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Greenbank Realignment and Southwest Transitway Extension

Project Status: 
Planned

Project Overview

Project description

The objective of the project is to complete an updated functional design, preliminary design and detailed design of the realigned Greenbank Road and Southwest Transitway Extension between Marketplace Avenue/ Chapman Mills Drive in the north and Barnsdale Road in the south including a new 610 mm diameter transmission watermain along the realigned Greenbank Road from Market Place to the south side of the Jock River.

The project will include the design of a new 4-lane arterial roadway with 2-lane segregated median Bus Rapid Transit and facilities for pedestrians and cyclists along the corridor. The project also includes a new bridge over the Jock River, a Park and Ride facility near the southern terminus of the future transitway corridor, and design of new watermains and sewers.

The project will be guided by the work completed as part of past Environmental Assessment (EA) studies, which each involved an extensive study process and included consultation with the public. In advance of the preliminary design, an updated functional design will be developed to reflect newer design standards developed since the following various EAs were completed:

  • Greenbank Road (from Malvern Drive to Cambrian Road) Class EA Study (December 2006);
  • Southwest Transitway Extension (from Strandherd Drive to Cambrian Road) Individual EA Study (December 2006);
  • Realigned Greenbank Road and Southwest Transitway Extension (Cambrian Road to Barnsdale Road) EA Study (July 2014);
  • Chapman Mills Drive Extension (Longfields Drive to Strandherd Drive) and Bus Rapid Transit Corridor (Greenbank Road to Borrisokane Road) EA Study (November 2016); and
  • Greenbank Watermain EA (October 2017).

Field investigations in support of design (e.g., geotechnical, hydrogeological and environmental drilling, natural environment studies, topographic surveying, etc.) will be undertaken in 2021. Impacts to residents are anticipated to be minimal and affected residents will be notified. Affected landowners will be contacted for Consents to Enter, as required.

Land acquisitions requirements vary along the corridor. The exact property requirements will be determined during detailed design in coordination with ongoing development. Tendering and construction of this project is not currently included in the scope of this project.

Key plan [ 298 KB ]

Project timing

A general summary of the estimated design timelines are as follows:

Winter 2020/2021 – Consultant selection and updated functional design start

Late Spring/Summer 2021 – First Public Information Session

Spring/Fall 2021 – Field Investigations

Winter 2022/2023 – Finalize Preliminary Design

Winter 2023/2024 – Finalize Detailed Design

2024-2026 – Property Acquisition

The above timelines are estimated and may change as the project progresses.

The construction timelines are yet to be determined and will be dependent on future budget approval and coordination with other infrastructure projects across the City. Currently, construction is planned to start in 2030 or later and will depend on future Council budget deliberations and transit affordability considerations. The construction phase of this project will occur over multiple years. The Greenbank Road Realignment and Southwest Transitway Extension (Chapman Mills to Cambrian) is tentatively scheduled to begin construction in 2031.

The City is completing an update of the Transportation Master Plan which is currently scheduled for completion in 2023. As part of this work, the City will be reviewing the prioritization and timing of future infrastructure projects, including the re-alignment of Greenbank Road and Southwest Transitway Extension. Based on this review, the timing of future projects may be adjusted based on network needs and available funding.

Public engagement

Stay tuned on this webpage and our social media pages for information about our public information sessions and how you can contribute feedback to the project!

Our first public information session is currently scheduled for June 24, 2021, to present the updated functional design drawings to the public. Between June 24 and July 8, residents will be able to review the design, ask questions and provide comment on the proposed works. Additional public information sessions will be scheduled and held throughout the design process. Residents will be notified of these events.

Accessibility

Accessibility is an important consideration for the City of Ottawa. The City makes every effort to provide access through and around construction sites. If you require special accommodation, please contact the City’s Project Manager.

COVID-19

COVID-19 is an unprecedented situation and the City of Ottawa is committed to protecting people and the community. The Province of Ontario has allowed certain businesses and workplaces, including all municipal construction projects, to continue operations subject to compliance with strict public health and safety protocols. The City is working closely with the industry and complying with restrictions and recommendations provided by municipal, provincial and federal health officials, as well as the Ministry of Labour, Training and Skills Development.

For further information or to provide comments, please contact the City’s project manager.

