and pedestrian/cyclist crossing improvements at key intersections, as well as street tree planting as per the Escarpment Area District Plan
    2. North-South Mid-Block Mews - the creation of a mid-block pedestrian mews running north-south from Albert Street to Laurier Avenue to facilitate pedestrian and cycling movement through the district, provide a front-door address for the western edge of the new residential infill development and to provide a link to the transit stops on Albert and Slater Streets. Between Slater Street and Laurier Avenue, the Mews will define the eastern edge of the central park and provide access, as well as a transition to, the new residential development. Once completed, the mews shall be dedicated to the City as a public right-of-way.
    3. New Central Park - the creation of a new central community park of 0.8 hectares and with dimensions as shown in Figure 1, as a focus of community recreational activity on the western portion of the block bounded by Bronson Avenue, Slater Street, Bay Street and Laurier Avenue.  City Council will undertake a community design process to determine the specific design and range of recreational uses of the park.  The existing community gardens and Tech Wall will be retained as part of the future park.  In addition, the inclusion of the uses proposed in the Escarpment Area District Plan CDP should be considered in the design of the park. [Amendment 122, August 16, 2013]

      Figure 1 - Park Dimensions - New Central Park
    4. Open Space Enhancement - in conjunction with the National Capital Commission, the investigation of the potential enhancement of the open space overlooking LeBreton Flats, atop the historic limestone cliff at the western end of Sparks Street, known as Bronson Park, and the creation of a destination park,  through such measures as the provision of suitable soft and hard landscape elements which are sensitive to the character of the Cathedral Hill heritage conservation district, the preservation of panoramic views from this site, provision of a staircase or other movement system from the top of the cliff to the base of the escarpment and the lower levels of an escarpment park and the provision of suitable interpretive elements relating to Ottawa's geologic and architectural history, together with other levels of government.
    5. Existing Open Spaces - promotion of the protection of existing open space areas such as the Garden of the Provinces;
    6. the designation and enhancement of pedestrian corridors, and in particular, the provision of an identifiable, enjoyable pedestrian network within the area which provides abundant landscape elements and links with local and nearby open spaces, Theme Streets and Character Areas, in particular, the Cathedral Hill heritage conservation district, Sparks Street, the Core, LeBreton Flats, the Parliamentary Precinct and the Ottawa River, and Centretown;

Views

  1. City Council shall ensure the protection and enhancement of significant views from public open spaces and along public rights-of-way in Upper Town. In particular, the panoramic views of LeBreton Flats, the Ottawa River and the Islands from the Sparks Street right-of-way in accordance with Policy g) above, as well as significant views to adjacent Character Areas, such as Sparks Street, the Core, and the Parliamentary Precinct, shall be protected and enhanced. City council shall protect the views of the Parliament Buildings from two locations at Beechwood Cemetery, as identified in Annex 12 in Volume 1 of this plan. [Amendment 69, November 26, 2008] [Amendment 122, August 16, 2013]

1.11 - LeBreton Flats

Mainland Lebreton and Victoria and Amelia Islands

Sections 1.11.2 – 1.11.5 are applicable only to the mainland area of Lebreton Flats and Victoria and Amelia Islands.  [Amendment 143, OMB File #PL141340, November 18, 2015]

Reference may be made to the report entitled "The LeBreton Flats Plan incorporating Official Plan Amendments" prepared by the National Capital Commission, January 1997. This report contains extensive background information concerning LeBreton Flats. [Amendment 143, OMB File #PL141340, November 18, 2015]

Chaudière and Albert Islands

Reference should be made to the report titled The Isles: Domtar Lands Redevelopment, dated April 22, 2014. This report is the developer’s design framework and development principles, which will guide the overall development in Ottawa and Gatineau and, specifically, on Chaudière and Albert Islands.

Sections 1.11.6 - 1.11.12 are applicable only to the Chaudière and Albert island area of Lebreton Flats. . [Amendment 143, OMB File #PL141340, November 18, 2015]

1.11.1 Vision – Mainland Lebreton and Victoria and Amelia Islands

[Amendment 143, OMB File #PL141340, November 18, 2015]

Unique Site

LeBreton Flats is a unique site, critical to the future of the heart of the Nation's Capital and the Central Area of the City of Ottawa. LeBreton Flats has a destiny, other than as idle lands, and has the potential to support a vibrant community once again. 

People-Place

The Vision is to make LeBreton Flats a people-place for the next century; to challenge the developers and decision makers of the future to create an urbane community within the Ottawa downtown where people can live, work, socialize and play. This community will be one of mixed uses, surrounded by open spaces. It will consist of compact neighbourhoods, linked together and to the wider open space network by pathways and pedestrian-friendly streets. The entire area will be supported by highly accessible public transit, to reduce reliance on the automobile.

Mixed Uses

LeBreton Flats will mean residential intensification in the Central Area and the introduction of new community-based employment opportunities. Mixed use will be a priority, in achieving a balance of jobs and housing and more efficient use of valuable urban land and infrastructure. Housing types, sizes and costs will respond to current and upcoming demographic shifts, and offer new opportunities for high quality design at medium to high densities within the Central Area. It will "reclaim" an orphaned site, through ensuring that remediation is undertaken as the site is developed.

National Capital Role

The role of Ottawa as the National Capital will be enhanced by the future LeBreton Flats. One of the last waterfront pieces of real estate in the downtown area will be retained in public hands as open space, with an emphasis on public access, and cultural and office uses of national and capital significance. A "LeBreton Common" will be provided as a major gathering place and stage for events, filling a critical gap in the current system of programmable open spaces in the Capital.

Blueprint for 21st Century

The LeBreton Flats plan represents a blueprint for the 21st century, which has the ability to satisfy many objectives through its diversity, balance and orientation.

1.11.2 Objectives

  1. To provide an extension to the Central Area, with a diverse range of uses and activities, where people can live, work, socialize and play.
  2. To create an opportunity to increase the National Capital presence in the Central Area, with development that will attract visitors to Ottawa.
  3. To promote compact development and encourage the efficient use of land in proximity to the LeBreton Flats transitway station.
  4. To provide an opportunity to substantially increase the number of dwelling units in the Central Area, with a range of housing options.
  5. To promote increased employment opportunities in the Central Area.
  6. To promote linkages with the adjacent areas and encourage the use of LeBreton Flats by the existing community.
  7. To ensure that development is compatible with the adjacent areas.
  8. To enhance the unique attributes of the site, such as the riverfront and the aqueduct.
  9. To encourage public use and accessibility of the Greenway System.
  10. To protect and integrate the designated heritage features such as the aqueduct, its bridges and the Pumping Station, in a sensitive manner.
  11. To ensure that infrastructure improvements are identified and undertaken.
  12. To ensure that the area meets the applicable soil and groundwater remediation standards.
  13. To ensure that development proceeds in an orderly and efficient manner.

1.11.3 Land Use Policies

The following policies apply to the land use designations shown on Schedule Q - LeBreton Flats Land Use. The land use categories include: Cultural/Office; Greenway System - Waterway Corridor, Major Open Space, Linkage; Mixed Use; and, Residential.

1.11.3.1 Cultural/Office Area

Publicly-Oriented Uses
  1. City Council shall support and encourage the development of publicly-oriented uses in the northern section of LeBreton Flats, to serve as a western anchor for Confederation Boulevard and the Parliamentary Precinct.
  2. City Council shall permit uses such as museums, art galleries and offices, and shall encourage public access, at least within the ground floors of buildings.
  3. City Council shall permit at-grade supporting uses such as retail, entertainment and restaurant venues, to promote this as a lively and attractive people-place during the days and evenings.
  4. City Council shall encourage and support the development of new nationally significant non-governmental and governmental uses, and in the expansion of the range of tourist attractions.
Generous Setbacks
    1. City Council shall ensure that a generous setback is provided between the Waterway Corridor Area and buildings north of the proposed "LeBreton Common", in order to increase the amount of open space between buildings and the Ottawa River; and, shall encourage this setback area to be developed as publicly-accessible outdoor space associated with those buildings.

1.11.3.2 Greenway System

Orientation
  1. City Council shall ensure that the Greenway System provides for public access to the Ottawa River, protection of significant natural areas, provision of municipal and federal park spaces, internal pedestrian/cycle linkages, and connections with the adjacent Greenway System; and in this regard shall support the provision of approximately 40 percent of LeBreton Flats as open space lands
  2. City Council recognizes that the "Greenway - Major Open Space" designation north of Scott Street and west of the proposed municipal park will remain as vacant land until its future use and remediation requirements are determined and that an official plan amendment may at some time be forthcoming to permit this land to be developed.
Waterway Corridor
  1. City Council shall ensure that the Waterway Corridor lands provide a variable width of parkland of at least 40 metres, between the edge of the Ottawa River and the Cultural/Office area, to facilitate public access to the riverfront in an open space environment.
  2. City Council shall require that a Landscaping/Habitat Restoration Plan be prepared to the satisfaction of the City of Ottawa, prior to the development of the Cultural/Office lands, and in conjunction with the proposed removal of the Ottawa River Parkway.
Major Open Spaces
  1. City Council shall encourage and support the use of the Major Open Space lands, identified as "LeBreton Common" on Schedule Q, for the staging of national, regional and local festivals and special events, and as a park area for ceremonial and leisure activities.
  2. City Council shall encourage the planning and programming of the "LeBreton Common" to address the mitigation of potential negative impacts on the adjacent community; and, shall permit only park use in this regard.
  3. City Council shall ensure that adequate community recreational uses are provided through zoning and the development of a proposed municipal park of approximately 2.5 hectares, as shown on Schedule Q.
  4. The City of Ottawa shall undertake the planning and design of the proposed municipal park.
  5. City Council shall require that the municipal park be dedicated and developed within one year of the registration of a plan of subdivision, or the approval of a site plan control application for any lands adjacent to the park.
Natural Features
  1. City Council shall require the retention of the major wooded areas and natural features within Linkage lands in the vicinity of the Fleet Street Pumping Station and the tailrace.
Linkage Lands
  1. City Council shall require that a minimum of 5 metres of open space is provided between the proposed fence line along the aqueduct and adjacent properties, to provide pedestrian/cycle paths for access to the proposed municipal park and to the rest of the Central Area.
  2. City Council shall encourage the National Capital Commission to develop the aqueduct area as parkland, taking into consideration its heritage, and landscape/habitat values, in the context of its importance to the vitality and attractiveness of LeBreton.
  3. City Council shall investigate using the aqueduct inlet water area as a leisure resource, while recognizing its function as the inlet to the operating underground conduit which provides water power to the Fleet Street Pumping Station.
  4. City Council shall ensure that the existing aqueduct bridges, where possible, provide pathway connections over the aqueduct
  5. City Council shall ensure that any potential negative impact on the aqueduct inlet and tailrace areas resulting from the construction of new bridges associated with the proposed "LeBreton Boulevard" is minimized through an Environmental Assessment process.
  6. City Council shall encourage the retention of the kayak training course in the tailrace.
  7. City Council shall require that applications for site plan approval for developments abutting the aqueduct tailrace are supported by geotechnical assessments to evaluate slope stability and development setbacks.
  8. The City of Ottawa shall undertake a recreational and cultural needs study for Planning District 3, which will identify those requirements that should be included in the development of the LeBreton Flats community.
Thomson-Perkins Mill
  1. City Council shall permit commercial uses in the Thomson-Perkins Mill heritage building.

