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Volume 2a - Secondary Plans

This is a consolidation of the Volume 2A of the Ottawa Official Plan as adopted under by-law 203 of 2003 by Ottawa City Council on 14 May 2003. This consolidation incorporates the text language changes to the Secondary Plans as approved by Ottawa City Council.

This consolidation is provided for convenience only. Reference should be made to the original certified documents which are on file with the City Clerk.

Former Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Rockcliffe Secondary Plan

Former Nepean

Secondary Plans for Merivale Road; Baseline and Woodroffe; and South Nepean Areas 1, 2, & 3; 4, 5, & 6; 7; 8; 9 & 10; 12 and 13.

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Former Ottawa

Secondary Plans for the Central Area; Carleton Heights; Centretown; Hunt Club; Sandy Hill; Preston-Champagne; Confederation Heights Area; Riverside Park; and the Key principles from Alta Vista/Faircrest/Riverview Park.

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Bayview Station District Secondary Plan

Old Ottawa East Secondary Plan

[Amendment 92, September 23, 2011]

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Preston-Carling District Secondary Plan

Richmond Road/Westboro Secondary Plan

[Amendment 70, June 24, 2009]

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Scott Street Secondary Plan

[Amendment #131, OMB File # PL140303, March 20, 2015] 

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South Keys to Blossom Park, Bank Street Secondary Plan

Wellington Street West Secondary Plan

[Amendment 93, May 25, 2011]

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Westgate Secondary Plan

[Amendment #188, May 10, 2017]

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Mer Bleue Urban Expansion Area Secondary Plan

Elmvale Acres Shopping Centre Secondary Plan

Tremblay, St. Laurent and Cyrville Secondary Plan

PDF Files - Volume 2A

City of Ottawa Official Plan – Volume 2A
Secondary Plans

PDF Documents

Download in .pdf format and read it with Adobe Acrobat.

Cover

Former City of Nepean Official Plan (Table of Contents)

Former City of Ottawa Official Plan (Table of Contents)

Former Village of Rockcliffe Park Official Plan (Table of Contents)

Richmond Road/Westboro Secondary Plan (Table of Contents)

Bank Street Secondary Plan (Table of Contents)

Barrhaven Downtown Secondary Plan (Table of Contents)

Bayview Station District Secondary Plan (Table of Contents)

Old Ottawa East Secondary Plan (Table of Contents)

Wellington Street West Secondary Plan (Table of Contents)

Montreal Road District Secondary Plan (Table of Contents)

Hurdman Secondary Plan (Table of Contents)

Blair Secondary Plan (Table of Contents)

Scott Street Secondary Plan (Table of Contents)

 Stittsville Main Street Secondary Plan (Table of Contents)

Former Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Rockcliffe Secondary Plan (Table of Contents)

South Keys to Blossom Park, Bank Street Secondary Plan (Table of Contents)

Uptown Rideau Street Secondary Plan (Table of Contents)

Preston-Carling District Secondary Plan (Table of Contents)

Richmond Road/Westboro Secondary Plan (Table of Contents)

Westgate Secondary Plan (Table of Contents)

Mer Bleue Urban Expansion Area Secondary Plan (Table of Contents)

Elmvale Acres Shopping Centre Secondary Plan (Table of Contents)

Kanata West Secondary Plan (Table of Contents)

Tremblay, St. Laurent and Cyrville Secondary Plan (Table of Contents)

Corso Italia Station District Secondary Plan (Table of Contents)

East Urban Community Phase 3 Secondary Plan (Table of Contents)

Corso Italia Station District Secondary Plan

[Amendment #253, April 14, 2021]

1.0 Introduction

This Chapter contains the Secondary Plan (herein referred to as “the Plan”) for the Corso Italia Station District. The purpose of this Plan is to provide detailed, area-based policy direction to guide both public and the private development and investments over the next 25 years.

Section 2 of this Plan describes the planning area where its policies apply. Section 3 outlines the vision and goals for the district. Section 4 and 5 provide more detailed direction for specific areas within the district, with a focus on area character and built form, and the public realm and mobility within that. Sections 6, 7, 8 and 9 provide policy for sustainability; servicing and infrastructure; housing; and, arts, culture and creative industry. The Plan concludes with Sections 10, 11 and 12 which describe its interpretation, implementation and schedules, which are important tools to clarify policy direction.

The various sections in the plan are closely linked and are not meant to be read in isolation.  Proponents should review all sections of this Plan, including the appendices for reference in interpretation of vision, in addition to Volume 1 of the Official Plan, when considering and preparing proposals for new public and private development in the District.

This Plan is City Council’s policy direction for all municipal actions, including public works, plan of subdivision applications, Zoning By-law amendments, site plan reviews, and Committee of Adjustment applications in the Corso Italia Station District.

2.0 Planning Area

The Corso Italia Station District Secondary Plan area is generally bounded by Somerset Street to the north, Highway 417 to the south, Breezehill Avenue and Loretta Avenue (south of Gladstone Avenue) to the west, and Preston Street (including properties facing Preston Street on its east side) and Booth Street (south of Balsam Street) to the east, as shown in Schedule A.

3.0 Vision and Goals

The Plan will guide an orderly transformation of the district area into a future south-western edge to the city’s future larger downtown.

Where a surrounding, vibrant community has long been established and will continue to thrive, a new vision for the Corso Italia Station District looks forward to the presence of the Corso Italia O-Train station and the redevelopment of significantly underutilized tracts of land nearby. These redevelopments will integrate with the existing community and introduce new urban elements that will cumulatively combine to reinforce Little Italy and Hintonburg as diverse neighbourhoods characterized by the right balance of built environment, uses and public realm amenities for an attractive and resilient future. New developments will provide the high-quality facilities and infrastructure needed to attract and support active transportation on a daily basis, and in doing so reduce automobile dependence.

“The Corso Italia Station District will be a compact, livable, transit-oriented community that is vibrant, diverse, green and focuses on sustainable transportation as the primary means of mobility throughout the area. Future development will be fully integrated and strengthen the existing community character and create a sense of place which reflects that identity.”

This Plan’s goals for the district are as follows:

  1. Expand the opportunities for active transportation to encourage a healthy and sustainable paradigm for area mobility and city-building.
  2. Reduce automobile activity and car dependence to minimize conflicts with pedestrians and cyclists, to support the use of transit and active transportation, and to improve the local environment and reduce GHGs; enhance the public realm by reducing the footprint of automobiles.
  3. Improve the amount, types and quality of spaces available for the neighbourhood to balance the increased numbers of people living and visiting the district.
  4. Concentrate the most dense and tallest buildings along the O-Train corridor to support transit use for new residents and to provide built form transitions to existing low-rise areas.
  5. Re-establish vacant or underutilized lots across the district with a strong urban form and design to support and enhance a high-quality public realm.
  6. Build on the heritage and character in the area to reinforce the established culture and success of the neighbourhood.
  7. Nurture the arts community and other diverse, small-scale activity generators to support a resilient local culture and economy for all members of society.
  8. Target the achievement of net-zero carbon/GHG emissions in new development through the planning, design and development of alternative renewable energy solutions.

4.0  Character Areas and Built Form

4.1.  Character Areas and Their Built Form

The policies of this section provide specific direction for each character area, as delineated on Schedule A - Character Areas. Maximum buildings heights for the district are specified on Schedule B - Maximum Building Height and Tower Location. On Schedule B, a dashed box indicates a permitted high-rise tower within a specific height category, the potential location of the tower, and the maximum building height of the permitted tower (the number within the box). Detailed built form policy about a specific area or property is further provided in this section. Schedule D - Reference Map locates key properties or areas referenced in the following policies. This should be used to understand applicable policies as sites are subdivided.

In addition to these specific policies, all development shall demonstrate that the general built form criteria outlined in Section 4.2 of this Plan are met before the permitted maximum height can be approved.  Section 5, Public Realm is a companion to this section and all developments are expected to contribute to the public realm improvements as detailed in Section 5, prior to approval.

Station Area

The Station Area surrounds the Corso Italia O-Train station and abuts Mixed Use Neighbourhood and Park designations. It will incorporate a wide range of transit supportive functions and built form, including the tallest buildings and highest densities in the Corso Italia Station District. Building heights that decrease as development moves away from the O-Train station and context-sensitive designs in this area will provide desirable transitions.

Given its central location within the established community, the Station Area provides a new opportunity to connect the neighbourhoods and people of Little Italy and Hintonburg and to create a district within the city that is built around transit and alternative transportation, minimizing reliance on automobiles.  The Station Area will be a priority area for public realm improvement as outlined in Section 5 of this Plan.  While this area will provide the most appropriate opportunities for the highest density buildings in the district, the properties fronting onto Gladstone Avenue will continue to be developed to support a Mainstreet character area east of Preston Street, through appropriate built form transitions.

General Policies:

4.1.1.1. High-rise, mixed-use development, with maximum buildings heights detailed in Schedule B may be permitted.

4.1.1.2 The remaining podium building height around the perimeter of a high-rise tower should be a height of three- to six-storeys, as further detailed in Section 4.2.2.

4.1.1.3 Mid-rise buildings, from five- to nine- storeys, may be permitted within a zone where a tower is permitted, but when no tower is developed on that parcel.

4.1.1.4 Notwithstanding the Station Area designation, the frontage of Gladstone Avenue shall be developed with the general built form characteristics and uses of a Mainstreet, to support the commercial continuity of the Gladstone mainstreet, west of Preston Street. It will be characterized by low- to mid-rise buildings or podiums fronting Gladstone Avenue.

4.1.1.5  The tower component of any high-rise building shall be setback from Gladstone Avenue to support the character of the Mainstreet and to minimize shadow and wind onto the public and private realms.

The Station Area is divided into four quadrants, each having policy directions that respond to their unique conditions:

North-east quadrant (933 Gladstone (OCH); 931 Gladstone Avenue; and 232 Preston Street)

The North-east quadrant of the Station Area will become a diverse area that permits a broad range of housing types, and a mix of uses, including affordable housing, commercial, retail, institutional uses, and supporting public realm, including privately-owned public spaces.

4.1.1.6 There shall be active frontages facing all public realm within the Station area. This includes the Trillium multi-use pathway and the 1.0 ha park.

4.1.1.7 Tower elements of developments shall be positioned to minimize shadow impacts on the park.

4.1.1.8 Despite 4.1.1.2, the podium of the 30-storey high-rise tower fronting the edges of the Gladstone Plaza and Street B, may be a maximum of nine-storeys, subject to meeting 4.1.1.9.

4.1.1.9  A new, neighbourhood urban plaza, referred to in this plan as the Gladstone Plaza, shall be provided south and/or west area of the southernmost building fronting Gladstone Avenue to facilitate a high-quality public realm opportunity at this high-activity node, as further detailed in 5.4.5 to 5.4.7 and shown on Schedule C.  The podium of the southern tower should be setback significantly from either Gladstone Avenue and/or the Trillium multi-use pathway to ensure a space of civic significance.  The Gladstone Avenue façade should be set back to create a view to the plaza and to provide an enhanced public realm for pedestrians at this important neighbourhood cross-roads.

4.1.1.10 Active retail frontages and/or other storefront, non-residential uses accessible to the public are required for all development at the following locations:

4.1.1.10.1 The podium of the building fronting all edges of the Gladstone Plaza and Street B on Schedule C. Such frontages are encouraged to extend as far as possible along the multi-use pathway from the plaza northward.

4,1,1,10,2 The majority of the frontage on the east side of “Street B” between the Gladstone Avenue and Balsam Street;

4.1.1.10.3         Retail frontages should be considered to extend along Street A and Larch Street as each phase of development at 933 Gladstone Avenue site progresses, but are not required.  A greater mix of uses within the site would encourage a stronger, 15-minute walking neighbourhood.  Ground level units along these streets should consider a design that is adaptable to provide for future flexibility in uses, such as live-work spaces.

4.1.1.11 New development permitted west of the designated Mixed-Use Neighbourhood shall be distributed and designed to provide a transition to the existing built form character in that area, through rowhouses, stacked townhouses, back-to-back stacked townhouses, or low- to mid- rise apartments. New single- or semi-detached dwellings are not permitted.

4.1.1.12 The two high-rise developments permitted on the north side of Gladstone Avenue, between the Street B and Preston Street, and south of Balsam Street shall be compatible and transition to the low- to mid-rise built forms of the abutting Main Street designation.

