High Performance Development Standards

On this page

What is the High Performance Development Standard

The High Performance Development Standard is a collection of voluntary and required standards that raise the performance of new building projects to achieve sustainable and resilient design. The High Performance Development Standard consists of three tiers of performance. The standards, also known as ‘metrics’ in Tier one are mandatory. Tiers two and three contain higher level voluntary standards.

Sustainable and resilient design in new development supports public health and safety, environmental protection and responds to climate change, all of which are priorities within Ottawa’s new Official Plan.

The High Performance Development Standard will be applied in the review and approval of:

•           All Site Plan Control applications in the Urban Area

•           HPDS Development Threshold Site Plan Control applications in the Rural Area

•           All Draft Plan of Subdivision applications

This will begin when the new Official Plan comes into effect.

“HPDS Development Threshold” application means a site plan application in respect of:

  1. Residential developments containing fourteen or more units, five or more floors and/or having a gross floor area of 1,200 square metres or more;
  2. all planned unit developments;
  3. mixed-use buildings containing fourteen or more units, five or more floors and/or with a gross floor area of 1,400 square metres or more;
  4. non-residential development of five or more floors and/or with a gross floor area of 1,860 square metres or more; and/or
  5. drive-through facilities in the Site Plan Control Inner Area or abutting residential zones.

We welcome you to explore this page to learn more about the High Performance Development Standard and its measures.

If you would like to receive updates on the High Performance Development Standard, including engagement opportunities, and other climate change news subscribe to the climate change e-newsletter.

Site Plan Metrics Tier 1

This standard applies to projects pursuing Site Plan Control approval within the City of Ottawa.

The High Performance Development Standard (HPDS) shall apply only to the parts of a site undergoing new, or modification to existing development. All projects are encouraged to advance the sustainability objectives of the HPDS to the fullest extent possible. Development on sites that are designated under Part IV or Part V of the Ontario Heritage Act shall be exempt from applicable standards if it can be demonstrated that they will negatively impact the defined cultural heritage attributes of the property. Projects that have completed a Pre-consultation Meeting prior to council approval of the standard will not be required to comply with the measures outlined herein.

Authority to implement this standard comes from Section 41 of the Planning Act which gives authority to require drawings or plans as it relates to sustainable design for exterior measures. This standard may point to other city requirements imposed through authorities such as zoning, where they relate back to sustainable design.

Site Plan Tier 1 Metrics Index

  1. Building Energy Efficiency
  2. Site Plan Accessibility
  3. Fresh Air Intake
  4. Tree Planting
  5. Plant Species
  6. Exterior Lighting
  7. Bird-Safe Design
  8. Sustainable Roofing
  9. Cool Landscape and Paving
  10. Common Area Waste Storage
  11. Electric Vehicle Parking
  12. Bicycle Access and Storage

1.1 Building Energy Efficiency

Building energy requirement aims to address climate change by reducing the greenhouse gas emissions associated with the operations of new buildings. The focus is on exterior measures and early design decisions to enable sustainable design solutions while minimizing incremental cost. Energy priorities evaluated and set early in design enable innovative solutions and design trade-offs that are not available later in the building design. Energy saving features are significantly less expensive to implement when embedded in plans prior to construction, and can lead to significant operational cost savings.

Requirement

HPDS Development Threshold Site Plan Applications are required to submit documentation demonstrating the following:

Using exterior elements, buildings shall be designed to meet or exceed one of the following (Projects may opt to factor in interior measures into the proposed design):

  1. Total Energy Use Intensity (TEUI), Thermal Energy Demand Intensity (TEDI) and GHG Emission Intensity (GHGI) targets by building type per Table 1 below. Multi Unit Residential Buildings are referred to as MURB in the table;

OR

  1. 25% carbon emission reduction beyond the Ontario Building Code, SB-10, Division 3 (2017)*;

OR

  1. Commitment to pursue certification program such as Energy Star for MURBS; LEED, or BOMA Best with a minimum number of energy points, or equivalent.

 

Table 1 Energy Intensities Buildings

  TEUI (kWh/m²/yr) TEDI (kWh/m²/yr) GHGI (kg CO2e/m²/yr)
MURB (≥ 4 Storeys) 142 52 19
MURB ( ≤  6 Storeys) 147 62 19
Commercial Office 142 42 19
Commercial Retail 132 52 12
All Other Building Types 25% over OBC
Mixed Use Buildings Mixed-use buildings will use an area-weighted average, by occupancy type

Compliance with this metric is proven through a preliminary energy model report submitted prior to approval. Project proponents are encouraged to engage an energy modeller as early as possible to maximize energy efficiency design opportunities.

Energy Modeling is performed as per the guidelines in the Energy Modelling Report Terms of Reference.

1.2 Site Plan Accessibility

This metric contributes to an inclusive community by ensuring accessibility is considered in the preliminary planning of the site and equivalent access to all users and minimize site accessibility issues for those with mobility devices or challenges. Accessibility requirements also appear in the Ontario Building Code.