Contact information

Should you have any inquiries, please do not hesitate to contact:

City Project Manager:
Erin O’Neill, P.Eng.
Senior Engineer, Infrastructure ServicesDesign and Construction – Municipal
100 Constellation Drive, Ottawa, ON K2G 6J8Tel: 613-580-2424 ext. 16008

Consultant Project Manager:
Gordon Chamberlain, P.Eng.
Principal, Transportation
Stantec Consulting Ltd.
Suite 400 - 1331 Clyde Avenue, Ottawa, ON K2C 3G4
Tel: 613-724-4390

Online engagement opportunity

Posted: 
Tuesday, June 15, 2021, 7:58 am
Last updated: 
Friday, June 25, 2021, 2:44 pm

Dates & Times

Thursday, June 24, 2021, 12:00 am to Thursday, July 8, 2021, 11:45 pm

The City of Ottawa continues to take precautionary steps to protect members of the public. As an alternative to hosting in-person public information sessions, information is being posted to Ottawa.ca and virtual information sessions are being held. The City remains committed to keeping the public informed of projects occurring in your neighborhood.

The City of Ottawa invites you to review and provide comments on the Greenbank Realignment and Southwest Transitway Extension Project by July 8, 2021. Information can be submited by email or by phone to the contact below.

A virtual public information session is being held on Thursday, June 24, 2021 at 5 pm. Please register if you wish to participate.

What: The City is undertaking the design of a new 4-lane arterial roadway with 2-lane segregated median Bus Rapid Transit and facilities for pedestrians and cyclists along the realigned Greenbank Road corridor. The project also includes a new bridge over the Jock River, a Park and Ride facility near the southern terminus of the future transitway corridor, and design of new watermains and sewers.

Why: The project is being undertaken to provide a key transportation link for the existing and fast-growing community of Barrhaven south of the Jock River. This online engagement opportunity will present the updated functional design drawings to the public and provide an opportunity for you to review the design, ask questions and provide comment on the proposed works. Additional public information sessions will also be scheduled and held throughout the design process.

Where: Greenbank Road between Marketplace Avenue/Chapman Mills Drive in the north and Barnsdale Road in the south.

When: The current project schedule is as follows:

  • Functional Design Update: summer 2021
  • Preliminary Design Completion: winter 2022/2023
  • Detailed Design Completion: winter 2023/2024
  • Construction: 2030 or later, depending on future budget deliberations

Who: The City of Ottawa has retained Stantec Consulting Inc. to develop a design for the Greenbank Realignment and Southwest Transitway Extension.

For further information about this project and/or to submit comments on the project, please contact the City project manager:

Erin O’Neill, P.Eng.
Senior Engineer, Infrastructure Projects
Design and Construction - Municipal
100 Constellation Drive, Ottawa, ON K2G 6J8
Tel: 613-580-2424, ext. 16008

Frequently asked questions (June 2021)

1. What are the timelines for construction of this project?

The construction timelines are yet to be determined and will be dependent on future budget approval and coordination with other infrastructure projects across the City. Currently, construction is planned to start in 2030 or later and will depend on future Council budget deliberations and transit affordability considerations. The construction phase of this project will occur over multiple years. The Greenbank Road Realignment and Southwest Transitway Extension (Chapman Mills to Cambrian) is tentatively scheduled to begin construction in 2031.

The City is completing an update of the Transportation Master Plan which is currently scheduled for completion in 2023. As part of this work, the City will be reviewing the prioritization and timing of future infrastructure projects, including the re-alignment of Greenbank Road and Southwest Transitway Extension. Based on this review, the timing of future projects may be adjusted based on network needs and available funding.

2. There is so much new development along the corridor. Is the design of the realignment project being coordinated with the various development applications and approvals?

Yes. Newer developments along the alignment were designed and approved with the future realignment of Greenbank Road along this corridor in mind, per the Environmental Assessment (EA) studies conducted between 2006 and 2017. The current functional design of the realigned Greenbank combines the previously approved EA studies and refreshes the design to incorporate updated design guidelines and current standards. Coordination between this project and the proposed developments is ongoing.

