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Project updates

Project Spotlight: New Signaling Technology Installed on Ottawa’s O-Train South Extension

As part of the O-Train South Extension Project, Siemens Mobility is preparing to install new signaling technology on Lines 2 and 4. The updated train control equipment will ensure that trains are moving to meet any changes in situation, demand, and at speeds that provide the most efficiency throughout the system. This will be increasingly important given higher ridership levels expected with the new extension and its connection to Ottawa’s Macdonald-Cartier International Airport.

This technology will be installed on all existing and new trains, tracks and stations servicing the existing O-Train South Line, as well as the 16 km of additional track and 8 stations to be built for the new extension. While the technology is proven through decades of safe use around the world, this newest version will be further supported with a complete upgrade to the existing signaling and communications system, including new signals, train detection system and switch machines, ensuring optimal performance throughout the entire system.

One important feature will be the Automated Train Protection (ATP) system. This technology will help the driver of the trains manage safe operational levels, protecting passengers against human error, such as over-speeding. In such situations, the system can automatically take over control of the train’s operation and return it back to a safe level.

The state-of-the-art technology that will help control the O-Train South Line when in operation.
The state-of-the-art technology that will help control the O-Train South Line when in operation.

Work is also now starting with the vehicle providers, including Stadler, who will provide 7 new vehicles. The technology provider is working with the vehicle manufacturers to install important onboard equipment, which will allow the vehicle operator to receive information and communicate effectively and clearly within this new system.

In the spring, work will begin to install the trackside equipment that will send appropriate signals to the driver, letting them know about any action needed on their part: to wait, to slow down, or to speed up; all contributing to the safe operation of the O-Train South Line.

By the Numbers:

New Signaling & Train Control system technology will be installed in:

  • 13 Diesel Multiple Uit (DMU) trains will be outfitted with the new onboard equipment.
  • 24 km of existig and new track will have new trackside (or “wayside”) equipment.

 

Stage 2 LRT 2020 Year-end Review

The Stage 2 LRT team has made progress in 2020 building the O-Train East, West and South extensions that will add 44 km of new rail and 24 new stations to the Ottawa’s light-rail network.

Stage 2 LRT Alignment Map

O-Train South Extension

Significant progress was made in 2020 for the O-Train South Extension, one of three major extensions to Ottawa’s Stage 2 LRT system. Since the provincial government mandated the continuation of essential transit infrastructure projects during the COVID-19 pandemic, crews have continued to forge ahead with the construction of this complex project, maintaining its priority on safety, collaboration and innovation.

The O-Train South Extension will add 16 kms of new track to the current portion of the O-Train Line 2, which runs from Bayview Station to Greenboro Station. Work includes adding passing tracks at South Keys and double tracks south of Leitrim to Limebank Road. Four kilometres of new track with two elevated guideways will provide a new link to the Macdonald-Cartier International Airport. The project is scheduled for completion in 2022.

Construction progress in 2020 by the numbers

  • Approximately 23 active construction work zones are in effect.
  • 6.3 km of original track has been removed and 1.5 km of new track has been laid.
  • 54 caissons have been drilled; only 9 caissons are remaining for completion.
  • 12 new rail bridges are under construction including 2 that have been completed.
  • 5 rail bridge decks have been poured.
  • 81 utilities have been relocated.
  • The first new Stadler FLIRT train carshells have been manufactured.
  • Construction on 4 new stations has commenced.
  • Upgrades on 3 existing stations is ongoing.

Key Milestones: Construction of new & upgraded stations

The existing portion of Line 2 will see two new stations added: Corso Italia and Walkley. The platforms of the current five stations at Bayview, Carling, Mooney’s Bay, Dows Lake and Greenboro will be extended to accommodate longer, larger capacity trains. The new South extension of Line 2 will add four new stations at Leitrim, Bowesville and Limebank as well as at South Keys which will serve as the transfer station to the Airport. The four-kilometre link to the airport will add two new stations at the Airport Terminal and at Uplands, adjacent to the EY Centre. Three new pedestrian bridges will also be built to improve connectivity at Bayview Station, over the Rideau River at Carleton University and at Hunt Club Road.

Airport elevated guideway
Airport elevated guideway progress, November 2020

Construction of the Walkley Yard MSF – the new home for the trains

The new Walkley Yard Maintenance and Storage Facility (MSF) is a key feature in the Stage 2 South Extension. Trains will be cleaned, inspected, maintained, stored and operated from the yard. This includes the existing six Alstom Coradia Lint Trains that will be fully refurbished, along with seven new Stadler FLIRT trains.