Requirement

All Site Plan Applications must demonstrate the following

Projects to ensure accessibility is addressed through the following requirements:

  1. For Public entrances to the site’s building projects must provide the same means of entrance for all users whenever possible, provide equivalent access when access by the same means is not possible, and identify on the site plan accessible building entrance(s).

AND

  1. Projects are encouraged to minimize interruptions along paths of travel through site planning. Design of grates embedded in the ground must meet the following requirements:
  • Grates along a path of travel must ensure openings do not allow passage of an object that has a diameter greater than 13 mm, ensure that elongated openings are oriented perpendicular to the pedestrian path of travel. (Figure 1)
grates design for accessibillity
grates design for accessibillity

Figure 1 Grate Design Path of travel

              AND

Grates that are outside a path of travel must have a maximum porosity of 20 x 20 mm (or 40 x 10 mm) or may be screened.

1.3 Fresh Air Intake

Air pollution from idling cars can pose a significant risk to the health of building occupants, which can’t be easily filtered out through mechanical air filters. Planning safe locations for fresh air intakes will, ensure sufficient distance from pollution or, buffers are incorporated so that pollutants are largely dissipated before ventilation air is brought into the building.

Requirement

All Site Plan Applications must demonstrate the following:

Site plans must demonstrate how on-site outdoor amenities, and fresh air ventilation intakes, are protected from air pollutants resulting from adjacent sources, and how neighbouring outdoor site amenities and fresh air intakes are protected from air pollutant sources generated on site. Adjacent sources of air pollutants include traffic or idling vehicle areas such as drive-throughs, and loading zones, it does not include parking spaces. 

Protection from sources of air pollutants can be achieved through setbacks, vegetation, or other technologies, that provide absorbent and protective buffering, or a combination of these measures. Sources of air pollutants are defined as areas within:

  • 150 metres of a road with an average of 50,000 vehicles or more per day,
  • 100 metres of road with an average of 15,000 vehicles or more per day, and
  • 100 metres of idling areas.

Protection options include:

  • Natural air pollutant buffering made up of rows of Red Maple, Red Oak, Little Leaf Linden or Honey Locust trees with a row of shrubs underneath the full length of the exposure zone.

OR

  • Physical buffer either by the building, or other structures such as walls 1.5m high.

OR

3.5 metres, or more, above road level.

1.4 Tree Planting

Trees are an important part of our natural systems supporting natural species, managing heat island impacts, and supporting natural storm water management. To ensure healthy long living trees with large canopies sufficient soil is critical. This metric lays out planting requirements to support long term health and growth of the site’s trees.

Requirement

Volume of high-quality soil sufficient to support canopy cover on the site, as recommended in the City’s Tree Planting Guidelines.

Projects must demonstrate 30 m3 high quality soil for street trees. Soil calculation can include continuous soil on private or public property. High quality soil excludes compacted soil, further details are provided in the Landscape Plan Terms of Reference.

Trees to be maintained and warrantied for a minimum of 2 years.

1.5 Plant Species

Plant selection is important for maintaining long term health of the landscape design and impacts to the greater natural systems. For this reason, the standard lays out requirements for no invasive plant species and targets for a large proportion of drought tolerant plant species. Climate projections suggest that we can expect more frequent summer drought conditions in the coming decades.

Requirement

Landscape plan to include no invasive species and target a minimum 50% native plant species. Drought tolerant and pollinator friendly plant species preferred.

Vegetated buffers to be 100% native vegetation.

1.6 Exterior Lighting

Exterior lighting is important to ensure nighttime safety of the site but the light pollution it causes can have negative effects on neighbouring residents, and local natural species. Nocturnal animals and migratory birds are particularly vulnerable to these impacts. Minimizing light pollution through Dark SkyTM compliant fixtures helps to mitigate these impacts.

Requirement

All exterior lighting fixtures will be Dark Sky compliant (full cut-off).  No uplighting.

Dark Sky Compliant fixture(s) must have the Dark Sky Fixture Seal of Approval  which provides objective, third-party certification for lighting that minimizes glare, reduces light trespass and doesn’t pollute the night sky. If a Dark Sky Fixture Seal of Approval is not available, fixtures must be full-cutoff and with a colour temperature rating of 3000K or less.

1.7 Bird Safe Design

Thoughtful design of windows particularly in high priority areas can help prevent fatal collisions of birds with buildings.

Requirement

Mid to high-rise residential and medium to large scale commercial / industrial / institutional:

  • Use specified bird-safe glass or integrated protection measures to treat at least 90% of exterior glazing within the first 16 m of height or to the height of the adjacent mature tree canopy.

AND

  • Use specified bird-safe glass or integrated protection measures to treat any glazing adjacent to a green roof, rooftop garden or garden terrace to a height of 4 m or to the height of the adjacent mature vegetation.

AND

  • Eliminate all fly-through effects (e.g., glass corners, parallel glass) and other traps from building design or use specified bird-safe glass or integrated protection measures.

Ottawa Bird-Safe Design Guidelines

1.8 Sustainable Roofing

As buildings take up more and more of the available space on property, rooftops become increasingly important component of site design. There are lots of opportunities to address sustainable design on the roof top. Including gardens or green roofs, reflective roofing, and solar power generation. This metric directs projects to incorporate one or a combination of these strategies.

