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Technical Reports

Brief Introduction for Website

A Transportation Impact assessment was prepared for the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment for the Carp snow disposal facility to quantify the impact of additional truck traffic on the existing road infrastructure.  Increasing truck traffic by 20 trips/hour (dozer operation) and 90 trips/hour (blower operation) was examined.  The study found the level of service for existing conditions at the Westbrook/Carp intersection to be less than desirable and proposed measures to mitigate the potential impacts.  To improve the access into the site from Westbrook, a 150m long deceleration lane was recommended.

A natural environment impact assessment statement was prepared to support the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment for the Carp snow disposal facility. Field studies were conducted of the natural environment at the site during 2012/2013. The main findings of the report include evidence of a nesting site for turtles and the presence of five butternut trees.  Recommended mitigation measures to reduce potential environmental effects were made and no further impacts are foreseen.

A Stormwater Management & Drainage report was prepared to support the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment for the Carp snow disposal facility. The stormwater assessment report reviewed drainage through the site and the management of stormwater on the site.  Calculations were done to determine existing conditions and establish pre-development flows.  The design objective is to maintain post-development flows to pre-development levels for the various storm events (2 yr. return to 1:100 yr. return for the 3 hour Chicago storm).   The report evaluated the contribution of drainage from off-site sources and recommended that the capacity of existing culverts beneath Westbrook (near Walgreen) be increased.  A new stormwater pond of approximately 4-5 ha is specified to provide quantity and quality control to accommodate both on-site and off-site drainage requirements.  The stormwater pond will discharge into the Highway 417 roadside ditch along the north limit through an existing culvert that will need to be lowered by a minimum of 0.5m.

A Meltwater assessment report was prepared to support the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment for the Carp snow disposal facility.  The meltwater assessment report reviewed the impact of chloride in the meltwater on the receiving stream (Feedmill Creek starts 1.9 kms downstream of discharge to MTO ditch) and the Highway 417 drainage ditch.  Melt rates were estimated for the average spring time melt period and dilution requirements (provided from the stormwater pond) defined to achieve a maximum discharge chloride concentration of 1000 mg/L.  A meltwater pond is proposed to manage the meltwater discharge. 

A Stage I archaeological assessment was completed to support the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment for the Carp snow disposal facility. The archaeological study included a review of the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sports registered archaeological sites database, local physiography and topography, historical mapping from the 19th century and a site reconnaissance to confirm the findings of the archival research. Based on the results of the assessment, parts the project property are identified as having potential for previously undiscovered archaeological resources.  A recommendation to undertake a Stage 2 Archaeological Assessment was made.

A Hydrogeological Investigation report was prepared to support the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment for the Carp snow disposal facility. The hydrogeological assessment report presented the findings of the investigation completed during 2012/2013. The report identified groundwater flow to be towards the northeast and estimated the groundwater recharge to be between 21 and 119 mm per year.  The City maps show the site to be within a Significant Groundwater Recharge Area (SGRA).   The findings of the investigation demonstrate that the site does not qualify as a SGRA.  Although other City maps also identify the site as being within a Highly Vulnerable Aquifer (HVA), observed conditions at the site suggests otherwise.  To prevent any potential contamination of nearby wells,  the report recommends that the snow stockpile, dump pad, melt water pond and discharge ditch be lined with a low hydraulic conductivity membrane to prevent melt water from mixing with the groundwater.

An Acoustic assessment report was prepared to support the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment for the Carp snow disposal facility. The predicted noise levels from 4 pieces of equipment operating on site and from the truck traffic were used as input to a predictive acoustical model for calculating the noise level at nearby receptors.  The model considers sound emissions under predictable worst-case operating conditions. The report recommends that a berm be constructed along a segment of the property’s east limit to reduce noise to an acceptable level at the closest receptor along this limit.

A Visual assessment report was prepared for the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment for the Carp snow disposal facility.  Visual impacts from the snow stockpile development were evaluated from an approach from all four sides of the property.  The north and south sides include the Highway 417 and Westbrook road, respectively.  Impacts are predicted to occur under full development height of 15m along segments of the North limit and East limit. Recommended mitigation measures include construction of a berm and planting of vegetation to improve the landscape.

A Geotechnical Investigation was prepared for the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment for the Carp snow disposal facility. The investigation identified the presence of fill areas within the property and found drainage to be poor due to many areas with ponded water.  A total of eight boreholes were drilled and four monitoring wells installed for groundwater monitoring.  The report provided recommendations for the design of foundations, suitability of soils, and road construction.  The site was evaluated for earthquake considerations. The groundwater level was found to be close to ground surface.   