Construction of the new Walkley Yard is well underway. After only breaking ground last year, the 200-tonne exterior shell is nearly complete and track installation has begun. The new Walkley Yard will be a 4,700 m2 LEED certified facility that will consist of two train maintenance bays, a two track train inspection facility, a train wash facility, 1800m of ballasted track, and 500 metres of interior track within the facility.

Aerial view of Walkley Yard Maintenance and Storage Facility
Walkley Yard Maintenance and Storage Facility, November 2020

Contributing to our community

The construction of the O-Train South Extension is a critical part of the post-COVID economic recovery for the National Capital Region. Here’s how the construction of the O-Train South Extension is making a difference this year:

  • The creation of 562 project jobs as of October 2020 with approximately 80% of these workers based in Ottawa, and it is expected to peak at 800 project jobs in 2021
  • TransitNEXT awarded over 342 orders to 152 local suppliers, representing a local spend of over $82 million
  • Building the LRT link to the Airport will help rebuild the tourism industry in the National Capital Region as a gateway to Ontario and Canada

Aerial view of the future Corso Italia Station
Aerial view of the future Corso Italia Station

O-Train East Extension

The O-Train East extension will see LRT continue from Blair Road to Trim Road, adding 12.5 kilometres of rail and 5 new stations to the O-Train network at Montreal Road, Jeanne d’Arc, Orleans Boulevard, Place d’Orleans, and Trim Road. The east extension will travel predominantly within the median of OR 174.

One of the critical objectives in 2020 was the relocation of infrastructure, including various utilities such as sewers, hydro lines, watermains, natural gas and telecommunications infrastructure in the Highway 174 corridor at Green’s Creek, Jeanne d-Arc, Orleans and Champlain Street to set the stage for the future track and station construction in the median.

Significant ramp modifications occurred at the Jeanne d’Arc Interchange where vehicle access to Highway 174 has been changed. The existing westbound on-ramps were removed and the southbound and northbound lanes of Jeanne d’Arc Boulevard now have signalized right turns. This will help reduce speeds and increase safety for all road users and create greater connectivity for all modes of transportation.

Further to the critical utility relocation work and road preparation work between Trim Road and Jeanne D’Arc, travellers along the 174 will have witnessed significant and intensive construction activity between Blair Station and Montreal Road. In order to connect trains from the existing transit alignment on the north side of the highway into the median itself, a new dedicated rail bridge is being constructed 800m east of the Highway 174 and Blair Road interchange and the existing bus transit bridge, south of Trillium Park. Crews have been hard at work constructing the pier caps that will hold the future Blair Station to 174 median rail bridge. From there, trains will travel east to the final stop at Trim Road where the Stage 2 team has been renovating the existing OC Transpo Park and Ride facility and building a future Highway 174 eastbound, north and south ramp required to make space for the realignment of Trim Road and the construction of the future Trim Station.

Over the course of the year, eastbound 174 lanes had to be shifted south and two new bridges had to be built at the Highway 174 Montreal Road interchange to create enough space to allow work on the guideway and station construction to begin. In November, crews worked over five weeks and weekends to detour traffic from the existing highway bridges to the two new bridges with minimum closure time and impact to the travelling public. This work was critical to enable the demolition of the existing bridges over the course of the first weekend in December and the start of the deep foundation for Montreal Station in 2021.

Aerial view of eastbound and westbound lanes on OR 174 at Montreal Road
New eastbound and westbound lanes on OR 174 at Montreal Road, November 2020

Highway 174 Montreal Road Bridges Demolition

A tremendous amount of meticulous planning ensured that the demolition of the Montreal Road Bridges was a success. This was a significant project milestone for the Stage 2 team.

For 57 hours, beginning Friday night at 8 p.m., Montreal Road was completely closed beneath Highway 174 to vehicles, including OC Transpo buses, pedestrians, and cyclists. Crews, operating various pieces of large construction equipment fitted with hydraulic hammers, buckets, forks and shears worked around the clock to demolish 1,456 cubic metres of concrete and 160 metric tonnes of steel.

Every detail was considered including the provision of a shuttle service to ensure that pedestrians and cyclists could get to the other side of the bridges along Montreal Road, safely. As planned, Montreal Road was re-opened for traffic and pedestrians by 5 a.m. Monday morning. And, for some time after, concrete and steel debris resulting from the demolition was safely hauled away.