North-west quadrant (951 Gladstone Avenue, 145, 131 and 127 Loretta Street)

The north-west quadrant of the Station Area will become a diverse area permitting a broad range of residential uses and other mixed uses, including commercial, retail, and light industrial uses.

4.1.1.13 Buildings will be sited and designed to create a built form transition from the Station Area character to the future Mixed-Use Block, on the west side of Loretta Street.

4.1.1.14 The high-rise towers at 951 Gladstone Avenue and 145 Loretta Street should maintain a minimum 23-metre separation distance between towers.

4.1.1.15  Future redevelopment around the Standard Bread Company Factory building shall incorporate design elements including, but not limited to building setbacks, stepbacks, massing, and public spaces that showcase the cultural heritage of that building and site as designated under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

South-west quadrant (175 Loretta Street - City Traffic Signals Operation; 950 Gladstone Avenue)

The south-west quadrant of the Station Area will become a diverse area permitting a broad range of residential uses and other mixed uses, including commercial, employment, retail, and light industrial uses.  Lands fronting Gladstone Avenue will redevelop to reinforce a continuous, pedestrian-oriented corridor.

4.1.1.16  Mixed-use buildings permitted over the balance of the south-west quadrant will be sited and designed to create a built form transition from the Station Area character to the existing, mature low-rise character exhibited by the west side of Loretta Street.

4.1.2 Mainstreet Corridor

Preston Street, Gladstone Avenue and Somerset Street West will continue to evolve as animated and active mainstreets.  As large properties redevelop or small-scale infills occur over time, these streets will solidify as the commercial spines of the Corso Italia Station District. A broad range of uses are permitted along the three corridors, including retail and service commercial uses, offices, residential and institutional uses. Mainstreets will be characterized by an eclectic collection of low to mid-rise buildings.

General Policies:

4.1.2.1 Mixed-use buildings up to a height of six storeys, in keeping with a Main Street function and character as outlined in Section 3.6.3 of the Official Plan may be permitted along Mainstreet corridors, unless otherwise indicated, as shown in Schedules A and B of this Plan.

4.1.2.2 Continuous at-grade retail, commercial or institutional frontages with public access from the street shall be provided along Preston Street, Gladstone Avenue and Somerset Street West. Amenity rooms or similar types of spaces reserved only for residents of a building shall not be permitted along Mainstreet frontages.

4.1.2.3  The ground floor frontage of buildings abutting the mainstreet should reflect the established retail scale and character to reinforce a fine-grain, human-scale of development.

Site-Specific Policies along Mainstreets

1010 and 1040 Somerset Street

4.1.2.4 Mixed-use development may be permitted at 1010 Somerset Street West to a maximum floor space index (FSI) of 1.5. High-rise development and the addition of floor space beyond the maximum FSI may only be considered with the dedication of a 1.0 hectare park, as described in the public realm policies (Section 5.4.1 to 5.4.3) and shown on Schedule C of this Plan.

4.1.2.5 Development fronting onto the Somerset Street bridge shall extend the Somerset Street Main Street Corridor west, and use the bridge deck as a publicly accessible active frontage.

4.1.2.6 Building heights along Somerset Street West shall be mid-rise to support and be consistent with the character of the Mainstreet Corridor. If the conditions of 4.1.2.1 are met, high-rise towers may be permitted as shown on Schedule B and shall be sufficiently set back from Somerset Street West to maintain a mid-rise frame along the Mainstreet and to minimize shadow and wind onto the public and private realms.

4.1.2.7 Retail, commercial and/or other non-residential active frontages are required for all development along the entire frontage of any buildings located along Somerset Street West.

4.1.2.8  Development at 1010 Somerset Street West may include a public recreational facility or public school.  A recreational facility may incorporate an expansion of the existing Plant Bath Recreation Centre.

4.1.2.9 Development of sites on either the east or west sides of the City Centre Underpass Pathway (see Section 5.2.6 to 5.2.13) shall be designed with public realm considerations by:

4.1.2.9.1 terracing downward or providing breaks in the building mass to maximize daylight along this active transportation spine.

4.1.2.9.2 activating building frontage(s) by concentrating the access/egress or activities of people of the buildings so they abut the pathway or underpass to keep “eyes on the street”; for example, locating 24-hour lobby, bike storage, or patios abutting the pathway.

4.1.2.10 Vehicular access to all parcels at 1010 Somerset Street West shall be as described in Section 5.2.6, and primarily directed to underground and/or podium parking where all vehicular movement between future development phases would occur, as well as site servicing, including: drop-offs and pick-ups, parking, deliveries, loading, garbage and recycling services, moving trucks and emergency vehicles.

4.1.2.11 Site planning and design of any parcel at 1010 Somerset Street shall ensure access of larger emergency vehicles, such as Fire Services, including via the surface, as deemed necessary but without compromising the objectives of the public realm policies with respect to pedestrian and cycling priority.

4.1.2.12 Prior to redevelopment, a temporary use by-law may be applied to 1010 Somerset to permit, on an interim basis, a City-operated parking lot.

4.1.2.13 A high-rise, mixed-use development may be permitted at 1040 Somerset Street. The Somerset Street frontage shall be developed to exhibit compatibility with the built form characteristics and uses of the Mainstreet, in general, to support the commercial continuity of the Somerset Street, west of the O-Train corridor, except where otherwise permitted by existing zoning.

Gladstone Avenue and Preston Street

4.1.2.14 Building development on the north side of Gladstone Avenue, from Preston Street to the new Street B (250 and 232 Preston Street; and 931 Gladstone Avenue) shall be set back a minimum of 2m from the property line on the northern side of Gladstone Avenue to ensure public realm enhancements can be satisfied, given the very narrow right-of-way at this location of Gladstone Avenue. This is in addition to the right-of-way widening (Section 5.2.39 to 5.2.40)

4.1.2.15 The north side of Gladstone Avenue, between Rochester Street and Preston Street (280 Rochester Street) shall be redeveloped to infill the underutilized areas adjacent to the mainstreet with mixed use low- to mid- rise buildings to a maximum of six storeys. This should integrate the existing community parkette at the corner of Preston Street and Gladstone Avenue.

4.1.2.16 Retail, commercial, institutional and/or other active frontages are required for all development fronting Gladstone Avenue, between Rochester Street and Piazza Dante. Such uses are also encouraged to frame the ground-level of Piazza Dante. Regardless of use, the ground floor around Piazza Dante, and any extension to it, should be designed as active frontage.

4.1.2.17 The east side of Preston Street, between Gladstone Avenue and The Queensway (Highway 417), shall be redeveloped to re-establish the Mainstreet Corridor in this block and expand and reinforce the Preston Street character.

4.1.2.18  The Adult High School (300 Rochester Street) will continue its institutional role and serve the community and the broader City.  As it redevelops, it should adhere to Mainstreet policies.

4.1.3 Mixed-Use Neighbourhood

The Mixed-Use Neighbourhood policies will apply to the areas in the district that are primarily residential in character and function.  Areas with existing low-rise buildings will continue to evolve with new low-rise development that complements that context, while areas of large or underutilized sites may also incorporate mid-rise buildings, and in specific locations, where appropriate, limited high-rise buildings may be permitted.  Both will provide a range of housing options intended to support the diversity of needs found and desired in the downtown core, including units with multiple bedrooms to support large families, as well as live-work alternatives. Small-scale non-residential uses will be permitted including functions and land uses meant to support the daily local needs of the neighbourhood, including: retail, service, cultural, leisure and entertainment uses.

Preston Side Streets

The low-rise street blocks to the west of Preston Street, between Oak Street and Balsam Street, and St. Anthony Street and Louisa Street, as shown on Schedule A, are a mixed-use neighbourhood that supports families and a wide range of demographics. It will continue to evolve and intensify over time to provide liveable, family-friendly housing options while supporting live-work alternatives and small businesses.  Redevelopment in the form of infill will be encouraged to ensure the unique quality and characteristics of the area remain, as major redevelopment occurs within the district.  Pedestrian and cycling will become the focus of mobility and infrastructure to support active transportation as the primary mode of travel.

4.1.3.1 Notwithstanding the provisions in Section 3.6.2 of Volume 1 of the Official Plan, low-rise residential and mixed-use development up to four storeys will be permitted in the Mixed-Use Neighbourhood as shown in Schedule A of this Plan.

4.1.3.2 Developments in the Mixed-Use Neighbourhood are not subject to the minimum density targets established for the “Bayview-Preston Area” in Section 2.2.2 of Volume 1 of the Official Plan.

4.1.3.3 The City shall protect and enhance the built form character of Little Italy by encouraging infill development that is sympathetic to the historic built form character of the neighbourhood through the development review process.

4.1.3.4 The City will encourage affordable and liveable housing units that are suitable for families with children through the development review process.

4.1.3.5 Development within the Mixed-Use Neighbourhood that is west of the established, low-rise buildings between Oak Street and Larch Street shall be designed with north-south private lanes. Access from those lanes to the existing, east-west public rear-lanes shall be pedestrian-only.

4.1.3.6 The City may consider acquisition of that portion of privately-owned properties that currently encumber the western passage of existing, east-west lanes to the new lanes described above (Section 4.1.3.5).

4.1.3.7 Not withstanding Section 4.1.3.1, on the block from Preston Street to the Street B, between Larch Street and Balsam Street, buildings up to six storeys may be permitted, as shown on Schedule B. The design of built form shall employ considerations in height, massing, scale, and architectural rhythm to provide transition to the low-rise residential buildings on the north side of Larch Street.

4.1.3.8 On the north side of St. Anthony Street, a building to a maximum of height of six storeys may be permitted over the balance of the site, and provide a transition to the low-rise buildings to the north on Louisa Street. While primarily a residential use, limited commercial uses may be permitted.

Rochester Heights Phase 2 (818 Gladstone Avenue)

This “superblock” will be broken down and redevelop as a fine-grained, neighbourhood that is a primarily residential use but also provides a range of opportunities to mix of non-residential uses. It will build on the diverse character of the surrounding neighbourhood, including Gladstone Avenue, by accommodating a range of housing options and supporting the reestablishment of the Gladstone Avenue mainstreet function. Its built form, public realm and mobility network will invite the community into the site to ensure it is weaved as integral part of community identity and functionality.

4.1.3.9 The existing, singular superblock will become a fine-grained system of smaller blocks and parcels of development.

4.1.3.10 Blocks shall be designed with high lot coverage and create high-quality public realm that includes a continuous network of pedestrian-only mews.

4.1.3.11 A range of low-rise, mid-rise and high-rise buildings may be permitted over the site as detailed in Schedule B.

4.1.3.12 There shall be a transition from low-rise to mid- or high-rise buildings on the site.

4.1.3.13 All buildings shall be designed so that no side wall faces an established public street.

4.1.3.14 All building elevations that front onto Piazza Dante, or any extensions of the park, shall have active frontages. Commercial uses, including small retail stores, restaurants, cafés or bars, are the preferred ground floor use, but spaces may also include uses that support a local arts hub, residential and related amenity uses. Building edges around the plaza are important to defining the park and to ensure it functions as a safe and attractive landmark to the community throughout the day.

4.1.3.15 Buildings surrounding and in proximity to Piazza Dante should be designed to maintain maximize sun exposure to the site throughout the day.

4.1.3.16 Corner units on all floors of mid- and high-rise buildings, that are primarily residential use, should provide larger units that maximize the number of bedrooms to encourage the accommodation of large families within the downtown core.

4.1.3.17 Development at the south-east corner of Gladstone Avenue and Rochester may be considered as a node for special uses, such as an arts hub.

Breezehill Avenue North

The Breezehill Avenue North area is between Somerset Street and Laurel Street, and Breezehill Avenue and the O-Train corridor and comprises several large, underutilized parcels.  Over time, this area will redevelop into a fine-grained, mixed use neighbourhood that responds to the character of the surrounding neighbourhood.  Devonshire Public School, on the west side of Breezehill Avenue, as well as the existing low-rise residential uses, and the O-Train corridor, constitute key context as the area evolves.  Transitioning building heights to this local context, as well as ensuring that the public realm and the mobility network are well designed and coordinated will ensure high volumes of active transportation use in the area.  In the interim, the existing industrial operations are permitted to continue operation.

4.1.3.18 High-rise, mixed-use residential developments up to the maximum building heights detailed in Schedule B may be permitted.