1.11.3.3 Mixed Use Area

Permitted Uses
  1. City Council shall permit a broad range of uses including residential, retail, office, entertainment, cultural, institutional and recreational uses within mixed use areas abutting arterial roads to generate all-day and year-round activity, and serve the needs of the community; and, in this regard, the primary uses shall be office or residential uses.
Transit Use
  1. City Council shall permit high density/profile office and/or residential uses above the ground floor of buildings along Booth Street, south of the proposed "LeBreton Boulevard", to encourage the use of transit facilities.
Use Integration
  1. City Council shall support the integration of residential and commercial and other uses within the same blocks and/or the same buildings.
Pedestrian-Oriented Uses
  1. City Council shall require that Booth Street provides a variety of small-scale, continuous, ground floor pedestrian-oriented uses, such as retail, restaurant and personal service uses, in creating a "Main Street" focus to serve the new community and visitors to the area.
  2. City Council shall permit a variety of ground-floor, small-scale retail, cultural, restaurant and entertainment uses, below residential uses along the north side of the aqueduct, to enhance public activity along this part of the aqueduct; and, in this regard, shall encourage the integration of the non-built area of these properties with the adjacent aqueduct Linkage lands.
  3. City Council shall permit limited retail development in other areas to provide for the immediate needs and convenience of residents, workers and visitors, while not detracting from the "Main Street" focus along Booth Street.
  4. City Council shall require that predominately residential development be provided along local residential streets with commercial development focused along Booth Street.

1.11.3.4 Residential Area

  1. City Council shall support the provision of a range of housing forms in medium to high profile buildings of a density appropriate to the downtown area, generally ranging from stacked townhouses to apartment buildings, to make effective use of the infrastructure, services and facilities within the inner-city area.
Affordability and Accessibility
  1. In support of the City Council’s commitment to achieve affordable housing within the Central Area, City Council shall require;
    1. That Council request the National Capital Commission to explore options for facilitating affordable housing by providing long term leases for one ($1.00) dollar to developers willing to build and maintain affordable housing. [Amendment #2, September 3, 2003]
    2. That should affordable housing targets not be met prior to 50% of the building permits being issued, City Council will require that the subdivision agreement provide for the City to be given by the National Capital Commission, the first right to acquire the lands for affordable housing.
    3. That the City work with the National Capital Commission to facilitate partnerships between non-profit housing providers and commercial developers to explore options for providing affordable housing above ground floor commercial developments, to meet the 25% target;
    4. That the amount of land to be set aside through the subdivision approval process shall be sufficient to allow 25% of the total housing stock within LeBreton Flats to be affordable Housing to the Action Ottawa criteria, or to the new Official Plan and proposed Municipal Housing Statement when approved;
Density and Profile
  1. City Council shall permit high density/profile residential buildings immediately south of the proposed municipal park, and along "LeBreton Boulevard", which will function as an arterial road.
Small-Scale Open Spaces
  1. City Council shall require that the local open space and recreation needs that are not met by the proposed municipal park, such as small play areas for children, be provided within residential areas through the development application review process.
Orientation
  1. City Council shall encourage housing development to be oriented to the local streets, in order to promote community interaction, safety and security.
Childcare Facilities
  1. Through the subdivision and site plan control processes, City Council shall investigate with property owners, options for providing childcare facilities in residential developments. These facilities should be provided at a rate of 9.3 square metres per child for interior space and 5.6 square metres per child for exterior space. Each facility constructed should be for a minimum of 50 children. [Amendment #2, September 3, 2003]

1.11.4 General Policies

The following general policies shall apply to LeBreton Flats.

1.11.4.1 Transportation

Transit Way and Station
  1. City Council shall encourage the construction of the proposed new transitway and station, prior to the start of development, to avoid negative impacts on the new community during construction; and, shall encourage a high level of pedestrian/cycle access to the transit station and the provision of cycle storage facilities.
Parkway Relocation and LeBreton Boulevard
  1. City Council shall support the relocation of the Ottawa River Parkway within LeBreton Flats, in order to ensure that the riverfront area is opened up to the public. With regard to LeBreton Boulevard, the National Capital Commission will ensure the required environmental assessment and functional design will address the impacts that the alignment will have on building heights and views in accordance with the City of Ottawa Official Plan.
Traffic Impact Studies
  1. City Council shall require that traffic impact studies be undertaken prior to the approval of applications for development, to ensure that site-generated traffic can be adequately accommodated and/or that measures are carried out to meet identified deficiencies, to the satisfaction of the City of Ottawa and the Regional Municipality of Ottawa-Carleton.
Noise Studies
  1. City Council shall require that noise studies be undertaken to the satisfaction of the City of Ottawa for development adjacent to the proposed transitway and station, and along arterial roads, and that appropriate mitigation measures are undertaken to address potential impacts.
Traffic Calming
  1. City Council shall require that traffic calming be considered in the design of local roads serving the residential areas, with a focus on minimizing potential shortcutting by through traffic, and as a means of improving livability and pedestrian and cycle safety, through Urban Design Guidelines, as set out in 1.11.4.4 a) below.
Alternate Development Standards
  1. City Council shall require that Alternate Development Standards be considered in determining the appropriate rights-of-way and adequate pedestrian, cycle and roadway facilities, through Urban Design Guidelines, as set out in 1.11.4.4 a) below.
Pedestrian/ Cycle Path System
  1. City Council shall encourage the incorporation of a continuous pedestrian/cycle path system within the Greenway, to encourage non-automobile movement; and, shall ensure its integration with facilities in the rights-of-way, and linkage with pathways outside LeBreton Flats.
  2. City Council shall encourage publicly-accessible pathways to the waterfront area through the northern Cultural/Office lands, and the "LeBreton Common".
  3. City Council shall support the provision of commuter cycling lanes along the proposed arterial roads.
  4. City Council shall require an at-grade connection to Booth Street from the proposed pedestrian/cycle path along Ottawa Street to the west and the Linkage lands to the east.
  5. City Council shall support the retention of the existing Heritage Designated aqueduct bridges as pedestrian/cycle connections across the aqueduct, in order to encourage safe north/south movement.
  6. City Council shall support the retention of the Heritage Designated Pooley's Bridge as a pedestrian/cycle connection.
  7. City Council shall support the provision of a pedestrian/cycle link under the Preston Street extension at the aqueduct, for access to the proposed municipal park.
Parking
  1. City Council shall support shared parking facilities in mixed use developments, to encourage the efficient use of lands and the integration of uses; and, shall consider reduced parking requirements for developments within walking distance of the proposed transit station, to encourage the use of public transit; and, shall discourage surface parking facilities, to minimize the negative impact of such facilities.
Tour Bus Parking
  1. City Council shall support the continuation of tour bus parking in LeBreton Flats in cooperation with the National Capital Commission, while ensuring that potential noise, visual and traffic impacts are minimized, and the development of the LeBreton Flats Character Area is not compromised.
  2. City Council shall encourage the provision of adequate automobile and tour bus parking to serve the proposed LeBreton Common through such means as:
    1. shared use of parking facilities associated with uses within the Cultural/Office lands on LeBreton; and
    2. utilizing parking facilities in the adjacent non-residential areas such as the Core Area and Parliamentary Precinct.
Community Linkage
  1. City Council shall encourage the provision of adequate pedestrian and cycle connections across Scott/Wellington/Albert Street, to encourage the safe movement of people between LeBreton Flats and the existing community.
Transit Servicing Plan
  1. City Council shall, as a priority, develop in consultation with the National Capital Commission, a transit servicing plan for LeBreton Flats that will be integrated with the City's transit system and shall require the provision of infrastructure and facilities such as but not limited to pedestrian paths and connections, transit stops, transit priority lanes along new roads, and Transportation Demand Management plans, to support the transit service plan through the development approvals process. [Amendment #2, September 3, 2003]
Roadway Concept Plan
  1. City Council shall require that the National Capital Commission develop a comprehensive roadway concept plan for all the roads to be developed and/or improved within LeBreton Flats. This concept plan will identify roadway cross sections that respond to policies in the Secondary Plan, the location of below and above grade services and will be subject to acceptance by the City and Utility Agencies. City Council will require that the accepted concept plan be used to define/detail conditions related to the construction of roads through subdivision and road opening approvals. [Amendment #2, September 3, 2003]

1.11.4.2 Environment

Soil and Ground Water Contamination
  1. City Council shall require environmental site assessment and restoration within the spirit of the Ministry of the Environment Guidelines for Use of Contaminated Sites in Ontario 1996 (revised February 1997), or other federal, provincial, or municipal regulations, as applicable, in effect at the time of development. In this regard, a Phase II Environmental Site Assessment shall be completed within the spirit of the Guidelines, prior to the final approval of a subdivision, severance or site plan control application for the area of such application. It is acknowledged that both City Council and the Ministry of the Environment have accepted certain Phase I and Phase II Environmental Site Assessments completed prior to the release of this guideline, towards fulfilling the spirit of the Guideline. [Amendment #2, September 3, 2003]
Site Remediation Plans
  1. City Council shall require that site-specific remediation plans and commitments to site restoration be undertaken prior to the final approval of a subdivision, severance or site plan application for the area of such application within LeBreton Flats; an Integrated Environmental Report will be required prior to the final approval of such applications.
Methane Gas Monitoring
  1. City Council shall require further methane gas monitoring of the Nepean Bay landfill site, to assess the impact on the feasibility and soil management requirements for the proposed municipal park lands, as part of the Phase 2 ESA, as set out in Policy 1.11.4.2 a) above.
  2. City Council shall require methane gas monitoring of any development within 30 metres of the Nepean Bay landfill.
Urban Forest
  1. City Council shall encourage the augmentation of the urban forest throughout the site in the review of applications for site-specific developments.

1.11.4.3 Infrastructure

Master Servicing Plan
  1. City Council shall require that a Master Servicing Plan, to address existing and proposed utilities and piped services, be prepared to the satisfaction of the City of Ottawa, and appropriate utility companies, prior to the submission of the initial development application; and, that this Plan provide details on the anticipated timing, funding, construction, maintenance and ownership responsibilities, in the context of the phasing of development. Should changes occur to the assumptions contained in this Plan as development takes place, the Plan shall be adjusted accordingly.
Underground Services
  1. City Council shall require that electrical, telephone and television cables be placed underground.
Stormwater Management
  1. City Council shall require that Stormwater Site Management Plans be submitted prior to the final approval of a subdivision, severance or site plan application, to the satisfaction of the City of Ottawa. These plans shall be consistent with the overall Stormwater Management Feasibility Plan and, where phased development is proposed, will identify any phasing for the implementation of the stormwater site management plan and any necessary interim stormwater management measures.