3. Will any additional property be required to accommodate the new realigned Greenbank Road?

For the most part, a minimum 41.5-metre-wide right-of-way has been set aside along the corridor to allow for this planned roadway construction. There are some isolated areas along the corridor where additional land would be required to meet design standards and project requirements. These are generally limited to near intersections and within areas of older developments. Exact property requirements will be negotiated by the City’s Real Estate Office with individual property owners as the design advances. If you have any specific questions or concerns, please contact the City Project Manager.

4. Are you improving the traffic capacity of Greenbank Road with this realignment?

The new realigned Greenbank Road between Chapman Mills Drive and Barnsdale Road will incorporate 4 lanes of traffic, plus dedicated turn lanes, which will increase the traffic capacity significantly to the communities in Barrhaven south of the Jock River. The new realigned Greenbank Road has many designations including being an arterial, truck route, Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Transitway corridor, cycling route and pedestrian route. Therefore, the corridor is being reconstructed as a “complete street” to improve the multi-modal capacity throughout the corridor, by providing improved facilities for all users.

5. What will happen to the existing Greenbank Road?

The existing Greenbank Road will remain in place following construction to allow access to the existing homes. Dead ends will be introduced just north and just south of the Jock River as part of a separate project. The existing bridge over the Jock River will be closed to motorized vehicles, but there are plans to repurpose the structure for active transportation users (cyclists/pedestrian).

6. I drop my child off at St. Joseph’s High School. Will the design of the realigned Greenbank Road alignment include facilities for a drop off zone / bus parking in front of the school?

On-street parking will be provided in the vicinity of the high school. A Transitway station will be constructed at the nearest signalized intersection (Darjeeling Street) which will serve the high school. In addition, a new connecting road (extension of Darjeeling) just north of the high school and two additional links will be constructed to connect the high school and existing Greenbank Road to Realigned Greenbank Road.

7. The current design includes dedicated lanes for Bus Rapid Transit (BRT). How will that work?

Two dedicated bus lanes will be constructed, one in each direction, within the central median of the realigned Greenbank Road Corridor. This will allow the existing Southwest Transitway to extend south from Barrhaven Town Centre to Kilbirnie, in accordance with the City of Ottawa’s Transportation Master Plan (Draft). This section of the Southwest Transitway will include seven (7) at-grade stations between Chapman Mills Drive and the new station and Park and Ride facility at Kilbirnie Drive. Stations are currently planned for Barrhaven Town Centre (reconstructed), Darjeeling, Riverboat, River Run, Cambrian, Dundonald, and Kilbirnie (including a Park and Ride). Local bus routes will also be able to enter and exit the Transitway corridor to service adjacent streets.

8. Will OC Transpo routes or bus stops be changing?

Upon opening of the newly constructed facilities, OC Transpo routes will be modified to take advantage of the new Transitway and improve service to residents in Barrhaven south of the Jock River. Bus stop locations will be reviewed in consultation with OC Transpo. Bus stations on realigned Greenbank Road are planned at intersections, and bus stops outside of the Transitway corridor will be located in accordance with OC Transpo Service standards.

9. Will the design allow for future conversion of the BRT to LRT?

As identified by the City’s Draft Official Plan and Transportation Master Plan, the City, LRT facilities south of Chapman Mills Drive are not envisioned in the foreseeable future. As such, the Southwest Transitway Extension for this project incorporates Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) design criteria only.

10. Will accessibility of the corridor be improved for this new road?

The design will meet the City of Ottawa Accessibility Design Standards, as well as the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA). Some of the key accessibility components of the design include a minimum 1.8m wide pedestrian facilities demarcated from the adjacent to a cycle track with seating areas / rest areas installed at select locations along the corridor. Intersections will include properly sized refuge areas for pedestrian crossings, accessible pedestrian signals and installation of tactile walking surface indicators (TWSIs). Design will also provide safe access to the median transit stations/stops.

11. What is being done to improve cycling facilities as part of this project?

The realigned Greenbank Road has been identified in the City of Ottawa’s Transportation Master Plan as a Cycling Spine Route, with several connections to other spine routes, local routes and pathways. In accordance with the City of Ottawa’s Cycle Plan, cycle tracks are being provided to make greater accommodation and connectivity to cyclists. Modifications to the current pathways are outside of the scope of this project; however, opportunities to provide further improved cycling and pedestrian connections along both sides of the Jock River are currently under review.