Requirement

For flat roofs (low slope ≤  2:12) over 500m2 projects must provide:

  1. Green roof for at least 50% of available roof space1;
  • Where possible, green roof area should be incorporated into visible or accessible locations, such as podiums.
  • Where green roof is accessible, the green area may be reduced by 20%
  • Where green roof is edible landscaping, the whole garden area, including pathways and adjacent terraces, may be counted as “green area”.

OR

  1. Cool roof installed for 90% of available roof space1 and if the roof is over 2,500m2 a minimum of 1,000 m2 will be designated solar ready2,3; Cool roof is defined as having a minimum initial reflectance of 0.65 and minimum emittance of 0.90 or a three-year aged Solare Reflective Index value of 64

OR

  1. A combination of a green roof, and cool roof and solar PV installed for at least 75 per cent of available roof space.

Specification details

1Available roof space is considered roof space that is not otherwise occupied by mechanical and electrical equipment.

2Proponents may seek an exemption from the solar ready component where:

  1. Accommodation of a solar energy system and/or a solar hot water heater would be impractical due to poor solar resources at project site;
  2. A substitute renewable energy system will be installed at the time of construction; or
  3. Where proponent can justify that a solar installation does not make sense such as buildings with low electrical loads making solar net metering an unfeasible option.

3Solar Ready Requirements

At a minimum, the project shall include requirements for:

  1. Static load roof strength, with a requirement that roofing where solar equipment could be placed be capable of supporting a minimum of 29 kg/m2 , where alternate solution for dealing with the loading requirements of solar is recommended by a professional engineer this may be used in lieu of the 29kg/m2 threshold, a letter from engineer stating alternate solution to be submitted.;
  2. Placement of non-solar related rooftop equipment, taking into account positioning that avoids shading of solar equipment (i.e., north of solar ready zone) and maximization of continuous roof space;
  3. Provision of space for a solar energy system DC-AC inverter on an outside wall in the utility room in accordance with ESA requirements (within 4.5m of future array location).
  4. Placement of solar ready area located in a space with high solar potential.

Recommended to also consider:

  1. Sizing and/or provision of extra electrical panels to accommodate addition of an appropriately sized future solar energy system. 
  2. A conduit for wiring from roof to electric panel.

Links:

1.9 Cool Landscape and Paving

Although Ottawa is a heating dominant climate, summertime impacts to human health are becoming an increasing concern. The urban heat island effect can increase the urban temperature several degrees above the natural rural temperature. This increase in temperature is largely due to greater paved area in the urban environment. Increasing the landscaped area, increasing shade or incorporating reflective paving can all help to reduce the urban heat island.

Requirement

Soft landscaping area requirements are addressed in the zoning By-law. The project is exempt from cool paving requirements where soft landscaping area exceeds the Zoning By-law by 20%,

OR

Use a combination of the following strategies to treat at least 50% of the site’s non-roof hardscape:

  • High-reflectivity paving materials with an initial solar reflectance of at least 0.33 or SRI of 29.
  • Open grid pavement with at least 50 % perviousness.
  • Shade from existing or new tree canopy within 10 years of landscape installation.
  • Shade from architectural structures that are vegetated or have an initial solar reflectance of at least 0.33 at installation or an SRI of 29.
  • Shade from structures with energy generation.
  • For parking areas projects may plant one tree for every five parking spaces distributed within or along the border of the parking area, in lieu of reflective paving or completing a shade study.

Non-roof hardscape includes driveways, walkways, courtyards, surface parking areas, artificial turf and other on-site hard surfaces.

Industrial work yards or similar areas that limit the available options for shading or reflective surfaces may be excluded from the hard surface area calculation.

1.10 Common Area Waste Storage

For the city to reach its waste diversion targets, individual actions are critical. Multi unit residential buildings rely on common area waste storage to enable residents to correctly sort their waste streams. Good design of the spaces with sufficient area and equal access helps to empower residents to maximize their waste diversion. No new requirements are proposed at this time, however, a reference to the Zoning By-law has been included in the High Performance Development Standard.

Requirement

Design and construct property with adequate space for City-allocated garbage, recycling, and organic waste containers. As required by Zoning, and the Solid Waste Collection Design Guidelines for Multi-Unit Residential Development. 

1.11 Electric Vehicle Parking

Requirements will ensure that infrastructure is available for electric vehicle charging to meet future demands. No new requirements are proposed at this time, however, a reference to the Zoning By-law has been included in the High Performance Development Standard to point to electric vehicle requirements in zoning. This will come into force when requirements are brought into effect as part of the new Zoning By-law Official Plan conformity exercise.

Requirement

Where parking is provided, projects are to evaluate electric vehicle charging readiness and indicate approach and number of electric vehicle ready spaces in conjunction with any requirements as referenced in zoning. 

EV Readiness Requirements Framework 

1.12 Bike Parking

Requirements will ensure that the infrastructure is available for bike parking to meet current and future demands. No new requirements are proposed at this time, however, a reference to the Zoning By-law has been included in the High Performance Development Standard to point to bike parking in zoning.

Requirement

Provide bike parking infrastructure as required by zoning. 

Site Plan Metrics Tier 2

This section lays out the draft requirements for Tier 2 Site Plan applications. Tier 2 is the voluntary component of the High-Performance Development Standard.

Site Plan Tier 2 Metrics Index

  1. Building Energy Efficiency
  2. Airtightness Testing
  3. Operational Energy
  4. Renewable Energy
  5. District Energy
  6. Embodied Carbon
  7. Thermal Imaging
  8. Health Supportive Amenities
  9. Exterior Lighting
  10. Operable Windows
  11. Interior Room Temperature
  12. Refuge Area
  13. Resiliency Plan
  14. Common Area Waste Storage
  15. In Suite Waste Sorting
  16. Construction Waste Management Plan
  17. Parking
  18. Micro-Mobility
  19. Electric Vehicle Parking
  20. Bicycle Access and storage
  21. Enhanced Bicycle Facilities
  22. Transit Access
  23. Enhanced Transit Facilities

 

2.1 Building Energy Efficiency

To address climate change by reducing the greenhouse gas emissions associated with the operations of new buildings

Requirement

Buildings shall be designed to meet or exceed one of the following:

  1. Total Energy Use Intensity (TEUI), Thermal Energy Demand Intensity (TEDI) and GHG Emission Intensity (GHGI) targets by building type per Table 2 below. Multi Unit Residential Buildings are referred to as MURB in the table.

OR

  1. 50% carbon emission efficiency improvement above the Ontario Building Code, SB-10, Division 3 (2017)*;

OR

  1. Commitment to pursue certification program such as Energy Star for MURBS; LEED or BOMA Best with a minimum number of energy points, or equivalent

Table 2 Tier 2 Energy Intensities Buildings

 

  TEUI (kWh/m²/yr) TEDI (kWh/m²/yr) GHGI (kg CO2e/m²/yr)
MURB (≥ 4 Storeys) 108 33 13
MURB (≤ 6 Storeys 108 38 13
Commercial Office 108 30 11
Commercial Retail 98 33 7
All Other Building Types 50% over OBC
Mixed Use Buildings Mixed-use buildings will use an area-weighted average, by occupancy type

2.2 Airtightness Testing

Air leakage accounts for significant portion of heat loss in buildings. Air tightness testing is one of the best ways to ensure that projects minimize air leakage there by improving the energy performance of the building.

Beyond just energy air leakage plays a role in other key building performance criteria including indoor air quality, and water vapor management.

Requirement

Conduct a whole-building Air Tightness Test to improve the quality and air tightness of the building envelope.

Follow ASTM E-3158-18 Standard Test Method for Measuring the Air Leakage Rate of a Large or Multizone Building. Additional guidance, including space type exemptions  can be found in US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Air Leakage Test Protocol.

2.3 Operational Energy

Ongoing operations and management is an important part of energy efficient buildings. Particularly as it relates to the more active components of the building such as mechanical systems and responding to occupant behaviour. Portfolio Manager  helps to track and benchmark the performance of buildings on an ongoing basis.  Benchmarking is also important to help evaluate that design intents are being realized as expected, helping to inform continuous improvement for the industry.

Requirement

Projects must commit to benchmarking their building in addition to installing metering equipment for ongoing monitoring

Benchmarking

Register the building on ENERGYSTAR® Portfolio Manager.

Submetering

Residential

Install thermal energy meters for each heating/cooling appliance in all residential units.

Non-Residential

Install thermal energy meters for each individual tenant in multi-tenant commercial/retail buildings

Energy Star Portfolio Manager

Better Buildings Ottawa Energy Benchmarking and Audit Program

2.4 Renewable Energy

To increase the amount of local renewable energy and decrease carbon impact related to site energy demands.

Requirement

Design on-site renewable energy systems to supply one of the following:

Minimum of 5 per cent1 of the building’s annual energy consumption from one or a combination of acceptable renewable energy sources;  

OR

Minimum of 20 per cent1 of the building’s annual energy consumption from geo-exchange.

Where it can be demonstrated that solar installation is not reasonable or feasible, this requirement may be waived.

Acceptable renewable energy sources include energy generated by:

  • Solar photovoltaics (PV) – use of building-integrated (including window or wall) or mounted, composite panels to convert solar energy into electricity, to be used within in the building or exported to the grid
  • Solar thermal – use of solar thermal collectors to directly convert solar energy into heating air or water for use in the building
  • Biogas systems – Fuel cells that use biogas to convert hydrogen and oxygen into electricity.
  • Biofuel systems – Fuels produced directly or indirectly from organic material and combusted for the production of thermal energy or electricity.
  • Wind systems – Building or site-integrated wind turbines that convert wind energy to electricity
  • Geoexchange – Use of electric ground source heat pumps coupled with horizontal or vertical ground loop piping systems to provide heating and cooling energy; or use or direct ground contact systems

1 Alternate percentages may be allowed for in specialty use buildings such as industrial uses, or laboratories with high energy density due to operational loads.

2.5 District Energy

Enable establishment and expansion of low carbon district energy systems through encouraging connections.