Acoustic Assessment – Final Report

If you require further translations on the attached .pdfs, please contact Carolyn Newcombe at (613) 580-2424 ext. 28230

Stantec Consulting Ltd. (Stantec) was retained by the City of Ottawa to conduct an acoustic assessment for a proposed snow disposal facility (SDF/Facility) located in the City of Ottawa’s west end, Ontario. The proposed development will include a snow disposal facility with an estimated disposal capacity of 357,000 m3, and potential for other activities related to a municipal public works yard, space permitting. This assessment evaluates the influence of noise generated at the proposed Carp Road SDF on surrounding sensitive points of reception (PORs) due to on-site activities.

The proposed Facility layout, the main noise sources of concern and corresponding source sound power levels were determined based on the information provided in site plans and based on previously obtained sound level measurements/literature of similar sources. The source sound power levels were used as inputs to a predictive acoustical model. The model considers sound emissions under predictable worst-case operating conditions to quantify the noise emissions from the Facility.

This acoustic assessment report was prepared considering noise-related bylaws and guidelines from the City of Ottawa and Ontario Ministry of the Environment.

The assessment indicated that the sound contribution from the proposed Facility during the predictable worst-case operation can meet applicable City of Ottawa guidelines with recommended noise control.

Acoustic Assessment – Final Report [ PDF - 12.3 MB ]

Archaeology & Assessment - Final Report

If you require further translations on the attached .pdfs, please contact Carolyn Newcombe at (613) 580-2424 ext. 28230

A Stage 1 Archaeological Assessment (AA) was completed in support of an environmental planning process for the development of a new snow disposal facility for the City of Ottawa.

The archaeological study included a review of the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport’s registered archaeological sites database, local physiography and topography, historical mapping from the 19th century and a site reconnaissance to confirm the findings of the archival research. Based on the results of the assessment, parts of the Project property were identified as having potential for previously undiscovered archaeological resources.

It is recommended that within the limits of areas of elevated archaeological potential any Project related ground disturbances, including new road development, temporary laydowns, storage or work areas, and any other activities which might cause below grade disturbances, be preceded by Stage 2 AA. Since ploughing of the ground surface is not feasible within the Project property Stage 2 AA will be completed using a test pit excavation strategy.

Archaeology & Assessment  - Final Report [ PDF - 11.6 MB ]

Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) – Final Report

If you require further translations on the attached .pdfs, please contact Carolyn Newcombe at (613) 580-2424 ext. 28230

This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) has been prepared to support a Municipal Class Environmental Assessment of the development of a new snow disposal facility (SDF) in Ottawa’s west end to service the disposal needs within Kanata and the surrounding area.  The purpose of this EIS is to identify and describe the natural heritage features known to exist within the project EIS study area, that may be impacted by the proposed development and to recommend appropriate measures to avoid and mitigate potential impacts, where possible.

Field studies and natural environment inventories were completed in 2012 to confirm the boundaries and characteristics of the natural heritage features that may be affected by the proposed development. The subject property is within the headwaters of Feedmill Creek and contains unnamed drainage features, an unevaluated wetland, and two ponds. Vegetation communities present include swamp, marsh, mixed-woodland, plantation and disturbed areas. The site provides habitat for turtles and avian wildlife; however, the only species at risk observed on the site were two Butternut trees.

Potential impacts to the natural environment associated with the proposed snow disposal facility include discharge of contaminants to aquatic environments, an increase in impervious surfaces (e.g., snow pad, roads) resulting in reduced groundwater recharge and increased runoff from impervious surfaces, and disturbance to wildlife and natural habitat. The following mitigation and monitoring measures are recommended to avoid or reduce potential environmental effects of the project:

  • Facility design to include meltwater management
  • Construction timing to avoid sensitive ecological periods
  • Monitor prior to construction to confirm that species at risk are not occupying the site
  • Implement a 25-m buffer to protect the Butternut trees, or if they are to be removed, register the activity with the MNR and implement a tree planting and protection plan
  • Employ appropriate erosion and sediment controls during construction
  • Avoid the adjacent wetland and trees to be retained on the subject property
  • Install perimeter fencing to exclude wildlife from the site during construction
  • Use native, non-invasive species appropriate for the site for landscaping
  • Develop and implement a monitoring plan to confirm that there are no negative impacts of meltwater release on downstream fish communities.

Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) – Final Report [ PDF - 7.2 MB ]

Hydrogeology Assessment – Final Report

If you require further translations on the attached .pdfs, please contact Carolyn Newcombe at (613) 580-2424 ext. 28230

This report presents the results of a hydrogeological assessment carried out for the proposed City of Ottawa (City) Carp Snow Disposal Facility (Facility), located along Westbrook Road in Ottawa's west end (herein after referred to as “Site” or “site”). The purpose of the hydrogeological assessment was to assess groundwater flow field conditions and impacts to groundwater recharge from the proposed land uses at the site.

