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Carlington Heights Pump Station Upgrade

Project Status: 
Planned

Public information session display boards (15 May 2017)

Welcome

The City of Ottawa Infrastructure Services Department welcomes you to the Carlington Heights pump station upgrade project public information session.

Staff of the City and the consulting firm Parsons Inc. are available to discuss the material displayed at the public information session.

Project team

City of Ottawa: Jeff de Laat – City Project Manager

Consultant: André Proulx – Consultant Project Manager

Purpose of this session

The purpose of this public information session is to present the planned construction project of the new Carlington Heights pump station, the timing of the construction and the related construction activities.

Project objectives

The Carlington Heights Pump Station (CHPS) was originally constructed in 1963. It draws water directly from the adjacent Carlington Heights Reservoir (CHR) and supplies a population of over 250,000.

The City of Ottawa Infrastructure Master Plan (IMP) has identified the need for additional capacity at the CHPS.

Improvements are needed so that this Station can provide adequate emergency supply to the City’s various water pressure zones.

This project will improve the reliability of supply to both existing and future development.

Key plan map showing projects limits.

Key components

  • New pumping station located on the west side of the reservoir, tight against the berm and adjacent to the existing communication tower compound
  • New 914mm diameter watermain connected directly off of the  existing 1200 diameter watermain on the east side of the reservoir
  • Four new discharge watermains connected to existing watermains
  • Demolition of the existing pumping station approximately 6 months after the new pumping station has been commissioned

Existing infrastructure [ PDF - 1.82 MB ]
Design rendering of the new pump station [ PDF - 3.1 MB ]

Budget

Approved budget/investment limit $13.6M.

Schedule

Design completion: Summer 2017
Tendering: Summer 2017
Construction start: October 2017
Construction end: October 2019

What to expect during construction

Hours of work

Permitted Monday to Friday between 7 am and 10 pm. Work may be permitted on Saturday, Sunday and Statutory holidays, if required.

Noise during construction

Noise By-Laws will be adhered to over the duration of this project. You may feel vibrations at your home or business due to the use of heavy equipment needed to complete this work. This is quite common and not usually a problem.

Reduced access

The construction zone will be fenced-off for the duration of the project with no access to the public. All public areas outside of the construction zone will remain accessible to the public.

Construction traffic

Expected traffic routes for construction vehicles is along Caldwell Avenue.

What to expect during construction [ PDF - 2.55 MB ]
Expected traffic routes [ PDF - 3.67 MB ]

Thank you for your attendance

All information/comments received will be maintained on file for use during the study and may be included in study documentation. With the exception of personal information, all comments will become part of the public record. Please note comments shall be accepted until May 29, 2017.

Prior to construction, affected residents will be notified of the commencement of work through the delivery of flyers.

Public information session (15 May 2017)

Potable water pump station design and construction project

You are invited:
Monday, May 15, 2017
6:30 to 8:30 pm
Carlington Recreation Centre (Gymnasium)
1520 Caldwell Ave, Ottawa, ON K1Z 8H5

The City of Ottawa invites you to attend a Public Information Session to review a construction project planned in your immediate neighbourhood.

At the Public Information Session starting at 6:30pm, you will be able to review the design plans for the project and a short presentation will be provided at 7:00pm to explain the nature of the construction project and the anticipated impacts during construction. Representatives from the City, City Councillors Riley Brockington (River Ward) and Rick Chiarelli (College Ward), and the design consultant will be available to discuss the project and to answer your questions.

Where: The new pump station will be located on the west side of the reservoir, tight against the berm and adjacent to the existing communication tower compound.

Key plan map showing projects limits.

Who: Design consulting firm, Parsons, has been retained by the City of Ottawa to develop preliminary and detailed design drawings and specifications for construction of the new pump station.

Why: The main objective of the upgrade is to improve the reliability of water supply to roughly one third of the City’s central water distribution system, and to provide additional capacity needed to accommodate future urban growth. The project is identified in the City’s current Infrastructure Master Plan.