1.11.4.4 Urban Design

Urban Design Guidelines
  1. City Council shall require that a set of broad Urban Design Guidelines for the entire LeBreton Flats area be prepared, in order to assist in the design of development, rights-of-way and open spaces, and their interrelationships, in an integrated and cohesive manner, prior to the initial submission of an application for development approval; and, that such urban design guidelines shall consider Alternate Design Standards and Traffic Calming.
Wind Testing
  1. City Council shall require wind testing of medium and high profile development proposals to evaluate the impact on streets, open spaces and other pedestrian activity areas and determine mitigation measures, prior to the approval of applications for Site Plan Control Approval.
Building Heights
  1. City Council shall require that maximum building profiles be as described generally in the following:
    1. To ensure that appropriate scale relationships will be provided along streets where development with a height of 10 stories is permitted on one side of the street and a building height limit of six stories is established along the opposite side of the street as shown on Map 4, City Council shall require that the higher profile development integrate with lower profile development through various techniques as set out in the Urban Design Policies of the Official Plan (Central Area Urban Design Policies set out in Chapter 5.0 and the General Urban Design Policies set out in chapter 12.0) to provide for achieving harmonious street environments consistent with the principals set out in the urban design guidelines developed as required by policy 1.11.4.4. [Amendment #24, May 25, 2005]
    2. up to six and eight storeys within the majority of the Residential Areas.
    3. up to six storeys in the Cultural/Office Area, north of "LeBreton Boulevard", in recognition of its proximity to the Greenway System, while ensuring that the policies in the Official Plan for protecting views of the Parliament Buildings and Other National Symbols are respected; and
    4. up to twelve storeys along the "LeBreton Boulevard" arterial road, while ensuring that a high-profile continuous wall of buildings is avoided, and that the policies in the Official Plan for protecting views of the Parliament Buildings and Other National Symbols are respected;
    5. up to ten storeys along Booth Street south of "LeBreton Boulevard", to provide for high density development in proximity to the transitway station on Booth Street;
    6. up to eight storeys at Preston and Booth Streets along Scott/ Wellington/Albert Streets , to provide for landmark buildings at the southern entrances to LeBreton Flats, and high density development in proximity to the transitway station on Booth Street;
    7. up to six storeys for buildings fronting on Scott/ Wellington/Albert Streets to provide for compatibility with the existing community;
View Protection
  1. City Council shall ensure that:
    1. in the area defined by a view with a viewpoint located in the centre of the proposed LeBreton Boulevard right-of-way immediately west of the intersection of the Booth Street right-of-way, no building, part of building or building roof structure shall be constructed. This protected view, as illustrated on Figure 1, is intended to provide for an unobstructed foreground view panorama extending from the Great Hall of the National Gallery in the north to the northwest corner of the upper terrace of the Garden of the Provinces on the south.
    2. in the area adjacent to the LeBreton Flats Foreground View Control Planes as shown on Ottawa Official Plan, Annex 6 C, no building, part of a building or building roof structure shall project into the lateral foreground view planes described on Ottawa Official Plan, Annex 6 C;
    3. building heights in Area "A" on Ottawa Official Plan, Annex 6 C shall not exceed 79.9 metres above sea level;
    4. in the area identified on Ottawa Official Plan, Annex 6 C- LeBreton Flats Foreground View Control Planes extending from Viewpoint 16 as shown on Ottawa Official Plan, Annex 6 A to the eastern limit of LeBreton Flats Character Area as shown on Schedule B - Central Area Character Area and Theme Streets, with the exception of Area "A" identified on Ottawa Official Plan, Annex 6 C, no building, part of a building or building roof structure, shall project above the building height limit planes established by the central and lateral foreground view planes defined by geographic co-ordinates and above sea level elevations on Ottawa Official Plan, Annex 6 C;

LeBreton Flats

Integration
  1. City Council shall encourage the integration of residential, office, and retail uses in mixed use areas in configurations and building forms that allow unique opportunities for creative development.
Special Needs
  1. City Council shall ensure that development accommodates the needs of persons with disabilities and other special needs groups.

1.11.5 Implementation [Amendment 143, OMB File #PL141340, November 18, 2015]

1.11.5.1 Implementation

Development Preconditions
    1. City Council shall require that prior to the submission of the initial application for development within LeBreton Flats, in the form of a Plan of Subdivision, Master Plan, rezoning, severance and/or site plan, the following have been prepared for the entire LeBreton Flats area, to the satisfaction of the City of Ottawa and the National Capital Commission, as appropriate, or other pertinent agencies:
      1. Urban Design Guidelines, as set out in Policy 1.11.4.4 a) above;
      2. Master Servicing Plan, as set out in Policy 1.11.4.3 a) above; and
Development Prerequisites
    1. City Council shall ensure that the following have been prepared to the satisfaction of the City of Ottawa and the National Capital Commission and other pertinent agencies as appropriate
      1. Traffic Impact Studies as set out in Policy 1.11.4.1c), prior to the final approval of site specific applications for rezoning, subdivision, site plan control or severance;
      2. Phase II Environmental Site Assessment and Contamination studies, as set out in Policy 1.11.4.2a), prior to the final approval of site specific applications for Subdivision, Severance or Site Plan Control;
      3. Site Specific Remediation Plans as set out in Policy 1.11.4.2c), prior to the final approval of site specific applications for subdivision, site plan control approval or severance;
      4. Noise Studies, as set out in Policy 1.11.4.1d), prior to the Final Approval of applications for subdivision, severance or site plan control; and
      5. Stormwater Site Management Plan, as set out in Policy 1.11.4.3c), prior to final approval of applications for subdivision, severance or site plan control".
Regular Reporting
    1. City Council shall encourage the National Capital Commission to prepare regular reports on environmental management and planning aspects for LeBreton Flats, to inform the public and agencies of progress in this regard.
Street Names
    1. City Council shall ensure that streets are named through the normal street naming procedures, with priority given to retaining existing street names and recognizing the history of the area.
  • 1.11.5.2 Implementation Tools
Plans of Subdivision
    1. City Council shall encourage the submission of applications for Plans of Subdivision as the preferred means of ensuring the orderly and efficient development of LeBreton Flats; should applications for Plans of Subdivision not be forthcoming, Master Plans shall be undertaken prior to the approval of development applications.
    2. City Council shall ensure that Plans of Subdivision and Master Plans are consistent with the Urban Design Guidelines, as set out in Policy 1.11.4.4 a) above.
Holding Zone
    1. City Council may utilize a holding (h) symbol in conjunction with any use designation in the Zoning By-law, to defer development of all or part of the LeBreton area, where it is determined that any proposed development is premature or that immediate development is inappropriate. These determinations will be based on the preconditions and prerequisites, as set out in Policy 1.11.4.5 a) and b) above, and will be used wherever cost sharing arrangements may be required and/or funding is not committed.
Consents
    1. City Council shall encourage the Committee of Adjustment to ensure that the Plan of Subdivision method is upheld as the primary method of providing lots, to ensure orderly and efficient development.
    2. City Council shall encourage the Committee of Adjustment, in reviewing consent applications, to take into account the preconditions and prerequisites of Policy 1.11.4.5 a) and b) above, and the objectives and policies of the LeBreton Flats Character Area.
       

1.11.6 Vision and Principles – Chaudière and Albert Islands Vision

Chaudière and Albert Islands are situated in a unique and distinctive location, within the Ottawa River next to the downtown core of both Gatineau and Ottawa and adjacent to the Chaudière Falls, one of the City's most distinctive natural features. As a result of the lands becoming available for redevelopment, there is an opportunity for the site to be transformed into a dynamic precinct within the City’s downtown to in itself become a place contributing to the image and identity of downtown Ottawa and raise the City’s profile as a visitor destination to be on par with some of the most iconic urban places within major cities across North America, such as Granville Island in Vancouver, the Distillery District in Toronto, and the Market District in San Francisco.

The development concept plans will serve as the frame of reference for the transformation of the islands, which capitalizes on the site's potential and opportunities to showcase Ottawa's industrial heritage. The Plan will also provide opportunities for the first time in the history of Ottawa for direct public access to the waterfront of the islands and Chaudière Falls within a dynamic quality urban mixed use community. The Islands will accommodate residential, employment, retail, and cultural uses located in both rehabilitated industrial heritage buildings and new development that will define unique open spaces within a pedestrian priority environment. The islands will become a must see, must visit place for residents and visitors of Ottawa and embody the principles of the One Planet Communities, reflecting and incorporating the highest standards of urban sustainability. The development concept plans are shown on Annex 1 to the Secondary Plan. [Amendment 143, OMB File #PL141340, November 18, 2015]

Development Principles

The following core principles have been defined for the overall development of the former Domtar lands and provide the foundation for the Secondary Plan policies for Chaudière and Albert Islands. The development principles recognize the significant opportunity and potential for the Islands to become one of the most unique and dynamic places within the core of the City that will bridge the downtowns of Ottawa and Gatineau.
 

  • Celebrate Heritage: Create a community that respects and celebrates the unique history and heritage assets.
  • Connect the Capital: Provide connectivity across the River for Ottawa and Gatineau residents, including active transportation networks and exemplary public transit.
  • Healthy Living: Ensure a robust public realm framework of new open spaces which will allow residents and tenants to live the healthiest life possible.
  • Ecological Systems: Demonstrate that economically viable urban renewal can serve as a catalyst for ecological renewal.
  • Vibrant Waterfront: Create new river fronts that have not been publicly accessible for generations, including areas where people can gather and experience the Ottawa River.
  • Complete Community: Feature a mix of residential, retail, commercial and recreational spaces so that people can live, work and play within the community.
  • Incubate Innovation: Foster innovation through inspiring social spaces and architecture that facilitate collaboration and an embedded commitment to creativity.
  • Create and Enhance Views: Respect existing views of Parliament, the National Gallery, the War Museum, Gatineau Park, city skylines, the Ottawa River and Chaudière Falls and create new opportunities for views of theses national symbols and the Falls. [Amendment 143, OMB File #PL141340, November 18, 2015]

 1.11.7 Land Use

The land use policies are focused on providing for Chaudière and Albert Islands to be transformed into a unique world-class sustainable community where people can live, work and play in one location. The site is to become a truly mixed use community, where residents would not need to leave the islands for most services or amenities. [Amendment 143, OMB File #PL141340, November 18, 2015]

 1.11.7.1 - Districts

The Islands comprise three districts that will each capitalize on their unique situations and conditions in a way where each will work together to create a complete sustainable urban place. Council will require that development within each of the districts achieve the following overall development concept as reflected on Annex 1 to the Secondary Plan. [Amendment 143, OMB File #PL141340, November 18, 2015]