The scope of work for this hydrogeological assessment consisted of installing a limited number of monitoring wells, developing the monitoring wells and obtain groundwater level measurements, undertaking short-duration recovery tests at selected well locations and estimating aquifer properties (e.g., hydraulic conductivity, storage, etc.), undertaking percolation testing at selected locations to determine in-situ percolation and infiltration rates in near-surface soils, determining the direction and magnitude of vertical hydraulic gradients, determine groundwater recharge using a variety of techniques, and preparing a hydrogeological assessment report summarizing the results of field investigation and data analysis.

Based on the results of field investigation, a conceptual understanding of the site hydro-stratigraphy can be formulated.  The site hydro-stratigraphy interpreted from the field borehole and monitoring well installation program is presented in the table below:

Elevation (m ASL1 Depth (m bgs2) Strata Description Deposit Type Hydro-Stratigraphy
+ 129 0 Topsoil, fill Non-native Unsaturated / seasonally saturated / variable saturated.  This unit is expected to behave as an unconfined aquifer when stressed
    Fibrous peat Organic Unsaturated / saturated.  Bounded below by a layer of lower hydraulic conductivity (till).  This unit is expected to behave as an unconfined aquifer when stressed
    Silty sand with gravel (Till) Glacial drift Saturated.  This unit is expected to behave as an unconfined aquifer when stressed
+ 118 11 Grey limestone Paleozoic bedrock Saturated.  A low-yielding aquifer bounded above by a layer of lower hydraulic conductivity (till).  This unit is characterized as poorly confined.

A site-specific groundwater contour map was developed to examine the direction of groundwater flow in the overburden geologic. Groundwater flows in the overburden geologic units indicate a northeast trend. In general, the positive values of vertical gradient were observed between the shallow and deep geologic units at the site suggesting the potential for downward flow direction during spring months. The small positive values of vertical gradient at well pair MW12-1 and MW12-2 indicate a marginal potential for downward movement of groundwater between the shallow and deep geologic units during summer and non-spring months.

Groundwater recharge rates were estimated for the site based on the observed water table fluctuations in monitoring wells screened in the overburden. Annual estimated groundwater recharge to the overburden ranged from 2.1 cm to 11.9 cm per year (21 mm to 119 mm per year).

In order to evaluate if the site qualifies as a Significant Groundwater Recharge Area (SGRA), observed site conditions were compared with SGRA characteristics presented in the Mississippi Valley Source Protection Area Assessment Report (August 2011). Although hydrogeological data indicate that some of degree of groundwater recharge is possible at the site, the estimated annual groundwater recharge, the presence of standing surface water, the nature and thickness of overburden units and the absence of outcrops of the Nepean Formation (sandstone aquifer) suggest that the site does not meet the characteristics of an SGRA. Although the site does not qualify as SGRA, proposed land use changes such as the construction of paved parking lots (addition of relatively impervious areas to the site) could nevertheless modify groundwater recharge. The reduction of the groundwater recharge at the site under the post-construction conditions should be compensated by additional measures aiming at increasing recharge in the rest of the site.

In order to evaluate if the site qualifies as a highly Vulnerable Aquifer (HVA), observed site conditions were compared with HVA characteristics presented in the Mississippi Valley Source Protection Area Assessment Report (August 2011). Although the depth to bedrock and the nature of the overburden materials do not suggest that the site should be considered as an HVA, the shallow water table and the poor confinement of the bedrock aquifer at the site suggest otherwise. Therefore, it is recommended that the areas where snow and melt water are stored be lined with low permeability material in order to prevent melt water from impacting the groundwater at the site.

The results of groundwater sampling did not indicate the presence of landfill leachate related impacts. Concentrations of chloride was found to range from 6 to 7 mg/L. Concentrations of sodium was found to range from 4.6 to 18.2 mg/L. These values represent low mineralization indicative of proximal recharge zone (Short travel time / distance).

Hydrogeology Assessment – Final Report [ PDF - 6.9 MB ]

Meltwater Management – Final Report

If you require further translations on the attached .pdfs, please contact Carolyn Newcombe at (613) 580-2424 ext. 28230

The City of Ottawa is preparing a Municipal Class Environmental Assessment for the development of a new Snow Disposal Facility (SDF) at 2125 Carp road in Ottawa.  The proposed site development will be designed to contain 357,000m3 of snow to a potential height of 15 meters. Melt water will be treated and discharged into the Ministry of Transportation (MTO) ditches that ultimately outlet to Feedmill Creek and then the Carp River. Figure 1-1 provides a key plan showing the SDF site, the pertinent MTO ditch location and its outlet into Feedmill Creek. The purpose of this report is to review the potential impact of snow melt from the site and its impact on existing surrounding land uses, including the receiving stream.

The SDF drainage system will include a gentle (approximately 0.5%) slope on the snow disposal pad, where the melt water is directed to grass swales. The entire site runoff will be treated for quality and quantity control in a melt water treatment pond system prior to discharge into the SWM outlet drain.

