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Richmond Secondary Plan

1.0 Introduction

Richmond was founded in 1818 and is the oldest community in the former Township of Goulbourn. Historically, growth in Richmond has been modest with a population that now approaches 4,500 people. Former plans included 210 hectares of land set aside for future growth. This Plan provides guidance for the development of these lands and the redevelopment of older areas of the village over time in a manner consistent with the community vision. The Village of Richmond Secondary Plan (hereafter referred to as the Plan or the “Secondary Plan”) should be read in conjunction with Volume 1 of the Official Plan and the Village of Richmond Community Design Plan (hereafter referred to as the “Community Design Plan?).

2.0 - Managing Growth

This Plan is based on a twenty-year planning period, from 2010 to 2030. The Master Servicing Study indicated that, at the time this Plan was adopted, the village had reached its development capacity based on the limitations of existing sanitary services. With the upgrades to these services as proposed in the Master Servicing Study, the residential capacity of the village is planned to increase from approximately 1,550 dwelling units to between 4,400 to 5,500 units (including existing units). In the Western Development Lands the expected range is between 1,800 to 2,300 dwelling units at build-out based on stages described in Section 8 of the Community Design Plan. In most of the village, water services will continue to be provided, as they are now: a combination of private and communal wells. In the Western Development Lands water will be piped from communal wells that will be owned and managed by the City. The communal well system will be sized to provide water to the entire village as a contingency for the future. To ensure that new development does not occur before the required services are available, holding provisions in the zoning by-law may be applied to vacant land.

Policies

Water

  1. Development in the Western Development Lands, Northeast Development Lands and Industrial Lands shall be on the basis of public communal well services. Development in the remainder of the village shall be based on private or communal wells unless it is deemed necessary to convert the village to a communal well system. [Amendment #181, March 9, 2017]

Wastewater

2.  All new development in Richmond shall be connected to the central wastewater collection system. No new development shall be permitted until the wastewater system can provide the capacity in accordance with the Master Servicing Study. [Amendment #181, March 9, 2017]

3. Existing wastewater infrastructure services shall be upgraded over time to provide the required capacity for the full development of the Village of Richmond. Upon submission of a development proposal, the proponent shall be required to demonstrate that capacity exists to service the development.

Transportation

4. Upon submission of a development proposal, the City will evaluate the transportation design against the Community Design Plan and the Transportation Master Plan.

5. While no additional road capacity is required to serve growth over the planning period, specific road improvement projects and the addition of new collector roads and pathways are required in the village as identified on Schedule C to the Community Design Plan.

3.0 - Land Use

The land use policies in the Plan guide future development in the village of Richmond through the following land use designations with guidance from the Community Design Plan.

Policies

  1. The land use designations are shown on Schedule A – Land Use, which forms part of this plan.
  2. Upon submission of a development proposal, the proponent will be required to demonstrate that:
    1. It is in accordance with the Servicing Policies of this Plan and the Official Plan.
    2. Through the appropriate design analysis, development addresses the provisions of the Village Design Guidelines and Demonstration Plans as contained in the Community Design Plan.
  3. The City will evaluate a proposal to change the designation of land from one category to another against its ability to meet the provisions in the following sections of the Community Design Plan:
    1. Section 1.4 Visionary Principles
    2. Section 1.5 Liveable Community Initiatives
    3. Section 4 Land Use
  4. In keeping with Richmond?s village character, the proponent of development shall provide a minimum of one tree in the road right-of-way of every new proposed ground-oriented dwelling and on both sides of all arterial and collector roads. If it has been determined that the soils cannot accommodate street trees in the arrangement proposed, then the road right-of-way or the building setbacks shall be increased so that trees can be provided.