West Chaudière District Development

The West Chaudière district comprises Chaudière Island located on the west side of Booth Street. This district will feature some industrial heritage buildings and a number of new buildings ranging from low to high profile. The District will accommodate a mix of uses to establish a lively mixed-use area with several stand alone residential buildings and mixed use buildings. High profile development will be strategically located on the west side and central portions of the District. The overall development for this District will provide for the creation of a new central civic square where retail type uses will be provided to establish an active pedestrian environment. As part of the internal street network, the civic square will be located on a new “heritage” street in the location of a previously existing street. The western tip of the District will be retained as public open space with a pedestrian focused on-site circulation system that will provide for ease of movement through the District and the urban street spaces leading to the shoreline and lookout over the Chaudière Falls. The District will also feature a connection to the Chaudière Falls Visitor Centre planned by the hydro authority to educate people on the history of the falls and their use in harnessing electricity to provide power for the City of Ottawa.  [Amendment 143, OMB File #PL141340, November 18, 2015]

East Chaudière District Development

The East Chaudière District comprises Chaudière Island located on the east side of Booth Street. This District like the West Chaudière District will feature a number of new buildings ranging from low to high profile. The distinguishing feature of this District will be the historic Board Mill where portions of the building will be retained and materials adaptively reused. The extension of the heritage street from West Chaudière will be continued on East Chaudière, similarly following the path of a formerly existing street leading to the east end public park. This District will accommodate a mix of uses to establish the district as a lively mixed-use area with several stand alone residential and mixed use buildings. The District will feature park and open space areas that will capitalize on opportunities for providing waterfront open spaces around the perimeter of the eastern side of the District with a larger public park at the east end that will provide for dynamic views down the Ottawa River and to the downtown skylines of both Ottawa and Gatineau.  The on-site circulation system will be pedestrian focused and provide for connections to the shoreline at strategic locations. Built form will be predominately low to medium profile with some strategically positioned higher profile development. [Amendment 143, OMB File #PL141340, November 18, 2015]

Albert Island District Development

Albert Island, the smaller of the islands, features existing industrial heritage buildings that are to be preserved and adaptively re-used with new low or medium profile buildings being introduced. The predominant uses will be small scale employment incubator uses, retail and restaurant uses to capitalize on the place-making opportunities for the site to become a unique destination within the islands. A pedestrian and cycling connection will be provided at the west end of Albert Island between the War Museum and West Chaudière District. [Amendment 143, OMB File #PL141340, November 18, 2015]

1.11.7.2 - Mixed Use

The area to be redeveloped with new residential and non-residential buildings and repurposed industrial buildings are designated Mixed Use on Schedule Q. Mixed use development and the publicly accessible open spaces contained within the internal street network and layout of the districts are to be provided as set out in the following policies:

  1. All three districts shall accommodate a mix of uses to provide for a dynamic mixed use community for the islands with a targeted total gross floor area (GFA) of approximately 100,000 square metres. This total GFA will accommodate a breakdown of uses generally as follows: 70-80% for residential uses; 5-10% for retail type uses; 10-15% employment type uses; and 5 10% other commercial, community, cultural related uses.
  2. The nature of mixed use that will be permitted and that are to be provided within each district are as follows:
      1. A broad range of non-residential uses are permitted within the Albert, East Chaudière and West Chaudière Districts, including: retail, office, entertainment, cultural, institutional and recreational uses within the mixed-use areas.
      2. A broad range of residential uses are permitted within the Albert, East Chaudière and West Chaudière Districts, including: low, medium and high-rise apartment dwellings and townhomes.
      3. The predominant uses within the East Chaudière and West Chaudière Districts shall be office and residential with retail type uses generally located on the ground floor of office and residential use buildings to contribute to public realm animation and activity.
      4. The predominant uses within the Albert Island heritage buildings will be retail, commercial and office to establish itself as a unique place within the islands. [Amendment 143, OMB File #PL141340, November 18, 2015
1.11.7.3 – Greenway / Open Space

The West and East Chaudière Districts will provide for publicly accessible open spaces along the shoreline generally as reflected on Annex 1 with the western tip of the West Chaudière District and the eastern tip of the East Chaudière District being developed as waterfront public parks shown as Greenway / Open Space land use designation on Schedule Q.  The following policies apply to the lands designated Greenway / Open Space:

  1. The parks located on the tips of West Chaudière and East Chaudière Districts are encouraged to be landscaped with creative look-out features to allow for visitors to experience the views of the downtown skyline, Parliament (east end park) and of the falls (west end park).
  2. The park space is encouraged to be designed so that visitors can connect to the River.
  3. The park is encouraged to be naturalized with multi-use pathways.
  4. The west end park, located on Chaudière West District, is envisioned to include a water play plaza, perimeter multi-use pathway, boardwalk, and a naturalized foreshore park planting.
  5. The east end park, located on Chaudière East District, is envisioned to include a street end plaza, a river overlook area, boardwalks and benches, and a restored river landscape. [Amendment 143, OMB File #PL141340, November 18, 2015]

1.11.8 - Heritage

The site has cultural heritage value derived from its association with First Nations, the early settlement of Ottawa, and the role that it has played in the industrial history of the City as the site has redeveloped over time with various industries, including wood, pulp and paper, and hydro-electric power. There are a number of structures throughout the site, including the buildings on Albert Island and West Chaudière District and portions of the Booth Board Mill abutting the Ottawa River’s edge on East Chaudière District that are under investigation for adaptive re-use. Equally important are the historic streets and public spaces to be reintroduced as a reminder of the former public realm and human activity that has existed on this site for over a century. The site’s cultural heritage value is reflected in various physical attributes that will be designated as heritage resources under the Ontario Heritage Act to protect and honour the site’s cultural heritage value after redevelopment.

The City and Windmill Development Group have signed a Memorandum of Understanding, which identifies the resources to be designated as well as the development of a heritage interpretive plan to commemorate the site’s history. To ensure protection of heritage resources, appropriate adaptive re-use, and the suitable integration with new development, the following policies apply to Chaudière and Albert Islands.

  1. A heritage interpretive plan which will include, but not limited to, the historic themes of First Nations, early settlement, the wood industry, the fire of 1900 and subsequent reconstruction, the pulp and paper industry, labour history, and others that may emerge as a result of further study shall be developed and implemented.
  2. The City will initiate the designation of identified heritage resources as part of the multi-year plan for the site.
  3. The developer shall consult with City heritage staff on plans for the adaptive re-use of heritage resources to ensure that the cultural heritage value of these resources is protected.
  4. New streets are encouraged to be located in historical rights-of-way to establish the history and importance of the site.
  5. New additions or construction in the vicinity of a place of heritage significance shall be in harmony with the existing structure but also identifiable as a new building or structure.
  6. New additions or construction are to include high quality design elements and materials. The design of new buildings will include transitional elements and considerations to proportion, scale and rhythm in order to respond to the character and scale of existing heritage buildings.
  7. The Cultural Heritage Impact Statement (April 2014) for the Domtar Lands Redevelopment Project demonstrates how the development will respect the site’s cultural heritage values. This report will be a reference document for the review of Site Plan Control applications.  [Amendment 143, OMB File #PL141340, November 18, 2015]

1.11.9 - Built Form and Building Design

The Islands are to a series of three districts comprised of buildings that are architecturally interesting, well proportioned, integrated with the heritage fabric, and that engage people in the public realm. Buildings are to have well defined street edges that frame the public realm and convey a sense of activity and liveliness, reinforcing the Islands as a pedestrian focused environment.

The tallest buildings within the three districts will generally be located on the western side of the West Chaudière District to respect the views from the Champlain Bridge of the Parliament buildings and the building rooftops along Confederation Boulevard. There will be limited high rise buildings on East Chaudière District and no high rises within the Albert Island District. The remainder of the site will provide for variety of building heights in the low and medium profile range and are to be located to create a unique and eclectic urban environment reflective of the building profile characteristic for this historical industrial site. The development concept plans shown on Annex 1 set out the general location of where buildings of different profiles shall be located to respect the principles of view protection and integration of new development with the heritage fabric to be retained. The maximum building profiles permitted on the islands are shown on Map 5.

In addition to the City-wide design guidelines for low and medium density infill, high rise development and transit-oriented developments, the following guidelines shall be considered and to the extent practical, be advanced for the different building typologies that will be developed to achieve the overall transformation of the Islands to ensure that the buildings and related uses succeed in defining and supporting the public realm environment.

  1. Low-rise Buildings:
      1. Buildings which are a single storey up to four storeys are considered low-profile buildings which may be single use or mixed use buildings as well as adaptive reuse heritage buildings.
      2. Low-rise residential buildings are to include stairs, stoops, garden patios, terraces, private outdoor amenity areas to support social life for adjacent public realm areas. Residential ground floor living spaces should be designed to directly engage the public realm, through the use of stoops, stairs, yards, and porches.
      3. Provision of decks and amenity areas are encouraged to enliven facades and roofs of buildings.
      4. Facades should be articulated to express individual residential units and individual tenants in multi-use buildings.
  2. Medium-rise Buildings:
      1. Five to nine-storey buildings will be used to create the primary character of the urban fabric for the Islands.
      2. To create a family-friendly and pedestrian focused environment, buildings should convey a sense of activity and bring building life to the pedestrian level and into the public realm. This can be achieved by encouraging multiple building entries, a high degree of transparency at the ground floor, direct physical connections to public amenity areas and a comfortable buffer between the street and the interior of residential units.
      3. Generous common spaces including roof top amenity areas are encouraged. Facades should be enlivened with balconies, decks and architectural articulations.
      4. Buildings should be articulated into smaller massing with breaks in the façade and roof line.
      5. Through block connections are encouraged to provide alternative pedestrian routes.
  3. High-rise Buildings:
      1. High-rise buildings over nine storeys are to be located on Chaudière Island so as to protect and maximize views of national symbols, Chaudière Falls, and the Ottawa River. The buildings are to maintain an open and permeable skyline.
      2. Tops of towers should be distinctive in order to enrich the skyline and enhance the role of the building as visual points of reference.
      3. Tower facades should be articulated to express the scale of an individual unit for residential towers and to reduce the mass of the overall building.
      4. Terraces and sky gardens are encouraged on tower facades.
      5. The base of towers should relate to the pedestrian scale and include active ground floor uses.
      6. Where there are two or more high rises in close proximity to one other, the towers shall not face or be parallel to one another to avoid creating a tall building focal point as well as ensuring tower separation of at least 15 metres.
      7. High-rise buildings up to 15 storeys are permitted. Minor changes to increase the number of storeys may be considered without requiring an Official Plan amendment where a detailed design review analysis demonstrates that the intent of the built form, urban design, view protection, and heritage policies of the Secondary Plan are respected. Number of storeys does not include mezzanines or elements to add architectural distinction for the tops of towers or roof top structures associated with roof top amenity. [Amendment 143, OMB File #PL141340, November 18, 2015]

1.11.10 - Urban Design

1.11.10.1 - Views

Given the central location of the Islands within the Ottawa River and downtown, there are significant views in all directions of the shorelines of Ottawa and Gatineau as well as the Parliament and other national symbols, Chaudière Falls, and landscapes. Protecting the view corridors are outlined in the policies as follows.

