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St. Joseph Boulevard Corridor Study

St. Joseph Boulevard Corridor Study

St. Joseph Boulevard Corridor Study [PDF 7.49 MB]

This document is the Council approved guide to the long-term growth and development of the St. Joseph Boulevard Corridor. The Community Design Plan provides guidelines for the day-to-day decision-making on land use planning and sets out the community's priorities for the future.

1.0 Introduction

St. Joseph Boulevard is a major arterial road in the City of Ottawa’s east end (Figure 1). St. Joseph Boulevard is the perfect location for revitalization and intensification. It is one of the City’s major arterial roads that provides continuous access right across the City. St. Joseph Boulevard becomes Montreal Road in Vanier, Rideau in downtown Ottawa and Wellington Street in front of the Parliament Buildings. There is no reason that the character of development abutting St. Joseph Boulevard cannot evolve to the more urban form that exists along this street as it extends west into downtown Ottawa.

The purpose of this study was to establish a framework to guide the evolution of a new form of development along St. Joseph Boulevard to create a lively, vibrant and diverse district with a mix of places to live, work, shop and play. Transit is key to the success of this area as it is a key ingredient for intensification.

With intensification of use and a new urban form of development, the function of the road will change. Travel speeds will be reduced, on-street parking will cause “friction” causing vehicles to travel more cautiously through this new urban district, and traffic operations will take on the conditions typical of Montreal Road, not a suburban arterial road.

Figure 1 - St. Joseph Boulevard is a major arterial road in the City of Ottawa’s east end.

Click to enlarge

The revitalization strategy includes an Official Plan Amendment and Zoning By-law Amendment. The intention is to establish a simplified planning framework that recognizes both the importance of urban corridors in the City of Ottawa and the tremendous redevelopment and intensification opportunities that these corridors provide to the long term development of the City.

To achieve the goals of the new Official Plan, it is important to remove the current disincentives that have frustrated redevelopment and intensification in the past. For example, parking requirements and density restrictions have made redevelopment difficult and uneconomic. Furthermore, the planning rules and regulations are difficult to assess and understand on a site-by-site basis.

A diversity of conditions

The study area includes the St. Joseph Boulevard right-of-way and the adjacent privately owned lands. It extends for 3.5 kilometres from approximately the old city of Gloucester/Cumberland municipal boundary to the edge of the greenbelt (Figure 1). The study area has evolved over a long period of time as the retail core area of the former Orléans. It is characterized as a “commercial strip”, where the development of a range of retail, office and light industrial uses have slowly supplanted the former retail and residential uses. Development has typically occurred on a site-by-site basis over the past 20 years, resulting in widely varying conditions along the street.

An interactive and iterative process

The City of Ottawa, in collaboration with local stakeholders, has recognized that there is a need to initiate a comprehensive revitalization of St. Joseph Boulevard. Our team was retained to “take a fresh look” at the corridor within the context of current planning policies and recent design studies. This study was initiated in May 2002 and completed early in 2003. The study was carried out in three phases:

  • Inventory and analysis;
  • Design; and
  • Implementation.

During each phase of the study, the team met with a Technical Advisory Committee, Public Advisory Committee and the general public to review the work in progress. This process was both interactive and iterative. As a result, our work reflects many of the objectives of the various stakeholder groups. During the summer of 2002, three workshops were held, where staff, committee members, interest groups, and the public were invited to critique and enhance the work-in-progress. The workshops were held on May 20, June 10 and July 15.

A new way of thinking about St. Joseph Boulevard

The need for change has recently been reinforced in Charting a Course, a background paper for the City’s new Official Plan. More importantly, however, is the observable need to enhance the overall image of St. Joseph Boulevard such that it can be transformed into a vibrant, diverse and economically successful component of the new City of Ottawa’s urban structure.

“Charting a Course” establishes key principles

As noted, Charting a Course sets out key principles that form the foundation for managing long-term growth and change in the new City of Ottawa. To a great extent, those principles also form the foundation of the revitalization strategy for St. Joseph Boulevard. Specifically, the following principles provide guidance:

Achieve diversity through a focus on community design

The new City of Ottawa will promote and preserve diversity. The City intends to encourage neighbourhood diversity by planning places to work, live and play within walking distance of each other in compact communities. Streets will be planned for pedestrians and cyclists, as well as cars. The City will focus on community design by changing the way they plan and evaluate development to put less emphasis on zoning and greater emphasis on building design.

Build vibrant, active and attractive centres

The new City of Ottawa will ensure that the downtown, main streets and town centres are as vibrant, active and attractive as the traditional villages. Ottawa is envisaged as a city with many centres of activity connected by excellent transit. Town centres in Orléans, South Nepean and Kanata will be planned to incorporate a mix of residential and employment uses with a variety of housing options. This will create diverse centres that are alive both day and night, and that will accommodate change. Public transit is one key to success, in particular rapid transit service to connect the town centres with one another and with downtown is important to shape plans for intensification.

Build a compact city

It is the new City’s ambition to rejuvenate and infill already developed areas. St. Joseph Boulevard is a perfect location to add more housing to rejuvenate established neighbourhoods and bring more people to help support local shops, services, schools and transit. To help intensify development, the City intends to devote less land to parking by reducing minimum parking requirements, using on-street parking and promoting shared use of parking.

Keep the City Green

The new City intends to manage growth by seizing every opportunity to conserve and regenerate the natural environment of landform, watershed and vegetation. They recognize that this must happen at every level - from individual sites, to neighbourhoods, to the City as a whole. Green spaces that perform important linkage functions must be identified and protected.

4.0 In Closing

St. Joseph Boulevard is ripe for revitalization and redevelopment. It is typical of many suburban arterial roads that have evolved over the past few decades. It presents a tremendous opportunity for the City to realize the ambitions of its new Official Plan. Centres, such as Orléans, and corridors, such as St. Joseph Boulevard, should be the focus of new developments that intensify housing and rejuvenate commercial and business districts.

Streets are one of the largest components of the open space system. The streetscape of St. Joseph Boulevard must be upgraded to demonstrate the City’s commitment to the revitalization of arterial roads.

Only once the public sector clearly illustrates its commitment through the investment of capital funding for enhancement, will the private sector follow. This is the case in most districts in cities across the continent that have undergone significant redevelopment.

The initial stages of streetscape improvements should proceed immediately. There are many examples of lively, vibrant mixed use districts and streets in Ottawa, as well as most major cities across the country, that have hydro poles and overhead wires. This is not an unusual condition in urban areas. The existence of hydro poles should not frustrate other changes to the streetscape. Absolutely, the issue of overhead wires on St. Joseph should be at the table during discussions with the authorities. In the meantime, revitalization should commence with a demonstration project.

This is the beginning, not the end. Revitalization will not be quick. Just as it has taken decades to reach the existing condition, it will take decades to change. Streetscape changes should be made on a block-by-block basis over the next several years. Property owners should be encouraged to work in partnership with the City to upgrade the landscape at the edge of parking lots fronting onto St. Joseph Boulevard. Applications for development should be considered in light of these urban design guidelines that seek to encourage buildings to be located at the street edge with uses that can enliven the pedestrian realm. Higher density residential uses will over time support new commercial uses that will create vibrant districts along St. Joseph.

The City and its partners must continue working to revitalize the area. They must continue to raise public awareness regarding the opportunities created by intensification and rejuvenation to alleviate the fear of change. The success of revitalization hinges on ongoing collaboration among all those with a stake in this project.

Official Plan Amendment

Part I: The Preamble

1.0 Location

The location, and lands affected by this Official Plan Amendment are known as the St. Joseph Boulevard Corridor, within the Orléans Planning Area, former City of Gloucester as shown on Schedule A. The lands include the public right-of-way and those lands lying adjacent to St. Joseph Boulevard as identified on Schedule B – Land Use.

2.0 Intent

The proposal is to redesignate the subject lands from ‘Industrial, Residential, Neighbourhood Commercial, and Core Activity Area to one new land use designation - Mixed Commercial/Residential Area. Joseph Boulevard is a major arterial road in the City of Ottawa’s east end. St. Joseph Boulevard is the perfect location for revitalization and intensification. It is one of the City’s major arterial roads that provides continuous access right across the City. St Joseph Boulevard becomes Montreal Road in Vanier, Rideau in downtown Ottawa and Wellington Street in front of the Parliament Buildings. There is no reason that the character of development abutting St. Joseph Boulevard cannot evolve to the more urban form that exists along this street as it extends west into downtown Ottawa.

Transform the nature, character and function of St. Joseph

The purpose of this Official Plan Amendment is to establish a framework to guide the evolution of a new form of development along St. Joseph Boulevard. This new form of development will transform the function and character of the street and will promote a lively, vibrant and diverse district with a mix of places to live, work, shop and play. Transit is key to the success of this area, as it is a key ingredient for intensification. With intensification of use and a new urban form of development, the function of the road will change. Travel speeds will be reduced, on-street parking will cause “friction” causing vehicles to travel more cautiously through this new urban district. Traffic operations will take on the conditions typical of Montreal Road, not a suburban arterial road.