The SDF melt water is treated by infiltration in the swales, decanting in an oil trap, a sediment forebay and then into the 24 hour (melt water) retention pond. The pond features include a forebay and servicing road for sediment removal. The pond bottom will consist of 300mm of 150mm minus limestone and the side slopes are finished with 200mm thickness of granular B – these details to be confirmed during detail design. The entire melt water pond would be underlain by a liner of low vertical hydraulic conductivity to restrict infiltration of meltwater into the groundwater within the site.

The meltwater pond discharge will combine with a Stormwater Management Facility (SWMF) outlet drain discharge and flow in a northerly direction in a lowered manmade channel though a 600mm diameter culvert into the MTO Highway 417 ditches.

The SDF is within the south west limits of the Feedmill Creek watershed which has been identified as a cool water fish habitat of some significance.  During early consultation with the Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority (MVCA) in 2012, the MVCA has indicated that a maximum mixed chloride concentration of 1000mg/L at the MTO ditch outlet is desirable to protect the fish habitat of Feedmill Creek.

The SDF location is outside of the Kanata West Master Drainage Plan but within the same watershed as the Kanata West Development. Accordingly the proposed SDF development will be compliant with the applicable environmental/drainage criteria of the Kanata West Concept Plan Master Servicing study noted as follows:

  • Each SWM pond serving the area will provide 80% removal of TSS for Level 1 fish habitat protection
  • Ponds to provide flow augmentation to the Carp River through prolonged extended detention
  • Within the study area, infiltration rates of 73 to 104mm/yr are required for all subcatchments.  A water balance is to be completed to ensure that infiltration targets are met
  • Final hydrologic modeling for Poole Creek, Feedmill Creek, and Carp River (by others) will account for direct major system discharges from all tributary areas

The Ministry of the Environment had requested in meetings (2012) with the City, that the drainage improvements done on the 2125 Carp property (to accommodate the SDF) also include corrective measures for drainage issues within Westbrook Business Park Drainage system. 

Water quality from the SDF MWMF should be within the MOE provincial water quality objectives and a TSS compliance limit of 40mg/L. The MOE does not have a surface water objective for chloride concentration.  Under the average year scenario, wherein climatic data, snow disposal volumes and the chloride concentrations are averaged, the MVCA chloride design objective of 1000mg/L at the MTO ditch must be achieved.  Three Options for dilution of the meltwater with water stored in the stormwater pond were investigated for average year conditions and one Option for the 1:10 year event.

Under Option 1, the SDF meltwater is diluted with water from the Westbrook SWMF by a ratio of 0.3:1. The assimilation modeling results in a target chloride concentration of 1000mg/L being met only after April 15th.

Under Option 2, the SDF melt water (i.e. 25Lps) is diluted with water pumped from the Westbrook SWM (i.e. 40Lps) by a ratio of 1.6:1.  The assimilation modeling results in a chloride concentration of 1000mg/L being met only after April 4th. 

Under Option 3, the April 1st objective of 1000mg/L, at the MTO ditch is obtained with a flow rate and storage volume of 50Lps and 50,000m3 respectively.

For melt conditions under a 1:10 year event, under Option 4, the Westbrook SWMF quiescent storage volume, and pump rate, necessary to model the target chloride concentration of 1000mg/L from April 1st on was calculated to be 65,000m3 and 85Lps respectively.

In summary, the Westbrook SWMF is sized to provide quality control and quantity control, as per Option 2.  For quantity control sizing, the melt water pond will provide for 3500m3 detention volume and a quiescent storage volume (3000 m3) for a total storage volume of 6500m3. Based on 4:1 side slopes and assuming a 600mm grade difference between the pond outlet invert and maximum water level, our initial development shown in Figure 2-1 has calculated the pond size to be 1.6 ha.

Meltwater Management – Final Report [ PDF - 5.3 MB ]

Stormwater & Drainage - Final Report

If you require further translations on the attached .pdfs, please contact Carolyn Newcombe at (613) 580-2424 ext. 28230

Stantec Consulting Ltd. (Stantec) was retained by the City of Ottawa to conduct a Storm water assessment and feasibility for the proposed snow disposal facility (SDF) located at 2125 Carp Road in Ottawa’s West End (southwest corner of highway 417 and Carp Road).  The proposed development will include a SDF with an estimated disposal capacity of 357,000m3, and potential for other municipal facilities (permitting to other restrictions).

This assessment evaluates the existing and proposed on-site and off-site drainage patterns based on 2-yr, 5-yr, 10-yr, 50-yr and 100-yr 3-hour Chicago storm events, while considering the existing 600mm CSP culvert capacity discharging to the 417 roadside ditch.

The existing upstream invert of the existing culvert must be lowered by approximately 0.5m in order for the conceptual design to remain feasible. To minimize any net impact of downstream hydraulic characteristics, the construction of an above grade storm water management (SWM) pond with a 4-5ha footprint will be required to attenuate on-site and off-site storm runoff to predevelopment flow rates. A permanent pool shall be proposed within the SWM pond in order to provide water quality assurances for total suspended solids and other treatable contaminates.  This permanent basin may also serve as a reservoir for the dilution of the spring freshet runoff from the SDF while chloride levels are above 1000mg/L. The City will be required to maintain a monitoring program for surface water quality during peak melting periods which vary seasonally.