  1. Public viewing opportunities of the national symbols and Chaudière Falls should be created and/or enhanced with the development.
  2. Building placement and open spaces should be positioned and designed to maximize public viewing opportunities of the iconic views described above.
  3. Views of the Islands from Ottawa and Gatineau are to be designed to be interesting, varied and dramatic.  [Amendment 143, OMB File #PL141340, November 18, 2015]
1.11.10.2 - Public Realm

The public realm will be comprised of a network of parks, open spaces, right-of-ways, plazas and courtyards as shown on image C of Annex 1. These public realm components will be integrated with the existing street network and connected to the surrounding open space network and river valley. The following public realm areas are identified by district. They will be carefully programmed to become popular public destinations.

Head Street Square, West Chaudière District

Head Street Square is a unique urban square to be established within the heart of West Chaudière and is to be designed to function as the village square for the district. The square should incorporate such features as a stage to accommodate special events, seating framing the square, featured plantings and paving, a water feature, and a wide perimeter for commercial animation.

Union Square, East Chaudière District

Union Square is to be located on the East Chaudière along Booth Street, near Chaudière (Union) Bridge, and across from downtown Gatineau. It is to be designed as a publicly accessible space offering views of the nearby bridges and falls. This square should be designed to provide a street end plaza, a commemoration feature, tree plantings, overlook and seating area of the River, and incorporate a terrace when the Board Mill building is redeveloped.

Courtyard, Albert Island

A new covered courtyard framed by existing industrial heritage buildings will be provided on Albert Island to create a comfortable pedestrian area which is accessible at all times of the year, creating a place within a place. At the west end of the island, a new pedestrian and bike crossing will provide a connection to the south shore of the River and to the West Chaudière District to the north. [Amendment 143, OMB File #PL141340, November 18, 2015]

1.11.11 - Transportation

The number of residents and visitors will increase in the City’s downtown core as Chaudière and Albert Islands intensifies over time. The transportation strategy to be implemented with this redevelopment will be focused on creating a highly walkable site that is connected to the multi use pathway and cycling networks and that is well serviced by transit. Achieving high modal shares for these non-automotive modes of transportation will be a high priority in the overall development of the Islands. Decreasing the need for automotive travel will be accomplished through a transportation demand management (TDM) program and ensuring that the appropriate infrastructure and initiatives to support use of sustainable transportation are put into place as the site develops. Best practices in walking, cycling, street design, and parking will be implemented to achieve a mixed-use community supported by sustainable transportation. A green transport plan will form part of the transportation strategy to monitor carbon emissions reduction targets.

Access to the Islands and linkages to the City's overall transportation system is provided by Chaudière (Union) Bridge linking Ottawa and Gatineau. The bridge is a federal asset owned by Public Works Government Services of Canada (PWGSC) and requires upgrades to improve pedestrian and cycling connections. Council supports improvements that will improve conditions for pedestrians and cyclists consistent with Council's overall priority for these travel modes as expressed in the Transportation Master Plan and Official Plan. The City will work with PWGSC and other stakeholders, including the NCC, City of Gatineau, and the developer, who collectively have been working on the overall Isles development project, to achieve these improvements. [Amendment 143, OMB File #PL141340, November 18, 2015]

1.11.11.1 - Active Transportation and Transit Infrastructure

Building on the development principle of healthy living, an active transportation network will be established that will prioritize walking, cycling, and transit to capitalize on the site’s location between the future Pimisi LRT station and the Portage bus transfer station at the heart of the region’s most transit rich area.

With the goal to reduce the need to travel off-site through the mix of uses to be made available on-site and to facilitate the ability to come to the site by non-automotive means, the development will support use of sustainable transport modes through the provision of the following transportation facilities to be provided as development progresses.

  1. Streets are to be designed as complete streets which provide suitable facilities for pedestrians and cyclists.
  2. The Booth-Eddy street corridor is to be improved with pedestrian, cycling and transit facilities and infrastructure in both travel directions. The City shall assist in the discussions with the other stakeholders to pursue pedestrian and cycling improvements on the Booth-Eddy street corridor and Chaudière Bridge, which may involve proposed changes to the cross-section along the corridor. These improvements will allow for the corridor to function as a central connector within the public realm network that provides improved multi-modal connectivity between both sides of the river.
  3. A pathway connection is to be provided from the existing NCC pathways along the south shore of the Ottawa River to the western tip of Albert Island and western edge of West Chaudière District.
  4. The right-of-ways for internal streets are to be landscaped with street trees and pedestrian and cycling amenities such as bike racks and seating.
  5. Existing bus lines will service the site with two new stops, one located along Eddy Street in Gatineau and the other along Booth Street in Ottawa. As development proceeds, the City will provide additional transit service to meet transit ridership needs and targets. [Amendment 143, OMB File #PL141340, November 18, 2015]
1.11.11.2 - Transportation Demand Management

The goal of the transportation strategy is to achieve high non-automotive modes of travel amongst those who will be living, working and visiting the Islands.  The City’s Official Plan modal share target for sites near rapid transit is: 45% transit; 20% for non-motorized; 25% auto driver; and 10% auto passenger. To achieve these targets a Transportation Demand Management (TDM) program will be developed and implemented in a phased approach.

There are a number of TDM strategies and initiatives, which will be utilized to reduce vehicle traffic and parking demand. The following policies will form part of the strategies in the TDM program, but does not limit the development of other initiatives as the program is developed.

  1. The developer will create a TDM program acceptable to the City that includes a transportation strategy, implementation plan, and monitoring program, which sets out the methods and initiatives to achieve the modal share targets noted above.
  2. Future employers, employees and residents will be targeted through the TDM program with incentive and educational programs implemented in the early phases of the development.
  3. Parking for residents, visitors, and other users should meet and not exceed the City’s minimum parking requirements. A parking rate maximum should be applied to the site.
  4. Parking is encouraged in underground parking garages with limited surface parking to increase available space for other uses including public realm and private amenity areas.
  5. Car sharing and bike programs are to be made available on-site.  [Amendment 143, OMB File #PL141340, November 18, 2015]
1.11.11.3 - Internal Street Network and Design

Booth Street provides the only public vehicular access and dissects Chaudière Islands into two districts. The private street network on West and East Chaudière Districts is conceived as an interconnected network of shared use streets and lanes to be carefully dimensioned and encompassing a series of short blocks to promote the ease of movement within a compact development. The concept plan of the street layout is illustrated in Annex 1. There are streets which existed on the Islands before but no longer exist due to the redevelopment of the site over the years. A number of these streets are to be reintroduced as heritage streets located in similar locations.

The primary objective of the street design is easy access and connection between all modes of transportation and providing multiple routes between all areas of the site and surrounding destinations. With an emphasis on pedestrian and bicycle friendliness, the street network also incorporates strong connections to surrounding pathway networks, with generous crossing where these networks come together. The following policies address the street design envisioned on the Islands.

  1. The street network on the Islands will be designed to include dedicated bicycle lanes, a minimum of 3 metre pedestrian zone on either side of the street, designed with plantings and street furnishings.
  2. Streets that are to be pedestrian priority zones such as around public squares and key pedestrian linkages will be designed as woonerfs (narrow curbless streets shared by all users), which assigns priority to pedestrians and cyclists.
  3. North-south streets should be oriented and designed to increase the amount of sun that reaches the public realm throughout the year.
  4. Streets should provide direct access to the riverfront.
  5. Streets that are oriented east-west should be staggered to buffer the public realm against prevailing west winds. The staggering also helps to establish a pedestrian scale, meandering urban character.  [Amendment 143, OMB File #PL141340, November 18, 2015]

1.11.12  - Phasing and Implementation

1.11.12.1 – Phasing Plan

The transformation of the Islands is to be in the spirit of the vision and in accordance with the policy directions set forth in the Secondary Plan. It is expected that the redevelopment of the Islands will occur through a phased development program that will extend over multiple years. The overall phasing as currently contemplated, comprises of six phases, but may be revised as further study is undertaken.

  • Phase 1: Removal of several structures from the site and the reconstruction and occupation of multiple heritage buildings.
  • Phase 2: New buildings to be added to the west side of Albert Island, completing development on the island. New buildings constructed at the west end of West Chaudière District.
  • Phase 3: Additional new buildings in the West Chaudière District.
  • Phase 4: The completion of development of the West Chaudière District. This will include the last buildings on the Island to be constructed, including a new building along Booth Street.
  • Phase 5: Adaptive reuse of the Board Mill building and associated new construction as a possible hotel, and the construction of buildings on the north side of East Chaudière District.
  • Phase 6: Complete development on East Chaudière District with two new buildings.

Council supports a phased approach to achieve the overall transformation of Chaudière and Albert Islands through the following implementation measures to ensure that requirements to support each phase of development will be undertaken. [Amendment 143, OMB File #PL141340, November 18, 2015]

1.11.12.1 – Implementation Tools

The vision and policy direction for the development of Chaudière and Albert Islands have been described in Sections 1.11.6 through to 1.11.11. The development as it proceeds through future development applications are to have high regard and consideration for the policies of the Central Area Secondary Plan and satisfy requirements where stipulated. The following additional tools will be utilized by the City to ensure the implementation of the development concept plan for the Islands.

Holding Zone

The Zoning By-law will be amended to rezone most of the Islands to Mixed-Use Downtown (MD) subzone. Holding provisions will be applied to the new zone to detail the provisions that are required to be met before the holding zone may be lifted.  This will include, but is not limited, to the preparation of environmental, transportation, and infrastructure reports as well as approval through a two-stage approval process where the Stage 1 approval will deal with the overall development directions for each district with Stage 2 approvals for each phase of development detailing and demonstrating how the phased development aligns with and will contribute to achieving the overall development directions for full build out as detailed in the next section.

Site Plan Control

A 2-stage Site Plan Control application process for the full development of the project will be undertaken. The Stage 1 Site Plan Control application will deal with putting in place approval for the development concept plan for the whole site as well as servicing, transportation, and environmental conditions and requirements to be addressed either as part of the Stage 1 approval or through the Stage 2 approval.  A Stage 1 Site Plan approval is required before proceeding to Stage 2 Site Plan applications.

A number of Stage 2 Site Plan applications will be submitted over the course of the development. These will be detailed plans demonstrating the architecture and building design as well as public realm treatments and may be submitted by building or groups of buildings on the same block or parcel of land. Each Stage 2 application will be subject to review by the City’s Urban Design Review Panel (UDRP). The Stage 2 applications will be implemented as set out in the Stage 1 Site Plan conditions and can be approved individually.  [Amendment 143, OMB File #PL141340, November 18, 2015]

1.11.12.2  Interpretation

City Council shall ensure that interpretation of the LeBreton Flats Character Area has regard to all applicable policies set out in the City of Ottawa Official Plan. [Amendment 143, OMB File #PL141340, November 18, 2015 ]

1.11.13 -  East Flats

[Amendment #223, October 23, 2018]

The following policies apply to the lands known municipally as 301 Lett Street, 324 Lett Street, and 133 Booth Street, as shown on Map 6. In addition, unless otherwise stated below, the general policies of this Secondary Plan shall apply to the East Flats.

