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Solid waste – data and reports

Solid Waste Master Plan

Managing Ottawa’s Waste – Planning for the Future

The City of Ottawa is set to undertake the first major update of its Integrated Solid Waste Master Plan since 2003. The Master Plan will set the strategic direction for how waste is managed in the City of Ottawa over the next 30 years.

The Waste Plan will build on the City’s Integrated Waste Management Master Plan, but will also consider the current regional, national and global waste context. This includes the shift to a circular economy, the move toward individual producer responsibility for products and packaging and the issue of single-use plastics.

Progress

Council has approved the scope and framework for the development of the City of Ottawa’s 30-Year Solid Waste Master Plan. The Waste Plan will be developed over the next two years and will guide how waste is managed in Ottawa over the next 30 years.

Consultation opportunities

The City will be conducting an extensive consultation and engagement process throughout the development of the Waste Plan. This will ensure that all stakeholders, including the general public, have the opportunity to provide their feedback, ideas and opinions.

The consultation process will begin in early 2020. Engagement opportunities will be promoted in advance on the City’s public engagement webpage.

You can also sign-up to receive periodic updates on the development of the Plan, including consultation opportunities.

If you have any questions on the project or would like to submit ideas for consideration, please email us at wasteplan@ottawa.ca.

Recycling and Green Bin Statistics

Great job!  Your efforts make a difference!

Your participation in the Blue/Black Bin, Green Bin and the Household Hazardous Waste programs has helped Ottawa to divert over 1.4 million tonnes of waste from the landfill in the past decade. 

The combination of these programs increased the residential diversion rate from 33% in 2009 to 44% in 2018.  Your participation has made a significant difference.

Waste tonnage graph

The drought in 2016 impacted the amounts of organics available to divert.

Blue and Black Bin Facts

Recycling extends the life of the City’s landfill site, protects the environment, and provides Ottawa with additional revenues!

In 2018, 56,968 tonnes of material collected in the blue and black box was sorted and marketed, resulting in $8,291,686 of revenue.  The materials collected are sorted at a Material Recovery Facility (MRF), baled, and shipped to the highest bidder.

   

Marketed Recyclables 2017

The chart indicates the revenue and total tonnages of each blue and black box recycling material collected, sorted and marketed in 2018.
$2,257,780 in revenue representing 3,647 tonnes of metal e.g. aluminum pop cans and steel / tin cans
$2,538,630 in revenue representing 7,561 tonnes of household plastic containers
$3,495,276 in revenue representing 37,730 tonnes of fibre e.g. newspaper, corrugated cardboard, boxboard such as shoe/cereal boxes

REMEMBER to place aluminum cans in your blue bin, don’t let it go to waste!

Green Bin Facts

Approximately 51 %[1]  of Ottawa residents are participating in the Green Bin program through curbside collection. Much of the material still found in the garbage could be diverted through the Green Bin program and or the recycling blue and black box program.

[1] Per Table 3.5 4-Season Participation Rates & Set-out Results, Green Bin participation rate.

Breakdown of Garbage

In the fall of 2014 and 2015 the city conducted a waste composition study. The study determined how much of the waste actually set out at the curb for disposal at the landfill site could in fact be diverted. The chart indicates we could be recycling and composting a lot more.

The chart indicates the breakdown of materials set out at the curb for collection in all waste streams.

The chart indicates the breakdown of materials set out at the curb for collection in all waste streams.

Black Bin recyclables represent 15.9% of materials set out for collection by a single family home.
Blue Bin recyclables represent 7.3% of materials set out for collection.
Green Bin Organics, including Leaf and Yard Waste, represent 50.1% of materials set out for collection.
Take It Back!/Hazardous Special Waste represent 0.4% of materials set out for collection.  
Garbage represents 26.3% of materials set out for collection.

The chart indicates the contents of the garbage stream set out at the curb which were going to the Landfill based on the waste composition study. 52% of these contents could actually be diverted.

The chart indicates the contents of the garbage stream set out at the curb which were going to the Landfill based on the waste composition study. 52% of these contents could actually be diverted.

6% of the contents found in the garbage actually belong in the black bin.
4.8% of the contents found in the garbage actually belong in the blue bin.
38.2% of garbage contents were green bin organics, while 2.1% of these contents were leaf and yard waste.
0.9% of contents found in the garbage were Hazardous or Special Waste.
48% of garbage contents were considered garbage materials.

The chart shows a comparison of the 2015 capture rate targets versus the 2014/2015 seasonal waste composition study.

The chart shows a comparison of the 2015 capture rate targets versus the 2014/2015 seasonal waste composition study.

Targets for waste disposal in the correct stream (Blue Bin, Black Bin and Green Bin) were created for various types of waste material according to the City of Ottawa’s Waste Plan.
These targets were set at: 85% for paper & fibre, 70% for metals, 70% for glass, 70% for recyclable plastics, 60% for green bin organics and 99% for leaf & yard waste.
The actual results were measured at: 80% for paper & fibre, 59% for metals, 83% for glass, 68% for recyclable plastics, 40% for green bin organics and 96% for leaf & yard waste.

Household hazardous waste

  • Each year the City’s Household Hazardous Waste Program helps residents to safely dispose or recycle over 575 tonnes of hazardous or special waste.  The collection events run from spring to fall.  Did you know that many household hazardous materials can be returned to local retailers throughout the year?  The Waste Explorer  will search hundreds of items from paint to fluorescent bulbs and batteries and tell you how to dispose of them.

Trail Road Waste Facility

The Trail Road Waste Facility offers FREE drop off for Ottawa residents for the following items: