Heritage Day

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Celebrate Heritage Day! February 22, 2022

Join us in celebrating Heritage Day 2022 with the theme “Growing from our roots - our heritage and histories.” While lockdowns and physical distancing measures continued to impact our communities over the past year, heritage groups, museums and archives, worked hard to connect people with their heritage and histories. Through providing research support for family genealogy projects or showcasing the connections between our past and present, Ottawa’s heritage community are here to engage and inspire.

Visual: View of Ottawa City Hall sign and outside views of Ottawa City Hall building.

Visual: Daniel Richer arrives inside Ottawa City Hall, rings bell and speaks on screen.

Oyez!

Ladies and gentlemen, it is my duty and pleasure as official Town Crier to welcome you to the 2022 celebration of Heritage Day in Ottawa!

This year’s theme explores the roots which support our ancestors, our families, and our communities. These roots contain thousands of years of history, and have provided the foundation for our city to grow towards the community we know and love today.

Please join us virtually in celebrating Ottawa’s heritage!

May God smile upon you!

Visual: Welcome to Heritage Day message with City of Ottawa logo and Capital Heritage Connexion logo

Visual: Daniel Richer on screen inside Councillor’s Lounge

Ladies and gentlemen. Salutations.

My name is Daniel Richer dit LaFlèche, and I am pleased to welcome you once again to Heritage Day in Ottawa.

For over forty years, I have been the National Capital Region’s Town Crier, and it is always an honour and a pleasure to be asked to participate in Heritage Day.

I would like to begin by acknowledging that we are meeting on aboriginal land that has been inhabited by Indigenous peoples from the beginning.

The City of Ottawa is built on unceded Algonquin Anishinabe territory.

The peoples of the Algonquin Anishinabe First Nation have lived on this territory for millennia. Their culture and presence have nurtured and continue to nurture this place.

We recognize and deeply appreciate their historic connection to this place. We also recognize the contributions of Métis, Inuit, and other Indigenous peoples in both shaping and strengthening the community of Ottawa, as well as our province and country as a whole.

The City of Ottawa and the Capital Heritage Connexion honour the peoples and the land of the Algonquin Anishinabe First Nation.

Ladies and gentlemen, we have two very special guests who will be speaking to you today.

Please welcome his Worship, Jim Watson, Mayor of the City of Ottawa, and Lady Meghan Walsh, Acting Executive Director, of the Capital Heritage Connexion.

Visual: Mayor Jim Watson speaks on screen.

Hello everyone.

I would like to welcome you to this year’s virtual edition of the Heritage Day celebrations here in the City of Ottawa.

Heritage Day celebrates our local heritage and invites residents to explore our history by visiting museums, archives and places of architectural significance.

For many years prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, Heritage Day celebrations have been typically held in-person.

This is the second year we’ve had to shift to a virtual event.

This year’s Heritage Day explores the roots of our communities and families that form the City as we know it today.

Ottawa’s own roots extend back for over 10,000 years – as the city was built on part of the unceded territory of the Algonquin Anishinabeg Nation who inhabited the area long before Anglophone and Francophone settlers arrived.

The city is now home to over 1 million people from diverse backgrounds and histories.

In celebration of our past and our future, I encourage everyone to visit heritage destinations, cultural landscapes and centres. Connect with traditional knowledge keepers, educators, parents and grandparents to experience our rich heritage.

Heritage Day is also a chance to recognize the contributions of the many dedicated volunteers who promote heritage conservation, and educate the public about the city’s history.

As lockdowns and physical distancing measures continue to impact our communities, heritage groups across the City all dug deeper to connect people with their heritage and histories.

Whether they were providing research support for family genealogy projects or highlighting the connections between our present and our past in a virtual exhibition, Ottawa’s heritage community was there to engage and inspire.

In the city’s west end, the Goulbourn Museum acted as a pillar of support for the local community by developing ways to meaningfully connect with heritage and history.

Over the past year, the Museum has used genealogical research and artefacts to develop programs that encouraged community members to explore how the past has influenced the present day.

Some of these programs includes the ‘Summer Seekers’, a series of web-facilitated learning modules that share local history with children through hands-on, outdoor learning activities.