3.1 The Village Core

The Village Core is the heart of Richmond. It reflects the village?s history, rural roots, small-town character and architectural heritage. In earlier times, McBean Street was once the main commercial street for the village and the Richmond Agricultural Fairgrounds on Perth Street was on the outskirts of the Village. These areas are to become the central place for the Village. The Village Core is envisioned to be a vibrant, pedestrian-oriented commercial area, comprised of smaller-scale buildings, which are readily accessible to residents, by a variety of means besides motor vehicles. The largest retail site, the “Richmond Plaza” at the western end of the Village Core, is an area that needs revitalization to complement the mixed-use vision for the Village Core.

Policies

  1. Permitted uses on lands designated Village Core include: retail, service commercial, office uses, parks and small institutional uses including a primary school.
  2. Residential uses are also permitted on lands designated Village Core and include: existing dwellings, apartments, residential in combination with a permitted non-residential use, multiple dwellings and retirement homes.
  3. Vehicle-oriented uses such as vehicle sales, rental and service uses and drive-through facilities that legally existed on the date of the adoption of the Plan may continue however no new uses of this kind shall be permitted.
  4. A maximum four-storey and a minimum two-storey height limit shall be required to define the edge of the street and to help create a village style streetscape.
  5. The City will evaluate development proposals in the Village Core against their ability to meet City Design Guidelines and the Community Design Plan. It is envisioned that the Village Core will evolve into a mixed-use street with a variety of village-style buildings, storefronts, signage and pedestrian amenities.
  6. Reduced parking requirements shall be established to encourage businesses to locate in existing buildings and to help revitalize the Core.
  7. On-site parking shall be located to the side of or behind buildings. If it is located at the side, the parking should be no closer to the street than the front of the building and landscaping should be used to help buffer parking areas from the sidewalk and abutting properties.

3.2 Village Commercial

Lands designated as Village Commercial provide places outside the Village Core for retail and service commercial uses. This designation is limited in area in order to focus commercial uses in the Village Core. Development in Village Commercial areas shall balance the needs of pedestrians and cyclists with the needs of automobiles and other vehicles. Any development in this designation shall have regard for all relevant City approved Urban Design Guidelines including those identified for Rural Villages.

Policies

  1. Uses permitted on lands designated Village Commercial include: retail and service commercial uses, institutional uses, car-oriented uses and facilities that serve residents, visitors and the surrounding rural community.
  2. The City will evaluate development proposals in the Village Commercial designation against their ability to meet City Design Guidelines and the Community Design Plan. High quality design is expected for all properties in this designation and building and landscape design shall be reflective of the village-style character.
  3. Within the Village Commercial designation, the maximum building height limit should be three-storeys.
  4. In order to reinforce a pedestrian environment, development proposals should not locate parking directly adjacent to Perth Street. Where it is determined by the City that parking is appropriate, it may be permitted and shall be done in the following arrangement (from the building to the sidewalk): a wide pedestrian space that is frequently connected to the sidewalk, a vehicular passageway, one-tier of parking and a landscaped space designed to screen the lower portion of the vehicles from the sidewalk.

3.2.1 Village Commercial 1

Lands designated as Village Commercial 1 provide a location for large-lot retail and service commercial uses not readily available elsewhere in the village. The Market Evaluation (February 2010) prepared by Malone Given Parsons in support of a development proposal for these lands establishes that the village currently has sufficient demand for this type of use. The Evaluation also concludes that the commercial development of the designated site can successfully coexist with the development of the Village Core. There will also be positive benefits for the village given that more residents who shop outside the village will shop locally. The reason this Village Commercial site is treated separately from other Village Commercial designations is to limit the size of the stores and to add specific policy direction for this large site.