Requirement

Where site is located:

In an area with high thermal energy density,

  • adjacent to a district energy system that is targeting new or future connection,

or

  • when a site plan includes 2 or more buildings

The project must demonstrate at least one of the following:

  • plan to connect to an existing district energy system;
  • be district energy-ready (as per guidelines);
  • demonstrate less greenhouse emissions in proposed design than district connected reference case.
  • demonstrate it is not feasible to connect to the district energy system in the area

 Terms

District Energy refers to systems that distribute thermal energy to multiple buildings in an area or neighbourhood. These systems typically consist of a heating and cooling centre, and a thermal network of pipes connected to a group of buildings.

High Thermal Density- neighbourhoods with 113 MJ/ha thermal energy demand per year.

2.6 Embodied Carbon

 To advance the industry understanding of embodied carbon

Requirement

Project will demonstrate embodied carbon target and commit to tracking and reporting on the target through construction of the project.

Achieving Real Net-Zero Emission Homes: Embodied carbon scenario analysis of the upper tiers of performance in the 2020 Canadian National Building Code

2.7 Thermal Imaging

To advance the industry understanding of performance of envelope systems

Requirement

Project will complete thermal imaging of the building to prior to finishing stage to demonstrate wall performance.

2.8 Health Supportive Ammenities

Design amenities such that they improve social connection for all ages, facilitate active lifestyles, and enable access to healthy food sources.

Requirement

Select one amenity measure from each category, the applicable project may choose an interior amenity in lieu of an exterior solution. For details on parameters follow the link outlining the specifics of each space type.

Active Living All Ages/ Community Connection Food Access
Large open exterior naturalized space* Place Making (POP designed for community connection) Food Garden
Outdoor Walking Trail Public Art Grocery Food Delivery
Outdoor Fitness Children’s play space Farmers Market
Indoor Fitness Shaded Outdoor seating On-site or nearby Healthy Food Retail
Restorative Garden Stroller Parking Free healthy onsite catering
Outdoor public water refill station Automated external defibrillator (AED) in building Kitchen area with access to views (non-residential)
    Outdoor Amenity (Commercial Only)    

*preference for public park, publicly accessible spaces preferred to be ground oriented

2.9 Exterior Lighting

Light pollution contributes to adverse impacts on humans, wildlife and local ecosystems. By updating requirements to preference for certified fixture we improved the rigor behind the light pollution reduction efforts already in place.

Requirement

Exterior lighting controlled by motion detectors or timers to reduce or extinguish non-essential lights between 11 pm and 6 am.

Interior lighting controlled by motion detectors or timers to reduce or extinguish lights from unoccupied areas of non-residential buildings outside of business hours.

2.10 Operable Windows

Extreme heat poses a significant health risk to the community which may only increase as the frequency of local extreme heat days increases. Operable windows are one of the key ways for residents to help manage their indoor temperature when air conditioning is unavailable either due to not being installed, a breakdown or, power outage.

Requirement

Include operable windows, in all regularly occupied spaces in dwelling units.

operable windows are windows that have accessible operator to open the window enabling ventilation and passive cooling. Exterior doors that open to a secure area, such as patio doors to balconies, may be counted as operable windows.

2.11 Interior Room Temperature

Extreme heat poses a significant health risk to the community which may only increase as the frequency of local extreme heat days increases. Spaces designed to not exceed maximum interior temperatures through mechanical or passive design solutions helps to ensure the spaces remain safe for occupants.

Requirement

Demonstrate through passive or mechanical design solutions that the interior temperature is designed to stay below 26°C in summer conditions

2.12 Refuge Area

Local climate projections suggest we can expect more extreme weather events more regularly. These events can often lead to power outages potentially for extended periods of time. Planning for refuge areas that provide a place for occupants to gather in these events is a simple way to ensure access to critical infrastructure in these events.

Requirement

Provide a refuge area with heating, cooling, lighting, potable water, and power available;

AND

Provide 72 hours of back-up power to the refuge area and essential building systems.

Resilience Planning for New Construction

2.13 Resiliency Plan

Improving the ability of the buildings to withstand the impacts of climate change and extreme weather is an important step towards creating a more resilient city and to protecting the health, safety and economic wellbeing of the city’s residents and businesses

Requirement

Complete resiliency planning checklist

Resilience Planning for New Construction

2.14 Common Area Waste Storage

Providing occupants with the tools necessary to conveniently sort and store waste from all streams is an important means of minimizing waste going to landfill. Methane associated with landfill gas has a global warming potential 25 times that of Carbon Dioxide.

Requirement

Ensure residents garbage, recycling, and organics waste receptacles are equally accessible. In residential buildings over 5 storeys these facilities shall be inside the building. Where facilities are located outdoors, they must be well lit and easily accessible.

2.15 In-Suite Waste Sorting

Providing occupants with the tools necessary to conveniently sort and store waste from all streams is an important means of minimizing waste going to landfill. Divertible waste in the landfill (specifically organic and paper products) produce methane gas, a GHG that is 25 times more potent than Carbon Dioxide. It is important to take proactive measures to encourage diverting this material from landfill. Methane associated with landfill gas has a global warming potential 25 times that of Carbon Dioxide.