The modules allow children to grow from their roots by discovering how the past has shaped their present, and about how history ties into their everyday lives.

The Museum also launched an exhibition to inspire children to stay connected to and learn about their family roots.

An online competition called “My Family Is…” encouraged children to research their heritage, create a family tree, and explore family heirlooms.

I am now pleased to present a proclamation to Goulbourn Museum, on behalf of all the heritage organizations, staff, and volunteers, which I am now pleased to read.

Visual: Mayor Jim Watson unveils the framed proclamation. Camera zooms in on proclamation text.

WHEREAS, Heritage Day is part of Heritage Week, a nation-wide celebration that encourages all Canadians to rejoice in and explore their local heritage and celebrate Canada’s uniqueness, that takes place during the third week of February; and

WHEREAS, Heritage Day is a time to reflect on the achievements of past generations and to accept responsibility for protecting our heritage; and

WHEREAS, Our shared heritage in all its forms has the power to bring people together and create a sense of belonging; and

WHEREAS, Gathering places like museums, and cultural objects such as artefacts and memorabilia are tangible touchstones with the past that can root us in place and nourish the spirit; and intangible heritage –such as traditions, storytelling and more– is at the heart of family and community; and

Visual: Mayor Jim Watson continues to speak on screen.

WHEREAS, 'We grow from our roots - our Heritage and Histories', is the theme for Heritage Day in 2022 in Ottawa; and Goulbourn Museum is dedicated to preserving and sharing the stories of the former Goulbourn Township and has acted as a pillar of support and engagement for the local community during the pandemic, creating virtual programming, such as the "My Family Is…" exhibit contest.

THEREFORE, I, Jim Watson, Mayor of the City of Ottawa, do hereby proclaim February 22nd, 2022 Heritage Day in Ottawa, and call upon all citizens to celebrate the richness of our past and the promise of our future.Thank you very much. Happy Heritage Day.

Visual: Meghan Walsh speaks on screen.

Thank You - Mayor Watson!

And to all joining us today, Hello - Happy Heritage Day and week!

My name is Meghan Walsh and I am the Acting Executive Director of the Capital Heritage Connexion. I'm very pleased to co-host Heritage Day 2022 with the Mayor of the City of Ottawa - the 2nd virtual edition of Heritage Day.

I’m most appreciative to receive this proclamation recognizing the continued growth of the Goulbourn Museum whose pivot to virtual programming in 2020 with their exhibit contest ‘My Family Is’ only continued to grow in 2021 with their virtual children’s program, Summer Seekers;

And, their ‘Transcribing Goulbourn Project’ which improved access to their physical collections through the hard work of community volunteers, who conducted remote transcriptions of handwritten manuscripts as a means to stay positive and connected.

Accepting this proclamation on behalf of the Goulbourn Museum I am happy to relay their deepest appreciation and to share with you all this clip from the winning submission in their ‘My Family Is’ exhibition contest from the Hambly family:

Visual: Lucy and Jack Hambly on screen from their home interview their grandmother over video chat.

Jack Hambly: Hi. Please state your full name, date of birth and age.

Shirley Hambly: My name is Shirley Hambly, I was born on the 18th of April 1934, that makes me 85 years old.

Lucy Hambly: And how do you know us?

Shirley Hambly: You are my grandchildren. The children of my youngest child Robert.

Jack Hambly: Where do you live now and how long have you lived there?

Shirley Hambly: I live in Morecambe, Lancashire in the United Kingdom, and I’ve lived here for 45 years.

Lucy Hambly: Right now is a strange time in history. We’re all social distancing in our own homes. Can you tell us about another strange time in history you’ve lived through before our time?

Shirley Hambly: Well yes, I’ve actually lived through the Second World War. I was five years old when it first started. I don’t remember too much about it. I could remember my mother getting me up in the middle of the night and we used to sit under the stairs, until the all clear went, because it’s the safest place in the house. If the house is knocked down, the stairs are always there so it’s safe underneath the stairs. That’s my first memory of the war.

I can remember going to school and taking a gas mask. I can remember food rationing and dried bananas, which you can’t imagine I suppose. Little black things they were.