Policies

  1. The total maximum gross floor area permitted on the site shall not exceed 7,000m2, and no single individual occupancy shall exceed 2,790m2
  2. The City will evaluate any development containing a proposed drive-through facility against its ability to meet City Design Guidelines for Drive-Through Facilities and the Community Design Plan. Drive through lanes shall not be permitted in front of street oriented buildings along Perth Street.
  3. Buildings located near Perth Street shall functionally front the street. Building elevations facing Perth Street are to be aesthetically pleasing and contain entrance doors and windows (clear glazing) with a minimum window target of 50% along the length of the façade.
  4. Street-oriented buildings shall be encouraged along the Perth Street frontage with a target of 50% built form along the developable frontage at build-out.
  5. Upon submission of a development application in the Village Commercial 1 designation, the proponent will demonstrate how they meet the objectives of this Plan and the Community Design Plan through the submission of a design brief.
  6. Servicing of these lands will be on the basis of the recommendations contained in the Master Servicing Study for the Village of Richmond.

3.3 Residential

Residential areas are envisioned to be village-style neighbourhoods that fit well with older parts of the community. These areas will provide a variety of housing styles and a wide range of community services so that residents can age in place in the same community if they so choose. Affordable housing is also needed so that the village offers housing options for people of all ages and incomes.

Policies

  1. Uses permitted on all lands designated Residential include: secondary dwelling units, group homes, rooming houses, shelter accommodation, retirement homes, care facilities, garden suites, home-based businesses, public utilities, open space and parks. Vacant residential lands that are currently being used for agricultural purposes may continue to be used for this purpose.
  2. The following uses may also be permitted on all lands designated Residential subject to a zoning amendment:
    1. Garden suites based on the ability of the site to accommodate the use
    2. Small institutional uses such as a church and daycare located on an arterial or collector road based on a review to confirm there will be no significant surrounding impacts
    3. Primary schools based on the following:
      • The site is a suitable size (2-3 ha) and configuration (generally rectangular)
      • It is located on two street frontages (collector/local road or collector/collector)
      • As many children as possible are within walking distance
      • Those walking do not have to cross what is perceived to be an unsafe or hazardous crossing
    4. One or two small convenience commercial uses (e.g. coffee shop, corner store) that serve the day-to-day needs of the surrounding neighbourhood as shown at the general location(s) identified on Schedule A.
  3. For the lands at 6143 Perth Street retirement residence is also permitted and that use shall comprise a minimum gross floor area of 5000 square metres, with a maximum of five storeys. [Amendment #209, May 9, 2018]

3.3.1 Residential – One and Two-Units

The Residential – One and Two-Unit designation is the predominant residential designation in the village. It provides for a range of ground-oriented, low-density residential and associated uses including detached and semi-detached dwellings.

Policies

  1. Uses permitted on lands designated Residential – One and Two-Units include: detached and semi-detached dwellings, duplexes, bed and breakfast, home-based businesses, and retirement homes - converted.
  2. A limited number of multiple attached dwellings not including apartments or stacked townhouses may be permitted by zoning amendment at the following locations, as long as the immediate area is surrounded by a significant band of detached and semi-detached dwellings.
    1. On an arterial or collector road
    2. Abutting a park or designated open space
    3. At the edge of a neighbourhood
  3. The maximum building height shall be approximately three and a half storeys.
  4. Upon submission of a development application in the Residential – One and Two-Unit designation, the proponent will demonstrate conformance to Schedule B – Parks, Open Space and Pathways Plan in the Community Design Plan.
  5. The City will evaluate a development proposal in the Residential – One and Two-Unit designation against its ability to meet City Design Guidelines and the Community Design Plan.
  6. New plans of subdivision will use the historical grid pattern for streets and will ensure equitable access to parks and other open spaces as required by the Official Plan.

3.3.2 Residential – Ground-Oriented Attached

The Residential Ground-Oriented Attached designation provides for a range of ground-oriented, higher density housing forms to provide a greater diversity of accommodation that will serve a variety of age groups and income levels close to uses and services that meet their needs.