What: The new pump station will be constructed adjacent to the existing station.  The existing pump station will remain in operation throughout the construction period of the new pump station. Once the new pump station is operational, the existing pump station will be de-decommissioned and demolished.  The main components of the new pump station include the following:

  • A new building complete with all new mechanical and electrical equipment to provide for the pumping needs of the various areas in the City.
  • Backup power supply for emergency use during power outages.
  • A new 914mm diameter suction watermain connected directly to the existing 1200mm diameter watermain on the east side of the reservoir.
  • Four new discharge watermains connected to existing watermains that supply water to the various water Pressure Zones in the City.
  • Demolition of the existing pump station approximately 6 months after the new pump station has been fully commissioned.

When: The current project schedule is as follows:

  • Preliminary and detailed design: Fall 2015 – May 2017
  • Design assignment completion: June 2017
  • Construction start: Fall 2017
  • Construction completion: Late Fall 2019

Accessibility is an important consideration for the City of Ottawa. If you require special accommodation at the public open house, please contact the undersigned.

For further information about this project and/or to submit comments, please contact:

City’s project manager:
Jeff de Laat, P.Eng.
Senior Engineer, Infrastructure Projects
City of Ottawa
Planning, Infrastructure and Economic Development Department
Design and Construction – Branch 2
100 Constellation Drive, 6th Floor West
Ottawa, ON  K2G 6J8
Tel: 613-580-2424 ext. 21916

Design consultant representative:
André Proulx, P.Eng., M.Eng.
Vice President
Parsons
1223 Michael Street, Suite 100
Ottawa, ON  K1J 7T2
Tel: 613-691-1573

Project overview (April 2017)

Potable water pump station design and construction project
Contract no. ISD15-3008

Background

The City of Ottawa is currently completing the design for the Carlington Heights Pump Station (CHPS) Upgrade. The main objective of the upgrades is to improve the reliability of water supply to roughly one third of the City’s central water distribution system, and to provide additional capacity needed to accommodate future urban growth. The project is identified in the City’s current Infrastructure Master Plan.

This design assignment follows the previous work completed under the Carlington Heights Pump Station Site Upgrade Environmental Assessment and Functional Design Study which identified and evaluated various infrastructure alternatives, selected a preferred alternative, and provided for a functional design of the required upgrades.

The CHPS was originally constructed in 1963. It draws water directly from the adjacent Carlington Heights Reservoir and supplies a population of over 250,000. The City of Ottawa is divided into various water system pressure zones based on providing customers with an appropriate minimum and maximum water pressure. Figure 1 shows the City's various water pressure zones. The CHPS is currently a two zone station serving the Meadowlands East (ME) and 2W Pressure Zones. The 2W Pressure Zone also supplies all of the water to the 3W and 3SW Pressure Zones. The station is a back-up source of water for Zones 2W, 3W, 3SW and SUC Pressure Zones, and is the only source of water for the ME Pressure Zone under normal operating conditions. These zones are noted on the following map.

The 2008 Infrastructure Master Plan identified the need for additional capacity at the CHPS. The output of this pump station is limited by pump capacity and the size of the suction and discharge piping near the station. Improvements are needed so that this pumping station can provide adequate emergency supply to Zones 2W, 3W, and 3SW. These improvements will also add capacity to accommodate projected urban growth in these zones.

Project description

A new pump station will be design and then constructed.  The new pump station will be located on the west side of the reservoir, tight against the berm and adjacent to the existing communication tower compound.  The existing pump station will remain in operation throughout the construction period of the new Pump station, as it is the only source of water supply to the ME Pressure Zone.  The existing pump station will only de decommissioned and demolished after the new pump station has been fully commissioned and is operating to the full satisfaction of the City.  The main components of the new pump station include the following:

  • A new building complete with all new mechanical and electrical equipment to provide for the pumping needs for the ME Pressure Zone and the backup pumping needs of the 2W Pressure Zone.
  • Backup power supply for the ME Pressure Zone pumps.
  • A new 914mm diameter suction watermain connected directly to the existing 1200mm diameter watermain on the east side of the reservoir.
  • Four new discharge watermains connected to existing watermains that supply water to the ME and 2W Pressure Zones.
  • Demolition of the existing pump station approximately 6 months after the new pump station has been fully commissioned.