4.1.3.19 The remaining podium building height around the perimeter of a high-rise tower, generally, should be a height of three- to six-storeys, as further detailed in Section 4.2.2. They will be sited and designed to create a built form transition to the existing, mature low-rise character exhibited by the west side of Breezehill Avenue.

4.1.3.20 Mid-rise buildings, from five- to nine- storeys, may be permitted within a zone where a tower is permitted, but when no tower is developed on that parcel.

4.1.3.21 All development with this area shall be designed to support active transportation use along Breezehill Avenue and Laurel Street, with special consideration of students and visitors to Devonshire Public School.

4.1.3.22 All development within this area shall carefully site buildings and consider how through-block connections from Breezehill Avenue to the future multi-use pathway on the west side of the transit corridor.

4.1.3.23 All redevelopment sites shall provide their portion of the future, western multi-use pathway (MUP) on-site and setback buildings accordingly and as needed (Section 5.3.3).

4.1.4 Mixed-Use Block

The Mixed-Use Block designations continue to offer uses that are large-scale in operation, and largely singular in use at present.  They may include large, private commercial and industrial enterprises or public facilities that serve the broader community, such as institutional or recreational uses.  As large lots, they also have the potential to provide redevelopment opportunities, in the short- and long-term, that will add to a diverse mix of uses and functions that will reinforce the overall district vision and goals.

Plant Bath (930 Somerset Street West)

4.1.4.1 The parcel of Somerset Street, Oak Street, and Preston Street to the western edge of the Plant Bath Recreation Centre shall continue to provide recreational uses and programming, including Plouffe Park. Development should not preclude future expansion to 1010 Somerset Street, west of it.

4.1.4.2 The property is designated under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act. Any redevelopment of this site shall conserve the heritage value and attributes of the designated building and/or site.

Adult High School (300 Rochester Street)

4.1.4.3 The property is listed on the City of Ottawa Heritage Register and may merit designation under the Ontario Heritage Act. Any redevelopment of this site should conserve the heritage value and attributes of the school buildings.

4.1.4.4 This block will continue its institutional role and serve the community and the broader City. However, if any major redevelopment occurs, new built form and uses along Gladstone Avenue will reinforce that mainstreet character and planned function.

Canada Bank Note Company (975 Gladstone Avenue)

This plan encourages the preservation of existing employment uses that are compatibility with other uses to reinforce a vibrant urban downtown core.  This city block, including its existing industrial use, is not expected to redevelop in the short- to long- term.  New development that is adjacent to this block shall ensure appropriate mitigation measures are implemented.  If the existing industrial use operation ceases in the future, this superblock may redevelop into a fine-grained, mixed-use neighbourhood that responds to the character of the surrounding neighbourhood, including the high-rise redevelopment to the east, and mature low-rise residential uses to the west.  Transitioning building heights to this local context, as well as establishing a high-quality public realm with several through-block connections will ensure future neighbourhood integration. 

4.1.4.5 The existing Canada Bank Note Company building will remain on the City of Ottawa Heritage Register and be reviewed through the City’s heritage planning process should any modifications to it or the site be contemplated.

4.1.4.6 New residential development that is built close to established industrial operations are responsible for mitigating their proximity in a manner that has no effect or impact on the established operation’s ability to continue operating, and any studies or mitigation measures shall be done at their own cost.

4.1.4.7 The existing employment and industrial operations that continue within this area, including the movement and routes of trucks for Canada Bank Note Company operations, should coordinate with any City public works projects involving public realm initiatives to maximize safe, efficient and comfortable public mobility, as the surrounding needs of the area change.

4.1.4.8 Mixed-use buildings, primarily residential in use, may be permitted up to a height of six storeys to create a built form transition from the high-rise buildings east of Loretta Street to the existing low-rise character, west side of Breezehill Avenue.

4.1.4.9 Despite Section 4.1.4.7 above, any future redevelopment of the site that includes new buildings or adaptive re-use will be a maximum building height of four storeys for approximately 30m east from Breezehill Avenue to ensure the appropriate transition to the established, low-rise neighbourhood west of Breezehill Avenue.

4.1.4.10 Any future subdivision and design of this block shall provide through-block connections from Breezehill Avenue to Loretta Street North to support active transportation.

4.1.5 Parks

The Corso Italia Station District area includes the development of new park land. Park land represents a character area comprised of City-owned parkland, as shown on Schedule A. This Secondary Plan seeks to balance the increased density proposed through redevelopment with the inclusion of active and passive public park spaces within the district.  It is important to note that privately-owned public spaces, or POPS, contribute to the Parks character, as they provide public realm opportunities but on private property, typically by permitting public access (at all times of the day) to spaces for passive recreational use. Details of both are provided in Section 5.4, including site specific policies for both Parks and POPS.

4.1.6 Other Greenspace

Other Greenspace are lands that are part of the grounds of an institution but are not open to the general public.  When redevelopment of the site is being considered, the recreational space should be considered for retention on the site, with a fulsome review regarding the opportunity to make the site more available for general community use. (See Section 5.2).

4.1.7 Green Transportation-Utility Corridor

The O-Train corridor will continue to be an open space and north-south transportation corridor that accommodates the O-Train and the multi-use pathways in the Corso Italia Station District connecting Dows Lake to the Ottawa River. With improved pedestrian and cycling connections, the corridor will serve as a green place that unites the communities that are currently divided by the O-Train trench.

4.1.7.1 The City shall protect and enhance the O-Train corridor as a continuous open space system that serves transportation, recreation, community, and urban ecological functions.

4.1.7.2 The City shall protect and enhance the Corridor to allow for the expansion of the existing multi-use pathway along the east side of the O-Train between the Queensway (Highway 417) and Somerset Street to reinforce this MUP as the principal active transportation spine through the District. Expansion should include more space for both pedestrians and cyclists, but also for the supporting infrastructure to create an attractive and safe public realm, for example, through inclusion of rows of trees or amenities such as benches or drinking fountains.

4.1.7.3 The City shall expand the Corridor to allow for the extension of the existing Trillium multi-use pathway along the west side of the O-Train between the Queensway (Highway 417) and Somerset Street to provide a parallel, north-south route that complements the existing east side, and provides better access to users arriving from west of the corridor.

4.1.7.4 Private property owners will be responsible for providing the multi-use pathway or bike route that is planned to be on or adjacent to their property (Section 5.3).

4.2 General Built Form Criteria

The Corso Italia Station District will see an eclectic mix of different building heights, massing, and typologies that are reflective of the history, the vitality, and dynamics of the place. The development within the District shall conform to the Official Plan built form policies pertaining to the Mixed-Use Centre and Traditional Mainstreet designations. The applicable Council-approved design guidelines and policies will also provide guidance on built form design. The following policies set out detailed criteria for all development projects to achieve high quality architecture and urban design and to ensure compatibility and transition.

4.2.1 Animated Building Edge

Animated building edges are essential for creating a safe, pedestrian-friendly, and successful urban environment.  The following policies address how to animate the public realm through built form and complement the Public Realm policies of this Plan (Section 5).

4.2.1.1 All new development projects shall be oriented to the local and internal streets, parks and pathways, including through-block connections, and walkways.

4.2.1.2 Edge conditions of development projects shall animate the public realm that they face through incorporating active entrances and architecture features and details that will enhance pedestrian safety and support the pedestrian experience.

4.2.1.3 Ground floor setbacks should be generally consistent with the existing pattern on the street and should range from 0m to 3.0m. Setbacks should only provide space for landscaping and tree plantings, patios, plazas or other spaces consistent with a downtown, urban built environment and supportive of public realm.

4.2.1.4 All new development regardless of use shall orient the principal façade and entrance(s) of main building(s) to the public street.

4.2.1.5 Locate front doors to face public streets and be directly accessible from the public sidewalk.

4.2.1.6 Ground floor residential dwelling units must include at least one active entrance facing a public street.

4.2.1.7 New private approaches and garages on facades of new low-rise residential buildings shall be prohibited. Garages shall only be permitted from an existing or new rear lane.

4.2.1.8 All development blocks shall strengthen building continuity with continuous built edges. Gaps between buildings should be minimized and only be used to create variation of interest in the street wall. Any deviation must be minor in proportion and demonstrate consistency with the quality of the broader public realm.

4.2.1.9 Ground-oriented units should consider a design that allows the future use of those units to be adapted to provide live-work or neighbourhood-commercial uses.

4.2.1.10 Building massing and elevations should enhance the character of the public realm and avoid creating microclimate impacts.

4.2.1.11 Loading and garbage facilities are to be primarily located underground, within a building podium, or screened from view from public streets.

4.2.1.12 Active frontage means: building frontages that animate the public spaces they face through:

  • pedestrian-oriented retail, commercial or institutional uses, or residential uses whose main front door is on said frontage; and 
  • doors that can be used by the general public directly from the sidewalk or public space to gain access to the building and use at all hours of regular operation, or to visit the residents of the dwelling; and 
  • architectural features and details that enhance pedestrian safety and provide visual interest to enrich pedestrian experience; and
  • the provision of a separate municipal address for each active entrance.

4.2.2 Mid-Rise Buildings

Mid-rise buildings are defined as buildings that are between five and nine storeys in height and may be permitted on a number of character areas in this Plan and may also be built on properties where high-rise buildings are permitted. In addition to the applicable policies in Volume 1 of the Official Plan, the following criteria will apply to mid-rise developments where they may occur.

4.2.2.1 In general, mid-rise building should have a base that relates to the sidewalk and pedestrian realm, a middle portion (a height that is approximately equivalent to the width of the right-of-way) to form part of the streetwall and relate to adjacent buildings, and a top that incorporates building form articulations such as step backs and/or elevation treatments to break up building mass and allow skyview, sunlight and transition.

4.2.2.2 New development will be required to articulate the building mass and explore design techniques such as setbacks and step backs to avoid the canyon effect along the public street and to minimize the visual and micro-climate impacts on public and private realms.

4.2.2.3 The relationship between the new development and the abutting existing and future residential buildings shall be carefully examined and addressed to ensure liveability for existing and future residents through adequate provisions for privacy, sunlight, and cross ventilation.

4.2.2.4 Mid-rise buildings, from five- to nine- storeys, may be permitted within a zone where a tower is permitted, when no tower is developed on that parcel.

4.2.3 High-Rise Buildings (10-30 storeys)

High-rise buildings are defined as buildings that are ten to thirty storeys in height and are permitted as shown on Schedule B, or specified in Section 4.1 of this Plan.  Potential high-rise building locations are identified on Schedule B. The following criteria apply to developments that incorporate a high-rise building in areas where a high-rise building is permitted:

4.2.3.1 A development site that accommodates a high-rise building shall have frontage on publicly-owned or publicly-accessible spaces along three of its sides. This could comprise of a combination of streets and/or publicly-owned or publicly-accessible spaces, such as a park, a multi-use pathway, or an easement created for public use. For example, combinations could include a frontage on three streets; a frontage on two streets plus one frontage on public space, or frontage on one street plus two frontages on publicly-accessible space.

4.2.3.2 The remaining podium building height around the perimeter of a tower(s) should generally be a height of three- to six-storeys: a three-storey maximum height should be developed along local streets where active residential frontage is required or provided, and a six-storey maximum height along designated Mainstreets or where retail uses are required or provided.

4.2.3.3 The podium and/or base of the development shall incorporate uses and human scale features to animate adjacent streets and open spaces.

4.2.3.4 Point tower design shall be provided for high-rise buildings.

4.2.3.5 Small floor plates will be encouraged with the typical floor area of a residential tower being generally up to 750 m2 and notwithstanding policy 4.11.15 of Volume 1 of the Official Plan, the typical floor area of an office tower being generally up to 2,000 m2.

4.2.3.6 Tower portions of high-rise buildings, as defined as between 10 and 30 storeys in height, will have a minimum separation distance of 20 metres. Reductions in this separation distance may only be considered if the development demonstrates compliance with policy 4.11.14a of Volume 1 of the Official Plan.

4.2.3.7 The relationship between potential towers within the same street block shall be addressed with towers being located as shown on Schedule B - Maximum Building Height and Tower Location and measures being introduced through the development review process to ensure orderly development of the block.

4.2.3.8 Coordination of tower locations shall be pursued to optimize views from towers to the city skyline and other public amenities.