3.0 Basis

Revitalization is needed

The City of Ottawa, in collaboration with local stakeholders, has recognized that there is a need to initiate a comprehensive revitalization of St. Joseph Boulevard. A consultant was retained by the City of Ottawa to “take a fresh look” at the corridor within the context of current planning policies and recent design studies. The need for change has recently been reinforced in Charting a Course, a background paper for the City’s new Official Plan. More importantly, however, is the observable need to enhance the overall image of St. Joseph Boulevard such that it can be transformed into a vibrant, diverse and economically successful component of the new City of Ottawa’s urban structure.

Charting a Course establishes key principles

As noted, Charting a Course sets out key principles that form the foundation for managing long-term growth and change in the new City of Ottawa. To a great extent, those principles also form the foundation of the revitalization strategy for St. Joseph Boulevard. Specifically, the following principles provide guidance:

  • Achieve diversity through a focus on community design – The new City of Ottawa will promote and preserve diversity. The City intends to encourage neighbourhood diversity by planning places to work, live and play within walking distance of each other in compact communities. Streets will be planned for pedestrians and cyclists, as well as cars. The City will focus on community design by changing the way they plan and evaluate development to put less emphasis on zoning and greater emphasis on building design.
  • Build vibrant, active and attractive centres – The new City of Ottawa will ensure that the downtown, main streets and town centres are as vibrant, active and attractive as the traditional villages. Ottawa is envisioned as a city with many centres of activity connected by excellent transit. Town centres in Orléans, South Nepean and Kanata will be planned to incorporate a mix of residential and employment uses with a variety of housing options. This will create diverse centres that are alive both day and night, and that will accommodate change. Public transit is one key to success, in particular rapid transit service to connect the town centres with one another and with downtown is important to shape plans for intensification.
  • Build a compact city – It is the new City’s ambition to rejuvenate and infill already developed areas. St. Joseph Boulevard is a perfect location to add more housing to rejuvenate established neighbourhoods and bring more people to help support local shops, services, schools and transit. To help intensify development, the City intends to devote less land to parking by reducing minimum parking requirements, using on-street parking and promoting shared use of parking.
  • Keep the City Green – The new City intends to manage growth by seizing every opportunity to conserve and regenerate the natural environment of landform, watershed and vegetation. They recognize that this must happen at every level – from individual sites, to neighbourhoods, to the City as a whole. Green spaces that perform important linkage functions must be identified and protected.
Change will require a comprehensive strategy

Private sector redevelopment along the St. Joseph Corridor is expected to occur incrementally, over a relatively long period of time. Further, an understanding of the market forces in the Corridor indicates that there is a need for some form of “incentive package” to stimulate change. The idea of an incentives package is to stimulate private sector redevelopment by reducing the cost of development, influencing the market for redevelopment and reducing the inherent risks of the approvals processes. This Official Plan Amendment promotes an incentive package based on:

  • Making planning regulations and approval processes less onerous and less cumbersome; and,
  • Providing a framework through which the City may offer a variety of incentives for redevelopment, including the potential for direct financial incentives.

The rules, regulations and processes identified in this Official Plan Amendment are in keeping with Charting a Course. It is the intention to establish a simplified planning framework that recognizes both the importance of urban corridors within the new City of Ottawa and the tremendous redevelopment and intensification opportunities that these corridors, and specifically the St. Joseph Corridor, provide to the long-term development of the City.

To achieve the goals of the new Official Plan, it is important to remove the current disincentives that have frustrated redevelopment and intensification in the past. Key issues include parking requirements and density restrictions that make redevelopment difficult and uneconomic and the array of planning rules and regulations that are difficult to assess and to understand on a site by site basis. Furthermore, given the dramatic shifts in retail development patterns, there appears to be limited market support for major commercial redevelopment in the Corridor. There does, however, appear to be some market support for medium density residential forms of development, and a market for niche retail and office.

This Official Plan Amendment establishes a single Official Plan Land Use designation for application to the entire St. Joseph Corridor. A complimentary zoning regime will also be suggested that provides sufficient and realistic incentives to promote redevelopment, while at the same time minimizing the impacts on abutting low density housing and ensuring an appropriate relationship between the buildings and the adjacent streets, especially at the identified urban gateways. Design guidelines have also been prepared to ensure that the City’s intentions for redevelopment are well understood.

Part II: The Amendment

1.0 Introductory Statement

All of this portion of the document entitled Part II: The Amendment, and attached map entitled Schedule ‘B’ constitutes Amendment Number __ to the Official Plan for the City of Gloucester.

2.0 Details of the Amendment

Item 1: That Schedule “A2 Land Use” of the Official Plan for the City of Gloucester, Orléans Planning Area be amended as shown on Schedule ‘B’ to this Official Plan Amendment.

Item 2: That a new Section 6.2.3.8 be added as follows:

6.2.3.7 St. Joseph Corridor

The St. Joseph Corridor extends for approximately 3.5 kilometres from the former City of Gloucester / Cumberland municipal boundary (just east of Place d’Orléans Drive) to the edge of the Greenbelt (or west side of Youville Drive), in the Orléans Planning Area. The current right-of-way width is approximately 32 metres along most of the roadway, with isolated sections in the older area having a right-of-way width of approximately 25 to 28 metres.

It is expected that, over time, the nature and character of development adjacent to St. Joseph Boulevard will evolve from a suburban commercial strip, to a more intensely developed, mixed-use urban district. With intensification of use and a new urban form of development, the function, nature and character of St. Joseph Boulevard will also change to reflect the planned urban environment.

As a result of this anticipated evolution, and notwithstanding any other provisions of the Official Plan, the existing right-of-way of St. Joseph Boulevard shall be maintained as it currently exists, with the exception that 26.0 metres will be sought for sections of the corridor located in the area between Edgar Brault Street and Gabriel Street currently at 25.0 metres. In addition, the City will enhance the visual appeal of the right-of-way, and will ensure that the function, nature and character of St. Joseph Boulevard is compatible with the planned urban environment. The City will consider more on-street parking, reduced centre lane widths, the provision of shared cycling facilities and encourage the reduction of private accesses leading to St. Joseph Boulevard.

Item 3: That a new Section 7.2.3 Mixed Commercial/Residential Area be added as follows:

7.2.3 Mixed Commercial/Residential Area

7.2.3.1 Purpose

The Mixed Commercial/Residential Area designation establishes a framework to guide the evolution of a new form of development along the St. Joseph Boulevard Corridor. This new form of development will transform the function and character of the street and will promote a lively, vibrant and diverse district with a mix of places to live, work, shop and play. Transit is key to the success of this area as it is a key ingredient for intensification.

With intensification of use and a new urban form of development, the function of the road will change. Travel speeds will be reduced, on-street parking will cause “friction” causing vehicles to travel more cautiously through this new urban district.

The St. Joseph Corridor shall function as a focus of activity for the surrounding low-density residential neighbourhoods. Ideally, the St. Joseph Corridor will offer a high quality environment, providing the opportunities to live, work and shop in close proximity.

The St. Joseph Corridor shall redevelop with a variety of compatible, well-integrated and higher density developments. The built form shall be comfortable in scale and design such that pedestrian activity is enhanced.

Land uses within the St. Joseph Corridor will be linked together by the road network, bicycle paths and pedestrian walkways. Development densities will help to support existing and potentially enhanced transit facilities along the Corridor.

The primary purposes of the Mixed Commercial/Residential Area designation are:

    1. To establish the St. Joseph Corridor as a focus of activity by promoting new development that includes a broad mix of land uses at generally higher densities than the adjacent neighbourhoods.
    2. To maximize pedestrian, bicycle, transit and vehicular accessibility and safety.
    3. To establish an urban design and planning policy regime that result in a high quality of built form and landscaping on both public and private sector properties.

7.2.3.2 Objectives

Development objectives for the Mixed Commercial/Residential Area designation are:

    1. Encourage redevelopment with an array of land uses that support transit and provide a comfortable and attractive pedestrian environment.
    2. Promote new buildings that create an improved image for the Corridor, contain the street and accentuate gateways and intersections.
    3. Encourage redevelopment with higher densities that support transit and provide a comfortable and attractive pedestrian environment.
    4. Encourage appropriate and achievable redevelopment at a scale that is financially feasible.
    5. Promote a level of uniformity of built form adjacent to the street edge.
    6. Reduce parking standards and permit on-street parking to promote a more intensified and transit supportive urban environment.
    7. Promote a rational reduction in the number of accesses to St. Joseph Boulevard.
    8. Establish a program of financial incentives and a regulatory regime that facilitates appropriate redevelopment.
    9. Ensure that all new development and redevelopment has regard for all design guidelines that are applicable to the St. Joseph Corridor and that have been approved by Council.

7.2.3.3 Policies

    1. The Mixed Commercial/Residential Area will be designated on Schedule A2 of this Official Plan.
    2. All new development and redevelopment will have regard to the applicable design guidelines contained in the St. Joseph Boulevard Corridor Study.
    3. Permitted Land Uses – It is the intent of this land use designation to encourage redevelopment with an array of land uses that support transit and provide a comfortable and attractive pedestrian environment. Single use and mixed-use buildings are permitted. Permitted land uses may include:
      1. Medium and higher density forms of housing;
      2. An array of commercial facilities including retail stores, convention centres, hotels,
        restaurants and all types of offices;
      3. Community, cultural, entertainment and recreational facilities; and
      4. Public utilities, parking structures, surface parking lots and all forms of parks and open
        spaces.