Aerial view of Montreal Road bridges demolition
Montreal Road Bridges Demolition, December 2020

O-Train West Extension

Throughout 2020 nearby residents, pedestrians, cyclists, motorists and transit users have witnessed a great deal of construction activity in Ottawa’s west-end. Much of this work is related to the O-Train West extension project from Tunney’s Pasture Station to Baseline Road and Moodie Drive. The west extension will add 15 km of rail and 11 new or converted rapid transit stations to the City’s LRT network.

Tunnel Construction

The west extension includes two cut and cover tunnels that will be constructed from the top down: the 3-kilometre Parkway tunnel will travel between Dominion Station and Lincoln Fields Station travelling underneath the Sir John A. Macdonald Parkway and Byron Linear Park, and the 270-metre Connaught tunnel that will link Lincoln Fields Station with Queensview Station by travelling underneath Connaught Avenue.

Map of the future Stage 2 West Extension tunnels

Before cut and cover tunnel construction can begin traffic needs to be shifted, and underground utilities must be relocated. Of critical importance in 2020, work was completed to shift the Sir John A. Macdonald Parkway north between Dominion Avenue and Cleary Avenue to allow for construction to safely occur on the south side.

At Rochester Field, work is underway to install temporary equipment that will produce concrete used to stabilize the excavation and form the tunnel walls. In the fall, an onsite facility was built that will process and dry the excavated material from the tunnel in slurry pits. This dry material can then be hauled away.

Slurry Pits in Rochester Field
Slurry Pits in Rochester Field

Excavation of the Parkway tunnel is well underway: approximately 30,000 cubic metres or 10% of the total quantity has been excavated, 60% of the pile drilling has been completed and 15,000 metres of piles have been drilled along Byron Avenue.

Support of Excavation work in Byron Linear Park
Support of Excavation work in Byron Linear Park

At Connaught, Queensview and Pinecrest important utility work has been ongoing and nearing completion in preparation of Support of Excavation work, which will begin this winter.

Lincoln Fields Flyover Bridge

One of the most interesting and unique structures in Connaught Park, and indeed across the entire west extension, is the Lincoln Fields Flyover Bridge. This bridge carries the eastbound and westbound track alignment from Lincoln Fields Station to the Connaught Tunnel. It crosses over the southbound alignment to Baseline Station, the existing transitway, Pinecrest Creek, and a multi use pathway (MUP).

The Lincoln Fields Flyover Bridge is a raised structure, at an approximate height of 8 metres, and a clearance underneath of 5 metres. It is comprised of spans carrying two directions of track with a width of approximately 8.2 metres. This year a total of 5 spans were installed, including 13 girders, 50 tons in total, each 38 metres long.

Lincoln Fields Flyover Bridge
Lincoln Fields Flyover Bridge, August 2020

Lincoln Fields Flyover Bridge December 2020
Lincoln Fields Flyover Bridge December 2020

Other notable works completed in the west include: a critical road detour opened to the public at Iris Station that permits multiple phasing of additional activities including the realignment of a culvert under Iris Street to accommodate future construction of the station and LRT guideway; opening of a new bus loop at Baseline Station; and, building a temporary bus station at Lincoln Fields Station.

The Makings of the New Walkley Maintenance and Storage Facility

Structural Steel installation at the Walkley Maintenance and Storage Facility in August, 2020
Structural steel installation underway at the Walkley Maintenance and Storage Facility in August, 2020

As part of the Trillium Line South Extension Project, one of many benefits will be the addition of longer Stadler FLIRT trains, with greater passenger capacity. In order to accommodate the long-term care and maintenance of this expanded fleet, a new Maintenance and Storage Facility (MSF) must be constructed. While construction of the new facility is underway, the current Trillium Line MSF is being used to complete an overhaul of the existing Alstom fleet of vehicles, so they can continue to be used on the completed South Extension.

Status of Construction

Construction of the new Walkley MSF (along the Walkley Rail Corridor) is well underway. Piling work has finished, concrete foundation pits are completed and underground mechanical infrastructure is in place. Following the erection of structural steel, concrete floor slabs are poured, and mechanical and electrical lines are installed as the walls are built. This exciting phase of the construction process permits a sense of the size and scope of the building.

Some interesting features have been designed into the facility include ways to make maintenance workers’ jobs a little easier. For example, the train tracks in one of the maintenance pits are on pedestals, or stilts, so that workers can access under the trains. There will also be a catwalk, with a lifeline above, that will protect maintenance workers when they access the tops of the trains.