Project timing

Preliminary and detailed design: Fall 2015 – May 2017
Design assignment completion: June 2017
Construction start: Fall 2017
Construction completion: Late Fall 2019

Budget

Design: $1,000,000 (estimate)
Construction: $8,600,000 (estimate)

Public involvement

A public information session will take place on 15th May 2017 at 6:30pm at the Carlington Recreation Centre on Caldwell Avenue, to present the background and the main features of the project to the public, and the expected impacts on the site access during the construction stage. At this time attendees will be able to review the information, ask questions and provide comment on the proposed works.

For further information or to provide comments, please contact the City’s project manager:

Jeff de Laat, P.Eng.
Senior Engineer, Infrastructure Projects
City of Ottawa
Planning, Infrastructure and Economic Development Department
Design and Construction – Branch 2
100 Constellation Drive, 6th Floor West
Ottawa, ON  K2G 6J8
Tel: 613-580-2424 ext. 21916

Notice of study commencement

Class Environmental Assessment and Functional Design

The City of Ottawa has initiated the Carlington Heights Pump Station Site Upgrade Class Environmental Assessment and Functional Design Study. The main objective of the study is to identify a preferred alternative for water supply infrastructure upgrades at the site [ PDF - 949 KB ]. These upgrades are needed to improve the reliability of water supply to roughly one third of the City’s central distribution system, and to provide additional capacity needed to accommodate future urban growth. The project is identified in the City’s current Infrastructure Master Plan.

This study will be carried out in accordance with the requirements of Phases 1 and 2 of the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment (Class EA). The study will include identification and evaluation of infrastructure alternatives, selection of a preferred alternative, and a functional design of the upgrades.

There is an opportunity at any time during the Class EA process for interested persons to provide comments. With the exception of personal information, comments received become part of the public record.

For more information, or if you would like your name added to the mailing list, please contact:

Chris Rogers, P. Eng.
Senior Project Engineer
110 Laurier Avenue West, 4th Floor
Ottawa, ON K1P 1J1
613-580-2424 ext. 27785
Fax: 613-580-2578
E-mail: Christopher.Rogers@Ottawa.ca

Online open house – preliminary preferred alternative

Project overview

The City of Ottawa has initiated the planning process for the Environmental Assessment (EA) Study for the proposed Carlington Heights Pumping Station (CHPS) Upgrades. The main objective of this study is to prepare the functional design and phasing plan for the proposed CHPS site upgrades in accordance with the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment (MCEA) requirements. This will include identification and evaluation of a range of alternatives that focus on potential pumping station and suction/discharge piping upgrades.

The following information has been prepared to provide an overview of the project and an outline of the study process to date.

Project background

Figure 1: Study Area [ PDF - 163 KB ]

The CHPS was originally constructed in 1963. It draws water directly from the adjacent Carlington Heights Reservoir and supplies a population of over 250,000. The City of Ottawa is divided into various water system pressure zones based on providing customers with an appropriate minimum and maximum water pressure. Figure 2 shows the City's various water pressure zones. The CHPS is currently a two zone station serving the Meadowlands East (ME) and 2W Pressure Zones. The 2W Pressure Zone also supplies all of the water t the 3W and Barrhaven (BARR) Pressure Zones. The station is a back-up source of water for Zones 2W, 3W, and BARR and is the only source of water for the ME Pressure Zone under normal operating conditions. These zones are noted on the following map.