Requirement

Provide dedicated space in-unit for residents to store containers for the following waste streams, either by using an under-the-counter solution, closet solution, or other acceptable solution:

  • Garbage
  • Paper recycling
  • Glass, Metal, Plastic recycling

Food and Organic Waste

2.16 Construction Waste Management Plan

Benchmarking of construction waste management is a challenge in the industry. While many builders seek to reduce wasted material in order to minimize cost, without an industry benchmark it is difficult to evaluate if strategies are improving on the industry standard or just maintaining the status quo. By committing to share this information, this will help to build a reference data base which the City may seek academic partnerships to report on in aggregate.

Requirement

Commit to reporting on construction waste tracking. Tracking includes measurement of total weights of waste, from recycled and non recycled streams relative to constructed area using the downloadable excel template. Include a summary of strategies used to minimize waste and report of significant events that may have contributed to abnormal volumes. Significant events could include fires or flooding leading to significant material damage, or partially complete spaces.

A Guide to Waste Audits and Waste Reduction Work Plans for Construction & Demolition Projects

2.17 Parking

To encourage a shift away from higher emission modes of transportation, a shift away from private vehicles is necessary and reducing the supply of parking spaces helps to achieve this goal. Reducing parking and ensuring users pay the costs associated with parking is encouraged.

Requirement

Provide at least 10% less parking than the maximum allowed under the zoning by-law.

And

Unbundle the parking spaces from the unit.

Unbundled parking is the practice of selling or leasing parking spaces separate from the purchase or lease of the commercial or residential use

2.18 Micro-Mobility

To move the community away from higher emission modes of transportation a number of different solutions are necessary. Micro-mobility solutions help to address short trips, and access to transit networks. To enable safe use of these solutions space for storage is encouraged.

Requirement

Provide space for micro-mobility devices located close to entrance, marked on site plan.

Micro-mobility includes vehicles such as scooters, bikeshare and their accessories.

2.19 Electric Vehicle Parking

To ensure occupants are able to access on site electric vehicle charging buildings need to include infrastructure and legal framework to enable installation of charging stations in shared parking spaces. The cost for including infrastructure rough-in and electrical capacity at initial construction is a fraction of the cost of adding it on post construction. This helps to minimize the costs associated with the transition to electric vehicles. In addition to the infrastructure, condo rules can place a significant barrier to future condo owners looking to install EV chargers for parking spaces. By setting out parameters to deal with common element issues related to EV chargers in condos at the outset, the process is simplified and will not require additional legal fees to amend or revise agreements.

Requirement

Residential Buildings

All parking spaces for use by residential occupancies including car-share spaces, (excluding visitor parking spaces), shall have an energized outlet installed adjacent to the space for the purpose of electric vehicle charging.

Level 2 charging capability must be provided for each parking space.

In addition, the infrastructure condo agreements, also referred to as parking area condo agreements shall lay out requirements, process and allowance for installation of electric vehicle charging stations.

In mixed use buildings the electrical infrastructure shall include revenue metering capability so that meters may be installed to apportioning energy costs to the different occupant types when electric vehicle supply equipment is installed. All projects are recommended to consider the metering needs and how they will be met.

For designs where an electric vehicle energy management system (EVEMS) is intended, the electrical infrastructure shall include all communications equipment, control systems installation, licensing, and permitting required to operate

Commercial Buildings

10% of all new parking spaces serving commercial, industrial, and institutional occupancies shall have an energized outlet installed adjacent to the space for the purpose of electric vehicle charging.

In mixed use buildings the electrical infrastructure shall include revenue metering capability so that meters may be installed to apportioning energy costs to the different occupant types when electric vehicle supply equipment is installed. All projects are recommended to consider the metering needs and how they will be met.

For designs where an electric vehicle energy management system (EVEMS) is intended, the electrical infrastructure shall include all communications equipment, control systems installation, licensing, and permitting required to operate

EV Readiness Requirements Framework

2.20 Bicycle Access and Storage

Enable cycling through access to safe and flexible storage facilities

Requirement

As part of the Transportation Impact Assessment submission, provide a cycling plan illustrating the route from the boundary street(s) to the on-site occupant and visitor bicycle parking locations. The route must operate at no more than 30 km/hr for mixed traffic or provide a separate facility for cyclists. Identify the number of spaces and location of secure occupant and visitor bicycle parking required by zoning bylaw and any additional spaces provided. The plan must illustrate that bicycle parking is accessible (5% grade maximum). Short term visitor bicycle parking must be located in a space with passive supervision to reduce theft and vandalism risks.

Provide sufficient bicycle parking to accommodate all tenants or commuters in a secure accessible location. 