The New Walkley MSF in numbers

  • A 200-tonne structural steel building
  • 4700 m2 of space including office space, train storage and shop areas
  • 3 train maintenance bays including an inspection pit and a train wash facility
  • A track yard with 1800m of ballasted track, 8 rail switches and 500m of interior track inside the maintenance shop

Good Neighbour

As part of the Trillium Line South Extension contract, TransitNEXT will be responsible for the maintenance of the entire Trillium Line for 27 years, once construction is complete. With this long-term presence in the community, TransitNEXT has taken many steps to ensure the new MSF is designed well for workers, the community and the environment:

  • The creation of distinct functional areas creating clear division between revenue vehicles, personnel vehicles and specialty equipment to promote the safety and security of drivers, staff, visitors, neighbours and the general public.
  • The site design takes full advantage of a compact configuration and topography, which results in an efficient campus and a minimized footprint.
  • A sustainable design and use of responsible and durable construction materials achieves LEED certification.
  • The design acknowledges the importance of being a good neighbour by minimizing light pollution.

When in service, the Walkley MSF will form the nucleus of the Trillium Line. As a 24/7 operation, it is here that vehicles will be washed, cleaned and maintained so they can continue to serve the transit needs of the City for years to come.

 

Project Spotlight: Stage 2 crews preparing to demolish Highway Montreal Road Bridges

Highway 174 westbound to close from Jeanne d’Arc Boulevard to Montreal Road November 20 to 23

Highway 174 westbound to close from Jeanne d’Arc Boulevard to Montreal Road November 20 to 23

Learn More

Project Spotlight: East Rail Flyover Bridge

Bridging Stage 1 with Stage 2: Everything you need to know about the Stage 2 O-Train East Extension Rail Flyover Bridge

Along the O-Train East Extension, light rail trains will operate in the centre median of Highway 174, from Blair Road to Trim Road.

Making space for the tracks within the median has required a relocation of both eastbound and westbound highway lanes as well as access ramps in certain areas. But have you wondered how the trains will actually get from the existing transit alignment on the north side of the highway into the median itself?

A new dedicated rail bridge will be constructed 800m east of the Highway 174 and Blair Road interchange and the existing bus transit bridge, south of Trillium Park. The trains will then travel 12 km east from Blair Station in the median until the end of the transit line at Trim Station.

O-Train Light-Rail Transit East Extension Map
O-Train Light-Rail Transit East Extension Map

How do you construct a Rail Flyover Bridge?

Building an elevated rail structure is a complex undertaking requiring significant design, engineering and construction expertise. It is made even more challenging when it has to be constructed over several lanes of live traffic on a major highway, transporting thousands of vehicles every day.

Over the past few decades construction methods have evolved to reduce traffic impact, facilitate building in congested areas, reduce overall construction schedules, and improve the long-term service life of structures.

Construction begins with drilled shafts, which are deep foundation supports for a bridge. At the flyover they are anywhere from 15 to 28 meters deep into the ground. First, drilling of the ground begins with a casing that holds back the soil from caving into the hole. Once completed, a steel cage fabricated to fit the hole is placed inside. To complete the work, concrete is poured inside to secure the cage. The casing is then removed, creating the supportive drilled shaft.

Then, bridge columns and column caps or “hammer heads” will be constructed, upon which precast concrete girders will sit. Precast concrete girders are horizontal supports for the bridge, that rest on top of the column caps.

One of these caps (also known as a “straddle bent”), will span westbound lanes of the highway to carry the tracks over the vehicular lanes without any columns within the road footprint. Once installed, a concrete deck will be built using precast panels lifted into place. Finally, the track and barriers will be installed to carry LRT trains.

Heavy equipment will be used extensively during the flyover bridge construction including bulldozers, excavators, asphalt mixers, formworks, and fabrication equipment. Every effort is made to minimize the impact on the local community during construction.

Aerial rendering of the rail flyover bridge, east of Blair Road (Looking North)
Aerial rendering of the rail flyover bridge, east of Blair Road (Looking North)

 

Relocation of Highway 174 lanes

In order to create enough space for the bridge work zone, crews need to establish a construction zone in the median of the highway, east of the transitway. Relocation of Highway 174 lanes began in Fall 2019, with the eastbound lanes. Since then, traffic past the Blair Road interchange has been pushed south to a new alignment. Westbound traffic will temporarily be moved into the eastbound lanes, to create a larger work zone on the north side of Highway 174.

Photo of asphalt breaking needs to be done in order to demolish the old highway and create the work zone for the new bridge.
Photo of asphalt breaking needs to be done in order to demolish the old highway and create the work zone for the new bridge.