Policies

  1. Uses permitted on lands designated Residential – Ground Oriented Attached include: triplexes and ground-oriented attached dwellings containing 6 units or less. A limited number of detached, duplex, and semi-detached dwellings may be permitted as long as 50% of the area of the designation remains for attached dwellings as defined above.
  2. The maximum building height should be three and a half storeys.
  3. The City will evaluate a development proposal in the Residential – Ground-Oriented Attached designation against its ability to meet City Design Guidelines and Community Design Plan.
  4. With the exception of private driveways, on-site parking should be located to the side or behind a building so that the front elevation can be close to the street. If it is located at the side, the parking area should be visually screened from the sidewalk and from abutting neighbours.

3.3.3 Residential – Apartments

The Residential - Apartments designation provides for more intensive, non-ground-oriented residential uses such as stacked townhouses and apartments

Policies

  1. Uses permitted on lands designated Residential – Apartments include: stacked townhouses and apartments.
  2. The City will evaluate a development proposal in the Residential – Apartment designation against its ability to meet City Design Guidelines and Community Design Plan.
  3. The maximum building height should be four storeys.
  4. A zoning amendment and an amendment to the Community Design Plan will be required to create new residential apartment or stacked townhouse sites. An amendment to the Official Plan is not required unless the height of the proposed building is significantly greater than the maximum permitted. The following criteria shall be used to assess these applications:
    1. Located on arterial roads or
    2. Located near a park
    3. Compatible with the surrounding community which may be achieved through building transitions and compliance with a maximum density of approximately 99 units/ha
    4. Of high-quality design based on the Design Guidelines in the Plan

3.3.4 Western Development Lands

The policies in this section deal with lands in the west of the village that were identified for future development. The Demonstration Plan for these lands, as shown in this Plan, defines the boundary of the Western Development Lands and will be considered in the development of these lands. This Demonstration Plan was derived from a three-day design workshop hosted by Mattamy Homes in December 2008 that focused on how best to develop these lands. The workshop was a collaborative effort between LRK, Mattamy, the City and the community. Development will primarily consist of detached dwellings, townhouses, parks, open spaces, a school and a pathway system.

Principles of Development

In addition to the policies contained in the Residential and other designations of this Plan, the following shall apply to the Western Development Lands:

  1. The Western Development Lands shall comply with the density and unit mix provisions contained in the chart below:

Dwelling Type

Max Density
Units/Net Ha

Unit Mix
(% of Total)

One & Two Units Large Lots

17

2-7%
Minimum

One and Two Units Small Lots

30

58-78%
Minimum

Townhouses

45

20-35%
Minimum

Townhouses with Rear Lanes

80

Back-to-Back Townhouses

99

2. Development phasing shall be in accordance with the Infrastructure Phasing Plan as contained in Section 8 of the Community Design Plan.

3. The City will evaluate a development proposal in the Western Development Lands against its ability to meet the Demonstration Plan as displayed in the Community Design Plan.

Watercourse Setbacks

4. Setbacks for the Jock River and the permanent flowing sections of the Moore Branch (Sections 1, 2 and 3 lower) and the VanGaal/Arbuckle Drain shall be in accordance with watercourse setback policy in the Official Plan. In addition, the Jock River setback will also be based on the requirements of an EIS to be submitted with the plan of subdivision. The setbacks will be confirmed to the satisfaction of the City in consultation with the RVCA given the proposal to locate the stormwater pond within the floodplain. The pond must be located a minimum of 30 m from top of bank.

5. The following watercourse setbacks shall apply to the Moore Tributary. The setbacks for sections 3-5 are contingent on the outcome of the Arbuckle and Moore municipal drain petition processes.

Moore Tributary

Setback

Section 3 (Upper)

30m from top of bank

Section 4

30m from top of bank

Section 5-8

15m from top of bank

6. The interim floodplain area north of Perth Street shown on Schedule A dictates that prior to development being permitted behind the 30 m berm from the Van Gaal Drain, the proponent will have to undertake sufficient works to demonstrate that:

    • Existing flood elevations are matched
    • There will be no increases in flood levels on adjacent properties and
    • A 30m setback is maintained due to the watercourse remaining a direct fishery.