Number of Spaces Required

Development Type  Long-Term  Short-Term 
Multi-unit residential, no garages or carports  (applies to high rise, low-rise and stacked townhouses)  1.5 spaces for studio and one-bedroom units  2.5 spaces for two-bedroom units  3.5 spaces for three-bedroom units  2 spaces for development with at least 20 units, and one additional space for every additional 20 dwelling units 
Offices  A minimum of one space for each 170 square metres of gross floor area.  Minimum of 6 spaces for any development with a minimum of 2,000 square metres of gross floor area 
Elementary schools  1 space for every 17 employees  1 space for every 5 students 
High School and Post-Secondary Schools  1 space for every 17 employees plus 0.4 space for every 10 students on a maximum attendance period  0.6 space for every 10 students on a maximum attendance period 
Restaurants, Bars, Retail, Personal; Service  One space for each 340 square metres of gross floor area  Minimum of 6 spaces for any development containing a minimum of 1,000 square metres of gross floor area 
Rooming unit or dwelling unit within a post secondary educational facility  0.75 per unit  0.25 per unit 
Airport; bus station; hospital; hotel; light industrial use; medical facility; technology industry; train station  N/A 1 per 1000 m2 of gross floor area 
(h) animal hospital; storage yard; truck transport terminal; warehouse  N/A  1 per 2000 m2 of gross floor area 
(i) all other non-residential uses  N/A  1 per 1500 m2 of gross floor area 

Passive supervision is defined as areas visible from high traffic or often occupied spaces.

2.21 Enhanced Bicycle Facilities

Enable cycling through access to safe and flexible storage facilities.

Requirement

Flexibility in size/type of parking facility - cargo, trailer. Provide secure purpose-built larger spaces for 20% to accommodate these vehicles

Supply electrical outlets in secure bicycle parking area for e-bikes. Sufficient outlets to service 20% of bike parking. Strategies to add multi-outlets are allowed.

2.22 Transit Access

Help to encourage transit use through improved access to transit facilities.

Requirement

Ensure quality linkages from building entrances to nearby transit stations.  This speaks to providing missing links of sidewalk outside the frontage limits.

Provide wayfinding signage on larger sites with multiple buildings for all transportation related amenities. Include bike parking locations, transit, ride hail information.

2.23 Enhanced Transit Facilities

Help to encourage transit use through improved transit facilities.

Requirement

When the building is next to a transit stop or requires that a new transit stop is added, project must install a shelter space for transit users with size based on mode share target.  This space is preferred in the right-of-way but can be provided in the building if insufficient right-of-way is available.

Shelter space refers to transit waiting area that provides protection from sun and rain. Where existing transit stop is already equipped with shelter space requirement is not

Plan of Subdivision Metrics Tier 1

There are 3 Tier 1 requirements or “metrics” that will apply to Plan of Subdivision applications.

Plan of Subdivision Tier 1 Metrics Index

1.1 Community Energy Plan

1.2 Tree Planting

1.3 Plant Species

 

1.1 Community Energy Plan

The Community Energy Plan ensures communities plan for the infrastructure necessary to move toward zero emissions and enables solutions that are only available if planned on community scale. For example, district energy is most efficient and cost effective when accounted for along with the other utility plans. Another example is that currently there are limitations on the electrical grid infrastructure’s capacity to connect to local renewable energy sources. This limits the number of net zero homes which may be constructed in any given area.

Requirement

Complete a Community Energy Plan as per the terms of reference document

1.2 Trees

Trees are an important part of our natural systems supporting natural species, managing heat island impacts, and supporting natural storm water management. To ensure healthy long living trees with large canopies, sufficient soil is critical. The standard lays out the planting requirements to support long term health and growth of the site’s trees.

Requirement

Volume of high-quality soil sufficient to support canopy cover on the site, as recommended in the City’s Tree Planting Guidelines.

30 m3 high quality soil required for street trees. Soil calculation can include continuous soil on private or public property. High quality soil excludes compacted soil, further details are provided in the Landscape Plan Terms of Reference.

Trees to be maintained and warrantied for a minimum of 2 years.

1.3 Planting

Climate projections suggest that we can expect more frequent summertime drought conditions in the coming decades. Plant selection is important for maintaining the long term health of greenspace set out in landscape design and address impacts to the larger natural heritage system. For this reason, the standard restricts invasive species and requires a large proportion of drought tolerant species.

Requirement

Landscape plan to include no invasive species and target a minimum 50% native plant species. Drought tolerant and pollinator friendly plant species preferred.

Vegetated buffers to be 100% native vegetation.

Plan of Subdivision Metrics Tier 2

This section lays out the draft requirements for Tier 2 Plan of Subdivision applications. Tier 2 is the voluntary component of the High Performance Development Standard.

Plan of Subdivision Tier 2 Metrics Index

2.1 Community Energy Plan

2.2 Extreme Wind and Snow Loading

2.3 Waste Storage

2.4 Construction Waste Management

2.1 Community Energy Plan

The purpose of a Community Energy Plan (CEP) is to support the transition to a low carbon future. A CEP is a key component in the design of a new community by using quantitative analysis to develop targeted strategies that reduce energy consumption and carbon emissions. The Community Energy Plan process is important because it ensures communities are equipped with the infrastructure necessary to move toward zero emissions and to enable solutions that are only available if planned on a community scale.