4.2.4 Skyscrapers (31+ storeys)

Skyscrapers are defined as buildings that are thirty-one storeys or more in height. These buildings will be prominent features in the skyline and landscape and will have an impact on the identity and characteristics of the District and the City and will require extra attention in planning and design. Potential high-rise building locations are identified on Schedule B. The following criteria will apply to developments that incorporate a skyscraper, in addition to those of Section 4.2.3 of this Plan:

4.2.4.1 Development proposals will be subject to a thorough view impact analysis from various vantage points defined in Annex 8A of the Official Plan and no building, part of the building, or building roof structure shall have any impact on the visual integrity and symbolic primacy of the Parliament Buildings and other national symbols.

4.2.4.2 Tower portions of skyscrapers, as defined as 31 or more storeys in height, will have a minimum separation distance of 25 metres between any tower portion of a high-rise or skyscraper building. Reductions in this separation distance may only be considered if the development demonstrates compliance with policy 4.11.14a of Volume 1 of the Official Plan.

4.2.4.3 Development shall display design excellence and pursue distinction and variation in many aspects of design, in particular, the sculpting and articulation of the shape, the massing, and the top of the building in order to create a unique silhouette and skyline.

4.2.4.4 Development will be subject to Urban Design Review Panel process to ensure exceptional urban design and architecture quality, and coordination in the formation of an urban skyline through variations of height and design.

4.2.5 Transition and Neighbourhood Line

The City’s built form vision for the Corso Italia Station District allows for high-rise buildings at strategic locations and establishes transitions into the surrounding neighbourhoods and open spaces as detailed in Schedule B Heights and Tower Location. The following policies address transition.

Height Transition

4.2.5.1 Building heights will be tallest adjacent to the Corso Italia O-Train Station and along the Queensway, and shall generally reduce in height toward the surrounding established neighbourhoods.

4.2.5.2 Design of development on properties within the Station area designation and abutting the Mixed-Use Neighbourhood designation shall be compatible to the height, massing, scale, and architectural rhythm of the established low-rise residential buildings to the east and west.

Neighbourhood Line

4.2.5.3 A Neighbourhood Line is established along the study area’s east boundaries (Ward 14) and along the west boundaries (Ward 15), as shown in Schedule B Heights and Tower Location.

4.2.5.4 New developments within the District along the Neighbourhood Line will be compatible to the height, massing, scale, and architectural rhythm of the adjacent low-rise residential buildings when a developing parcel abuts a parcel with an existing low-rise building. Where a street is between new development and existing low-rise residential buildings, the street provides a buffer that can play an important role in building transitions and design considerations.

4.2.5.5 New developments within the District along the Neighbourhood Line shall explore design techniques such as a strong expression of a two or three-storey base with ground-oriented units and setbacks at the upper floors to reduce the visual and micro-climate impacts, where the building is facing the street. At the rear of the building, where it faces onto existing low-rise residential buildings, new development shall explore setbacks above four storeys.

4.2.5.6 New development at the southeast corner of Booth Street and Raymond Street shall incorporate a podium along Booth Street with a maximum height of four storeys in order to maintain a low-rise building profile directly along Booth Street between Raymond Street and Arlington Avenue. If a tower is developed, massing should employ additional setbacks and/or stepbacks.

5.0 Public Realm and Mobility

The successful transformation of the Corso Italia Station District will require the provision of a generous and high-quality public realm that attracts and supports people.  The public realm is both a destination for people and it determines where and how residents and visitors will be able to move, recreate, rest and socialize in the district, or in other words, their mobility.  Together, the public realm within the Corso Italia Station District will comprise public streets (including pedestrian-only streets and other spaces within the right-of-way), pedestrian and cycling paths, green transportation-utility corridors, and parks and other privately-owned public spaces (POPS).

Goals for public realm and mobility in the district are:

  • Design a network that supports the transportation modal share targets described in the City’s Transit-Oriented Development Plans with a minimum 85% modal share for transit, walking and cycling.
  • Maximise the provision of quality infrastructure dedicated to cycling and walking to support the target modal shares and implement a sustainable mobility paradigm that is resilient under a range of possible conditions, such as changing economic or health environments.
  • Reduce automobile activity and car dependence to minimize conflicts with pedestrians and cyclists, to support the use of transit and active transportation, and to improve the local environment and reduce GHGs; enhance the public realm by reducing the footprint of automobiles.
  • Improve the amount, types and quality of spaces available for the neighbourhood through increased parks, privately-owned public spaces and create use of public right-of-way to balance the increased numbers of people living and visiting the district.

5.1 Public Realm Objectives

This Secondary Plan sets out key directions for improvements that will rebalance public realm allocation across the district to ensure high-quality space is abundant to meet the following objectives.

5.1.1 Plan and design all new development with a premise of sustainable transportation (foot, bike, transit) having absolute precedence on how streets, paths and other linkages are designed.

5.1.2 Break down “superblocks” or large parcels of land so they are divided up to connect with the existing street grid and will facilitate the establishment of fine-grain pedestrian realm and mobility network.

5.1.3 Introduce new active transportation links to form an expansive, diverse, and easy-to-use pedestrian and cycling mobility network that connects the neighbourhood.

5.1.4 Minimize the number of streets that provide full vehicular movement.

5.1.5 Maximize right-of-way space and infrastructure for active modes of transportation, and for the allocation of passive recreational uses.

5.1.6     Provide ample opportunity for social interaction and physical distancing, when necessary, within the public realm through more options for pedestrian routes and enhanced passive recreational spaces, with supportive public amenities, such as benches, shade trees, public art, recreational installations and similar supporting features.

5.1.7 Create places of interest, foster identity, and support neighbourhood recreation and commerce.

5.1.8 Design all transportation infrastructure to provide high-quality cycling and walking environments oriented towards O-Train stations.

5.1.9 Provide motor vehicle access to all city blocks, including via underground structures, to minimize the number of private approaches and vehicle activity at surface grade.

5.1.10 Create indirect driving routes to reinforce slow vehicle speeds, to eliminate cut-through traffic, and minimize vehicle volumes.

5.1.11 Slow speed driving environment on all internal streets to support active transportation

5.1.12 Strategically control the availability of on-street parking, only where the need is most anticipated, to allocate more ROW to cycling lanes.

5.1.13 Prohibit new surface parking across the district, in general. At 818 Gladstone Avenue, very limited amounts of residential surface parking may be permitted in the interior of the block, and those spaces shall never abut a public street.

5.1.14 Protect the existing character of local side streets.

Schedule C - Public Realm Plan, sets out the key elements of the public realm and their locations and should be used to guide the municipal capital projects and the review of development applications.

5.2 New Streets and Active Transportation Network

The following policies provide specific direction for the public realm in specific areas across the district, as illustrated in Schedule C - Public Realm Plan, and located in Schedule D - Reference Map.

General Policies:

5.2.1 New streets or extensions will prioritize the safe movement of pedestrians and cyclists in their planning and design so that they enhance the active transportation experience, ensure safety, calm traffic and create a more enjoyable and welcoming public realm.

5.2.2 While vehicle volumes are anticipated to be low on local streets, pedestrians should be provided separation from traffic to ensure a comfortable and accessible environment. Wide sidewalks and a sense of place along the pedestrian routes shall be provided for these streets. Widenings are not for additional motor vehicle space.

5.2.3 On streets that are designated with road of right-of-way protection, additional width shall be allocated to prioritize improved conditions for active transportation, such as provision of a cycle lane or track, widened sidewalk, and street trees.

5.2.4 To support a high-quality pedestrian environment and to minimize traffic at new development sites, the developer and City shall explore possible mitigation measures such as:

5.2.4.1 Constructing physical speed management measures in local streets, such as bulb-outs/curb extensions, speed humps, chicanes, raised intersections, raised pedestrian crossings, pedestrian refuge islands, and so forth. These must result in all internal streets with a maximum driving speed of 30 km/h.

5.2.4.2 Posting clear speed limit reductions on local streets (supported by physical traffic calming measures);

5.2.4.3 Implementing turning restrictions for local streets in the district (that is permitting “out” movements but no “in” movements, etc.);

5.2.4.4 Installing “Local Area Traffic Only” signs at accesses to local streets in the Study Area.

5.2.4.5 Transforming streets into living streets, such as woonerfs (low speed limits of 10 to 15 km/h, narrow pavement widths, and lack of curbs or signage to have all modes of travel exist in the same space);

1010 Somerset Street

5.2.5 The street and block pattern for properties south of Somerset Street West, west of Preston, north of Gladstone Avenue and east of the Trillium multi-use pathway (property at 933 Gladstone Avenue and 1010 Somerset Street West) shall follow the street and block framework shown on Schedule C - Public Realm Plan.

5.2.6 No through street shall be permitted from Somerset Street to Oak Street.

5.2.7 Primary vehicular access to the 1010 Somerset Street site should only be from Somerset Street.

5.2.8 Servicing, drop-offs or pick-ups, and parking for 1010 Somerset parcels shall primarily occur via a north-south connection from Somerset Street to a podium and/or underground facility. This includes all access required to the western-most parcel, located on the west side of the right-of-way extending south from the “City Centre Underpass Pathway” and future the pedestrian and cycling route (5.2.10). Any future recreational facilities or institutional uses will be required to use the access from Somerset Street.

5.2.9 Not withstanding, 5.2.8, an external east-west lane on the rear side of buildings with Somerset Street frontage may be considered, if deemed necessary to service the interior of the block; for example, to address Fire Services operations. This would connect from the principal Somerset Street access, but could run external in lieu of access through the interior of a buildings. Establishing a high quality and safe pedestrian-oriented environment, particularly given the context of the abutting park, shall remain a priority.

5.2.10 The City Centre Underpass and Pathway, linking City Centre Avenue and 1010 Somerset Street and the 933 Gladstone Avenue sites, provides the most direct, accessible and convenient route to significant, future redevelopments at City Centre Avenue, Albert Street, LeBreton Flats, and the Bayview O-Train Station and shall be used as a primary pedestrian and cycling gateway and corridor to and from these redevelopment sites.

5.2.11 Not withstanding, 5.2.6 and 5.2.7 above, if limited vehicular access is to be provided using the City Centre Underpass Pathway, it must be subordinate to pedestrian and cycling circulation. Should the width of the underpass be enlarged, consideration may be given to additional vehicular access only if the primacy of pedestrians and cyclists is maintained.

5.2.12 Without necessary improvements to the Underpass (as described in 5.2.11), vehicular use of the City Centre Underpass Pathway shall not be permitted for general public access to parking uses on any parcel at 1010 Somerset Street (public or private). Vehicular use at the Underpass Pathway may be considered for limited access for the servicing of 1010 Somerset, if a public recreational facility or school were to develop, and if deemed necessary. Under such a circumstance, restricted automobile access would not interfere with the core function, as a key pedestrian and cycling route.

5.2.13 A staircase that links pedestrians from the City Centre Underpass Pathway directly to the south side of Somerset Street shall be provided by future development. The stairway shall be easily visible and publicly accessible at all times.

5.2.14 The gateway of the City Centre Underpass Pathway will be a dynamic space and shall accommodate users 24-hour a day. Lighting will play a major role to ensure security and the success of ground-level uses facing onto this pedestrian-oriented gateway and corridor. Programmed lighting and programmed activities should be considered to ensure year-round safety and activity, exploring opportunities that may not be currently City standard, in order to turn this node into a destination.

5.2.15 Future development may be built to abut the existing MUP, allowing improvements for access to and from the Somerset Street bridge. Any reduction in MUP accessibility and functionality is prohibited.

5.2.16 A new pedestrian pathway and cycling route shall extend from the City Centre Underpass, across the new 1.0 park, connecting to the extended Oak Street, near Street A, to the east and to the multi-use pathway to the west. Its exact location will be coordinated with the park programming to ensure it supports park uses, but also ensure desire lines to off-site destinations are maximized.

933 Gladstone Avenue and Preston Street Side Streets

5.2.17 The street and block pattern shall be generally as shown on Schedule C - Public Realm Plan.

5.2.18 The new internal road network, including Streets A, B and C, and the Oak and Larch Street extensions, shall ensure there are routes for all cyclists that provide barrier-free, continuous and low-stress facilities, such as cycle tracks, bike lanes or multi-use pathways; or by designing narrow streets where cyclists share the road with automobiles. Such shared streets shall provide safe, comfortable environments that are attractive for use by cyclists of all ages and needs, and to achieve this shall employ speed management techniques that ensure vehicular traffic does not exceed a maximum speed of 30 km/h.