3.3.5 Northeast  and Southeast Development Lands

The policies in this section deal with lands in the northeast and southeast of the village. The Demonstration Plan for these lands, as shown in the Village of Richmond Community Design Plan, defines the boundary of the Northeast Development Lands and will be considered in the development of these lands.  [Amendment #150, December 21, 2017]

Principles of Development

In addition to the policies contained in the Residential designations of this Plan, the following shall apply to the Northeast  and Southeast Development Lands:

  1. The maximum density for one and two unit - large lot residential as shown on the table in section 3.3.4 shall apply to all plans of subdivision on these lands. If greater densities or a wider range of unit mix are desired, the proponent shall be required to submit a concurrent CDP/Zoning amendment to determine which parts of the table shall apply to the satisfaction of the City.  [Amendment #150, December 21, 2017]

3.3.6 The Floodplain

The floodplain is a limitation on the underlying land use designation in that no new development is permitted. Vacant land in the floodplain has generally been designated as Open Space and developed land has generally been designated to match the existing use(s).

Principles of Development

  1. The policies in section 4.8.1 of the City?s Official Plan shall apply to all land identified as floodplain as shown on Schedule A of this Plan.
  2. The floodplain is subject to change by the Rideau Valley Conservation Authority. Any changes approved by the RVCA will not require an amendment to this Plan.
  3. Four floodplain areas are designated as Interim Floodplain on Schedule A. This indicates that the Rideau Valley Conservation Authority has either a) approved a change in principle or b) received an application to modify the floodplain in these areas. The reference to interim on Schedule A means that if and when the RVCA changes their floodplain mapping for these lands, then development can proceed based on the underlying land use designations and in accordance with the Demonstration Plans without amending the floodplain as shown on Schedule A to the Community Design Plan or the Secondary Plan.

3.4 Institutional

The Institutional land use designation accommodates a range of community and emergency uses that serve the needs of Richmond area residents and visitors. This designation applies to the larger institutional uses in the village. Other smaller scale institutional uses including a primary school may be located in other designations such as the Village Core or the Residential designations.

Policies

  1. Uses permitted on lands designated institutional include: a range of public uses such as a library, school, fire station, arena, community facilities used by the public, cemetery, church, community garden, museum, retirement/residential care facility and other associated uses.
  2. New institutional uses should be located in such a way as to provide adequate buffering to any nearby residential uses. Large institutional uses such as a high school will require an amendment to the Secondary Plan and the Community Design Plan.

3.5 The Richmond Fairgrounds

The Richmond Agricultural Society runs the Richmond Fairgrounds located at the northwest corner of Perth Street and Huntley Road. These lands are home to the annual Richmond Fair, which is a major annual attraction held in the third weekend of September. The Fair is an event that has put the village on the map throughout Eastern Ontario, being one of the largest fairs of its kind in the area. It is also one of the oldest; the first Richmond Fair being held in 1844. The Fair provides “an opportunity for families to enjoy viewing the best of their neighbour's kitchens, crops, livestock and machinery. It also plays an important role in exposing the general public to agricultural practices. As people move away from the farm, the Fair is a way to remind them about where their food comes from.” (Agricultural Society website) These lands contain the Richmond Curling Club, the Dining Hall, two large agricultural buildings and other smaller accessory buildings. The Richmond Fairgrounds designation is intended to reflect the roots of the local farming community and to provide only those uses needed to ensure the long-term viability of the Richmond Fair.

Policies

  1. Uses permitted on lands designated Richmond fairgrounds include: a fairground, a recreation and athletic facility and other ancillary uses to a fairground, a community centre and a recreational facility.
  2. Future changes to the Richmond Agricultural Society lands should consider the following:
    1. Improvements to the pedestrian environment along Perth Street
    2. Greater pedestrian access between Perth Street and the sports facilities to the north

3.6 The Industrial Lands

The Industrial Lands provide an opportunity for industrial and employment-generating uses that require large parcels of land and that are not always compatible with residential uses.