Figure 2: City Pressure Zones [ PDF - 209 KB ]

The 2008 Infrastructure Master Plan identified the need for additional capacity at the CHPS. The output of this pumping station is limited by pump capacity and the size of the suction and discharge piping near the station. Improvements are needed so that this pumping station can provide adequate emergency supply to Zones 2W, 3W, and BARR. These improvements will also add capacity to accommodate projected urban growth in these zones.

Environmental Assessment requirements

This project has been planned as a Schedule 'B' project under the MCEA document (2011). The purpose of the Class EA study is to confirm project need and justification, document existing environmental conditions, examine alternatives and potential impacts, and recommend a preferred alternative for the upgrade.

Consultation

Communication and consultation are an important part of the study process. The City will engage the public through a variety of methods including information posted on the City Web site and meetings, as required, with community associations and approval agencies. The project also benefits from a Technical Advisory Committee that provides guidance and support through the planning and design processes.

Existing conditions

Existing environmental conditions are characterized to determine sensitivities and provide a baseline against which the effects of each of the alternatives can be assessed. Overall, the baseline data was collected and analyzed for key environmental parameters in order to:

  • Provide an understanding of existing conditions;
  • Allow for predictions of how the proposed project may cause these environmental conditions to change; and
  • Allow for predictions of how adverse effects can be mitigated and beneficial effects enhanced.

Key social, natural, and geotechnical conditions are represented on the following maps.

Figure 3: Social Conditions [ PDF - 145 KB ]

  • Areas of archaeological potential surround the water reservoir beyond the existing access roads
  • on-road cycling routes are identified outside of the study area
  • Off-road cycling routes and multi-use pathways are located through Carlington Woods extending to the east and west of the study area
  • Sanitary and storm sewers are located beneath the majority of the roadways

Figure 4: Natural Features [ PDF - 116 KB ]

  • Carlington Woods (Urban Natural Area 121) surrounds the reservoir and pump station to the south, east and west
  • A waterbody resulting from the snow storage is identified west of Clyde Avenue

Figure 5: Geotechnical Conditions  [ PDF - 116 KB ]

  • A former landfill area at McBride Street and Raven Avenue was closed in 1953
  • The depth to bedrock varies from 0 to 15 metres across the site

Evaluation criteria

Each Alternative was assessed against a series of criteria for the purpose of selecting a preliminary preferred alternative. Included in the table below is the rationale for the selection of the criteria and the indicators that will be used to assess the impacts/rate the effect.

Table 1 Evaluation Criteria
  Criteria Objective Indicators
Economic Capital Cost Minimize

Cost estimate

Economic Operating and Maintenance Costs Minimize Number and age of structures and magnitude of hydraulic losses
Technical Configuration Simplify to minimize hydraulic losses and maximize flexibility for future expansion  Hydraulic concinnity of station layout and watermain connections
Technical Operational Flexibility Minimize number and duration of site inspections by Operations staff Number of buildings and related structures
Technical Maintenance Minimize equipment and building maintenance requirements Number and age of structures 
Technical Site Security Protect against illegal entry Site location and layout
Technical Hydraulic performance Eliminate constraints on capacity imposed by Net Positive Suction Head Available and low reservoir operating levels Length of suction lines and suction and pump elevation relative to the reservoir floor
Technical Future Site Flexibility Minimize constraints on future 2W feedermain connection and reservoir expansion Site location and yard piping layout – especially on west side of reservoir
Technical Service disruption Minimize duration of service loss or reduction in service levels Need for system shutdowns to accommodate construction and watermain connections
Technical Construction risk Minimize construction impacts on existing above- and below-grade utilities and structures Proximity to existing utilities and structures
Social/Cultural Provincial and Municipal Planning Policies and Objectives Adhere to provincial and municipal planning policies and objectives Consistency with provincial and municipal planning policies and objectives
Social/Cultural Archaeological Resources Minimize disruption of archaeological resources Extent of disruption to areas identified as having archaeological potential
Social/Cultural Recreational Pathway Network Minimize disruption of the recreational pathway network Disruption to the City of Ottawa and National Capital Commission formal recreational pathway network
Social/Cultural Disruption during the Construction Period Minimize disruption to local residents and business caused by construction traffic during the construction period Construction site access route location, length of access routes and duration of construction 
Social/Cultural Protection of Views for Existing Neighbourhood Minimize visual intrusion on existing neighbourhood  Pump site location and site layout 
Natural Environment Urban Natural Feature Minimize disruption to identified Urban Natural Area Proximity to Urban Natural Feature 
Natural Environment Designated Species Minimize disturbance to Species at Risk / Designated Species Disturbance to Species at Risk / Designated Species 
Natural Environment Vegetation Impacts Protection of existing vegetation Loss of trees and shrubs 
Physical Environment Geotechnical Conditions