5.2.19 Three new, north-south streets shall be created, as shown on Schedule A, and shall each have their own street name:

  • “Street A” shall intersect with the Oak Street extension.
  • “Street B” shall intersect with Gladstone Avenue.
  • “Street C”, a woonerf street, shall intersect with Oak Street and the Larch Street (new western segment).  Whether it is a public or private street will be determined through the development review application process.

5.2.20 Streets A and B and the Larch Street extension shall provide the principal, north-south pedestrian spine through the 933 Gladstone Avenue site given the anticipated residential population immediately abutting it and its direct alignment with the City Centre Underpass Pathway, a major urban connection and desire line to City Centre Avenue, future development at City Centre, 900 Albert Street, LeBreton Flats, the major transportation hub at Bayview Station, and Albert Street access to the downtown core.

5.2.21 Streets A and B, Oak Street and the Larch Street extension shall have a right-of-way width that must be able to accommodate to City-standards the following elements: accessible and enhanced pedestrian facilities, safe and inviting cycling conditions for all ages, medium to large street trees on both sides, maximum 3.0m-wide vehicular lanes, and on-street parking that supports these spatial elements.

5.2.22 Streets A and B, and the Larch Street extension may provide passive recreational space through additional sidewalk width to provide an attractive and functional area for residents and visitors to meet, recreate and rest.

5.2.23 Street C should be established as a “woonerf” or shared street where the right-of-way is shared amongst pedestrians, cyclists and vehicles, and shall be a minimum 15.0m right-of-way. It should be designed with enhanced pedestrian amenities and greenery.

5.2.24 The new north-south lanes that are to be implemented east of the “woonerf” street shall have no vehicular access to the existing Laurel Street or Larch Street. Car access should be only from Oak Street and the new Larch Street segment.

5.2.25 Oak Street shall be opened and extended to the west to provide access and frontage for the new 1.0 -hectare park and permit access into the 933 Gladstone property, as shown on Schedule A. Re-design of the street shall incorporate speed management measures to ensure the street maintains the characteristics of a local residential street, including a maximum driving speed of 30 km/h.

5.2.26 A pedestrian route, such as a treed sidewalk, shall be located on the north side of Oak Street and its extension.

5.2.27 The existing Larch Street shall remain a dead-end to motor vehicles, however, an active transportation extension of Larch Street shall be created to intersect with Street B, as shown on Schedule A. West of the landscaped dead-end at the existing Larch Street, a segment to new Larch Street will extend west and provide motor vehicle circulation to Streets A and B.

5.2.28 Laurel Street shall remain a dead-end street to motor vehicles.

5.2.29 A new Laurel Street Active Transportation Corridor shall be established between Laurel Street east of the O-Train Corridor to Laurel Street west of the O-Train Corridor to connect the district to surrounding communities and to link future cycling infrastructure. This will be accomplished by constructing an active transportation bridge, as shown on Schedule C. No motor vehicle traffic will be permitted on the corridor or the bridge. It should be a minimum width of 12m to include separated sidewalks and cycle tracks, and generous street trees on both its north and south sides.

5.2.30 The public realm of the Laurel Street Active Transportation Corridor between the Trillium multi-use pathway and the dead-end of Laurel Street may be enhanced with passive recreation uses, where possible. Buildings should address the path with active frontages or architectural details.

5.2.31 Balsam and/or Larch Streets may be connected to the 933 Gladstone site, if appropriate transportation studies clearly demonstrate that there is no other option to ensure a sound management of automobile circulation based on mode shares that reflect the downtown location and mode share goals that may apply under the Transportation Master Plan. The preferred option is to open Balsam Street only.

5.2.32 Pedestrian and cycling paths shall be provided between each new development block that abuts the Trillium multi-use pathway to provide connection to local streets to reinforce the fine-grained mobility network. The paths shall be publicly accessible 24 hours, each day of the year, to ensure a continuous connectivity.

5.2.33 The intersections of any new street shall be designed at or very near 90-degree angles. This reinforces the existing street grid characteristic of the downtown core and turning radii that are the minimum permissible reduce the likelihood and/or severity of collisions between motor vehicles and vulnerable road users by slowing the motorist turns.

5.2.34 The rights-of-way of the existing Oak, Laurel, Larch and Balsam Streets shall be redesigned with a priority to establish enhanced pedestrian and cycling routes, during any future public works infrastructure renewal project, or private redevelopment project. This includes ensuring the connection the existing and future streets so that the active transportation network is coordinated and unified. A woonerf or shared street may be considered.

5.2.35 On-street parking locations on local streets should be identified in early planning phases to ensure that the space they take up does not preclude active transportation objectives in subsequent phases of development.

5.2.36 Curb cuts or depressed curbs that currently facilitate access for illegal front-yard parking spaces shall not be reinstated.

5.2.37 The City will consider introducing a “front-yard parking elimination incentive program” that provides owners with a 10-year, no-cost, on-street parking permit when a legally established front-yard parking space is replaced by a planted front yard.

5.2.38 The City may consider the purchase of a portion of any property that currently blocks access from the existing east-west rear lanes to future north-south rear lanes to the west, at 933 Gladstone Avenue. Opening of these lanes shall be only to provide improved pedestrian connectivity and enhance the pedestrian network; motor vehicle access between the existing and future rear lanes shall be prohibited.

Gladstone Avenue

5.2.39 The public realm along the north side of Gladstone Avenue, from the O-Train Station to Booth Street, shall receive a higher order of treatment. It will have ample sidewalks separated from the vehicular flow by a planting strip, including street trees. It will be characterized by generous pedestrian zones for walking, ample bicycle parking, street furniture, street trees and planting beds. Bus stops and shelters will be located along Gladstone Avenue.

5.2.40 A 10m road widening to the north side of Gladstone Avenue shall be required from the right-of-way centreline from Preston Street to Street B to ensure public realm improvements can be satisfied, including adequate space for active transportation mobility needs, such as a widened sidewalk and bicycle lane, as well as adequate space for new street trees to provide continuity with the higher order public realm designated for the north side of the Gladstone Avenue. No part of the widened right-of-way shall be allocated to additional or widened car lanes or on-street parking.

5.2.41 The implementation of a “Station Gateway” at the crossing of the multi-use pathway and Gladstone Avenue, east of the O-Train Station, shall be a design and operational priority, given its importance as north-south transportation spine in the western downtown core. The active transportation priority should provide high Level of Service for both pedestrians and cyclists. As future redevelopment occurs around it, any traffic solution will prioritize its visibility, efficiency, and the convenience and safety of pedestrians and cyclists. The multi-use pathway alignment parallel and abutting to the O-Train corridor will remain in perpetuity.

818 Gladstone Avenue (Rochester Heights Phase 2)

5.2.42 The block, parcel and right-of-way framework shall support a public realm made up of a combination of paths and through-block connections for pedestrian activity, integration and accessibility to the surrounding neighbourhood. It shall be open 24-hours a day, all days of the year. The network of pathways shall provide pedestrians with multiple route options that satisfy key desire lines, but also can provide moments of rest, relaxation and interaction.

5.2.43 East-west paths shall be established onsite generally aligning with the neighbouring Louisa Street and Arlington Avenue to extend continuity to support an expansive and easy to use pedestrian and cycling network.

5.2.44 A north-south pedestrian route shall be established to provide internal pedestrian spine from Gladstone Avenue to Raymond Street.

5.2.45 Pedestrian gateways into the site should be located near the corners of Gladstone Avenue and Rochester Street, Booth and Raymond Streets, and from Piazza Dante to the interior of the site to satisfy future desire lines of the Booth Street Complex to the Gladstone Avenue, Preston Street, and the O-Train Station.

5.2.46 A variety of activity nodes should be considered along the path system to offer options for passive recreational use.

5.2.47 The building(s) at the south-east corner of Gladstone Avenue and Rochester Street shall support a place-making experience and a pedestrian gateway from the Gladstone Avenue mainstreet into the broader Rochester Height Phase site. All units fronting Gladstone Avenue shall have direct, public access to sidewalk.

5.2.48 Alternate standards for street cross-sections may be considered to support an enhanced pedestrian environment, to limit and mitigate vehicular use of the site.

5.2.49 Encourage the on-site protection and integration of existing, mature trees.

5.2.50 Gladstone Avenue and Booth Street will be considered for reconfiguration to prioritize the movement and experience of pedestrians, cyclists and other forms of alternative transportation. Public works undertakings shall consider the elimination of the east bound, right-turn lane on Gladstone Avenue onto southbound Booth Street, to provide an opportunity for:

5.2.50.1 Re-purposing the ROW for a cycling lane.

5.2.50.2 Slowing eastbound car traffic along Gladstone frontage of this revitalized block, as and it turns onto Booth Street.

5.2.50.3  A northward expansion of Piazza Dante into the existing Gladstone  Avenue to improve the street presence and neighbourhood identity of  the public space and by becoming part of the vista point in the foreground of St. Anthony’s Church.

5.2.51 A woonerf street may be permitted within the interior of the block linking Booth Street and Rochester Street.

5.2.52 Limited amounts of residential surface parking may be permitted in the interior of the block, and those spaces shall never abut a public street.

Adult High School (300 Rochester Street)

5.2.53 Given the superblock scale of this site, future redevelopment shall include of a Master Site Plan that:

5.2.53.1 Establish an east-west connection for pedestrians and cyclists located  parallel to the southern edge of the site to connect Rochester Street to Preston Street.

5.2.53.2  Addresses how park or recreational space that is accessible for general  community use can be provided. 

5.2.53.3 Considers how the urban plaza (south of the existing Adult High School) can be enhanced.

Rochester Street

5.2.54   Rochester Street will be designed as a complete street with wide sidewalks, bicycle facilities, on-street parking, and street trees, taking into account the context of the corridor and the available right-of-way.

5.3 Active Transportation Bridge and Multi-Use Pathways (MUP)

5.3.1 An active transportation bridge shall be built over the O-Train corridor directly connecting pedestrians and cyclists from Laurel Street east of the O-Train corridor to Laurel Street west of the O-Train corridor, and to the broader mobility network.

5.3.2 The bridge facility and infrastructure shall be designed and constructed to provide an active transportation route for the exclusive use of pedestrians, cyclists and other alternative transportation modes. No motor vehicles will be permitted, except for maintenance.

5.3.3 A north-south, multi-use pathway (MUP) shall be provided on the west side of the transit corridor, to continue the route from south of the Queensway bridge to Somerset Street. It will be developed primarily on privately-owned land, and deeded to the City as part of the development application processed. Provision of an easement may be considered in limited cases, if deemed more appropriate. Private property owners will provide a feasibility study, a design, pay for and construct that portion of the pathway that is on or adjacent to their property, and deed the property to the City as part of development approval.

5.3.4 The design and construction of a new MUP, or the re-construction the existing MUP, shall widen or twin the paths to accommodate both pedestrians and cyclists in a way that attracts them under year-round conditions to support active transportation needs originating from both within the district and outside of it. Separating pedestrians and cyclists along multi-use pathways provides an important opportunity to achieve more appropriate conditions, beyond the standard pathway paved width of 3.0 m, where a spatial opportunity exists or can be created. Where the MUP is existing, improvements will be at the cost of the City, however, any new developments by adjacent landowners to an existing MUP shall work with the City to facilitate such improvements.

5.3.5 The existing ramp, or comparable, that provides direct access for cyclists and pedestrians to and from the Somerset Street Bridge to the existing, eastern MUP should be retained at, or near, its present location to maintain convenience and choice for active transportation users.

5.3.6 The existing, eastern MUP should be aligned in a way that remains as direct and intuitive for cyclists and pedestrians, giving them priority. It shall not create awkward site conditions that would affect abutting development parcels, their building siting and yield. An alignment that is the same or very close to original MUP alignment (i.e. immediately abutting the O-Train corridor) is the preferred scenario, for example, at Gladstone Avenue.

5.3.7     A heated MUP that uses the energy from the district energy infrastructure should be considered where that infrastructure is located beneath or near it, if feasible. 

5.4 Parks and Other Public Spaces

5.4.1 A park of no less than 1 hectare shall be designated on 1010 Somerset Street and be located from the western edge of the existing Plouffe Park to the existing Trillium multi-use pathway, as shown in Schedule C.

5.4.2     The 1 ha park should provide a range of public space programming, including:

5.4.2.1 A possible extension of uses at Plouffe Park.

5.4.2.2 An unobstructed active recreational space that can accommodate a full- size soccer pitch.

5.4.2.3 A pathway connecting the City Centre Underpass to the Oak Street extension.

5.4.2.4  An area for passive recreation or communal gatherings, at the western  end of park, abutting the multi-use pathway. Given its view terminus of  the park and intersection at the MUP, this space is highly visible and  should include feature(s) of cultural expression, such as public art, First Nations and local storytelling, or other place-making experiences.   