Photo of new and old highway alignment (facing westbound on Highway 174)
Photo of new and old highway alignment (facing westbound on Highway 174)

Photo of realignment construction work as seen at night (looking east on Highway 174)
Photo of realignment construction work as seen at night (looking east on Highway 174)

 

Fun Facts
  • The O-Train East Extension Flyover Rail Bridge is approximately 240m long.
  • On average the bridge is 5m in height
  • In order to support the rail bridge, there are six columns, two abutments, and 21 girders.
  • In total there will be 1275m³ of concrete poured to create the bridge.

Everything you need to know about the Stage 2 LRT O-Train West Extension Cut and Cover Tunnels

Project Spotlight: Upgrades for the Dows Lake Trillium Line Tunnel

What’s up down under Dows Lake?

While Ottawa’s residents were out safely enjoying scenic summer views and socially-distanced water sports on Dows Lake, the TransitNEXT crew continue to make headway on construction upgrade works in the tunnel under Dows Lake as part of the Trillium Line South Extension Project stretching between Carling Station and Carleton Station. This work will help ensure a safe, efficient, environmentally-friendly LRT connection under Dows Lake and will continue through the Winterlude and Tulip Festival seasons in 2021.

TransitNEXT crews have been removing older, existing rail from the Dows Lake Tunnel to make way for the construction of the new LRT tracks. The rail removal is being undertaken along the entire length of the 578-metre tunnel. Once all removed, the hardwood track ties will also be removed and assessed by a certified track inspector for re-use suitability. Ties found to be suitable will be re-used in other areas of the project and ties not suitable for use will be disposed of in an environmentally-friendly manner.

Prior to construction getting underway, TransitNEXT conducted detailed inspections of the Dows Lake Tunnel. The complexity of the construction work under a body of water, and amidst the COVID-19 situation, requires significant coordination to ensure quality control and the safety of both crews and surrounding communities.

TransitNEXT’s Design Team has also been producing a virtual 3D Building Information Model (BIM) of the entire tunnel including the pump house, to ensure a well-coordinated design and avoid issues during construction. The Design and Construction Teams are also collaborating on an on-going basis with the Maintenance Team to assess and formulate preferred solutions in the virtual space, before construction.

Safety First

In early June 2020, the TransitNEXT Safety Team, Ottawa Fire Services, and the Special Operations Division of Ottawa Paramedic Service conducted a “collaborative walk-through” of the Dows Lake Tunnel, to proactively protect the TransitNEXT crew as well as the public during tunnel construction activities. The temporary shut-down of the train and walk through of the tunnel provided an important opportunity for Ottawa’s Emergency Service providers to get a first-hand look at the areas they would need to access in the event of an emergency incident in or near the tunnel.

Some of the topics of discussion included:

  • Accessibility on how Emergency First Responders get in an out of the tunnel
  • Conditions rescue teams face on the rail tracks and in the tunnel
  • Confirmation that Emergency Response Plan is in place for construction.

Late in June, in a team exercise with the Ottawa Fire Department, TransitNEXT ran a functionality test on the Fire standpipe in the tunnel. This allowed the team to ensure that all services are familiar with the use of the systems, components and processes that are in place. The health and safety of front-line workers is always the highest priority and this preparedness exercise was a key undertaking before construction began.

 Safety Partners Walk-through of Dows Lake Tunnel
June 3, 2020 Safety Partners Walk-through of Dows Lake Tunnel with TransitNEXT Safety Team, Ottawa Fire Services and Ottawa Paramedic Service - North Portal

Safety Partners Walk-through of Dows Lake Tunnel
June 3, 2020 Safety Partners Walk-through of Dows Lake Tunnel with TransitNEXT Safety Team, Ottawa Fire Services and Ottawa Paramedic Service

Dows Lake Tunnel by the numbers:
  • Length of tunnel: 578 metres in length with 23 reinforced concrete box segments separated by expansion joints
  • Height of tunnel: approximately 6.7 metres high from the top of the rail
  • Width of tunnel: approximately 5.1 metres wide
About the Dows Lake Tunnel and its upgrades:

The Dows Lake Tunnel is a critical piece of infrastructure providing a north-south connection along the Trillium Line. Originally built and owned by Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR), it opened for operation in 1964 as a rail tunnel to accommodate freight trains. The tunnel was easily converted for use by OC-Transpo in 2001 for the O-Train (today’s Trillium Line).