Avoid ground conditions which could impact on the feasibility of  construction

Extent of construction within elevated bedrock
Physical Environment Contamination Potential  Avoid areas of environmental concern that could potentially impact the soil and groundwater quality in the area of the proposed work in turn affecting design, construction, health and safety  Proximity to areas of contamination 

Alternative solutions

Alternative solutions were developed based on an understanding of the existing economic, technical, social/cultural, and natural and physical environmental conditions. Technically, these alternatives address existing condition-related issues, hydraulic limitations (pumping, suction and discharge), electrical limitations, and physical space limitations, within the existing pump station.

Eight alternatives were developed as follows.

Option 1 | Existing Station Addition [ PDF - 286 KB ]

  • Continued use of all existing pumps
  • Addition to existing building to house additional 2W pumps & standby power
  • New suction connection through the west reservoir wall and continued use of existing suction
  • New discharge line for new pumps

Option 2 | New Station at Existing Site with New West Side Suction  [ PDF - 193 KB ]

  • Ultimate demolition of existing station
  • New station & all new pumps tight to reservoir berm
  • New suction connection through the west reservoir wall

Option 3 | New Station Tight to Reservoir Wall  [ PDF - 165 KB ]

  • Ultimate demolition of existing station
  • New station set into the reservoir berm tight to the reservoir wall to reduce suction line lengths to a minimum
  • Gravity connection for 2W off the existing suction line but interconnected inside the station – and abandon the existing and long length of dead watermain

Option 4 | New Station on Reservoir Roof  [ PDF - 144 KB ]

  • Ultimate demolition of existing station
  • Reinforcement of the reservoir roof & construction of walled-off pump wells
  • New vertical turbine pumps to the reservoir floor
  • Existing suction line retained as a 2W gravity connection
  • New discharge lines for 2W and ME – and abandon existing

Option 5 | Station Addition with New Suction off East Side  [ PDF - 126 KB ]

  • Continued use of all existing pumps
  • Addition to existing building to house additional 2W pumps & standby power
  • New suction line off the 1W connection to improve net positive suction head available

Option 6 | New Station on East Side with New East Side Suction  [ PDF - KB ]

  • Ultimate demolition of existing station
  • New station & all new pumps tight to reservoir berm
  • New suction connected directly to the Zone 1W reservoir inlet pipe
  • New piping connections to Zones 2W and ME along the south side of the reservoir

Option 7 | New 2W Station on East Side and Existing Station dedicated to ME  [ PDF - 151 KB ]

  • Ultimate demolition of existing station
  • New station and all new pumps tight to berm on east side of reservoir
  • New suction connection directly off the 1W connection removing all constraints on reservoir level control
  • Existing suction line retained as a 2W gravity connection (but an internal connection could be provided to allow it to be abandoned)
  • Existing station is retained and dedicated to Zone ME

Option 8 | New Station on South Side and New East Side Suction  [ PDF - 139 KB ]

  • Ultimate demolition of existing station
  • New station & all new pumps tight to berm on east side of reservoir
  • New suction connection directly off the 1W connection removing all constraints on reservoir level control
  • Existing suction line retained as a 2W gravity connection (but an internal connection could be provided to allow it to be abandoned)
  • New discharge lines for 2W and ME – and abandon existing
  • Option 6 but located on the south side of the reservoir and set partially into the berm

Capital costs for the various options ranged from $4.4 M to $7.0 M. The estimates costs include construction costs, hydro allocations and engineering as well as a contingency.