5.4.3 Recreation, Cultural, and Facility Services will provide the recommendations for park programming, planning and design.

5.4.4 If a school is built at 933 Gladstone Avenue or 1010 Somerset, the City of Ottawa and the School Board for the school will jointly review and develop programming of park to maximize the shared use of the space for area residents and students.

5.4.5 A neighbourhood, urban plaza, referred to in this plan as the Gladstone Plaza, will be built on 933 Gladstone Avenue. This privately-owned public space (POPS) will be a minimum size of 650m², designed as a unified, contiguous public space, and shall have frontage on both Gladstone Avenue and the existing Trillium multi-use pathway. There shall be building setbacks on both of these frontages to ensure adequate public realm on each of these active frontages at this significant location at the crossroads of the district.

5.4.6 The Gladstone Plaza shall be a space of civic significance creating neighbourhood identity and place-making for this redeveloping area, and therefore, provide functional and aesthetic roles for surrounding area, including the Trillium multi-use pathway, the surrounding new developments and supporting the O-train station.

5.4.7 The majority of the Gladstone Plaza shall be designed and used for public space. However, a small amount of the space may permit at-grade retail or restaurant uses by tenants of the building.

5.4.8 The Gladstone Plaza area should anticipate greater volumes of north-south pedestrian traffic along the existing MUP and from Gladstone Avenue, and will therefore, provide a supporting role in this pedestrian route by ensuring design will accommodate pedestrians from Gladstone Avenue to the north end of the plaza.

5.4.9 New public park land of a minimum of 1700m² shall be provided at 818 Gladstone and located contiguous with the existing Piazza Dante.

5.4.10 Piazza Dante will be revitalized and expanded as public park to serve the existing and the new residents of the surrounding Rochester Height Phase 2 area. Its cultural significance will be reinforced as programming and design opportunities are explored in the context of the evolving Gladstone Avenue mainstreet and redevelopment phasing at Rochester Heights Phases 1 and 2.

5.4.11 Courtyards or small parkettes are encouraged as part of new developments through privately-owned public spaces (POPS) to support a broader public realm network that is continuous and unified.

5.4.12 The identification of public spaces at 818 Gladstone Avenue site should consider the location of significant trees or stands of trees that remain on the site.

5.4.13 The existing soccer pitch at 300 Rochester Street (Adult High School) is designated as “Other Greenspace”, given it is part of the grounds of an institution, but is not open to the general public. However, it has long provided a recreational facility to local soccer club and has cultural value to the identity of Little Italy. When redevelopment of the site is being considered, the recreational space should be considered for retention on the site, and a fulsome review made regarding the opportunity to make the site more available for general community use.

5.5 Parking and Servicing

Bicycle

5.5.1 Reduced on-street parking should be replaced by ubiquitous and plentiful bike parking racks or bike parking lots strategically located as close to destinations and building entrances as possible.

5.5.2     Bike parking rates should exceed the minimum required by the zoning by-law for multi-unit residential buildings to support the required active transportation vision for the district. Zoning By-law amendments should reflect a percentage of required spaces for long term parking and match a minimum rate of 1.0 bike parking space per multi-residential unit.

5.5.3 Long term interior bike parking facilities shall:

5.5.3.1 Be located in a secure and comfortable parking area and maximize convenient access to the street and pathway grid to encourage more trips by bicycle. Locations should be nearest to the entrances that do not inhibit coming and going. This may be within the building, such as the basement where automobiles are store; or within a secure, locked and heated outside area. Consider features like automated door openers leading to/from interior bike parking.

5.5.3.2 Provide storage space that reflects the number and sizes of residential units within in a building, such as a range of one- to four bedroom- units. This ensures support of essential transportation support a diversity of tenants, including larger households.

5.5.4 Short term parking facilities shall be provided, primarily for ease of coming and going, and facilitating visitors. They may be provided by a paved outdoor area near building entrances with a bike parking lot, the size dependent on the number of dwelling units.

Automobile

5.5.5 On-street public parking should be strategically controlled, given the existing right-of-way constraints on the street network across the District and due to risks of encouraging travel to the District by personal vehicle and discouraging active transportation, especially cycling. Where on-street parking is desirable, it should be designed in such a way as to integrate with and allow active transportation infrastructure, for example bike lanes or sidewalks, and not preclude such facilities. However, the use of on-street parking permit zones for residents shall be considered a preferred alternative to on-site parking that results in building or site design that is incompatible with established character, or prohibited by other policies in this plan.

5.5.6 While the numbers will decrease over time, automobiles will continue to be driven to the District, and hence so will a need to provide parking for those vehicles. To supplement on-street parking, other parking alternatives for consideration include:

5.5.6.1 Arrangements to share parking among developments with different peak demand times. This creates a need for a lesser parking supply that is better-utilized.

5.5.6.2 Permitting paid public parking in underground garages of buildings, where those garages have their entrances within a short distance of a Mainstreet.

5.5.6.3 Structured parking buildings that include and/or are intended to be converted into other uses in the long-term future, subject to the requirements of Section 5.5.7.

5.5.7 All parking for new developments should be provided in below-grade parking structures. Underground parking ensures that scarce ground-level or surface areas and their uses will be occupied and used for people, not vehicles, over the duration of a day. Moreover, these are most accessible lands to pedestrians.

5.5.8 Parking may be considered within podium structures in cases where topography can ensure that the podium parking at ground level does not abut a public sidewalk and other public realm. Where they are adjacent, an active frontage use should separate the parking garage and the street.

5.5.9 Entrances to underground or podium parking or servicing for large sites or blocks should be located as close to the vehicle source street as possible. This minimizes the amount of public or private right-of-way or site space dedicated for automobile use and minimizes the at-grade travel distance of vehicles through a site. This can reduce conflict between automobile modes and active transportation modes of transportation, and it can maximize the amount of space allocated for active transportation mobility and recreation uses.

5.5.10 All parking should be accessed at one point per block face, and consolidate shared access drives or ramps, if necessary, to avoid multiple vehicle access points in a single development phase. Parking access locations should located to avoid unnecessary disruption to the public realm and street edge.

5.5.11 Surface parking lots are prohibited. In limited cases, along private streets, surface parking may be permitted where it shall only be provided by parallel, on-street parking for long- and short-term parking. Surface parking for ground-oriented residential units should be provided in the interior of the block, and those spaces shall never abut a public street.

5.5.12 There shall be no drop-offs or lay-by designs on either public or private streets. Drop-offs and deliveries may be considered on the interior of the site.

5.5.13 All on-site parking, storage, and logistical functions such as solid waste management and removal, should occur within the building, underground, or in a well-designed area that is visually screened and where noises are well-mitigated from the general public and on-site or neighbouring residential use. Individual loading or garbage truck bays at grade that are not designed this way will not be permitted.

6.0 Sustainability

The Plan area is characterized by a number of large and small properties.  Large underutilized or vacant parcels provide an opportunity to incorporate, advance and showcase sustainable design and development with renewable energy solutions.  The goal is to achieve net zero annual greenhouse gas emissions through various design considerations and mandates.

6.1 District Energy System

6.1.1 New developments should pursue the coordination, design and introduction of district energy systems at their site. Such heating and cooling systems are strongly urged to be supplied from renewable energy sources if available, such as geo-thermal sources, rather than non-renewable energy sources in order to achieve the City’s target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 100% by 2050.

6.1.2 Property owners and developers shall work with the City to advance district energy systems by way of shared funding, research and coordination, as may be required. Parties may pursue a joint memorandum of understanding, initiated by the City of Ottawa, that defines the terms of implementation, such as who is responsibility for what, when actions should be delivered, who bears cost, and other required matters.

6.1.3 No district energy system component, such as a district energy control centre, shall preclude the free and clear programming and use of the parkland at 1010 Somerset Street.

6.1.4 Underground infrastructure related to a district energy system could be located under the existing Trillium multi-use pathway. No infrastructure shall negatively impact the regular operation of the multi-use pathway.

6.1.5 Temporary utility servicing will only be permitted for development until such time as the ultimate end state source of energy is constructed an in-service date for district energy is offered. In such instances, buildings are to be constructed to be district energy-ready in accordance with municipal guidelines. Any temporary utility servicing shall be removed once the district energy hook-up is commissioned.

6.2 Other Sustainability Initiatives

6.2.1 Solar energy, energy storage systems, zero emissions space and water heating and other zero emission technologies that are or may become available over the span of the area’s development shall be considered in redevelopments, including through public and private sector partnerships.

6.2.2 Energy efficient transportation systems will be integrated where feasible, including electric vehicles and charging facilities. Options which will reduce the need to truck snow from the area should be considered.

6.2.3 Low impact development alternatives for stormwater management, such as rainwater capture and reuse for irrigation, bioswales, permeable pavement, and similar approaches are encouraged and will be evaluated where viable. Such alternatives shall be developed at the project onset and in coordination with City Stormwater Management staff to assess implementation feasibility.

6.2.4 The City will encourage and facilitate opportunities for partnerships, incentives and funding opportunities that assist in implementing sustainability initiatives.

6.2.5 The City may consider alternative development standards for streets, utilities and infrastructure to support sustainable practices and will coordinate as necessary with the city departments and external service organizations to coordinate the achievement the plan’s objectives.

7.0 Servicing and Infrastructure

New infrastructure will be required for development within the Corso Italia Station District. It is expected that servicing requirements can be managed on a property-by-property basis through the normal development review process.

7.1 The City will require the proponents of new development to review on-site stormwater control needs in the early stages of the site plan review process. In some cases, underground storage, or non-traditional Low Impact Development measures may be required to meet control requirements.

7.2 The City will require the proponents of new development to evaluate fire flow demands in relation to available local fire flows as part of the site plan review process. This evaluation may identify the need for local watermain upgrades, dead-end looping, and/or additional fire protection measures.

8.0 Housing

This District will be attractive and supportive for all members of society. There will be a broad range of housing choices for existing and future residents, as many more people are expected to live in the area in the long term. A community that is diverse is both complete and resilient. The policies below, which are further to the policies in Section 4.5 of Volume 1 of the Official Plan, support this objective:

8.1 Affordable housing should be provided in accordance with Official Plan targets and in conformity with any requirements that may be enacted in an Inclusionary Zoning By-law.

8.2 A range of housing types and tenures are encouraged for residential uses. Twenty-five per cent of all rental and ownership housing in the District should be affordable, meeting Official Plan policies for affordability.

8.3 The City will work to facilitate partnerships with the non-profit and private sectors to develop affordable rental housing for households below the 30th income percentile as defined in the Official Plan.

8,4 The City will consider the provision of affordable housing units and the conservation and replacement of affordable rental housing as possible community benefits. Legislation requires that existing RGI units that are lost through redevelopment must be replaced; therefore, replacement of RGI units will not be considered as a possible community benefit.

8.5 Affordable housing is encouraged to be incorporated throughout the district, and through various means. The City shall include the provision of affordable, artist live-work space units on privately-owned lands, as possible, under Section 37 or a Community Benefits By-law.

8.6 In recognition of the difficulty encountered by many people in securing adequate live-workspace, the City shall encourage the provision for a percentage of live-work space in residential developments in the Corso Italia Station District Secondary Plan area, through the Zoning By-law.

8.7 The entire Corso Italia Station District area subject to this Plan is designated a Protected Major Transit Station Area. Inclusionary Zoning regulations shall be implemented within the district, once Council approves a broader City strategy and policy for its implementation.

9.0 Arts, Culture and Creative Industries

The Corso Italia Secondary Plan Area is a place where arts, cultural, and creative industries have organically grown to be a defining element of the area’s identity. With enhanced vitality and quality, the area in and around the District will continue to inspire arts-related uses and to encourage creative industries and the local businesses that contribute to their ecosystem.

9.1 Arts and Cultural Preservation and Enhancement

9.1.1 New development projects in the area should demonstrate that their proposal has considered how it can support and reinforce the arts and cultural capital of the area. Planning and design initiatives can be directly through a proponent’s project or in coordination with other opportunities that may be private, public, or non-governmental (not-for-profit), for example.