Notwithstanding any other permitted use, outside storage shall be specifically prohibited.

    1. Height – Promote new buildings that create an improved image for the Corridor, contain the street and accentuate gateways and intersections.
    2. Density – Encourage redevelopment with higher densities that support transit and provide a comfortable and attractive pedestrian environment.
    3. Built Form – Promote new buildings that create an improved image for the Corridor, contain the street and accentuate gateways and intersections. It is the intention of this Plan to promote buildings that are of high quality individually, and when considered collectively, create an attractive streetscape with appropriate pedestrian amenity. Policies with respect to built form include:
      1. The proportion of the ground floor coverage of the building footprint should be maximized
        and building heights should create a street space scaled to pedestrians;
      2. Landmark buildings, higher density and taller buildings shall be located at intersections.
        Additional built and/or landscape features should be included in the design of these sites
        to accentuate their importance;
      3. All new buildings adjacent to St. Joseph Boulevard shall be sited to face, front and
        feature the street. They should create continuous frontages, close to the edge of the right-
        of-way. Minor variations may be considered in the review of site plans to accommodate
        appropriate urban design features, such as an urban square and/or additional landscape
        features;
      4. Windows and door entrances will face the road, and provide for direct pedestrian access
        to the city sidewalk – windows and door entrances will occupy at least 50% of the
        building façade adjacent to St. Joseph Boulevard;
      5. Canopies or other weather protection over entrances and the pedestrian zone should be
        considered adjacent to retail, personal service and restaurant frontages; and,
      6. Loading and service areas associated with any permitted use must not be located
        adjacent to, or visible from St. Joseph Boulevard.
    4. Parking – Consider a reduction in parking standards within the implementing zoning by-law to promote a more intensified and transit supportive urban environment. In addition, the following policies apply within the Mixed Commercial/Residential Area designation:
      1. The City, in reviewing and approving any development within the St. Joseph Corridor
        shall explore every opportunity to promote shared parking among adjacent landowners.
      2. Whenever possible, development applications shall be considered on a comprehensive
        basis in association with abutting lands and the nearby on-street parking supply.
        Consideration shall be given to consolidating access points to St. Joseph Boulevard, as
        well as shared parking facilities.
      3. When redevelopment occurs, parking shall be adequately screened from abutting
        residential zones, and from all public streets and landscaped to ensure an attractive
        streetscape.
    5. Shared Access – Promote a rational reduction in the number of private accesses to St. Joseph Boulevard. The City, in reviewing and approving any new development within the St. Joseph Corridor shall explore every opportunity to promote shared access among adjacent landowners. Alternative side yards setbacks may be considered to recognize shared access driveways and/or structured parking facilities.
    6. Zoning By-law – The implementing zoning by-law shall, in conjunction with all design guidelines that are applicable to the St. Joseph Corridor and that have been approved by Council, establish the parameters for development within the St. Joseph Corridor.
    7. Site Plan Control – All development within the St. Joseph Corridor shall be subject to site plan control in accordance with the City’s Site Plan Control By-law.
    8. From time to time, the City may receive development applications that do not achieve all of the objectives, policies and guidelines for the St. Joseph Corridor as identified in this Plan, and in other applicable planning documents. In these instances, the City will review the application on its merits, and may consider the application for approval if it is demonstrated, to the City’s satisfaction, that the proposed development:
  • Does not preclude the ability to build additional permitted density at a later date; and,
  • Otherwise achieves all of the other applicable policies of this plan, including the approved urban design guidelines.
  1. Community Improvement – The entire St. Joseph Corridor shall be considered a Community Improvement Area and the City may establish, by by-law, the Corridor, or specific components of the Corridor, as a Community Improvement Project Area. The City may identify and delineate a Community Improvement Project Area in areas that display any or all of the following criteria;
    1. Inadequate municipal infrastructure, including piped services, roads and streetscapes,
      public parking facilities and/or storm water management facilities;
    2. Inadequate community services such as public recreational/cultural facilities, public open
      space and/or social services;
    3. Building and/or property deterioration to the extent that it negatively affects the overall
      image of the St. Joseph Corridor;
    4. Development at densities that are too low to support planned transit facilities; and/or
    5. Site contamination levels that require environmental site remediation prior to
      redevelopment.