Policies

  1. Uses permitted on lands designated Industrial Lands include: light industrial uses, office, printing plant, service and repair shop, small batch brewery, warehouse and heavy equipment and vehicle sales, rental and servicing, research, technology, nurseries, greenhouses, catering, places of assembly, broadcasting and training.
  2. The maximum building height should be equivalent to four storeys.
  3. The City will evaluate a development proposal in the Industrial Lands designation against its ability to meet the Design Guidelines and the Community Design Plan with particular attention to the Demonstration Plan. As these lands develop, there may be adjustments made, but the intent of the Demonstration Plan should be maintained.
  4. The Industrial Lands shall be serviced based on the Master Servicing Study to ensure that there is a logical and coordinated approach to development.
  5. For buildings that abut McBean Street and Eagleson Road, front and side building elevations are to be aesthetically pleasing and have primary doors and real windows (with a target of 50% window coverage) oriented towards the street.
  6. Adequate buffering including landscaping and screening will be provided between uses in the Industrial Area to ensure that storage areas and parking areas are screened from adjacent properties and from McBean Street.
  7. In addition to the above policies for those lands identified as Industrial Area 1 on Schedule A – Land Use, the boundaries of the designation are approximate and the minimum area of 18.5 ha of employment land shall be provided as a result of the subdivision and development of the land. [Amendment #150, December 21, 2017]

3.7 Parks

Lands that are designated Parks are intended to be used for park and recreational purposes and normally provide a range of publicly accessible facilities for residents and visitors. Aside from existing municipal parks and those planned for the future, there are a number of unopened road right-of-ways that end at the Jock River. By designating these lands as “Park”, greater public access can be provided along the length of the Jock River as envisioned by residents in the vision for Richmond.

Policies

  1. Uses permitted on lands designated parks include: a park, recreational and athletic facility, environmental preserve and an education area.
  2. Parks will be developed in consultation with local residents and parks planning staff and should be based on the following:
      • Pedestrian connections should be provided to sidewalks and pathways
      • The park should be exposed to local streets with a minimum of two street frontages
      • Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) should be considered in the design of the park
      • The park should not be located immediately adjacent to school properties but may be associated with other community facilities or infrastructure
      • The park will not be used as part of, or associated with, the function of the stormwater management system.
  3. The Parks, Open Space and Pathways Plan, as shown on Schedule B of the Community Design Plan, should be consulted to ensure a high degree of connectivity between parks and the rest of the village.
  4. New parks will be required in the Western and Northeast Development Lands and in the Industrial lands as shown on Schedule A. Their specific locations will be determined through the development review process.

3.8 Open Space

The Open Space designation applies to natural lands not used for park purposes or that are constrained by floodplains. Lands in this designation link the parks and the shores of the Jock River together into an open space network that contributes to the quality of life for residents of the village.

Policies

  1. Uses permitted on lands designated Open Space include: passive recreation, community garden, environmental preserve and education area. Agricultural use limited to the growing of crops shall be permitted but not within 30 m of the Jock River.
  2. The boundaries of the Open Space designation are based on current mapping information. The precise boundary of open space will be defined by the zoning by-law. As a result, when more information is obtained, minor adjustments may be made to the boundary by zoning amendment only. Major changes or the removal of open space will require an amendment to the Secondary Plan.
  3. For land in private ownership that is designated Open Space, access to these lands is not permitted without the consent of the property owner.
  4. Multi-use pathways will be incorporated near the Jock River or other waterways through the development review process.