So it does equate to today a little bit because it’s a difficult time now isn’t it.

Visual: Meghan Walsh speaks on screen.

Thank you Lucy, Jack and Nana Hambly. I highly encourage everyone to watch their full video linked on our Heritage Day page.

There are so many other groups and organizations who contributed to Ottawa’s heritage community this past year and I’d like to take a moment to highlight a few:

Black History Ottawa provided virtual programming for Black History Month and Emancipation Day, as well as genealogy research support through their website.

Huntley Township Historical Society continued to support their community members in genealogical research through publications and online virtual events.

Know History launched their new podcast Rooted: Beausoleil Island, an auditory experience that explores the history of Beausoleil Island using soundscapes, storytelling, interviews, and historic texts.

The Franco Ontarian Heritage Network which supports the research of their members through the virtual research center: My Roots.

These were just a few of the organizations who have dug deeper to connect people with their heritage and histories this past year.

Of course none of this wonderful work could be done without the hard work of heritage volunteers. Today, I have the great honour to present the Louise and Eric Moore Award for Outstanding Volunteerism in Capital Heritage. This year’s recipient is Helen Porteous!

Visual: Certificate for the Louise & Eric Moore Award for Outstanding Volunteerism in Capital Heritage made out to Helen Porteous.

The Louise and Eric Moore award honours highly dedicated volunteers and Helen Porteous fits that bill and then some. Helen is a longtime volunteer board member at the Osgoode Township Museum and over the past couple of years Helen has taken on the gargantuan task of leading the museum’s heritage garden committee, maintaining the museum’s 10,000 square foot heritage garden, as well as surrounding orchard and grounds.

Visual: Meghan Walsh speaks on screen.

If you pop by the Osgoode Township Museum anytime during the spring, summer or early fall you’re almost guaranteed to run into Helen, and now you can congratulate her on her most well deserved award.

Thank you all for continuing to stand tall during these difficult times. And thank you to the City of Ottawa Cultural and Heritage Programs and Spaces Branch staff who helped CHC pivot to this virtual presentation, especially as CHC itself is pivoting to New Directions in 2022. As many of you know, our Executive Director of 7 and a half years, Catherine Lindquist, has now moved on to a new position and we would like to thank her for her years of service to the Capital Heritage Community and wish her the best in her new pursuits.

This Heritage Day presentation came together in just under a month and is a simpler version of the Heritage Day ceremony. We appreciate everyone’s understanding and resilience, which has been clearly displayed over these past couple of years.

In lieu of our Heritage Quiz, we encourage everyone to explore the virtual programming presented by the Goulbourn Museum and the countless other heritage organizations in the National Capital Region via the links on our Heritage Day webpage.

We at Capital Heritage Connexion hope you enjoyed our presentation.

Happy Heritage Day!

Thank You

Visual: Daniel Richer speaks on screen.

Ladies and gentlemen, this concludes this year’s Heritage Day ceremony! If you’re interested in learning more about the museums and heritage sites that continue to promote Ottawa’s rich history, please visit ottawa.ca/museums or capitalheritage.ca. Thank you so very much for joining us today. Happy Heritage Day, everyone! Thank you. Merci. Miigwetch.

Visual: Daniel Richer walks down stairs inside Ottawa City Hall. Text overlay reads: Happy Heritage Day, www.ottawa.ca/museums, www.ottawa.ca/musées, www.capitalheritage.ca, www.patrimoinecapitale.ca with City of Ottawa logo and Capital Heritage Connexion logo.

Why celebrate Heritage Day?

Canada’s collective story is told through our special places, whether they are historic buildings or sites, archives, libraries, museums, commercial main streets or districts, places of faith, industrial areas, or natural or cultural landscapes.

Our shared heritage and histories in all forms has the power to bring people together and create a sense of belonging. Gathering places like town squares, and pow wow grounds, and cultural objects such as artefacts, regalia and family memorabilia are tangible touchstones with the past that can root us in place and nourish the spirit. Intangible heritage – languages, traditional rituals, music, dance, storytelling and more – is at the heart of family and community.