In addition, for areas within the Mixed Commercial/Residential Area designation that have
been further identified, by by-law as a Community Improvement Project Area, the following policies apply:

      1. The City may prepare a detailed Community Improvement Plan. In the preparation of a
        Community Improvement Plan, the City will solicit the input of affected residents,
        property owners and other interested stakeholders. Community Improvement Plans, and
        subsequent amendments thereto, may be adopted by Council.
      2. During the preparation of a Community Improvement Plan, the City shall explore options
        for the provision of financial incentives to the private sector. The review of all
        development applications within the St. Joseph Corridor shall have regard for all design
        guidelines that are applicable to the St. Joseph Corridor and that have been approved by
        Council and, further, the eligibility requirements for any financial incentive program
        offered by the City shall require new development to conform to the guidelines.
      3. When the City is satisfied that the intent of an Improvement Plan has been carried out,
        Council may, by by-law, dissolve the Community Improvement Project Area.

3.0 Interpretation

The Mixed Commercial/Residential Area designation is specific to the identified portion of the St. Joseph Corridor as identified on Schedule A2 – Land Use. As such, the purpose, objectives and policies of this land use designation may, in some instances, be in conflict with other policies of this Official Plan. Where the intent and details of this land use designation conflict with the other, more general policies of this Official Plan, the policies of this designation shall prevail. In addition to the above, the provisions of Section 11.2.4 of the Official Plan of the former City of Gloucester shall apply.

Schedule A

Schedule A

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Schedule B

Schedule B

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Zoning By-law

The Following Is An Explanatory Note To By-Law Number 2003

By-law Number 2003-____ amends By-law Number 333 of 1999, the former City of Gloucester Zoning By-law. The amendment affects all properties located adjacent to St. Joseph Boulevard as shown on the Location Maps provided as Document 3.

The City has undertaken an extensive planning study along the street with the intent being to revitalize both the public lands and adjacent privately owned lands. As part of the implementation process, the proposed zoning bylaw will set new regulations which will encourage the form of development the city is seeking to create along this portion of the street.

Current Zoning

Currently a variety of zones exist along the street, ranging from the Industrial General Zone (Mg) at the western edge, to the Commercial Community Zone (Cc1) which is predominant along both sides of St. Joseph Boulevard. The following is a brief summary of the existing zoning that will be impacted by the proposed zoning:

  • Mg - Industrial General Zone; range of industrial uses; maximum 13.7 m height; maximum 0.35 Floor Area Ratio (FAR)
  • Ic - Institutional Community Zone; range of institutional uses, special needs housing, clinics; some conditional commercial uses; maximum 0.6 FAR
  • Cc1 - Commercial Community Zone; range of commercial; some conditional residential and institutional uses; maximum 10.7 m height within 20 m of a Residential zone and 22.0 m beyond 30 m of a residential zone; 0.6 FAR
  • Cn - Commercial Neighbourhood Zone; smaller scale commercial uses; conditional apartments permitted; maximum10.7 m height; 0.35 FAR
  • Ch - Commercial Highway Zone; larger format; space extensive commercial uses; maximum 10.7 m height; 0.35 FAR
  • Cd - Commercial District Zone; range of commercial uses; conditional apartments and institutional; maximum 10.7 m height within 20 m of a Residential zone; up to 48.0 m beyond 30 m of a residential zone; 1.5 FAR
  • Rd1 - Row dwelling; permits row dwellings at 20 – 60 units per hectare

There are also some exception zones that prohibit certain land uses, recognize existing uses, establish setback, parking or landscaping regulations. These include the Cc1(E1),(E2), (E3), (E22), (E26); Cn(E29) exception zones and the HCc1 – Holding Commercial Community Zone.

Proposed Zoning

One new zone is proposed to replace the zones listed above including all exception zones not described as shown by “Area A” on Document 3.

Uses

The proposed Cm – Commercial Mixed Use zone will include a range of uses, such as townhouses, apartment dwellings, retail uses, automobile service and gas stations, office, community, entertainment and recreational uses, convention centres, hotel, institutional use, parking lots, and parks. Outside storage will be prohibited, as will front yard parking. A number of new regulations will also apply pertaining to building height, density, setback and parking.

Height

Maximum building heights will be a function of the lot depth, generally speaking the deeper the lot, the higher the building that can be built. The proposed zoning encourages higher buildings to locate at the major corners. The new maximum building height will be 12.5 metres (or 4 storeys) for properties having lot depths of 40 metres or less; and 18.75 metres if the lot depth is greater than 40.0 metres. A minimum height of 9.0 metres and a maximum height of 25.0 metres (8 storeys) are to be applied to properties located at any of the key gateway corners (Jeanne d’Arc; Place d’Orléans; Orléans; Youville at St. Joseph Boulevard), provided the average lot depth is greater than 60 metres.