The TransitNEXT Team is working with the City of Ottawa and its partners to address several historical challenges through design and construction of the tunnel’s upgrades:

  • Improving the water infiltration management system at expansion joints by performing joint repairs.
  • Upgrading and providing maintenance of the drainage system including the installation of a new pump system and ensuring the adequacy of the existing drainage system capacity.
  • Upgrades to the tunnel’s track ties, standpipe system, ventilation system, and emergency walkway to align with National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) -130 standards.

Tracking Stage 2 Trillium Line Rail Bridge Work

Stage 2 Confederation Line West Extension Spring 2020 Update

Stage 2 Trillium Line South Extension Spring 2020 Update

Stage 2 Confederation Line East Extension Spring 2020 Update

Stage 2 Trillium Line South Extension construction taking off at the Ottawa International Airport

Stage 2 LRT East Extension Information Session

Posted: 
Wednesday, March 11, 2020, 4:28 pm
Last updated: 
Wednesday, March 18, 2020, 8:50 am

Dates & Times

Monday, April 6, 2020,
6:30 pm to 8:30 pm

Location

Community Pentecostal Church
1825 St Joseph Boulevard
Ottawa, ON

Accessibility is an important consideration for the City of Ottawa. If you have any questions or require special accommodation to attend, please contact the project team.

The O-Train system is extending farther south, east, and west as part of the Stage 2 Light Rail Transit Project.

The City of Ottawa is hosting a drop-in information session where project team members will be available to answer questions one-on-one about connectivity designs and construction plans.

Contact

Stage 2 O-Train Light Rail Transit Project Construction Summary: East Extension June through December 2019

This notice is to advise that, as part of the Stage 2 O-Train Light Rail Transit project, crews and equipment will be working at multiple locations in the east, south, and west areas of Ottawa, supporting design and construction of extensions to the O-Train transit network.

This overview highlights the key activities in the East Extension area scheduled to occur throughout the remainder of 2019. To learn more about what’s being planned, please visit the project website at ottawa.ca/stage2.

WHAT’S HAPPENING ALONG THE EAST EXTENSION CORRIDOR

From Blair Station to Trim Station

Borehole Investigations and Survey Activity (Underway)

Geotechnical investigations are taking place along the east extension corridor to collect soil, water and bedrock data. In some areas, temporary and intermittent night work will be required to ensure public safety and to minimize the impacts to motorists in high-traffic areas. For information on temporary night work approved in your area, please visit the project website at ottawa.ca/stage2.

Intermittent lane closures may also be required in immediate work areas as crews move between borehole locations. Noise from drilling and related activities could reach moderate levels at times. Depending on the data from borehole investigations, new borehole locations and repeat investigations may be required during daytime and nighttime hours.

Crews are also conducting survey work along the east corridor, scheduled during daytime hours. This includes survey equipment set-up and collecting elevation data both on and off-street. Minimal disruption is expected to traffic and local areas.

Highway 174 and Perimeter Area Work (Begins in Summer)

On-street roadwork is required to widen traffic lanes on the south side of Highway 174 (eastbound lanes). This includes area clearing and tree/vegetation removal, grading and excavation, utility relocation, backfill and asphalt work in preparation to shift vehicular traffic to the south side. This will allow future guideway work to begin in the centre median area, away from active traffic lanes. Intermittent eastbound lane closures on Highway 174 may be required during off-peak or overnight hours as crews and equipment construct the new traffic lanes. All traffic will be maintained in both directions along Highway 174 although minor off-peak delays to eastbound traffic may occur at times.

WHAT’S HAPPENING LOCALLY NEAR STATION AREAS

Borehole and survey activities are also occurring locally around station areas during daytime construction hours, and during nighttime hours only if required. Additional activity in preparation for station work is also scheduled to begin in 2019 and is highlighted below.

Montreal Station Area Preparation Work (Begins in Summer)

To the west of Montreal Station (between the existing Blair Station and the future Montreal Station), utility relocation and foundation work is scheduled to begin in preparation to build the new elevated LRT guideway that will connect to Blair Station. This includes area clearing and tree/vegetation removal, grading and excavation, utility relocation and foundation work. These activities will not affect Blair Station and is currently scheduled for daytime hours. To the east of Montreal Station, utility relocation and foundation is scheduled in preparation for future work in the Montreal interchange.

In the Montreal Station area, local utility relocation work includes fence installation, clearing and tree/vegetation removal, excavation, utility relocation and/or tie-ins to existing underground utilities. If required, brief service disruption may occur as the new utility service is connected. In addition to utility relocation adjacent to the north and south of Highway 174, Shefford Road near the Montreal Station area is also scheduled for utility relocation work. This is currently scheduled during daytime hours and access to all residences will be maintained.