Each alternative was evaluated and assessed a comparative score out of 10 for each criteria indicator with 10 representing the least impact/best result.

Table 2 Evaluation Results
Criteria Option 1 Option 2 Option 3 Option 4 Option 5 Option 6 Option 7 Option 8
 Economic                
 Capital  10.0  7.0  6.7  6.4  8.6  6.3  8.3  6.2
 Operating & maintenance  9  10  10  10  9  10  8  10
 Technical                
 Configuration  8  10  10  10  8  10  9  10
 Operational flexibility  6  6  6  6  10  10  8  10
 Maintenance  6  10  10  9  6  10  8  10
 Site security  9  10  8  9  9  9  9  9
 Hydraulic performance  10  10  10  10  10  10  10  10
 Future site flexibility  9  9  9  9  9  10  9  10
 Service disruption  8  8  8  6  10  10  10  10
 Construction risk  6  9  9  5  7  10  10  10
 Social/cultural                
 Planning policy compliance  10  10  10  10  10  10  10  10
 Archaeological resources  10  8  8  7  10  8  10  8
 Recreational pathway network  10  10  10  10  10  10  10  5
 Construction disruption  9  10  10  8  7  7  7  6
 Site aesthetics & visual impacts  9  10  10  5  9  7  7  8
 Natural environment                
 Urban natural feature  10  10  10  10  9  9  9  7
 Designated species  10  10  10  10  9  9  9  7
 Vegetation impacts  3.9  7.8  5.9  1.0  6.3  9.3  10  9.3
 Physical environment                
 Geotechnical conditions  10  10  10  10  10  10  10  10
 Contamination potential  10  10  10  10  10  10  10  10
 Total  173  185  181  160  177  185  181  176

 Sensitivity analysis

The weighting of each of the criteria groups were considered in evaluating the sensitivity of the evaluation results to variability in criteria weighting. Initially, weighting values for all criteria were scored equally. The weightings were then adjusted to varying degrees to test their influence on the outcome. Examples are illustrated below.

All weights equal [ PDF - 35 KB ]

Technical 10 – all others 0  [ PDF - 35 KB ]

Natural 10 – all others 0  [ PDF - 38 KB ]

Social/Cultural 10 – all others 0  [ PDF - 36 KB ]

Options 2 and 6 are ranked in the top three when Economics, Natural and Technical are weighted high. Option 6 loses its top-three ranking when Social/Cultural is weighted high, reflecting the increasing influence of visual impacts and construction disruption. Options 2 and 6 consistently ranked amongst the highest in the various weighting scenarios. 

The key benefits of Options 6 and 2 are as follows:

Option 6

Key Benefits

  • Uninterrupted operation of existing pumping station during construction of the new station
  • Shorter construction period compared to options involving additions to the existing station
  • Maximizes operational flexibility of the reservoir
  • Good access for operations and maintenance
  • Frees up land to west of reservoir for potential future uses.

Option 2

Key Benefits

  • Uninterrupted operation of existing pumping station during construction of the new station
  • Shorter construction period compared to options involving additions to the existing station
  • Facility essentially hidden from view of nearby residents and users of the green space
  • Reduced hydro supply extension compared to Option 6

Preliminary preferred alternative

A major advantage of a suction connection on the reservoir inlet/outlet line (Option 6) is that it effectively increases the volume of available storage in the Carlington Heights Reservoir by approximately 20 ML. This has both operational benefits and economic benefits. Despite the functional and operational advantages of Option 6, the environmental impacts of a major facility on the east side of the reservoir could be substantial, especially considering the fact that technically acceptable locations were available on the west side and would essentially be hidden from view for recreational users of the area (Option 2). Taking into account Option 6 represented the preferred technical solution but Option2, which places the station near the existing site, would be less intrusive, an option combining the advantages of both was developed as the Preliminary Preferred Alternative [ PDF - 371 KB ].