1.11.13.1 Vision

Development of the East Flats neighbourhood will support the broader vision for LeBreton Flats to create a truly urbane neighbourhood in the Central Area, one where the needs of daily life are accessible within a five or ten minute walk. The emergence of a new neighbourhood on LeBreton Flats will extend the fabric and vitality of the Downtown and support the Confederation Line. 

East Flats will be a mixed-use district of high-rise and mid-rise built forms that support a range of housing sizes and incomes. Podiums of the high-rise buildings will contain commercial and institutional uses that serve residents, create pedestrian-friendly streetscapes, and enliven parks and open spaces along the historic aqueduct.

The buildings will discourage automobile use by promoting a walkable and connected public realm of streets and open spaces that are extensions of the existing network of streets, bicycle paths, and multiuse trails that surround and extend into LeBreton Flats and beyond. A new park adjacent to and over the historic aqueduct will complement the new community.  The park will connect and integrate the neighbourhood to the Pimisi O-Train Station and to existing and future destinations to the south through paths for walking and cycling. It will also provide an additional amenity for residents of all ages, over time becoming part of a ring of open spaces around LeBreton Flats, connecting to the Ottawa River Pathway and Capital Pathway.

The policies below are intended to enable the East Flats vision.

1.11.13.2 – Policies

Land Use and Built Form

  1. Active frontages are required along the majority of all buildings facades at street level as shown on Map 6. Grade-accessed residential units are required along Lett Street, and all other required active frontages may be comprised of a mix of permitted uses. Residential lobbies are permitted along any frontage. Active at-grade uses will address elevation changes in a manner that ensures direct pedestrian access into a building at periodic intervals along the sidewalk.  Garage entrances, loading areas and other vehicular sidewalk crossings will be combined as much as possible, and their widths will be minimized.
  2. All buildings will be built close to the property line to consistently frame streets and open spaces. Setbacks will generally be between 0.5 and 3.0 metres and generally consistent along each street frontage. Setbacks should be greater than 3.0 metres along Booth Street for enhanced streetscaping.
  3. Building entrances will be located in accessible and visible locations oriented to the street. Separate municipal addresses should be assigned to each active entrance.
  4. The floor of a building fronting a street or public open space will be designed to incorporate active uses and transparent glazing to create visual interest and support an active public realm. The floor-to-ceiling height of the first floor at street level will generally be a minimum of 4.5 metres. Canopies and other architectural details will be used to help define the first floor and provide weather protection.
  5. Notwithstanding policy 1.11.4.4 Urban Design, Building Heights (a)(iii to v), high-rise development is permitted along the east side of Booth Street south of Fleet Street to accommodate high density development in proximity to the Pimisi O-Train Station, and maximum building heights are not permitted to exceed the heights shown on Map 6 without an amendment to this plan.
  6. Tall buildings will take a tower-and-podium form. The podium component will generally be two to six storeys and should animate the pedestrian realm, form a continuous street wall, and relate to the adjacent buildings in massing, height and architectural rhythm. A podium of up to nine storeys is permitted along Booth Street provided building mass articulation and an additional stepback is provided above the sixth floor of the podium design.
  7. Towers will be stepped back from the podium level, generally a minimum of 2.0 metres, to mitigate their micro-climatic and visual impact and provide transition from abutting properties. Greater stepbacks from the podium shall be provided for tower(s) facing Lett Street.
  8. Towers will generally be restricted to a maximum floorplate of 750 square metres to maintain sky views and reduce the perceived massing of the buildings.
  9. Generally, the minimum separation distance between towers should be 23 metres to mitigate shadow impacts on adjacent sensitive areas, sky-view and privacy impacts. Towers should contribute to the skyline through varied articulation and mechanical penthouses should be architecturally integrated in a manner that is consistent with the overall character of the tower.
  10. Each phase of development with a high-rise tower is subject to formal review by the Urban Design Review Panel during Site Plan Control. A proposal resulting in a tower with more than 30 storeys may also be subject to review by the Tall Buildings Design Review Panel.
1.11.13.3 – Parks and Open Space
  1. Parkland and open space along the aqueduct, as shown on Map 6, will accommodate active recreation amenities, passive unstructured open space and landscape features, as well as multi-use pathways including a direct multi-use path linking Lett Street to Pimisi Station and connections to other pathways. Dedicated parkland shall be designed and programmed to meet the needs of a diversity of residents, including older adults and children. The park and pathways will be built to City Standards for Parks and to the City of Ottawa Accessibility Standards for the Built Environment, and main pathways should be lit.
  2. The owner/developer of the lands (excluding parks and open space) shown in Map 6 shall work with the Parks Department to encourage the delivery of the said parkland in association with the first phase of development. Funding for the parkland is to be determined, but may be accomplished through the use of contributions towards Section 37 requirements, or Cash-in-Lieu of Parkland monies (Ward account only) resulting from the development may be directed towards the said park.
  3. The park’s design should celebrate the historic aqueduct, bridges, and Fleet Street Pumping Station through restoration, signage, interpretive and aboriginal elements, and other strategies.
  4. Parkland edges should be animated by means of building entrances, and buildings should have glazing and animation facing the outdoor spaces.
  5. Publicly-accessible connections, which satisfy City Standards, from Booth Street to the open space system and parkland below, along the aqueduct, will be provided.
1.11.13.4 – Streetscapes
  1. The east side of Booth Street will be designed with a sidewalk area wide enough to support a row of street trees (and an associated soil volume that will support their growth to full canopy), public seating, and other landscaping elements in the public right-of-way.
  2. As development occurs on the lands shown in Map 6, the owner shall explore with the City, pedestrian and cyclist connections across Booth Street, generally between Fleet Street and Pimisi O-Train Station, and where required, providing such connections will allow for improved safe movement of people across the corridor by connecting the “East Flats” to the future development west of Booth Street.
  3. The streets internal to the neighbourhood (Lloyd, Lett, and Fleet Streets) will prioritize the safety and comfort of pedestrians and cyclists and will be planted with street trees on both sides with sufficient soil volumes to support their long-term health and vitality.
  4. Signage and other wayfinding elements will be installed in the East Flats to facilitate pedestrian and cyclist access to Pimisi Station and other destinations in the area.
  5. The use of a diversity of native species in the planting of street trees and other landscaping will be encouraged.
1.11.13.5 – Access, Parking and Loading
  1. Residential parking will be substantially located underground. Limited parking for commercial and institutional uses may be located above grade only if such parking is within a building and located behind active uses with direct sidewalk frontage.
  2. Pick-up and drop-off locations should be located close to primary building entrances on the street or internal to developments, where appropriate.
  3. Loading and servicing areas will be located within building podiums or underground, with access generally located on Lloyd Street or Lett Street or through the use of a mid-block service lane.
  4. The location of parking for different uses and minimizing vehicular access points is encouraged.
  5. The sharing of parking spaces among uses that have peak parking demands at different times of the day shall be encouraged.
  6. Adequate on-site visitor parking shall be provided with each phase of development.

1.12 - Rideau Street

 Rideau Street

1.12.1 Vision

Revitalization

The coming years will see the continued but accelerated evolution of Rideau Street and the realization of the potential of this area as a vital part of Ottawa's Central Business District through a variety of public and private initiatives.

At street level, this will be reflected by the revitalization of the street, and its reinstatement as both an east-west transportation artery and a dynamic pedestrian shopping street. This will be achieved through: the opening of the street to automobile traffic with the retention of bus-only lanes, the realization of continuous, pedestrian-oriented uses with direct street access and enhanced visibility, the preservation and enhancement of heritage buildings and facades, the maximization of sunlight, the provision of pedestrian links to adjacent areas (especially to the By Ward Market and the Rideau Congress Centre areas), and the creation of an identifiable streetscape theme, with unique street furnishings, landscaping, lighting and signage.

Mixed Uses

Above the street, a mix of commercial as well as some residential uses will attract businesses, residents and visitors, supporting the retail street and the surrounding area, day and night. New developments will be designed to high urban design standards, and will complement, and be sensitive to, surrounding uses. This design sensitivity will provide a sense of human scale, and permit the sunlight penetration, views, and wind attenuation that will help create a pleasant pedestrian environment not only for Rideau Street itself, but also for adjoining areas, such as the By Ward Market.

Rideau Street Evolution

An east-west flow of pedestrian and vehicular traffic will be successfully reactivated complementing established north-south pedestrian routes, and through truck traffic will be removed. In addition, Rideau Street's establishment as a gateway into the Central Area, the creation of significant development at the east end of the street, and the realization of an aggressive centralized retail marketing strategy will all contribute to Rideau Street's evolution as a vital part of the Central Business District. The potential expansion of the Congress Centre, and increased hotels east of the Canal will also assist in the successful realization of the Central Business District east of the Canal.

Main Street

Clearly, Rideau Street will establish itself as the main street spine for the Central Area east of the Canal - providing pedestrian and transportation links to the area west of the Canal, as well as essential transit services to the surrounding areas.

Rideau Street will be the focus of exemplary development which accentuates existing features, and sets an urban design standard for Ottawa and other cities. It will also be a premiere business address, a sought-after residential location, and a popular downtown destination and meeting place.

1.12.2 Objectives

Vital Part of Central Business District
    1. To revitalize, and promote the development of Rideau Street, as designated on Schedule B - Central Area Character Areas and Theme Streets, as a vital part of the Central Business District, with a mix of commercial and residential uses which focus on a historical, pedestrian-oriented shopping street.
Gateway Function
    1. To promote the function of Rideau Street as an east-west transportation artery, and a gateway into the Central Area.