To the south of Highway 174, east of Montreal Station, crews will also be building a temporary project office, which is not anticipated to result in traffic pattern changes or nighttime activity. This includes area clearing and tree/vegetation removal, utility and groundwork, followed by constructing a temporary site office to be operational during the construction period.

Jeanne D’Arc Station Area Preparation Work (Begins in Fall)

Utility relocation around the Jeanne D’Arc Station area includes fence installation, excavation, utility relocation and/or tie-ins in conflict with the station area. Work in this area is not anticipated to affect local roads in the station vicinity, but brief service disruption may occur as the new utility services are connected. This work is also scheduled to occur primarily during daytime hours.

Trim Station Area Preparation Work (Begins in Fall)

Area clearing and site preparation at Trim Station may also begin before the end of 2019. This activity includes grading and excavating the existing overflow area parking lot, tree/vegetation removal and local utility relocation. This work is not anticipated to affect motorists in the immediate area and is scheduled during daytime hours.

DATES AND HOURS OF WORK

Confirmed timeframes and implementation details for key activities will be posted to the project website at ottawa.ca/Stage2. Please note the timeframes in this summary are estimated and subject to change.

Construction activity is primarily scheduled to occur during typical daytime construction hours between 7am and 10pm Monday to Saturday, and between 9am to 10pm on Sunday’s and holidays. Nightwork will be required at times to minimize the impact to motorists or for public safety. Appropriate notice will be provided for any adjacent nightwork.

ANTICIPATED IMPACTS

Pedestrian, cyclist and vehicle access will be maintained during construction although minor delays to traffic may occur at times. Temporary crossings may be implemented in designated areas and pedestrians and cyclists should use extra caution as traffic patterns change. Motorists should be aware of and adhere to traffic control signage, posted speed limits and traffic control personnel. Changes to OC Transpo services are not anticipated and transit stops will remain accessible. Noise and temporary disruptions are not anticipated to be significant during these activities. Please note that all tree replacement as part of final restoration will be in accordance with the tree compensation plan for the project, and area restoration (such as re-seeding greenspaces) will be completed as part of local area finishing works.

The safety of workers and the public is paramount, and we thank you for your patience during construction.

WHAT’S NEXT

In early 2020, crews will continue with site mobilization in additional areas, continued roadwork and preparation for construction of stations, structures, and the guideway. Please stay connected with our team as we report on our progress and provide our 2020 construction look-ahead at the end of this year.

 

For further information about this project, please contact our project team:

Rail Construction Program

City of Ottawa

Email: stage2@ottawa.caPhone: 3-1-1

Stage 2 O-Train Light Rail Transit Construction Summary: West Extension June through September

the east, south and west areas of Ottawa, supporting design and construction of extensions to the O-Train transit network.

This overview highlights the key activities in the West Extension area scheduled to occur in stages and concurrently throughout the remainder of 2019. For additional area-specific information and to learn more about what’s being planned for community outreach, please visit the project website at ottawa.ca/stage2.

WHAT’S HAPPENING ALONG THE WEST EXTENSION CORRIDOR

From Moodie Station and Baseline Station to Westboro Station

Borehole Investigations and Survey Activity (Underway)

Geotechnical investigations are taking place on and off-street along the west extension corridor to collect soil, water and bedrock data. In some areas, temporary and intermittent night work will be required to ensure public safety and to minimize the impacts to motorists in high-traffic areas. Nighttime borehole activity is also scheduled to occur along the Transitway parallel to Highway 417, although changes to transit service are not required. For more information, please visit the project website at ottawa.ca/stage2.

Intermittent lane closures may also be required in immediate work areas as crews move between borehole locations. Noise from drilling and related activities will occur at moderate levels at times. Data gathered from the borehole investigations may lead to new borehole locations or repeat investigations may be required.

Crews are also conducting survey work along the west corridor, which is scheduled during daytime hours.

This includes equipment set-up and collecting survey elevation data. Minimal disruption in local areas is expected with minimal effects to traffic.

Building Demolition (Begins in Fall)

Building demolition within the project limits will occur on the east side of Connaught Avenue between Severn Avenue and Hanlon Avenue (three structures), and on Richmond Road east of Cleary Avenue (one structure). These activities are scheduled to be completed during daytime hours and will result in localized lane closures while crew remove material and debris.

WHAT’S HAPPENING LOCALLY NEAR STATION AREAS

Borehole and survey activities are also occurring locally around station areas during daytime construction hours, and during nighttime hours only if required. Additional activity in preparation for station work is also scheduled to begin in 2019 and is highlighted below. Please note that activity around station areas not listed below is not currently scheduled this year.