In order to improve upstream drainage issues, the capacity of the 5-600mm CSP culverts crossing Westbrook Road on-site will require upsizing to lower the upstream hydraulic grade line (HGL). Other off-site improvements are flagged for Westbrook Road, Willowlea Road and Walgreen road, as many of the existing culverts may require replacement and upsizing based on requirements set as part of the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment (MCEA) and current City Standards.

The SDF will also require a snow melt pond (SMP) for water quality and quantity assurances. Snow melt shall be retained for a 24-hr period prior to discharging to the proposed swale which “mixes” with available flows from the SWM pond. The SMP has been sized for both retaining a peak snow melt and attenuating the runoff from the SDF based off a 100-year storm event.

To prevent contamination of nearby groundwater wells, the meltwater pond and the snow stockpile and snow dump pad base will be provided with a liner to prevent mixing of meltwater with groundwater. This stormwater assessment report was prepared considering storm related by-laws and guidelines from the City of Ottawa and Ministry of the Environment.

Based off the conceptual design layout, site restrictions and assumptions, this assessment indicates that off-site and on-site drainage patterns may be attenuated to existing flow rates at the site outlet.

Stormwater & Drainage - Final Report [ PDF - 6.9  MB ]

Transportation Impact Study – Final Report

If you require further translations on the attached .pdfs, please contact Carolyn Newcombe at (613) 580-2424 ext. 28230

As a part of the Environmental Assessment being undertaken for the proposed Carp Road Snow Disposal Facility (SDF) located at 2125 Carp Road, the City of Ottawa retained Stantec Consulting Ltd. to prepare a Transportation Impact Study. 

The study examined transportation conditions for the 2013 existing condition, the 2014 opening-day horizon, and the 2022 future horizon. 

During peak hours of operations, the SDF is expected to generate 180 trucks per hour assuming a blower is utilized to process snow loads.  As a worst case scenario, truck traffic generated during the site peak operation was assumed to occur during the AM and PM roadway peak hours of operation.

The primary SDF access will be located adjacent to the Westbrook Road / Walgreen Road intersection and it will form the north leg of this intersection.  The access will require a westbound right turn deceleration lane to accommodate truck traffic entering the site.  The right turn deceleration lane should include 90m of storage and 60m of taper length (subject to detail design).

The Carp Road / Westbrook Road intersection currently operates at capacity.  With the additional traffic generated by the SDF this intersection will continue to worsen during future horizons.  In order to alleviate existing deficiencies at this intersection, an additional eastbound left turn lane is recommended for a dual left turn operation.  An additional northbound receiving lane and a reconfiguration of the east leg of the intersection will also be required to accommodate the dual eastbound left turns.  Although this improvement alleviates the eastbound traffic, the southbound through movement will continue to operate at capacity. 

The City of Ottawa’s Transportation Master Plan identifies the widening of Carp Road to four lanes during phase 2 (2016 – 2022) from Highway 417 to Hazeldean Road.  An Environmental Assessment is currently underway to confirm the need and to evaluate the impact of this widening.

Until this widening occurs, the southbound through movements at the Carp Road / Westbrook Road intersection will continue to operate at capacity.  After the widening occurs, and with the additional eastbound left turn lane, this intersection is expected to operate satisfactorily during the horizons assessed in this study.

Because the geometric improvements identified for the Carp Road / Westbrook Road intersection as part of this study do not coincide with the timing if anticipated improvements to Carp Road (the EA for the Carp Road widening was recently initiated and is currently ongoing), there are several options from which to proceed.  These include:

  1. Maintain the desired opening day horizon of 2014 but limit typical SDF trucking operations to occur outside of the roadway peak hours and acknowledge that the Carp Road / Westbrook Road intersection will operate at capacity until the Carp Road widening occurs.  During emergency situations or during major snow events the peak hour trucking restrictions could be lifted
  2. Maintain the desired opening day horizon of 2014 and construct the additional eastbound left turn lane and northbound receiving lane at the Carp Road / Westbrook Road intersection and acknowledge that the southbound through movements will operate at capacity until the Carp Road widening occurs
  3. Maintain the desired opening day horizon of 2014, construct the additional eastbound left turn lane and northbound receiving lane, and provide additional southbound through capacity by constructing an additional southbound through lane on Carp Road
  4. Postpone the desired opening day horizon of the SDF until the Carp Road widening occurs

Transportation Impact Study – Final Report [ PDF - 2.0 MB ]

Visual Assessment – Final Report

If you require further translations on the attached .pdfs, please contact Carolyn Newcombe at (613) 580-2424 ext. 28230

The purpose of the Visual/Landscaping Assessment for the Carp Snow Disposal Facility is to assess the visual impacts of the proposed snow disposal facility on surrounding receptors. The assessment will provide a pictorial representation of the site development based on the existing site conditions and the proposed design, with and without mitigation measures.