1.12.3 Policies

Mixed Use Business District with Shopping Street Focus
    1. City Council shall promote Rideau Street as a significant Central Area shopping street and an integral part of the Central Business District. City Council shall therefore:
      1. require pedestrian-oriented uses at grade;
      2. permit and promote commercial, residential or other appropriate uses to locate above the street; and
      3. promote uses which encourage evening activity, such as restaurant-bars and entertainment uses.
Profile of Development and Design Criteria
    1. City Council shall ensure that development along Rideau Street provides an interesting roof treatment or other appropriate design feature at the upper levels, within the height limits, contributes to a sense of human scale and minimizes overpowering effects, respects heritage resources and the preservation of the symbolic primacy of the Centre Block, minimizes shadowing and undesirable wind impacts, and provides a continuity of weather protection, in accordance with Policies d) and e) below. City Council shall therefore permit a range of building profiles, while having regard to the following criteria:
      1. where it directly abuts the street, development shall generally be at low profiles, retaining the sense of a traditional shopping street;
      2. where development reaches medium to high profiles above the street, it shall generally be set back;
      3. development between Sussex Drive and Dalhousie Street will generally be at low to medium profiles; development between Dalhousie and Cumberland Streets will generally be at medium to high profiles, and:
      • provide an appropriate transition to abutting Character Areas, and in particular, from Rideau Street to the low profile forms in the By Ward Market Character Area compatible with the heritage character of the area,
      • maintain direct sunlight on the By Ward Market Square, in accordance with Policy 1.5.3 d) of this chapter, and
      • maximize sunlight on the William and Waller Street pedestrian malls; and
      1. a concentration of high profile development will be promoted between Cumberland Street and King Edward Avenue, in order to establish an anchor and visual focus for the street and to help define it as a gateway into the Central Area.
Heritage Area
    1. City Council shall ensure the protection, conservation and enhancement of heritage resources on Rideau Street, and shall ensure that the design of development respects, and is sensitive to, such heritage features.
Rideau Street Heritage Group
    1. City Council shall recognize that the group of heritage buildings on the north side of Rideau Street generally between Sussex Drive and Cumberland Street represents the most significant heritage area on Rideau Street. City Council shall, therefore, investigate its potential designation as a Heritage Conservation District and the adoption of design criteria for the Central Area.
Façade Improvement
    1. City Council shall promote the implementation of a façade improvement programme for Rideau Street, and shall investigate financial opportunities to achieve this aim, in consultation with Rideau Street interests.
Theme
    1. City Council shall, in consultation with Rideau Street interests, establish and promote an appropriate theme for Rideau Street, and shall ensure that this theme is reflected by development within this area.
Distinctive Streetscape and Pleasant Pedestrian Environment
    1. City Council shall ensure that a distinctive, co-ordinated streetscape treatment and a pleasant pedestrian environment are established and maintained along Rideau Street. In particular, City Council shall ensure that the Rideau Street streetscaping treatment:
      1. is vibrant, respects its heritage resources, and reflects its gateway function and theme, in keeping with Policies a), b) and g) above;
      2. accommodates large volumes of pedestrian traffic and provides adequate seating and bus waiting areas;
      3. establishes and maintains an attractive, identifiable streetscape for Rideau Street, including such elements as unique landscape treatment, soft landscaping, trees, lighting, signage and entrance elements which reflect its gateway function. These elements shall be in keeping with the theme established for the street, as well as its heritage character;
      4. maintains and provides identifiable, secure, inviting pedestrian links to adjacent Character Areas, especially the By Ward Market and Rideau/Congress Centre Character Areas, and to the Central Area west of the Canal; and
      5. animates and enhances the William and Waller Street pedestrian malls, in a manner which will facilitate a variety of pedestrian-oriented activities, such as street theatre, outdoor cafés and business association and other activities and events in accordance with Policy 1.5.3 j) of this Plan.
Views
    1. City Council shall protect significant public views from the Rideau Street right-of-way - particularly those of the significant heritage area as per Policy d) above; views of Parliament Hill and heritage resources west of the Canal; and of the Mercury Court development at Rideau and Dalhousie Streets.
Transportation Artery
    1. City Council shall promote Rideau Street as an east-west transportation artery by:
      1. accommodating both automobile traffic and exclusive bus lanes;
      2. maintaining a high level of transit service;
      3. ensuring provision of suitable bus shelter/waiting areas; and
      4. pursuing the removal of through truck traffic as appropriate alternative routes become available.
Parking
    1. City Council shall identify the parking needs of Rideau Street, and if appropriate, facilitate the provision of additional short-term parking spaces within mixed use development on the edges of adjacent Character Areas or on Rideau Street subject to Policy l) below, exclusive of the By Ward Market.
Access Loading
    1. City Council shall facilitate continuous pedestrian and vehicular movement along Rideau Street by generally requiring that appropriate off-street loading and vehicular access occur from nearby streets, subject to the fulfillment of policies in the Secondary Policy Plans for adjacent Character Areas.
Central Retail Management and Marketing
    1. City Council shall facilitate the implementation of a central retail management strategy for Rideau Street in consultation with Rideau street interests.
Targeted Strategy Rideau Street Beautification
    1. In addition to the streetscaping elements for Rideau Street outlined in Policy g) above, City Council shall consider undertaking the following targeted strategy (see Annex 11) to implement the Downtown Ottawa Urban Design Strategy. Note that Targeted Strategies for Rideau Centre/Congress Centre Façade Improvement and Heritage Asset Protection and Street Theming in Section 1.6 Rideau-Congress Centre also apply to Section 1.12 Rideau Street:
      1. a vigorous maintenance program, including the reintroduction of new hardy street trees, landscaping and lighting along Rideau Street; and
      2. removal of one of the overhead pedestrian bridges linking the Rideau Centre with the HBC store, or alternatively, a redesign of the two bridges to make them inspiring set pieces for the Rideau Centre in connection with the City’s public art program. [Amendment #24, May 25, 2005]

1.13 - Sparks Street

 Sparks Street

1.13.1 Vision

Focal Point

In the future, Sparks Street will be one of the most popular tourist destinations in Ottawa's Central Area, and an important focus for retail, commercial and pedestrian activity in the Central Business District.

Boasting its prime location and renowned open-air pedestrian mall, its exceptional heritage buildings, busy retail shops and popular outdoor cafés, Sparks Street will continue to flourish, attracting large numbers of employees, residents, tourists and businesses.

Heritage District

In recognition of their exceptional heritage value and historic significance, Sparks Street's heritage resources will be conserved and enhanced through their designation as a Heritage Conservation District. Sensitive new development will complement these resources, ensuring that Sparks Street's heritage ambience is retained.

At-Grade Interest

At street level, continuous, inviting retail outlets with narrow frontages and direct street access will attract pedestrians to the shops east of Bank Street, while similar uses will evolve west of Bank, extending the outdoor shopping experience of the street. New streetscape treatment which complements the refurbished easterly blocks will also be introduced west of Bank Street and linked to the Cathedral Hill Conservation District and LeBreton Flats. Above the street, new office uses and a residential component will support the retail and contribute to a more vibrant, secure environment, particularly during evening hours.

Profile

Infill development along the mall will complement the historic buildings on the street, creating a sense of human scale and an enjoyable pedestrian environment. On the south side of the street, the upper stories of higher profile buildings will be set back, providing opportunities for overlooking terraces and retaining direct sunlight on the mall. Views along the length of the street and towards Confederation Square will be protected.

Mixed Uses

A specific marketing strategy will promote a strong retail mix on Sparks Street, and uses which encourage both day and evening activity, especially restaurants and restaurant-bars, colourful outdoor cafés, and arts and cultural uses. This prosperity will encourage pedestrian-oriented activity on the mall, which extends beyond office hours and enlivens the street during the evenings and on weekends.

Chambers Block

The redeveloped Chambers Block at the street's east end will create an identifiable focal point near Sparks Street's entrance and Confederation Square. The development will conserve its striking heritage buildings and I and be compatible with the mall environment, while providing such supporting uses as offices, cinemas and pedestrian-oriented retail outlets. This sensitive infill will truly contribute to the desired evolution of Sparks Street.

Pedestrian Linkage

Sparks Street will remain an oasis in the heart of the City. With its sunlit and sheltered seating areas, greenery, and the sounds of water fountains and street musicians, it will continue to provide opportunities for people to relax, socialize or just people-watch. Sparks Street will also provide a continuous pedestrian corridor from the Canal to the Garden of the Provinces and the exciting future development of the LeBreton Flats area, linking the Central Area east and west of the Canal, and promoting access to the Bank Street promenade and Rideau Street shopping/business districts.

Mid-Block Connection

Mid-block pedestrian links which provide connections between and through buildings to the Core and the Parliamentary Precinct, will be promoted and enhanced. A sensitively designed open-air pedway over Queen Street will also connect Sparks Street to a major parking facility in the World Exchange Plaza development. Due to its inviting, visible access from Sparks Street through a narrow pedestrian mews lined by retail uses and infill development which respects the heritage character of Sparks Street, this innovative development will play an especially important role in ensuring the vitality of Sparks Street.

The Sparks Street of the future will provide a delightful balance of commercial activity in a heritage and urban open space environment, and will draw more and more people with its unique mix of shops, restaurants and entertainment uses.

1.13.2 Objectives

Open Air Pedestrian Mall
    1. To strengthen Sparks Street, as designated on Schedule B - Central Area Character Areas and Theme Streets, as an integral part of the Central Business District, with a mix of uses which focus on an open-air pedestrian shopping mall.
Protect Unique Qualities
    1. To protect the architectural, historical, cultural, social and environmental significance of Sparks Street by conserving and enhancing its heritage resources, maintaining a vehicle-free pedestrian mall with opportunities for socialization, and ensuring sensitive development.
Open Space/ Pedestrian Corridor
    1. To promote the function of Sparks Street as a linear open space and a significant pedestrian corridor linking the Central Area east and west of the Canal.