12. Why are the cycling facilities separated instead of being on the road facilities, as shown in the previous EAs?

The designs identified from previous EAs have been updated to incorporate the latest Provincial and City of Ottawa design guidelines, which now call for the installation of separated cycling facilities. Due to the high traffic volumes and operating speed on the realigned Greenbank Road, separated raised cycle tracks are preferred for this type of corridor to improve comfort for cyclists and enhance the overall safety of the corridor. A new update to the City design guidelines in anticipated to be issued in July for intersections, for which any changes will need to be incorporated into the preliminary design.

13. What is a protected intersection?

A protected intersection is a signal-controlled intersection with dedicated space and crossings for pedestrians, bicycles and motor vehicles which improves user safety and comfort. Protected intersections create shorter, simpler crossings, more predictable movements, and better visibility between people walking, people on bikes and people driving. Unlike at conventional intersections, cyclists are not forced to merge into traffic. Instead, they are given a dedicated path through the intersection. The setback between the vehicle lane and the cycling facility makes cyclists more visible to turning drivers than in a conventional intersection. This, along with design elements including corner safety islands, setback crosswalks and cross rides (cycling crossings), and dedicated bicycle signals reduce potential conflicts between all users. For more information please visit Protected intersections.

14. Why are the raised cycle tracks (bike lanes that are raised up from road level) curved at some intersections?

Horizontal curves are used for multiple reasons such as improving visibility of cyclists by turning vehicle drivers and slowing cyclists before they enter an intersection and are being designed to the City’s current guidelines and standards which are in line with North American standards.

15. Will all intersections be protected?

Yes, however due to adjacent property, building or grading constraints, designs for some intersections/corners may need to be modified from City of Ottawa and Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities (AODA) design guidelines to accommodate these constraints. If there are no constraints, a pedestrian refuge area can be provided between the curb and cycling facility where a pedestrian will wait to cross. In this option the pedestrian and cyclist facilities remain at the same level. If there are significant constraints that do not provide sufficient space for a pedestrian refuge area between the curb and the cycle track, the cyclist facility ramps down to road level in advance of the intersection and pedestrians will wait on the sidewalk before crossing. The cyclist facility will ramp back up on the far side of the intersection, past the crosswalk and crossride.

16. What are you doing to encourage pedestrian usage along the corridor?

The proposed pedestrian facilities along the future Realigned Greenbank corridor are planned to be a minimum 1.8m wide (and wider where feasible) in accordance with current City of Ottawa and Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities (AODA) guidelines. The pedestrian facilities will be located behind the cycle track which will provide a greater buffer between vehicles and pedestrians. Where the pedestrian facility is against the cycle track, demarcation will be installed to separate the two facilities. Intersections will be constructed with properly sized waiting areas. Bus stops will be separated from pedestrians and cyclists along the median BRT corridor.

17. Will existing and future overhead utility lines be buried?

There is currently no plan to bury Hydro lines or other overhead lines within the project limits. It is City policy, for roadways classified as is this section of Greenbank Road, to work around the (future and existing) Hydro lines unless there is a technical requirement to bury them. At this time, there is no requirement to bury the Hydro lines.

18. Why is a new bridge required over the Jock River?

A new bridge is required over the Jock River to allow for the widened road cross-section to accommodate traffic, BRT, cycling and pedestrian facilities. After further review during the functional design, and confirmation of the design requirements, it was determined that the preferred bridge design is a utilitarian, single structure bridge to minimize impact to the environment and reduce costs. Additional consultation with regulatory agencies will be undertaken as part of the design process to confirm design elements, identify any needs for habitat compensation or restoration, and develop environmental mitigation measures in advance of construction.

19. Will you ensure that city scaping is reflective of native fauna and contributes to the ecology of the area (e.g., trees that produce berries for wildlife or that blossom for bees)?

Yes. Wherever possible, native plants will be used where suitable for site conditions.

20. How will construction impact me?

Construction planning and staging will be reviewed during the preliminary design stage and will be finalized during the detailed design stage. In general, we anticipate that local access will be maintained throughout construction for motorized traffic, pedestrians and cyclists. Some construction noise and vibration should be anticipated; however, the work will be completed in accordance with the City’s bylaws which restrict work hours and noise levels at receiving sites (i.e., homes). Additional details on construction planning and staging will be provided in subsequent information sessions once the design has advanced.