Site photos were taken during the fall 2012 and 2013 and show site conditions.

A review of the aerial photography, site photos and the Environmental impact statement resulted in the identification potential receptors surrounding the landfill property that could potentially be impacted by the new snow disposal facility.

Visual impacts zones are zones from which the Snow Disposal Facility are potentially visible.  From the assessment of views from all sides of the proposed development and consideration of impacts to surrounding property owners, Stantec has identified that mitigative measures will be required along the north and east limits to mitigate the impact to traffic along Highway 417 and an existing residence, respectively.  In addition, a fence along the south side of the snow dump pad is desirable for blocking the view from Westbrook Road.

Two approaches to planting have been developed and will be used at different locations. The approach incorporating a 4m high berm would be used along the east limit while planting at existing ground will be used along the north limit.

Details on the type of trees, planting location and spacing will be defined in a Landscape Drawing to be submitted for City approval as part of the Site Plan Control process.

Visual Assessment – Final Report [ PDF - 37.7 MB ]

Preliminary Geotechnical Investigation – Final Report

A Municipal Class Environmental Assessment (MCEA) is being undertaken by the City of Ottawa to develop a 23.4 hectares (ha) property located at 2125 Carp Road for use as a snow disposal facility to service the needs of Ottawa’s west end. A 2009 study by the City had identified the snow disposal needs to be 357,000 cubic metres (m3). Figure 2 shows the communities that will be serviced by the proposed facility. The property is currently privately owned but the City is proceeding with its purchase in 2013. The MCEA study is being conducted in accordance with the planning process for a Schedule B project.

Phase 1 of the MCEA process was completed in February 2013 and a Public Open House held February 23rd to present the findings of the Problem Definition. Phase 1 summarized the previous work completed by the City in their review and evaluation of ten potential sites considered for development. The 2009 study identified the site at 2125 Carp as being the preferred location for a new facility. A copy of the Notice and the Executive Summary of the Phase 1 report was circulated electronically to provincial and federal agencies, the Conservation Authority, Aboriginal communities, and internally within the City. 

Phase 2 of the MCEA process involved the description of the environment through numerous investigative studies undertaken during 2012 and 2013 and the evaluation of alternatives to and alternative methods (design). Studies completed in Phase 2 included a geotechnical investigation, hydrogeological assessment, archaeological assessment, transportation assessment, drainage and stormwater management assessment, meltwater assessment, an Environmental Impact Statement (Natural environment), a Visual/Landscape assessment, and social/heritage assessment. The findings of the Phase 2 for the preferred design, as identified below, was presented to the public at an Open House held August 6th, 2013 at the former Goulburn municipal office on Huntley Road. Notices for the meeting were published in both the Ottawa Sun and Le Droit on two consecutive weeks prior to the event. 

The preferred design is the development of the site as per layout shown in Figure 9. Our preferred design will provide a capacity of approximately 350,000 m³ for snow stockpile and accommodate the disposal demand predicted for the 1:50 year snow event. The snow footprint would occupy an area of approximately 4 to 5 ha with an additional 1ha for the dump pad. The maximum stockpile height would extend to 15 m above the base elevation (around elevation 127 to 128m). The back slope and side slopes of the snow stockpile are specified as 1H:1V and the front slope (facing south) at 5 H:1V The base of the snow footprint would be graded on a 0.5% slope facing southward towards the meltwater pond/facility.

To accommodate truck and pup combinations and tri-axle trucks, a dump pad area with a 50 m width was specified. The dump pad and the snow footprint would be underlain by a geotextile laying directly on the native silt and overlain with 600 mm of granular material (450 mm of granular B, 150 mm of granular A) and 150-200mm of asphalt grinding.

A low hydraulic conductivity membrane would be installed beneath the stockpile and dump pad to prevent seepage of chloride impacted meltwater into the groundwater. 

The dump pad would be sloped to provide positive drainage to the meltwater pond forebay. A permanent pool is provided in the meltwater pond to allow a minimum of 24 hours settling of sediment. And oil/grit separator would be provided at the outlet of the meltwater pond which then discharges to the ditch leading to Highway 417. The meltwater pond and the ditch would be lined with a low hydraulic conductivity membrane to prevent seepage of chloride impacted meltwater into the groundwater.

The site design also includes a 4ha size stormwater management facility/pond for quantity and quality control of on-site and off-site drainage generated from the 1:100 year storm event. The pond size is much larger than what would typically be required for treatment of on-site conditions (post development flow being equal to pre-development) because drainage from off-site properties (59ha) flow through the property and need to be accounted for in the design. The stormwater pond volume will contain approximately 50,000 m3 of water. Some of this water will be used during spring melt to dilute the discharge from the meltwater pond. The discharge from both ponds will be mixed and discharged into the Highway 417 roadside ditch.