9.1.2 A percentage of contributions pursuant to Section 37 of the Planning Act, or any successor Community Benefits provision, for development applications may be collected and used within the Corso Italia Station District for:

9.1.2.1 The provision of artist live-work space (Section 8);

9.1.2.2 The development of an Art’s Hub which will serve as a focal point and community anchor to the area’s creative cultural industries. It will continue to enhance and evolve an already vibrant arts culture, while providing connections to Bayview Yards to the north, and the Preston- Carling District, to the south.

9.1.2.3 The provision of art and creative industry workspace.

9.1.3 The City may consider preparing an area-specific Community Benefits By-law for the Corso Italia Station District.

9.2 Small Format Businesses

This Plan encourages design of new development that supports the provision of smaller format retail and maker spaces for family-operated or small, local entrepreneurial business that serve the community, such as retail or serviced-base shops, such as coffee, dessert, floral, shoe and other repair shops, or mobile phone and courier pick-up shops. These types of businesses appeal to commuters who can access these services on route and on foot and don't rely heavily on vehicular traffic.

10.0 Intrepretation

This Secondary Plan establishes a range of policies to guide future development in the Corso Italia District. Sections 3 to 9 and Schedules A, B, C and D constitute the Corso Italia Station District Secondary Plan.

Schedule A - Character Area identifies various land use character areas within the Mixed-Use Centre and General Urban Area and provides policy directions for these areas.

Schedule B - Height and Tower Location illustrates the height provision and the general tower locations of the Secondary Plan. The height limit provided for on this Schedule is the maximum permitted. The general floor to ceiling height provision is provided in Section 2.2.2 of the Official Plan. The location of the towers is approximate rather than absolute.

Schedule C - Public Realm Plan illustrates the overall long-term public realm plan for the Corso Italia Station District. It identifies the improvements and enhancements that are needed for transforming the District into a future west downtown destination.

Schedule D - Reference Map identifies key properties and areas referenced in Secondary Plan policy

Annex A – Demonstration Plan is used to show how planning and design policies could be implemented to achieve the area vision. It is not a proposal. While it is conceptual and for illustration only, it does exemplify how the diverse range of policy objectives could be achieved in a wholistic and realistic way. Moreover, many elements of these demonstrations do contain planning and design outcomes, infrastructure and features that are either required or recommended under the policies of this Plan, and therefore, they provide a useful illustration of expected outcomes from this Plan.

11.0 Implementation

11.1 General Land Use Planning Tools

This Secondary Plan shall be implemented using some or all of the following, as provided for under the Planning Act and also identified in Volume 1 of the Official Plan:

11.1.1 Approval of individual draft plans of subdivision/condominium and part lot control exemptions.

11.1.2 Enactment of Zoning By-laws.

11.1.3 Use of site plan control.

11.1.4 Execution of Letters of Undertaking and/or registration of site plan agreements.

11.1.5 Use of the Holding Symbol “h”.

11.1.6 Dedication of parkland or cash-in-lieu of parkland.

11.1.7 Use of powers and incentives enabled by a Community Improvement Plan.

11.1.8   Use of development agreements registered on title.

11.2 Achieving Public Realm and Mobility Improvements

11.2.1 As Part of the Development Review Process

11.2.1.1 Clarify how the application implements the policies in Section 5.0 of this Plan and strategies and guidelines.

11.2.1.2 Identify the location and design of public spaces, including public lands, (such as required parkland), privately-owned public spaces, cash-in-lieu or some combination, as referenced in this Plan.

11.2.1.3 Identify how the development will be responsible for but not limited to the following improvements within and adjacent to the public rights of way: new sidewalks and special paving, street trees and understory plantings, pedestrian level lighting, street furniture, and landscaping.

11.2.1.4 Plan of Subdivision and/or Site Plan Control applications shall reflect the parkland dedication area requirements identified in this secondary plan, and the park property configurations generally reflected in Schedule C. Should a publicly-owned property be sold to a private landowner, and should there be any deviation from the park dedication requirements resulting from their application, including increases to density exceeding the amount of parkland identified and notable changes to park area configurations, that property is subject to parkland dedication requirements, including cash-in-lieu of parkland, and to the contribution of community benefits as part of the development application review and approval process to ensure the realization of priority public realm improvements

11.2.2` Special Public Realm Improvement District

11.2.2.1 The City shall designate the entire Corso Italia Station District Secondary Plan area, as shown in Schedule A of this Plan, as a special public realm improvement district.

11.2.2.2 The City shall direct that all cash-in-lieu of park land collected through development applications within the Corso Italia Station District pursuant to Section 42 of the Planning Act be used for the acquisition of new park land and the improvements to the existing parks within the Corso Italia District.

11.2.2.3 The City shall direct that all contributions collected through development applications within the Corso Italia Station District pursuant to Section 37 of the Planning Act be used within the Corso Italia District.

11.2.2.4 The City may consider preparing an area specific Development Charge Area for the Corso Italia District.

11.2.3 Priority Projects for Public Realm Improvement

11.2.3.1 The City shall give priority to the acquisition and development of parks and improvement projects at the 1010 Somerset property, Plant Recreation Centre and Plouffe Park site, and 933 Gladstone Avenue site, including the active transportation bridge, as highlighted in Schedule C - Public Realm Plan over the next 15 years.

11.2.3.2 The next priority are public realm improvement projects identified for the remainder of the secondary plan area, as developments occur.

11.2.4 Achieving the Mobility Vision

11.2.4.1 Further to Section 5, any new development application shall demonstrate how proposed streets and paths and their conditions will achieve the objectives and policies of this Plan. This will be shown through the appropriate transportation study. This will be prepared in advance of or concurrent with applications for a Plan of Subdivision and/or Zoning By-law amendment. The transportation study will be approved to the satisfaction of the General Manager of Planning, Infrastructure and Economic Development.

11.3 Co-operation with Other Jurisdictions

The implementation of certain policies will require the co-operation of other public authorities, including the Province of Ontario and the National Capital Commission. Wherever the agreement or involvement of two or more authorities is required to implement certain aspects of the Plan, the City of Ottawa will initiate discussions with these authorities with the objective of reaching an agreement on a desirable course of action.

12.0 Schedules

Schedule A - Character Areas Plan

Schedule B – Maximum Building Heights and Tower Location Plan

Schedule C - Public Realm Plan

Schedule D – Reference Map: Key Properties or Areas Noted in Secondary Plan Policy

13.0 Annexes

Annex A – Demonstration Concept Plan for Corso Italia Station District Secondary Plan

Annex B – Demonstration Concept Plan for 818 Gladstone Avenue by Ottawa Community Housing Corporation

Annex C – Demonstration Concept Plan for 933 Gladstone Avenue by Ottawa Community Housing Corporation

East Urban Community Phase 3 Secondary Plan

[Amendment #251, March 31, 2021]

1.0 INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this Secondary Plan (“the Plan”) is to guide future growth and development on the East Urban Community Phase 3 Area (‘EUC Phase 3 Area’) lands.

The Plan is City Council’s policy direction for municipal actions, particularly in the review of Plans of Subdivision, Zoning and Site Plan Control Applications, applications to the Committee of Adjustment, and in the undertaking of public works.

The Plan is based on the EUC Phase 3 Area Community Design Plan (CDP) and supporting documents. The Plan translates the key aspects of the CDP and supporting documents into statutory policy. The CDP includes detailed land uses descriptions and design guidelines that must be referred to in the review of development applications. The Plan is closely linked to the CDP and the two documents should be read in conjunction to assist with the interpretation and implementation of the Plan’s policies.

Schedule A - Land Use Concept Plan must be read in conjunction with the policy direction.

2.0 PLANNING AREA

The EUC Phase 3 Area Secondary Plan area is described by Schedule A and hereafter referred to as the “planning area”.

3.0 VISION

The proposed EUC Phase 3 Area is envisaged to be a new complete neighbourhood for Orléans and the rest of the city. Its mix of housing, employment, institutional and commercial services, combined with leisure and recreational opportunities will make it an attractive place to live, work, and play.

The design of this community is based on a walkable, transit-supportive street and block network with connectivity to the future Cumberland Transitway line and its stations. Higher density and mixed-use areas are located strategically to serve the community and beyond. The neighbourhoods will have parks, transit and other amenities within an easy walking distance.

Planning and Design Framework

The following principles provided the policy framework for the Plan and form the foundations of creating a livable and walkable community for the EUC Phase 3 Area:

  • Establish a new, vibrant centre in Orléans which accommodates a range of uses, such as office, low, medium and highest density residential, retail, entertainment, and institutional uses, and acts as a central node of activity for the surrounding community.
  • Achieve compact growth which makes efficient use of land and existing infrastructure and is phased in step with required infrastructure improvements.
  • In anticipation of the future Cumberland Transitway line, establish a Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) pattern which incorporates “complete streets” that provide safe, convenient and comfortable conditions for walking, cycling and public transit for all ages and abilities.
  • Ensure that connections across the hydro corridor, the Transitway and Brian Coburn Boulevard are provided for the safe and efficient passage of pedestrians, cyclists, and motorists from one side of the planning area to the other.
  • Foster growth that complements the existing community of Orléans and facilitates connectivity between Transitway stations and surrounding neighbourhoods through such measures as sidewalks and cycling facilities, multi-use pathways (MUPs), safe road crossings, and a pedestrian-friendly road network.
  • Protect, improve and restore the Natural Heritage System within and adjacent to the planning area and create a Greenspace Network which connects natural features, such as woodlands and stormwater ponds, and community features, such as public parks, and shopping areas.
  • Encourage the establishment of a distinct identity for the currently undeveloped planning area through the creation of area-specific design guidelines which recognize and celebrate existing features and promote the creation of new public parks and civic spaces that contribute to a sense of place and foster a sense of community.
  • Support the economic development potential of Orléans by creating development opportunities within this planning area for a range of employment uses that are well-served by transit.

4.0 LAND USE & KEY URBAN DESIGN DIRECTION

The following subheadings and policies provide guidance for the future development of the planning area with respect to land use, mobility, community development, urban design, and implementation. Further detail and guidance regarding their interpretation is found within the EUC Phase 3 Area CDP, which should be read in conjunction with this Secondary Plan.

LAND USE POLICIES

City Council has approved the East Urban Community Phase 3 CDP and supporting studies to guide future development in the secondary plan area. Development is therefore to occur in keeping with the CDP and its supporting studies subject to the following objectives and policies.

General Policies

  1. Residential development will be limited to not more than 55 per cent detached dwelling units, at least 10 per cent apartment dwelling units, and the remainder may be comprised of multiple dwelling units, other than apartments.
  2. The overall residential development shall meet the minimum average density target of 34 units per net hectare. Net residential density is based on the area of land exclusively for residential use, including lanes and parking areas internal to developments but excluding public streets, right-of-way and all non-residential uses.
  3. Illustration of any lands within schedules does not imply that the lands are available or open to the public.
  4. The City will determine when to purchase lands for public benefit. The inclusion of privately-owned lands within any designation or schedule in this plan does not in any way obligate the City, Conservation Authority or Province to acquire, compensate or purchase these lands.
  5. As illustrated on Schedule A, a community park will be a permitted use in employment lands designation on lands abutting the snow disposal facility.
  6. The EUC Phase 3 Area CDP policies shall guide permitted uses and building heights within each CDP designation.
  7. West of the Innes Park Woods the City will permit, without need for an Official Plan Amendment, any extension of the Medium Density Residential designation area south to Vanguard Drive.

Policies for Private Agreements

Agreements are to be initiated by the landowners within the defined EUC Phase 3 Area to provide for the fair sharing of costs among the benefiting parties and to coordinate the necessary development of parks, infrastructure and open space. The following policies provide requirements for new development under these private agreements.

  1. Landowners within the EUC Phase 3 Area shown on Annex 5 (Urban Areas Subject to a Community Design Plan or Policy Plan Approved by Ottawa City Council), shall enter into private agreement(s) to share costs associated with:
    1. the preparation of the CDP, secondary plan and supporting studies;
    2. costs of the major infrastructure projects and associated studies and plans required for the development of the EUC Phase 3 Area which are not otherwise covered by Development Charges;
    3. the dedication and costs of development of parklands.
  2. Landowners within the EUC Phase 3 Area shown on Annex 5 (Urban Areas Subject to a Community Design Plan or Policy Plan Approved by Ottawa City Council), shall enter into private agreement(s) to establish a Master Parkland Agreement to create a mechanism which allows for compensation of parkland dedication and associated development costs that may be inequitably distributed across the Community Design Plan area;
  3. Each agreement under policies 8 and 9 above shall contain a financial schedule describing the estimated costs of the major infrastructure projects or parkland requirements and associated studies and plans, as well as the proportionate share of the costs for each affected landowner.
  4. The City will require each owner to demonstrate that it has executed the Funding Agreement and any applicable Cost Sharing Agreement, or the other owner’s consent to the owner proceeding in advance of the Cost Sharing Agreement being executed, as a condition of approval for all draft plan of subdivision and condominium, site plan and severance applications in the secondary plan area. A development condition shall require notification from the Administrator of the EUC Phase 3 Area Landowner’s Group that the owner is party to the relevant agreement(s) and has paid their share of any costs pursuant to the agreement(s) prior to registration.