Density

The new density provisions are also dependent upon the depth of the lot. Deeper lots have the potential for greater building density. New Floor Area Ratios (FAR) are proposed which will generally increase the allowable development permitted on the individual sites. The proposed FARs will range from 1.5 for sites that have a lot depth of 40 metres or less; to 3.0 for average lot depths more than 40 metres, and to a maximum of 3.5 FAR for lots located at the key gateway corners, and having an average lot depth greater than 60 metres.

Frontage

New minimum frontages are proposed which will facilitate the development form of having buildings locate at the front property line, with parking in behind. Minimums of 18.0 and 24.0 metres are proposed.

Setbacks

To address the abutting residential uses, setback provisions are proposed that will be a function of building height. As a minimum, no development may locate within 7.5 metres of a residential zone. In addition to the building height regulations above, the maximum height of any building (or portion thereof) between 7.5 metres and 20.0 metres of the rear lot line is 12.5 metres. Buildings (or portions there of) that are greater than 12.5 metres in height and 18.75 metres or less must be located more than 20.0 metres from the rear lot line. Buildings that are greater than 18.75 metres in height (or portions thereof) but no more than 25.0 metres must be located at least

30 metres from the rear lot line.

All new buildings must locate between 0.0 and 4.0 metres of the front lot line. For any building that is entirely residential, the building may locate between 0.0 and 6.0 metres of the front lot line, but the front yard must be used for landscaping. Buildings located at major corners must have main walls that occupy 75% of the lot width along St. Joseph Boulevard, and on side streets, 50% of the lot depth adjacent to the street. For all other sites, the main wall must occupy 50% of the lot adjacent to St. Joseph Boulevard. No blank building facades adjacent to streets are permitted.

One minimum side yard of 6.0 metres is proposed to allow for a driveway, and the other side yard will be 0.0 metres.

Parking

New parking regulations are proposed which will generally reduce the amount of required parking needed on-site. The idea is to maximize on-street parking, and to encourage the sharing of parking between uses and sites, and to reduce this land intensive use. The proposed residential parking rate is 1.15 spaces per unit. Commercial office will be changed to 1.0 space per 40 square metres. The required parking for stand-alone restaurant buildings will remain at 1 space per 10 square metres. Parking reductions will be supported with the appropriate supporting studies. No parking will be permitted with the front yard of any building. The maximum amount of lot that can be covered by the required parking is 35%. All required parking must first be located in the rear yard. Excess parking may then locate in side yards, with appropriate landscaping to screen the view from any public street. A parking lot or structure which is the primary use cannot occupy more than 70% of the lot. Unless changed by this amendment, all other general provisions will apply.

 

Proposed Zoning Map

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Further Information

Amendment to Zoning By-law No. will include the following:

  1. A definition for Average Lot Depth.
  2. A new section to add a new “Commercial Mixed Use” zone.
  3. New permitted main uses:
    1. Apartment dwelling, including accessory apartment
    2. Automobile repair service
    3. Commercial entertainment
    4. Office
    5. Community or recreation facility
    6. Convention centre
    7. Group home
    8. Hotel (commercial accommodation)
    9. Institutional use and accommodation (fire, police station, hospital, school)
    10. Medical or dental office and clinic
    11. Nursing home
    12. Office
    13. Parking garage
    14. Parking lot
    15. Place of public assembly
    16. Personal service business
    17. Restaurant
    18. Retail business
    19. Retirement home
    20. Row dwelling
    21. Seniors housing
    22. Street row dwelling
  4. New minimum lot frontage is 18.0 metres where access to the rear yard is provided by a public lane, a secured private driveway, or over an exterior side yard; or 24.0 metres where access to the rear yard is provided from St. Joseph Boulevard, over a front yard.
  5. The maximum density for development is 1.5 Floor Area Ratio for lots that have an average lot depth of 40 metres or less; 3.0 Floor Area Ratio for lots that have an average lot depth of more than 40 metres; and 3.5 Floor Area Ratio for lots that have an average lot depth greater than 60 metres and are located at the corner of St. Joseph Boulevard and one of, Youville Drive, Jeanne d’Arc Boulevard, Orléans Boulevard or Place d’Orléans Drive.
  6. All new buildings must be located between 0.0 and 4.0 metres of a public right-of-way (front yard and exterior side yard).
  7. For any building that is entirely residential, the building must be located between 0.0 and 6.0 metres of the front lot line, and any space between the front line and the building must be landscaped.
  8. When vehicular access is provided from St. Joseph Boulevard, a minimum side yard of 6.0 metres must be provided to accommodate a driveway, but the other side yard can be 0.0 metres.
  9. The minimum setback from the rear lot line is 7.5 metres for all cases. This rear yard may accommodate an access lane or parking where adequate screening is provided.
  10. For corner site development, a minimum of 75% of the lot line along St. Joseph Boulevard must be occupied by a building façade; and a minimum of 50% of the lot line along the exterior side yard must be occupied by a building façade.
  11. For all other sites, the main wall of the building must occupy a minimum of 50% of the lot line adjacent to St. Joseph Boulevard.
  12. Blank building facades are not permitted along any street frontage; windows and door entrances must occupy a minimum of 50% of any building wall along St. Joseph Boulevard.
  13. The maximum building height is 12.5 metres for lots that have average lot depths of 40.0 metres or less.
  14. The maximum building height is 18.75 metres for lots that have an average lot depth greater than 40 metres, and the 18.75 metre height limit can only be used for a building or that portion of a building located between the front lot line and 20 metres of the back lot line; between 20 metres of the back lot line and 7.5 metres, the maximum building height is 12.5 metres.
  15. For lots that have an average lot depth greater than 60 metres and are located at the corner of St. Joseph Boulevard and one of, Youville Drive, Jeanne d’Arc Boulevard, Orléans Boulevard or Place d’Orléans Drive, the maximum building height is 25.0 metres, and the 25.0 metre height limit can only be used for a building or portion of a building located between the front lot line and 30 metres of the back lot line; 18.75 metre height limit can only be used for a building or that portion of a building located between the front lot line and 20 metres of the back lot line; between 20 metres of the back lot line and 7.5 metres, the maximum building height is 12.5 metres.
  16. In addition to the above height regulations, on any corner lot, the minimum building height shall be 9.0 metres within 0.0 and 4.0 metres of the front and exterior side yards.
  17. A minimum of 1.15 spaces per residential unit must be provided.
  18. A minimum of 1.0 space per 40 square metres of gross floor area must be provided for all commercial uses other than stand-alone restaurant.
  19. Stand-alone restaurant buildings must provide at least 1.0 space per 10 square metres of gross floor area. No additional parking is required for outdoor patios / seating areas.
  20. No parking is permitted within a front yard or street yard.
  21. The maximum amount of any lot that may be covered by a parking lot used for required parking is 35% of the lot area.
  22. If a surface parking lot or parking structure is the only use, the maximum amount of the lot covered by the parking lot or parking structure shall be 70% of the lot area. In the case of a parking lot, it must be set back 6.0 metres from all streets and which space must be landscaped and appropriate screening provided.
  23. Required parking may be provided on other sites.
  24. At least 6.0 metres must be provided for all driving aisles.
  25. Unless otherwise changed by this amendment, all other general provisions will apply as required.
  26. Exterior storage is not permitted.

Appendix

Zoning Provisions - Summary Table

Zone Permitted Uses Height Density Street Yard Other Yards
Mg – Industrial General Zone an array of industrial and .commercial uses, typically space extensive max 13.7 m 35 FAR 4 m 1 m or 8 m if abutting a residential zone
Ic – Institutional Community Zone broad array of institutional uses, including special needs housing, clinics and recreational facilities. Some commercial uses permitted conditionally max 18.0 m 0.6 FAR 1.00 FAR for a retirement home   1 m varies according to building height and adjacent land use
Cc1 – Commercial Community Zone an array of commercial uses. residential and institutional uses are permitted conditionally, as part of a mixed use development 10.7 m within 20 m of an R zone
18.0 m within 30 m of an R zone
22.0 m beyond 30 m of an R zone
.60 for commercial uses up to a max GFA of 35,000m2 80uph for residential 0 m varies according to building height and adjacent land use
Cn – Commercial Neighbourhood Zone smaller scale commercial uses, apartments permitted conditionally 10.7 m .35 FAR 0 m 0.0 m or 6.0 m if abutting a residential zone
Ch – Commercial Highway Zone larger format, space extensive commercial uses 10.7 m .35 FAR 1.0 m 1.0 m or 6.0 m if abutting a residential zone
Cd – Commercial District Zone commercial uses, apartments and institutional uses permitted conditionally 10.7 m within 20 m of an R zone
22.0 m within 30 m of an R zone
48.0 m beyond 30 m of an R zone
1.50 FAR for commercial complex calculations for ancillary residential and institutional uses 0.0 m 0.0, except where abutting a residential, where distances vary according to building height
Rd1 – Residential Double Dwelling Zone detached, duplex, semi-detached     5.0 m Interior side-1.0/1.2 m rear-7.0 m
Exceptions Comments
Cc1 (E1) provides a list of prohibited land uses
Cc1 (E2) site specific exemption that recognizes an existing use
Cc1 (E3) site specific exemption dealing with parking, prohibited uses and permissions for an outdoor patio
Cc1 (E22) site specific exemption that recognizes an existing use
Cc1 (E26) site specific exemption that deals with setbacks
Cn (E29) site specific exemption that deals with parking, setbacks and landscaping