3.9 The Richmond Conservation Area

The Richmond Conservation Area designation accommodates a variety of outdoor leisure and environmental uses that allow the area to continue to be used as one of the two major environmental features within the village (the other being the Jock River). The Area will be used by the local birding community and serve as part of the Rideau Trail, which is a part of the Trans-Canada Trail. In 2006, the Rideau Valley Conservation Authority initiated a discussion with the community about management strategies for the Area. Although many good ideas were developed, a management plan for the area was never finalized. As part of the preparation of this Plan (2010), the management plan was revisited and included site visits to confirm the existing conditions recorded in the 2006 management plan and meetings with conservation authority staff on the likelihood of implementing the draft recommendations. As part of the Community Design Plan process, City staff received public comments on the Jock River and the Conservation Area, which have been incorporated into this Plan.

Policies

  1. Uses permitted on lands designated Richmond Conservation Area include: passive recreation, community gardens, environmental preserves, education areas, parks, outdoor recreation facilities and utilities such as a wastewater lagoon facility.
  2. The City will explore options for capital improvements and infrastructure funding for the Richmond Conservation Area and public lands along the Jock River.

4.0 - Natural Heritage Systems and Heritage Resources

The City has prepared an Environmental Management Plan (EMP) for the village of Richmond to support this Community Design Plan. The EMP identifies natural features such as the Jock River, Marlborough Creek and their tributaries and terrestrial resources such as the Marlborough Forest and Richmond Conservation Area, local woodlots and hedgerows. Through the identification and evaluation of these features, new development can be directed away from areas that are significant or sensitive to impacts. The environmental features map is shown on Schedule D of the Community Design Plan.

Buildings of heritage interest and the layout of the community are important components from the past that should be part of the future. Therefore development shall not only be compatible with what remains but shall enhance it.

Policies

  1. In relation to the protection of natural heritage systems, the provisions contained in the Community Design Plan and the Environmental Management Plan shall guide development.
  2. When considering a development application, Council will be guided by the following Official Plan policies and considerations:
    1. Development is not permitted within the Marlborough Forest. Any other proposed development within 120m of the significant woodland identified on Annex 14 of the Official Plan would require an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Section 4.7.8 of the Official Plan describes the EIS and its scope.
    2. Watercourse setbacks will be based on section 4.7.3 of the Official Plan. The minimum setback shall be determined based on technical studies completed to support all development applications.
  3. The buildings of heritage interest, as identified in Appendix 3 of the Community Design Plan, shall be added to the City of Ottawa?s Heritage Reference List and Registry to ensure that demolitions and building alterations are monitored. The City may add more buildings over time.
  4. To help conserve buildings of heritage interest, the Heritage Resources policies (Section 5) and the Design Guidelines (Section 7) of the Community Design Plan shall guide development.

5.0 - Implementation

Implementation and interpretation of this Amendment shall be in accordance with the City of Ottawa?s Official Plan policies and the implementation policies as contained in the Community Design Plan.

  1. The Community Design Plan shall be adopted by City Council as the policy direction for the village. A portion of Section 3.0 (Managing Growth), most of Section 4.0 (Land Use) and Schedule A of the Community Design Plan will be adopted as a Secondary Plan.
  2. Unless otherwise specified, an amendment to the Secondary Plan (OPA) shall be required for any substantive change including a change to the water and wastewater policies and a change from one major land use category to another, for example a change from industrial to residential. In these instances the provisions in the Community Design Plan will automatically be changed with the OPA.
  3. An amendment to the Community Design Plan (as a concurrent process to a zoning or subdivision application) shall be required for any substantive change to a policy or Schedule contained in the Community Design Plan that is not contained in the Secondary Plan as well as other matters as specified in the Community Design Plan.
  4. Minor, non-substantive changes to the CDP or interpretations to the village design guidelines and demonstration plans shall be made at the discretion of the Director of Planning and Infrastructure Approvals. In these cases, subdivision, site plan and zoning approval by the City constitute approval of the change or interpretation of the provisions of the CDP.