The target discharge limits for the mixed discharge is 40 mg/L for Total Suspended Solids (TSS) and 1000 mg/L for chloride. Both ponds are designed to provide 24 hours of detention time.

A net effect analysis for the preferred design was completed and mitigation measures proposed to minimize negative effects. Most potential environmental effects resulting from the Project following implementation of mitigation measures will be small in size and temporary in nature. Numerous mitigation measures have been proposed to reduce or eliminate effects on Valued Environmental Components (VECs) through all phases of the Project (i.e. site preparation, construction and operation).

Despite implementation of best practices and mitigation through good design, some residual environmental effects will remain. For those cases additional monitoring and follow-up programs have been recommended.

Approvals required to implement the development of the site include Ministry of the Environment (MOE) approval of the stormwater and meltwater ponds for on-site work and existing drainage works off-site through the issuance of Environmental Compliance Approvals (ECA). The City will also undertake an amendment to their Zoning by-law to permit snow disposal as a permitted use in the light Industrial designation for this property – this process is under the Planning Act and separate from the MCEA process. The Stage 1 & 2 archaeological assessment approvals for ground disturbance are required before construction activities commence.

The estimate of probable cost for the development of the site is $ 6 million, as detailed in Section 8.10

Following the completion of the Phase 1& 2 consultation and revisions to the MCEA report (as required), a Notice of Completion for the Study will be published and provide a period of 30 days for final review. If public concerns regarding this project cannot be resolved, any person may request a Part II Order. Should the Minister of Environment deem that this is necessary; the project could be elevated to a Schedule C or an Individual Environmental Assessment. If no concerns are expressed to the Minister of the Environment within thirty (30) days of filing the study and notification thereof, the project will proceed in accordance with the recommendations of the Phase 1 & 2 Report.

The Phase 1&2 MCEA report was circulated electronically to provincial and federal agencies, the Conservation Authority, Aboriginal communities, and internally within the City. Physical copies of the documentation is posted at the City of Ottawa libraries (see Notice in Appendix C for locations) and at the City’s corporate office. A copy of the report and Appendices is also available electronically from the City’s website for this project.

Preliminary Geotechnical Investigation – Final Report [ PDF - 2.1 MB ]

Electrical Assessment - Final Report

If you require further translations on the attached .pdfs, please contact Carolyn Newcombe at (613) 580-2424 ext. 28230

Stantec Consulting Ltd. (Stantec) was retained by the City of Ottawa to conduct an electrical assessment for a proposed snow disposal facility (SDF/Facility) located in the City of Ottawa’s west end, Ontario. The proposed development will include a snow disposal facility with an estimated disposal capacity of 357,000 m3 and potential for other activities related to a municipal public works yard, space permitting. This assessment evaluates the provision of an electrical power supply and lighting at the proposed Carp Road SDF.

 The electrical assessment for provision of a power supply and lighting for the site was undertaken as part of the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment for the Carp snow disposal facility. It was determined that lighting would be provided through an overhead power supply line located along the access road up to an Electrical Equipment Kiosk in the vicinity of the snow dump pad. The overhead line will provide a 200A-600V, 3 Phase power supply to the facility trailer and Kiosk. The report recommends that the snow dump pad be illuminated to an average of 10 lux. During the design phase, a computer lighting simulation will be performed to detail the type of light fixture and pole height/spacing to ensure minimum spill-over effect on to Highway 417 and surrounding properties.

Electrical Assessment - Final Report [ PDF - 60 KB ]

Municipal Class Environmental Assessment Study – Phase 1 & 2 – FINAL

If you require further translations on the attached .pdf, please contact Carolyn Newcombe at (613) 580-2424 ext. 28230

A Municipal Class Environmental Assessment (MCEA) is being undertaken by the City of Ottawa to develop a 23.4 hectares (ha) property located at 2125 Carp Road for use as a snow disposal facility to service the needs of Ottawa’s west end. A 2009 study by the City had identified the snow disposal needs to be 357,000 cubic metres (m3). Figure 2 shows the communities that will be serviced by the proposed facility. The property is currently privately owned but the City is proceeding with its purchase in 2013. The MCEA study is being conducted in accordance with the planning process for a Schedule B project. 

Phase 1 of the MCEA process was completed in February 2013 and a Public Open House held February 23rd to present the findings of the Problem Definition. Phase 1 summarized the previous work completed by the City in their review and evaluation of ten potential sites considered for development. The 2009 study identified the site at 2125 Carp as being the preferred location for a new facility. A copy of the Notice and the Executive Summary of the Phase 1 report was circulated electronically to provincial and federal agencies, the Conservation Authority, Aboriginal communities, and internally within the City.