1.13.3 Policies

Central Business District
    1. City Council shall promote Sparks Street as a significant Central Area shopping street, a tourist destination, and a vital part of the Central Business District. City Council shall therefore:
      1. require continuous pedestrian-oriented uses at grade in development which is designed to give preference to narrow storefronts with direct street access;
      2. permit commercial, residential and other appropriate uses above the street; and
      3. encourage uses which promote tourism and evening activity, such as food and restaurant uses, specialty stores, galleries, entertainment, restaurant-bars, outdoor cafés, arts and cultural, and residential uses.
Open Space Link/Pedestrian Corridor
    1. City Council shall recognize, protect and promote Sparks Street as an open space link and pedestrian corridor which promotes pedestrian movement between the LeBreton Flats and Canal areas, and between the complementary Bank, and Rideau Street shopping streets.
Heritage Conservation District
    1. City Council shall recognize that the group of heritage buildings on Sparks Street between Elgin and Bank Streets contains one of Ottawa's finest groupings of heritage buildings, and shall therefore, investigate their potential designation as a Heritage Conservation District and the adoption of design criteria.
Heritage Character
    1. City Council shall ensure the protection, enhancement and conservation of heritage resources on Sparks Street, and shall ensure that the design of development respects, and is sensitive to such heritage.
Theme
    1. City Council shall, in consultation with Sparks Street interests, establish and promote an appropriate theme for Sparks Street, and shall ensure that this theme is reflected by its streetscaping treatment and development within this area.
Profile
    1. City Council shall ensure that the profile of development along Sparks Street respects heritage buildings and the visual integrity and symbolic primacy of the Centre Block. The profile of development shall also contribute to a sense of human scale, minimize shadowing and maximize direct sunlight on the pedestrian mall, and provide a continuity of weather protection. City Council shall also ensure that the upper stories of infill development on the south side of the mall are generally set back from the street to maximize direct sunlight on the mall and to minimize over-powering effects.
Distinctive Streetscape and Pleasant Pedestrian Environment
    1. City Council shall ensure that a distinctive, co-ordinated streetscape treatment and a pleasant pedestrian environment are established and maintained along Sparks Street. In particular, City Council shall ensure that such streetscaping treatment:
      1. accentuates its unique open space/open air ambience and reflects its function as a major pedestrian corridor, in keeping with Policy b) above;
      2. reflects its identified theme and is sensitive to, and complements its heritage ambience, in accordance with Policies d) and e) above;
      3. is cohesive, i.e., that streetscape treatment of Sparks Street west of Bank Street integrates with and complements that of the easterly blocks;
      4. accommodates large volumes of pedestrians and provides adequate public seating, in both sunlit and sheltered areas;
      5. optimizes use of sunlit areas on the pedestrian mall; and
      6. ensures abundant landscaping and elements which generate pedestrian interest, such as water fountains, sculpture or other appropriate art forms. [Amendment #24, May 25, 2005]
Targeted Strategy
The Interface District – Sparks Street
    1. City Council shall consider undertaking the following targeted strategy (see Annex 10) to implement the Downtown Ottawa Urban Design Strategy:
      1. make Sparks Street the centrepiece of the Interface District as per Policy 1.3.3k) of Volume 2A of this Plan;
      2. if Sparks Street is not chosen for a future rapid transit route, consider the implications of opening up the mall to vehicular traffic during off-peak periods;
      3. convert Sparks Street back to a traditional heritage-scaled street by removing the kiosks and clutter and by planting additional street trees the full length of the mall to improve the pedestrian experience;
      4. encourage tourism through better signage, programming and promotion of the street as a major heritage destination in the city;
      5. extend the Sparks Street BIA coverage to the entire length of the street and;
      6. work in collaboration with the National Capital Commission and the Sparks Street BIA to implement the findings of the Sparks Street Vocational Study. [Amendment #24, May 25, 2005]
Animation
    1. City Council shall promote the animation of the pedestrian mall with appropriate uses and activities such as outdoor cafés, appropriate street vending, street musicians, street theatre or other performing arts.
Open Space Plaza
    1. City Council shall promote the protection, animation and enhancement of the open space plaza on the northwest corner of Sparks and Bank Streets.
Pedestrian Links
    1. City Council shall promote the provision and retention of identifiable, secure and inviting public pedestrian links at appropriate locations along Sparks Street, to facilitate pedestrian movement between Sparks Street, the Core, and the Parliamentary Precinct.
Sparks Street Mews
    1. In support of Policy j) above, and in order to strengthen the retailing function and attractiveness of Sparks Street, City Council shall, as a priority, support the infill development of the former Speakers' Corner site and adjacent properties on the western portion of the block bounded by Sparks, O'Connor, Queen and Metcalfe Streets. To achieve this aim, City Council shall promote and ensure:
      1. the protection, enhancement and conservation of heritage resources in accordance with Policy c) above, while ensuring that infill development respects, and is sensitive to such resources;
      2. the creation of a lively, inviting, enjoyable and identifiable open-air pedestrian link connecting Sparks Street and the Core, which
      3. creates a narrow retail mews leading to an attractive open-air pedway over Queen Street;
      4. the provision of a human scale of development in accordance with Policy f) above;
      5. the provision of continuous pedestrian-oriented uses at grade adjacent to Sparks Street, and the open-air pedestrian link; and
      6. the maintenance of the function of the Hardy Arcade at-grade pedestrian access to the Core.
View
    1. City Council shall protect and enhance existing significant views as seen from the Sparks Street public right-of-way, such as those of the Centre Block, the War Memorial/ Confederation Square, and the Canal. [Subject to Amendment 69, November 26, 2008]
Short-Term Parking
    1. City Council shall ensure an adequate supply of parking for Sparks Street, particularly short-term parking which serves shoppers. In keeping with this policy, City Council shall ensure convenient, visible pedestrian access to such parking from Sparks Street.
Central Retail Management
    1. City Council shall facilitate the implementation of a central retail management strategy for Sparks Street in consultation with Sparks Street interests.

1.14 - Bank Street

Bank Street

1.14.1 Vision

Main Street

In the coming years, Bank Street will continue to be recognized as "Main Street" Ottawa and will feature prominently in the City's Central Business District, both as a significant shopping street/commercial district, and as a gateway to the Central Area.

Revitalization

A sense of "Old is New Again" will be conveyed as the Bank Street streetscape is revitalized, with the protection and enhancement of heritage buildings, the restoration of the original character of, and continuity between building facades, and the introduction of a consistent, vibrant streetscape treatment. Development will reflect a high quality of design, and contribute to a sense of human scale, resulting in a street level environment which is visually enjoyable.

Profile

Development will generally reflect a traditional Main Street theme, providing continuous pedestrian-oriented uses at grade with narrow shop frontages and direct street access. These uses will cater to employees from the surrounding Core area and residents from throughout the region, particularly the nearby Upper Town and Centretown neighbourhoods, such as specialty retail personal services and restaurants.

Infill development along Bank Street, and in nearby sites in the Core, will create an enjoyable pedestrian environment while accommodating significant commercial and residential uses, as well as sensitively integrated parking facilities. This mix of uses will support the retail street both day and evening, creating a more vibrant, secure environment.

Heritage

The distinctive streetscape of heritage buildings along both sides of Bank Street between Slater and Laurier Streets will be designated as a Heritage Conservation District, contributing significantly to the theme and character of the street.

Movement

Bank Street will continue to provide a high level of convenient transit service and will remain one of the downtown's most important pedestrian routes. A vibrant streetscape treatment will complement Bank Street south of the Central Area and emphasize a gateway role, while reflecting a Main Street theme. Co-ordinated streetscape elements and abundant trees will attract the interest of passing drivers and transit riders, and will draw pedestrians along the street. Sidewalk areas will accommodate large numbers of pedestrians, while providing a continuity of weather protection, comfortable bus waiting areas, casual seating and opportunities for social interaction.

Focal Point

The intersection of Laurier Avenue with Bank Street will be an important focal point, through the enhancement and animation of the open area on the southeast corner adjacent to the L'Esplanade Laurier towers. This focal point will provide an identifiable meeting place and entry into the Central Area and will be designed to promote pedestrian flow to and from Bank Street south. At street level, this area may be identified by such features as a clock tower, water fountain or sculptural elements. Above the street, the L'Esplanade Laurier towers will continue to provide a landmark which is visible from as far away as Ottawa South.

Linkage

Bank Street will be improved as a major north-south pedestrian corridor, linking with the Core by means of intersecting east-west streets. Bank Street will also function as a strong pedestrian link to the Parliamentary Precinct, with physical improvements to its north end serving to link with the pedestrian promenade along the Ottawa River, which will provide connections to the LeBreton Flats and Canal areas. Bank Street will also link to Sparks Street, providing a continuous retail experience for shoppers. Views northward towards Sparks Street and the Parliamentary Precinct will be maintained.

With its vibrant Main Street ambience, the future Bank Street will be enhanced as a distinctive gateway to the Central Area, a popular shopping promenade and a successful business location.

1.14.2 Objectives

Business District with Shopping Street Focus
    1. To enhance and promote Bank Street, as designated on Schedule B - Central Area Character Areas and Theme Streets, as an integral part of the Central Business District which focuses on a pedestrian-oriented shopping street.
Gateway Function
    1. To promote Bank Street as a gateway into the Central Area and a significant north-south transportation corridor.
Protect Heritage
    1. To protect the historical and architectural significance of Bank Street and to promote its Main Street theme.

1.14.3 Policies

Mixed Use Business District
    1. City Council shall promote Bank Street as a significant Central Area shopping street, a vital part of the Central Business District and a gateway to the Central Area. City Council shall therefore:
      1. require continuous pedestrian-oriented uses at grade;
      2. permit commercial, residential or other appropriate uses above the street; and
      3. encourage uses which are vibrant and/or promote evening activity, such as specialty stores, galleries, restaurants and entertainment uses.
Theme
    1. City Council shall, in co-operation with Bank Street interests, promote a Main Street theme for Bank Street, and shall ensure that this theme is reflected by development within this area.
Profile of Development
    1. City Council shall ensure that development along Bank Street provides an interesting roof treatment or other appropriate design feature at the upper levels, within the height limits, contributes to a sense of human scale, minimizes overpowering effects, respects heritage resources, minimizes shadowing and maximizes direct sunlight on pedestrian areas, and is in keeping with a Main Street theme and Policy b) above.
Protect Heritage Resources
    1. City Council shall ensure the protection, enhancement and conservation of the heritage resources on Bank Street, and shall ensure that the design of development respects, and is sensitive to such heritage resources.
Heritage Conservation District
    1. City Council shall recognize that the group of heritage buildings along both sides of Bank Street between Slater Street and Laurier Avenue represents the most significant heritage area on Bank Street. City Council shall, therefore, designate this area as a Heritage Conservation District and adopt related design criteria.
Façade and Sign Improvement
    1. City Council shall, in co-operation with Bank Street interests, ensure the continued implementation of the Bank Street facade and sign improvement programme.
Distinct Streetscape and Pleasant Pedestrian Environment
    1. City Council shall ensure that a distinctive, co-ordinated streetscape treatment and a pleasant pedestrian environment are established and maintained along Bank Street. In particular, City Council shall ensure that the Bank Street streetscaping treatment:
      1. is vibrant, and reflects its gateway function and Main Street theme, in keeping with Policies a) and b) above;
      2. complements and integrates with that of Bank Street south of the Central Area;
      3. accommodates large volumes of pedestrian traffic and provides adequate seating; and
      4. includes a tree planting corridor/area.
Bank and Laurier Focal Points
    1. City Council shall investigate, together with Bank Street interests, the creation of a focal point on the southeast corner of Bank Street and Laurier Avenue, which will provide a recognizable gateway entrance to the Central Area, and serve as a usable pedestrian amenity area, through such measures as:
      1. enhancing and animating the open area on the southeast corner;
      2. introducing identifiable entrance features at street-level, such as a sculptural art form and water features, clock tower or other appropriate form which is compatible with the theme of the street; and
      3. maintaining and enhancing distant views of the L'Esplanade Laurier towers from Bank Street south of the Central Area.
Pedestrian Links
    1. City Council shall promote identifiable, inviting pedestrian links between Bank Street and the nearby Core, Sparks Street, and the Parliamentary Precinct and thereby to the Ottawa River; as well as to the Upper Town and Centretown neighbourhoods.
Views
    1. City Council shall, protect and enhance views of the Parliamentary Precinct from the Bank Street right-of-way in accordance with Policy 1.4.3 i) of this Plan, and, in accordance with Policy i) above.
Transit
    1. City Council shall ensure the provision of a high level of transit service along Bank Street.
Parking
    1. City Council shall ensure the provision of an adequate supply of parking for Bank Street, particularly short-term parking which serves shoppers.
Central Retail Management
    1. City Council shall investigate, together with Bank Street interests, the implementation of a central retail management strategy.