Moodie Station and Baseline Station Area Preparation Work (Begins in Summer)

Crews are scheduled begin area clearing and utility relocation work in preparation for building a temporary construction site/maintenance office near Moodie Drive and Corkstown Road, near Holly Acres north of Highway 417, near Baseline Road and Woodroffe Avenue and on Iris Street east of Parkway Drive. This activity is schedule to occur during daytime hours and may require intermittent localized lane closures if required. Brief service disruption may occur as the new utility services are connected.

Crews may also perform area clearing, site preparation and utility relocation at the Light Maintenance and Storage Facility (LMSF) south of Corkstown Road west of Moodie Drive. This activity is scheduled to occur during daytime hours and may require intermittent localized lane closures. Crews are also scheduled to begin clearing and site preparation work south of Highway 417 between Holly Acres Road and Richmond Road.

Bayshore Station Area Preparation Work (Begins in Summer/Fall)

Area preparation activity for the pedestrian crossing to access the future Bayshore Station area includes clearing, tree/vegetation removal, utility installation, signaling and roadwork adjacent to and across Woodridge Crescent. Work in these areas are primarily off-street and scheduled during daytime construction hours.

NOTICE TO RESIDENTS

Lincoln Fields Station Area Preparation (Begins in Fall)

Roadwork is required to relocate underground utilities along the north side of Carling Avenue, between the Carling Avenue and Richmond Road area and on Byron Avenue. This includes area clearing and tree/vegetation removal, grading and excavation, utility relocation, backfill and asphalt work. Temporary traffic lane closures may be required in these areas although vehicle and pedestrian access will be maintained. Following this activity, a temporary detour on Carling Avenue in the Lincoln Fields Station area is scheduled to allow future guideway work to proceed away from active traffic lanes.

Work Between Cleary, Dominion and Westboro Station Areas (Begins in Summer)

Preparatory activities are underway on Sir John A. Macdonald Parkway between Dominion Avenue and Cleary Avenue. These activities include site mobilization and fence installation, tree/vegetation removal, utility relocation and roadworks in preparation to temporarily shift traffic away from the cut-and-cover area. Once completed, all traffic will be shifted to the north side of the Parkway that will allow the future cut-and-cover construction to safely occur on the south side without interfering with active traffic lanes. Limited nightwork may be required to avoid impacts to traffic.

The existing pedestrian/cyclist pathway near this area may be affected at times and alternative access will be maintained. A temporary site trailer will also be installed within the project limits of Rochester Field but will not impede pedestrian or cyclist access. Activity in this area is scheduled to occur during daytime hours, although limited nighttime activity may be required to avoid peak traffic times. Utility relocation around the Kitchissippi Lookout, Atlantis Avenue and Lanark Avenue area is also scheduled, which may result in local traffic pattern changes in immediate work areas.

DATES AND HOURS OF WORK

Confirmed timeframes and implementation details for key activities will be posted to the project website at ottawa.ca/stage2. Please note the timeframes in this summary are estimated and subject to change.

Construction activity is primarily scheduled to occur during typical daytime construction hours between 7am and 10pm Monday to Saturday, and between 9am to 10pm on Sunday’s and holidays. Intermittent nightwork will be required at times to minimize the impact to motorists or for public safety.

ANTICIPATED IMPACTS

Pedestrian, cyclist and vehicle access will be maintained during construction although minor delays to traffic may occur at times. Temporary pathways and crossings will be implemented in designated areas and pedestrians and cyclists should use extra caution as traffic patterns change. Motorists should be aware of and adhere to traffic control signage, posted speed limits and traffic control personnel. Changes to OC Transpo services are not anticipated and transit stops will remain accessible. Noise and temporary disruptions are not anticipated to be significant during these activities. Please note that all tree replacement as part of final restoration will be in accordance with the tree compensation plan for the project, and area restoration (such as re-seeding greenspaces) will be completed as part of local area finishing works.

The safety of workers and the public is paramount, and we thank you for your patience during construction.

WHAT’S NEXT

In early 2020, crews will continue with site mobilization in additional areas, continued roadwork and preparation for station, guideway, structures and cut-and-cover construction. Please stay connected with our team as we report on our progress and provide our 2020 construction look-ahead at the end of this year.

For further information about this project, please contact our project team:

Rail Construction Program

City of Ottawa

Email: ottawa.ca/stage2

Phone: 3-1-1

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