Mix of densities, forms and uses

A mix of residential forms and unit types shall be provided, to create housing options and diversity in housing stock throughout the planning area.

  1. To distribute density and housing forms more evenly throughout the area, dwelling types in the low-density designation should be mixed by blocks to avoid large blocks with only a single types of housing form.

Small-scale commercial uses

  1. In addition to the commercial areas identified on Schedule A, small-scale convenience commercial or micro-retail uses that are easily accessible by foot or bicycle shall be permitted in areas along collector streets as enabled by the Zoning By-law.  The implementing zoning should apply use of the suffix “-c” (or similar notification) to the parent residential zone to permit small-scale commercial businesses in a residential zone.

Parks

  1. A hierarchy of parks in the greenspace network is to be provided including Community and Neighbourhood Parks and Parkettes, with amenities as recommended in the East Urban Community Phase 3 Area Parks Plan.  One of these, a Community Park of not less than 4.6 ha shall be located just west of and abutting the existing snow disposal facility.

PEDESTRIAN AND CYCLING MOBILITY

Cycling Facilities

  1. Cycling facilities will be established along Collector streets as exhibited in the EUC Phase 3 CDP.

Pedestrian-Priority measures and crossing of Collector Streets

  1. Infrastructure that prioritizes pedestrian movement, will be designed and installed at places over the main collectors where they meet with the through-block pedestrian corridor and where a collector divides two sides of an offset grid. This infrastructure may include bulb-outs, pedestrian cross-overs (PXOs), and combinations of these features. Pedestrian crossings will be at periodic intervals to encourage pedestrian connectivity, with preference given to their location in the vicinity of transit stops.
  2. All collector streets shall have pedestrian facilities on both sides and cycling connectivity. Collector street cross sections will be refined based on city policies and standards at the time to achieve necessary connectivity for pedestrians and cyclists in the 24m ROW.  Exceptions may be made without amendment to this Plan in the case of short collector street segments that do not provide essential connectivity; in such cases, there may be a sidewalk on only one side of the street.

COMMUNITY & URBAN DESIGN

Street and Block Pattern for People

The street and block pattern of a new neighbourhood sets the stage for a community’s quality of life and for the efficient movement of people throughout the community. The street network design is to be designed to provide a safe and pleasant experience to all users by moderating vehicle speeds. A well-planned, fully connected street grid that filters traffic through it, rather than funneling it to the largest streets, not only improves circulation, but also serves as the most important traffic calming strategy in community design. Before specific traffic calming features (such as speed bumps or curb extensions) are planned for, the street and block patterns are already carefully planned to achieve passive traffic calming as the result of good design layout.

  1. The street network will be designed to meet the following:
    1. As a priority, the street and block layout will be designed with the user experience in mind and must ensure a safe and pleasant environment for all users and not only motorists.
    2. The street system will be fully connected and organized in an Offset Grid configuration. The intent of this grid configuration is to provide multiple route options for all modes of transportation throughout the planning area while calming through traffic, providing for efficient transit operations and discouraging cut-through car traffic. Local (minor) streets and collector (major) streets should connect directly with arterials (avenues).
    3. As illustrated in the CDP, neighbourhood blocks will, where feasible, be 1 hectare or less in size and regular in shape to support a highly permeable neighbourhood. Smaller block sizes are also intended to promote shorter active transportation trips and a variety of route and mode options.  Where larger block sizes are proposed and are deemed acceptable to the City, there shall be at least one pedestrian mid-block connection that aligns with streets on either side of the block.
  • Plans of subdivision shall establish a street hierarchy in which the various street-types are designed (and not merely posted) for driving speeds that support: safer driver behaviour; enhanced pedestrian and cycling safety; and achieves desired comfort levels for non-motorized users.
  1. Vehicular operating speeds on each type of street will be passively controlled through appropriate design. Minor (local) streets will be designed to dictate lower vehicular speeds (30km/h), major (collector) streets moderate speeds (40km/h to 50km/h).
  2. The street pattern and network design will facilitate access by all modes of transportation to public facilities, places of commerce, parks, schools, open space, and to the public transit network.
  3. Reverse lotting, where rear yards abut Collector streets, shall not be permitted. There shall be no window streets along Collector streets.
  4. The frontage of lands along public streets will feature buildings with active frontages regardless of the land uses contained therein. Surface parking areas should primarily be to the side or rear of buildings.
  5. Where houses are adjacent or opposite parks, the front, rear or side elevations will have windows and doors facing the park to provide for greater streetscape continuity and animation.
  6. Where soil conditions are favourable, strong street tree planting can create character among many other benefits, such as safety and comfort, and will be included along all street frontages, at the developers cost.   Trees and other landscaping, such as plantings along noise fences, window streets and bio-swales, or other remnant pieces of land within a subdivision are also encouraged.

Traffic calming

  1. The design and implementation of traffic calming facilities shall occur at the time of development and at the cost of the developer as a condition of the approval at the Draft Plan of Subdivision application process.  This will occur in conjunction with the original street design and construction to avoid the need to return later at greater cost and inconvenience. This process will also include the identification of the appropriate traffic calming techniques for certain streets or conditions to encourage local walking and cycling, and slower, but efficient vehicular movement.  The highest priority areas or streets for traffic calming are expected pedestrian travel routes.  Determination of traffic calming measures shall be consistent with City guidelines for the design and implementation of such measures, and will be undertaken in consultation with affected City departments.

Parking

One objective of this Secondary Plan is to ensure that, in the design of subdivisions, the location of various dwelling types is planned to deliberately offset the site-specific parking strengths and challenges of each type of dwelling by having sufficient proximity between dwelling types to absorb overall parking needs on a neighbourhood-wide basis.

  1. At the time of Draft Plan of Subdivision, proponents shall submit a street parking plan that demonstrates how on-street parking has been maximized, including how lots of varying widths and dwellings of varying types have been organized so as to maximize on-street parking opportunities.  The CDP outlines design options for achieve the above.

5.0 NATURAL HERITAGE SYSTEM

Rock Barren

A rock barren featuring large areas of exposed limestone bedrock is located along the northern edge of the planning area, to the immediate south and east of Innes Park Woods. The rock barren and the adjacent 30 metres of land have been identified as Significant Wildlife Habitat for snakes due to the presence of an overwintering habitat (hibernaculum) within the fractured limestone of the rock barren. The area must be protected from unnecessary encroachment and is particularly susceptible to changes in water infiltration (in terms of both quantity and quality) and shading of the rocky outcrops. Some encroachment will be necessary to ensure that the grades maintain existing drainage patterns in the area.

The planned southern extension of Frank Bender Street across the rock barren poses a barrier to wildlife movement, which should be reduced to the extent possible through the use of crossing structures, protective barriers, and/or other measures. Further, design and construction of the extension of Frank Bender Street will require additional design criteria and mitigation to minimize the impact on the natural feature and its functions in order to protect the Significant Wildlife Habitat and the wildlife that depend on it. The extension of Frank Bender Street across the rock barren will be permitted subject to a detailed design approved by the City, in consultation with the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF) and the Conservation Authority.

In order to offset the impacts of the proposed development, a compensation plan may be developed which contains measures that could improve the habitat of species in the rock barren area.

Elements of the Natural Heritage System are illustrated on Official Plan Volume 1 Schedule L. Other natural features may be present, which are not shown on this Schedule, but which meet the City’s natural heritage system definition in Section 2.4.2 of the Official Plan. The policies below apply to all natural heritage features and constraint lands, regardless of whether or not they are included on Schedule L.

  1. Development and site alteration will not be permitted within or adjacent to any natural feature or adjacent to the designated Innes Park Woods, unless an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) has been prepared as part of the development application process, which indicates that there will be no negative impacts on the natural features or their ecological functions.

For the purposes of this Plan, "adjacent" is generally defined as within 30 metres of the edge of the feature.

  1. As part of the development application process and in keeping with policies of the Official Plan, additional studies may be required to address constraints such as, but not necessarily limited to: unstable slopes and; geotechnical hazards.
  2. Where ‘Species at Risk’ are found within the Study Area, which will be dealt with during the development review stage under the Endangered Species Act.
  3. The Woodlot in the southwest quadrant of the EUC Phase 3 Area CDP will be preserved as part of the Natural Heritage System as non-developable lands and will be transferred to the City for nominal consideration through future plan of subdivision approvals.

6.0 IMPLEMENTATION

Private Agreements for Development Costs

  1. Landowners within the EUC Phase 3 Area shown on Official Plan Annex 5 (Urban Areas Subject to a Community Design Plan or Policy Plan Approved by Ottawa City Council), shall enter into private agreement(s) to:
  • proportionally share the costs by affected landowners for major infrastructure projects and associated studies and plans required for the development of the EUC Phase 3 Area which are not otherwise covered by Development Charges;
  • establish a Master Parkland Agreement, including the adjacent landowner of the approved plan of subdivision located to the immediate west to create a mechanism which allows for compensation of parkland dedication and associated development costs that may be inequitably distributed across the Community Design Plan area;
  • share the dedication and costs of development of parkland.

Such agreement(s) are to be initiated by the landowners within the defined EUC Phase 3 Area and provide for the fair sharing of costs among the benefiting parties, to complement the provisions of a Development Charges By-law;

  1. Each agreement under policy 1 above shall contain a financial schedule describing the estimated costs of the major infrastructure projects or parkland requirements and associated studies and plans, as well as the proportionate share of the costs for each affected or benefitting landowner.
  2. Consistent with the Official Plan Section 5.3.5 Cost Sharing Agreements, the City will require each owner to demonstrate that it has executed the Funding Agreement, and any applicable Cost Sharing Agreement, or the other owner’s consent to the owner proceeding in advance of the Cost Sharing Agreement being executed, as a condition of approval for all draft plan of subdivision and condominium, site plan and severance applications in the secondary plan area. A development condition shall require notification from the Administrator of the EUC Phase 3 Area Landowners Group that the owner is party to the relevant agreement(s) and has paid their share of any costs pursuant to the agreement(s) prior to the registration.

Bus Transit Routes

To capture transit ridership in the initial phases of development transit stops and routes should be available for use beginning with the early stages of development to provide the highest degree of convenience, safety and efficiency for new residents.

  1. Landowners will be required to enter into an Early Transit Service Agreement to determine the method and means by which the development, as well as adjacent areas, can be efficiently and effectively serviced by transit.  The Owner shall enter into the agreement to outline the provision of interim bus service with the Transit Services Branch, prior to the registration of the subdivision or condominium.
  2. Early Transit Service Agreements shall include, but are not necessarily limited to, the following:  establishment of routes and stops, levels of service, and provision and maintenance of stops and turnarounds.  Early Transit Service Agreements may also be required to include funding and cost-sharing arrangements, and the timing and triggers for the transfer of responsibility to the City.
  3. Pre-consultation, which is required prior to an application for Draft Plan of Subdivision will include OC Transpo and the relevant School Boards in order to coordinate bus routes with the design of streets, blocks and pedestrian connections.

Additional Conditions and Requirements for Plans of Subdivision

  1. Applications for draft plan of subdivision shall be processed concurrently with any required applications under the Drainage Act.
  2. Prior to the approval of any draft plan of subdivision application, the Master Servicing Study shall be consulted directly to determine what conditions are required to be completed and approved by the affected agencies.

Build Out

Upon build-out of the streets, Medium Density Residential areas, Highest Density Residential areas and Commercial areas, it is intended that this Secondary Plan and associated Community Design Plan may, at the discretion of the City, be retired and voided.

While small-scale change and development within the Plan area is possible after build-out, the directions contained in the Secondary Plan and CDP will have already been implemented, and development policies can revert to the general policies of the Official Plan.

7.0 SCHEDULE

Schedule A – Land Use Plan