Heritage Day is also a chance to recognize the contributions of the many dedicated staff and volunteers promoting heritage conservation and educating the public about our city’s history. Gathering places like museums, and cultural objects such as artifacts and memorabilia are tangible touchstones with the past that can root us in place and nourish the spirit; and intangible heritage – such as traditions, storytelling and more – is at the heart of family and community.

In celebration of our past and our future, we encourage all – young and old, deeply rooted or new to Canada and its Capital – to visit heritage destinations, cultural landscapes and centres, and connect with traditional knowledge keepers, educators, parents and grandparents to experience heritage on Heritage Day and beyond. Find out how heritage is being celebrated in your community; and learn about services offered by local heritage organizations, public programs and special initiatives, as well as professional development and volunteer opportunities.

Join the Cultural and Heritage Programs and Spaces Branch in partnership with the Capital Heritage Connexion, and embrace, explore and enjoy your heritage places and experiences in Canada’s Capital during Heritage Week February 21 to 27 and throughout the year!

Bilingual Video Transcript: Heritage Day 2022

Visual: View of Ottawa City Hall sign and outside views of Ottawa City Hall building.

Visual: Daniel Richer arrives inside Ottawa City Hall, rings bell and speaks on screen.

Oyez!

Ladies and gentlemen, it is my duty and pleasure as official Town Crier to welcome you to the 2022 celebration of Heritage Day in Ottawa!

Mesdames et messieurs, en tant que crieur public, j'ai le devoir et le plaisir de vous souhaiter la bienvenue à la Fête du patrimoine 2022 à Ottawa!

This year’s theme explores the roots which support our ancestors, our families, and our communities. These roots contain thousands of years of history, and have provided the foundation for our city to grow towards the community we know and love today.

Le thème de cette année explore les racines qui soutiennent nos ancêtres, nos familles et nos communautés. Porteuses de milliers d'années d'histoire, ces racines ont servi de fondation pour que notre ville puisse se développer et devenir la communauté que nous connaissons aujourd'hui et que nous aimons.

Veuillez vous joindre à nous virtuellement pour célébrer le patrimoine d'Ottawa!

Please join us virtually in celebrating Ottawa’s heritage!

May God smile upon you!

Visual: Welcome to Heritage Day message with City of Ottawa logo and Capital Heritage Connexion logo

Visual: Daniel Richer on screen inside Councillor’s Lounge

Ladies and gentlemen, mesdames et messieurs. Salutations.

My name is Daniel Richer dit LaFlèche, and I am pleased to welcome you once again to Heritage Day in Ottawa.

Je m'appelle Daniel Richer dit LaFlèche, et je suis heureux de vous accueillir encore une fois de plus à la Fête du patrimoine à Ottawa.

For over forty years, I have been the National Capital Region’s Town Crier, and it is always an honour and a pleasure to be asked to participate in Heritage Day.

Depuis plus de 40 ans, je suis le crieur officiel de la région de la capitale nationale, et c'est toujours un honneur pour moi d'être invité à participer à la Fête du patrimoine à Ottawa.

I would like to begin by acknowledging that we are meeting on aboriginal land that has been inhabited by Indigenous peoples from the beginning.

The City of Ottawa is built on unceded Algonquin Anishinabe territory.

The peoples of the Algonquin Anishinabe First Nation have lived on this territory for millennia. Their culture and presence have nurtured and continue to nurture this place.

We recognize and deeply appreciate their historic connection to this place. We also recognize the contributions of Métis, Inuit, and other Indigenous peoples in both shaping and strengthening the community of Ottawa, as well as our province and country as a whole.

The City of Ottawa and the Capital Heritage Connexion honour the peoples and the land of the Algonquin Anishinabe First Nation.

J’aimerais tout d’abord souligner que nous nous réunissons sur un territoire autochtone habité depuis la nuit des temps par les Premières Nations.

Ottawa est bâtie sur un territoire non cédé de la Nation algonquine Anishinabe.

Les peuples de la Nation algonquine Anishinabe vivent sur ce territoire depuis des millénaires. Leur culture et leur présence l’ont enrichi et l’enrichissent toujours.