Impacts and mitigation

The CHPS will be designed and implemented with the benefit of contemporary planning, engineering, and environmental management practices. Best Management Practices (BMPs) will be implemented including:

  • Erosion and Sediment Control Plan
  • Construction and Traffic Management Plan
  • Emergency Response Plan
  • Environmental Protection

Following the incorporation of the BMPs, site specific, mitigation measures were identified to reduce potential negative effects. These include:

  • Geotechnical Considerations
  • Butternut Assessments (if required)
  • Landscape Plan for new station
  • Public Communications Plan
  • Pedestrian Detour / Management Plan
  • Hoarding and Exclusionary Fencing

Schedule and next steps

The study team will review comments and address concerns or questions that are raised by the public. Thereafter, the next steps in the study process are to:

  • Confirm the preferred alternative solution (early summer)
  • Prepare the EA report (early summer)
  • Committee and Council meetings (summer)
  • 30 Day Public review of EA Report (summer/early fall)
  • Functional Design (fall)
  • Design (winter and spring 2014)
  • Construction (starting 2015)

Comments

Tell us what you think. Provide your comments by mail or e-mail by June 28, 2013.

Chris Rogers, M.A.Sc., P. Eng.
Senior Project Engineer
Planning and Growth Management Department
City of Ottawa 110 Laurier Avenue West, 4th Floor
Ottawa, ON K1P 1J1
613-580-2424, ext. 27785
E-mail: Christopher.Rogers@ottawa.ca

ottawa.ca/carlingtonpumpstation

Notice of completion

Carlington Heights Pump Station Site Upgrade
Class Environmental Assessment Report Available for Review

The City of Ottawa has completed a Class Environmental Assessment (Class EA) study for the Carlington Heights Pump Station Site Upgrade. This project is needed to improve the reliability of water supply to about one third of the City's distribution system, and to provide additional capacity needed to accommodate future urban growth. This project has been planned as Schedule 'B' projects under the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment document (2007). The purpose of the Class EA study was to confirm project need and justification, document existing environmental conditions, examine alternatives and potential impacts, and recommend a preferred site upgrade alternative.

Copies of the Carlington Heights Pump Station Site Upgrade Environmental Assessment Study Report are available for review at the following locations:

City Hall Client Service Centre 
110 Laurier Avenue West 
Ottawa, ON K1P 1J1 
613-580-2400 

Alexander Community Centre
960 Silver Street
Ottawa, ON K1Z 6H5
613-798-8978

Carlington Recreation Centre
1520 Caldwell Avenue
Ottawa, ON K1Z 8M7
613-798-8920

The 30-day public review for this project begins on Thursday, November 28, 2013. Written concerns or comments may be submitted within 30 calendar days from the date of this notice to:

Chris Rogers, M.A.Sc., P. Eng.
Senior Project Engineer
Planning and Growth Management Department
City of Ottawa
110 Laurier Avenue West, 4th Floor
Ottawa, ON K1P 1J1
613-580-2424 ext. 27785
E-mail: Christopher.Rogers@Ottawa.ca

If concerns regarding this project cannot be resolved in discussion with the City of Ottawa, a person/party may request that the Minister of the Environment make an order for the project to comply with Part II of the Environmental Assessment Act (referred to as a Part II Order). This request must be received by the Minister at the address noted below, prior to January 6, 2014. A copy of the request should also be sent to the City of Ottawa at the above address. If there are no requests received by January 6, 2014, the project will proceed to design and construction as presented in the Class EA study. (Review period has been extended one week due to holiday season.)

Ministry of the Environment
The Honourable Jim Bradley
77 Wellesley Street West, 11th Floor, Ferguson Block
Toronto, ON, M7A 2T5
Tel: 416-314-6790 Fax: 416-314-7337

With the exception of personal information, all comments will become part of the public record.
This notice first issued on Thursday, November 28, 2013.