 Phase 2 of the MCEA process involved the description of the environment through numerous investigative studies undertaken during 2012 and 2013 and the evaluation of alternatives to and alternative methods (design). Studies completed in Phase 2 included a geotechnical investigation, hydrogeological assessment, archaeological assessment, transportation assessment, drainage and stormwater management assessment, meltwater assessment, an Environmental Impact Statement (Natural environment), a Visual/Landscape assessment, and social/heritage assessment. The findings of the Phase 2 for the preferred design, as identified below, was presented to the public at an Open House held August 6th, 2013 at the former Goulburn municipal office on Huntley Road. Notices for the meeting were published in both the Ottawa Sun and Le Droit on two consecutive weeks prior to the event.

 The preferred design is the development of the site as per layout shown in Figure 9. Our preferred design will provide a capacity of approximately 350,000 m³ for snow stockpile and accommodate the disposal demand predicted for the 1:50 year snow event. The snow footprint would occupy an area of approximately 4 to 5 ha with an additional 1ha for the dump pad. The maximum stockpile height would extend to 15 m above the base elevation (around elevation 127 to 128m). The back slope and side slopes of the snow stockpile are specified as 1H:1V and the front slope (facing south) at 5 H:1V The base of the snow footprint would be graded on a 0.5% slope facing southward towards the meltwater pond/facility.

 To accommodate truck and pup combinations and tri-axle trucks, a dump pad area with a 50 m width was specified. The dump pad and the snow footprint would be underlain by a geotextile laying directly on the native silt and overlain with 600 mm of granular material (450 mm of granular B, 150 mm of granular A) and 150-200mm of asphalt grinding.

A low hydraulic conductivity membrane would be installed beneath the stockpile and dump pad to prevent seepage of chloride impacted meltwater into the groundwater.

 The dump pad would be sloped to provide positive drainage to the meltwater pond forebay. A permanent pool is provided in the meltwater pond to allow a minimum of 24 hours settling of sediment. And oil/grit separator would be provided at the outlet of the meltwater pond which then discharges to the ditch leading to Highway 417. The meltwater pond and the ditch would be lined with a low hydraulic conductivity membrane to prevent seepage of chloride impacted meltwater into the groundwater.

 The site design also includes a 4ha size stormwater management facility/pond for quantity and quality control of on-site and off-site drainage generated from the 1:100 year storm event. The pond size is much larger than what would typically be required for treatment of on-site conditions (post development flow being equal to pre-development) because drainage from off-site properties (59ha) flow through the property and need to be accounted for in the design. The stormwater pond volume will contain approximately 50,000 m3 of water. Some of this water will be used during spring melt to dilute the discharge from the meltwater pond. The discharge from both ponds will be mixed and discharged into the Highway 417 roadside ditch.

 The target discharge limits for the mixed discharge is 40 mg/L for Total Suspended Solids (TSS) and 1000 mg/L for chloride. Both ponds are designed to provide 24 hours of detention time.

 A net effect analysis for the preferred design was completed and mitigation measures proposed to minimize negative effects. Most potential environmental effects resulting from the Project following implementation of mitigation measures will be small in size and temporary in nature. Numerous mitigation measures have been proposed to reduce or eliminate effects on Valued Environmental Components (VECs) through all phases of the Project (i.e. site preparation, construction and operation).

 Despite implementation of best practices and mitigation through good design, some residual environmental effects will remain. For those cases additional monitoring and follow-up programs have been recommended.

Approvals required to implement the development of the site include Ministry of the Environment (MOE) approval of the stormwater and meltwater ponds for on-site work and existing drainage works off-site through the issuance of Environmental Compliance Approvals (ECA). The City will also undertake an amendment to their Zoning by-law to permit snow disposal as a permitted use in the light Industrial designation for this property – this process is under the Planning Act and separate from the MCEA process. The Stage 1 & 2 archaeological assessment approvals for ground disturbance are required before construction activities commence.

The estimate of probable cost for the development of the site is $ 6 million, as detailed in Section 8.10

Following the completion of the Phase 1& 2 consultation and revisions to the MCEA report (as required), a Notice of Completion for the Study will be published and provide a period of 30 days for final review. If public concerns regarding this project cannot be resolved, any person may request a Part II Order. Should the Minister of Environment deem that this is necessary; the project could be elevated to a Schedule C or an Individual Environmental Assessment. If no concerns are expressed to the Minister of the Environment within thirty (30) days of filing the study and notification thereof, the project will proceed in accordance with the recommendations of the Phase 1 & 2 Report.

The Phase 1&2 MCEA report was circulated electronically to provincial and federal agencies, the Conservation Authority, Aboriginal communities, and internally within the City. Physical copies of the documentation is posted at the City of Ottawa libraries (see Notice in Appendix C for locations) and at the City’s corporate office. A copy of the report and Appendices is also available electronically from the City’s website for this project.

Municipal Class Environmental Assessment Study - Phase 1 & 2 - FINAL