Nous sommes conscients de leur lien historique avec cette terre et nous comprenons ce que cela signifie. Nous soulignons également la contribution des Métis, des Inuits et des autres peuples autochtones, qui ont à la fois façonné et renforcé la communauté d’Ottawa ainsi que notre province et notre pays dans son ensemble.

La Ville d’Ottawa et Connexion patrimoine de la capitale tiennent à rendre hommage aux peuples et au territoire de la Nation algonquine Anishinabe.

Ladies and gentlemen, we have two very special guests who will be speaking to you today.

Veuillez accueillir Son Honneur, Jim Watson, maire de la ville d'Ottawa, et Meghan Walsh, directrice générale intérimaire de Connexion patrimoine de la capitale.

Please welcome his Worship, Jim Watson, Mayor of the City of Ottawa, and Lady Meghan Walsh, Acting Executive Director, of the Capital Heritage Connexion.

Visual: Mayor Jim Watson speaks on screen.

Hello everyone.

Bonjour tout le monde.

I would like to welcome you to this year’s virtual edition of the Heritage Day celebrations here in the City of Ottawa.

Heritage Day celebrates our local heritage and invites residents to explore our history by visiting museums, archives and places of architectural significance.

J’aimerais vous souhaiter la bienvenue à l’édition virtuelle des célébrations de la Fête du patrimoine de cette année ici, à Ottawa.

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, Heritage Day celebrations have been typically held in-person.

This is the second year we’ve had to shift to a virtual event.

This year’s Heritage Day explores the roots of our communities and families that form the City as we know it today.

Ottawa’s own roots extend back for over 10,000 years – as the city was built on part of the unceded territory of the Algonquin Anishinabeg Nation who inhabited the area long before Anglophone and Francophone settlers arrived.

The city is now home to over 1 million people from diverse backgrounds and histories.

In celebration of our past and our future, I encourage everyone to visit heritage destinations, cultural landscapes and centres. Connect with traditional knowledge keepers, educators, parents and grandparents to experience our rich heritage.

Heritage Day is also a chance to recognize the contributions of the many dedicated volunteers who promote heritage conservation, and educate the public about the city’s history.

La Fête du patrimoine est aussi l’occasion de souligner le travail des nombreux bénévoles dévoués qui font la promotion de la conservation du patrimoine et sensibilisent la population à l’histoire d’Ottawa.

As lockdowns and physical distancing measures continue to impact our communities, heritage groups across the City worked hard to connect people with their heritage and histories.

Whether they were providing research support for family genealogy projects or highlighting the connections between our present and our past in a virtual exhibition, Ottawa’s heritage community was there to engage and inspire.

In the city’s west end, the Goulbourn Museum acted as a pillar of support for the local community by developing ways to meaningfully connect with heritage and history.

Over the past year, the Museum has used genealogical research and artefacts to develop programs that encouraged community members to explore how the past has influenced the present day.

Some of these programs include the ‘Summer Seekers’, a series of web-facilitated learning modules that share local history with children through hands-on, outdoor learning activities.

The modules allow children to grow from their roots by discovering how the past has shaped their present, and about how history ties into their everyday lives.

The Museum also launched an exhibition to inspire children to stay connected to and learn about their family roots.

An online competition called “My Family Is…” encouraged children to research their heritage, create a family tree, and explore family heirlooms.

I am now pleased to present a proclamation to the Goulbourn Museum, on behalf of all the heritage organizations, staff, and volunteers, which I am now pleased to read.

J’ai maintenant le plaisir de présenter une proclamation au Musée Goulbourn, au nom de tous les organismes, employés et bénévoles œuvrant à la mise en valeur du patrimoine. Je vous la lis maintenant.

Visual: Mayor Jim Watson unveils and picks up the framed proclamation.

Visual: Camera zooms in on proclamation text.

WHEREAS, Heritage Day is part of Heritage Week, a nation-wide celebration that encourages all Canadians to rejoice in and explore their local heritage and celebrate Canada’s uniqueness, that takes place during the third week of February; and

WHEREAS, Heritage Day is a time to reflect on the achievements of past generations and to accept responsibility for protecting our heritage; and WHEREAS, Our shared heritage in all its forms has the power to bring people together and create a sense of belonging; and

WHEREAS, Gathering places like museums, and cultural objects such as artefacts and memorabilia are tangible touchstones with the past that can root us in place and nourish the spirit; and intangible heritage –such as traditions, storytelling and more– is at the heart of family and community; and

Visual: Mayor Jim Watson continues to speak on screen.

WHEREAS, 'We grow from our roots - our Heritage and Histories', is the theme for Heritage Day in 2022 in Ottawa; and Goulbourn Museum is dedicated to preserving and sharing the stories of the former Goulbourn Township and has acted as a pillar of support and engagement for the local community during the pandemic, creating virtual programming, such as the "My Family Is…" exhibit contest.

THEREFORE, I, Jim Watson, Mayor of the City of Ottawa, do hereby proclaim February 22nd, 2022 Heritage Day in Ottawa, and call upon all citizens to celebrate the richness of our past and the promise of our future.

Thank you very much. Happy Heritage Day.

Visual: Meghan Walsh speaks on screen.

Meegwetch, Merci, Thank You - Mayor Watson!

And to all joining us today, Kwe-kwe, Bonjour, Hello - Happy Heritage Day and week!

My name is Meghan Walsh and I am the Acting Executive Director of the Capital Heritage Connexion. I'm very pleased to co-host Heritage Day 2022 with the Mayor of the City of Ottawa - the 2nd virtual edition of Heritage Day.

Au nom de la Connexion patrimoine de la capitale, j'ai le plaisir de co-organiser la fête du patrimoine 2022 avec le maire de la ville d’Ottawa - la deuxième édition virtuelle de la fête du patrimoine.

I’m most appreciative to receive this proclamation recognizing the continued growth of the Goulbourn Museum whose pivot to virtual programming in 2020 with their exhibit contest ‘My Family Is’ only continued to grow in 2021 with their virtual children’s program, Summer Seekers;

And, their ‘Transcribing Goulbourn Project’ which improved access to their physical collections through the hard work of community volunteers, who conducted remote transcriptions of handwritten manuscripts as a means to stay positive and connected.

Accepting this proclamation on behalf of the Goulbourn Museum I am happy to relay their deepest appreciation and to share with you all this clip from the winning submission in their ‘My Family Is’ exhibition contest from the Hambly family:

Visual: Lucy and Jack Hambly on screen from their home, interview their grandmother over video chat.

Jack Hambly: Hi. Please state your full name, date of birth and age.

Shirley Hambly: My name is Shirley Hambly, I was born on the 18th of April 1934, that makes me 85 years old.

Lucy Hambly: And how do you know us?

Shirley Hambly: You are my grandchildren. The children of my youngest child Robert.

Jack Hambly: Where do you live now and how long have you lived there?

Shirley Hambly: I live in Morecambe, Lancashire in the United Kingdom, and I’ve lived here for 45 years.

Lucy Hambly: Right now is a strange time in history. We’re all social distancing in our own homes. Can you tell us about another strange time in history you’ve lived through before our time?

Shirley Hambly: Well yes, I’ve actually lived through the Second World War. I was five years old when it first started. I don’t remember too much about it. I could remember my mother getting me up in the middle of the night and we used to sit under the stairs, until the all clear went, because it’s the safest place in the house. If the house is knocked down, the stairs are always there so it’s safe underneath the stairs. That’s my first memory of the war.

I can remember going to school and taking a gas mask. I can remember food rationing and dried bananas, which you can’t imagine I suppose. Little black things they were.

So it does equate to today a little bit because it’s a difficult time now isn’t it.

Visual: Meghan Walsh speaks on screen.

Thank you Lucy, Jack and Nana Hambly. I highly encourage everyone to watch their full video linked on our Heritage Day page.

There are so many other groups and organizations who contributed to Ottawa’s heritage community this past year and I’d like to take a moment to highlight a few:

Black History Ottawa provided virtual programming for Black History Month and Emancipation Day, as well as genealogy research support through their website.

Huntley Township Historical Society continued to support their community members in genealogical research through publications and online virtual events.

Know History launched their new podcast Rooted: Beausoleil Island, an auditory experience that explores the history of Beausoleil Island using soundscapes, storytelling, interviews, and historic texts.

Le réseau du patrimoine franco-ontarien qui soutient la recherche de leurs membres par le centre de recherche virtuelle: Mes Racines.

These were just a few of the organizations who have dug deeper to connect people with their heritage and histories this past year.

Of course none of this wonderful work could be done without the hard work of heritage volunteers. Today, I have the great honour to present the Louise and Eric Moore Award for Outstanding Volunteerism in Capital Heritage. This year’s recipient is Helen Porteous!

Visual: Certificate for the Louise & Eric Moore Award for Outstanding Volunteerism in Capital Heritage made out to Helen Porteous.

The Louise and Eric Moore award honours highly dedicated volunteers and Helen Porteous fits that bill and then some. Helen is a longtime volunteer board member at the Osgoode Township Museum and over the past couple of years Helen has taken on the gargantuan task of leading the museum’s heritage garden committee, maintaining the museum’s 10,000 square foot heritage garden, as well as surrounding orchard and grounds.

Visual: Meghan Walsh speaks on screen.

If you pop by the Osgoode Township Museum anytime during the spring, summer or early fall you’re almost guaranteed to run into Helen, and now you can congratulate her on her most well deserved award.

Thank you all for continuing to stand tall during these difficult times. And thank you to the City of Ottawa Cultural and Heritage Programs and Spaces Branch staff who helped CHC pivot to this virtual presentation, especially as CHC itself is pivoting to New Directions in 2022. As many of you know, our Executive Director of 7 and a half years, Catherine Lindquist, has now moved on to a new position and we would like to thank her for her years of service to the Capital Heritage Community and wish her the best in her new pursuits.

This Heritage Day presentation came together in just under a month and is a simpler version of the Heritage Day ceremony. We appreciate everyone’s understanding and resilience, which has been clearly displayed over these past couple of years.

In lieu of our Heritage Quiz, we encourage everyone to explore the virtual programming presented by the Goulbourn Museum and the countless other heritage organizations in the National Capital Region via the links on our Heritage Day webpage.

We at Capital Heritage Connexion hope you enjoyed our presentation.

Happy Heritage Day!

Meegwetch - Merci - Thank You

Visual: Daniel Richer speaks on screen.

Ladies and gentlemen, this concludes this year’s Heritage Day ceremony! If you’re interested in learning more about the museums and heritage sites that continue to promote Ottawa’s rich history, please visit ottawa.ca/museums or capitalheritage.ca.

Si vous souhaitez découvrir davantage les musées et les sites patrimoniaux qui continuent de promouvoir la riche histoire d'Ottawa, consultez ottawa.ca/musées ou patrimoinecapitale.ca.

Thank you so very much for joining us today. Happy Heritage Day, everyone! Thank you. Merci. Miigwetch.

Visual: Daniel Richer walks down stairs inside Ottawa City Hall. Text overlay reads: Happy Heritage Day, www.ottawa.ca/museums, www.ottawa.ca/musées, www.capitalheritage.ca, www.patrimoinecapitale.ca with City of Ottawa logo and Capital Heritage Connexion logo.

Proclamation recipient - 2022

This year, Mayor Watson will recognize the importance of the theme Growing from our roots - our heritage and histories by offering the proclamation to the Goulbourn Museum.

Situated in the city’s west end, Goulbourn Museum shares stories of the former Goulbourn Township, including the history of Richmond – the oldest military settlement in Ottawa. While many families have been separated due to COVID-19 restrictions, the Museum has acted as a pillar of support and engagement for the community by developing ways to meaningfully connect with heritage and history.

Over the past year, the Museum has used genealogical research, artefacts, and settler experiences to develop reflective and engaging programs that encouraged community members to explore how the past has influenced the present day. The idea of growing from our roots is exemplified through initiatives such as Summer Seekers, the My Family Is… exhibit contest, and Transcribing Goulbourn. To learn more about Goulbourn Museum and their initiatives, visit goulbournmuseum.ca.

Photo of winning "My Family Is..." exhibition by the Hambly family. Includes collection of family photos and objects displayed in family home in the style of a museum exhibit.