Requirement

  1. Complete a Community Energy Plan demonstrating energy emissions and resiliency targets on a community scale through measures such as district heating systems, micro grids or other development agreements. Subdivisions may take several years to build out, the community energy plan must factor in the expected build out rate and advance buildings toward near zero emission buildings by 2030.
    OR
  2. Commit to achieving individual energy performance levels as per below:

Use exterior measures, buildings shall be designed to meet or exceed one of the following (interior measures may be factored into the proposed design): 

  1. Total Energy Use Intensity (TEUI), Thermal Energy Demand Intensity (TEDI) and GHG Emission Intensity (GHGI) targets by for Part 9 buildings per table below
TEUI  (KWh/m²/yr)  TEDI (KWh/m²/yr)  GHGI   (kg CO2e/m²/yr) 
108  38  13 

OR 

  1. 40% energy emission improvement above the Ontario Building Code (OBC), SB-12;  

OR 

  1. Commit to pursue approved certification program  

Tier 2: R-2000®, CHBA NZe, NZEr, or Passive House, or equivalent. 

Certification programs are to be the current version as of date of submission following programs defined transition requirements if the submission falls within a version transition period. Equivalent programs to be approved by City, documentation demonstrating equivalency with respect to carbon emission performance, integrity and verification is to be provided by applicant for City to review

2.2 Extreme Wind and Snow Loading

Local climate projections suggest more extreme wind and other weather events are likely to occur more frequently in the coming years. Structural enhancements, particularly to low rise wood frame buildings, can help improve the resilience of our community to these events.

Requirement

Enhance wind and snow loading provisions for Part 9 wood frame buildings. Through the following strategies.

  • Hip roofs framed with engineered trusses are preferred.  
  • Hurricane [tie] or framing anchor on all rafter to wall connections shall be required. 
  • Laminate shingles rated for high wind speeds, install an ice-and-water shield over sheathing, or tape seams between roof sheathing panels are required. 
  • Roof sheathing (OSB or plywood) shall be nailed with 8d ring shank (0.131” × 2.5”) or 10d (0.148” × 3”) nails on 4” on center along the edges and 6” on center in the field. Dimensional lumber decking is not allowed. 
  • Wall sheathing required to overlap common rim joist and sill plate.  

Garage doors required to be rated to 217 km/h.

2.3 Waste Storage

Providing occupants with the tools necessary to conveniently sort and store waste from all streams is an important means of minimizing waste going to landfill. Divertible waste in the landfill (specifically organic and paper products) produce methane gas, a GHG that is 25 times more potent than Carbon Dioxide. It is important to take proactive measures to encourage diverting this material from landfill. Methane associated with landfill gas has a global warming potential 25 times that of Carbon Dioxide.

Requirement

Provide dedicated space in-unit for residents to store containers for the following waste streams, either by using an under-the-counter solution, closet solution, or other acceptable solution:  

  • Garbage 
  • Paper recycling 
  • Glass, Metal, Plastic recycling 
  • Food and Organic Waste 

2.4 Construction Waste Management

Benchmarking of construction waste management is a challenge in the industry. While many builders seek to reduce wasted material in order to minimize cost, without an industry benchmark it is difficult to evaluate if strategies are improving on the industry standard or just maintaining the status quo. By committing to share this information, this will help to build a reference data base which the City may seek academic partnerships to report on in aggregate.

Requirement

Commit to reporting on construction waste tracking. Tracking includes measurement of total weights of waste, from recycled and non recycled streams relative to constructed area using the downloadable excel template. Include a summary of strategies used to minimize waste and report of significant events that may have contributed to abnormal volumes. Significant events could include fires or flooding leading to significant material damage, or partially complete spaces.

A Guide to Waste Audits and Waste Reduction Work Plans For Construction & Demolition Projects

Frequently asked questions

When will the standard be fully implemented?

The HPDS will come into effect for new site plan and subdivision applications when the new Official Plan is approved by the Province. Tier 1 of the standard will be mandatory at this point. There is further phasing of requirements as outlined below:

Tier 1 building energy efficiency metrics will not apply until June 1, 2023 (i.e. Energy Modeling Reports will be “Report-Only” – see FAQ below)

  • Tier 1 metrics will apply to applications for extension and revision of plan of subdivision effective June 1, 2023
  • Tier 1 requirements for bike and electric vehicle parking will be introduced as part of the new Zoning By-law (post Official Plan adoption)
  • The mandatory metrics are expected to be updated in 2025 and will come into effect in 2026.

What about ongoing applications?

We encourage projects, including those that have already been through pre-consultation or submitted an application, to comply with the High Performance Development Standard. The HPDS will not apply to projects that have been through pre-consultation where the HPDS was not introduced OR are submitting an application prior to the new Official Plan receiving provincial approval. The HPDS will apply to applications for an extension or revision of draft plan approval (Plan of Subdivision) that are submitted on or after June 1, 2023.

What is the timing on incentives for Tier 2 projects?

There are currently no financial or process related incentives available to be implemented.  Staff have been directed to investigate incentive options and report back to Council in 2023.

What does “Report Only” mean for Energy Modeling Reports submitted before June 1, 2023?

The term “Report Only” describes an interim period until June 1, 2023 when Tier 1 energy targets must be met. The “Report Only” period will help staff and industry become more familiar with energy modeling reports and how energy efficiency is to be reviewed during the approval process. It is also for industry to gain a better understanding of the types measures projects can apply to achieve energy targets.

Are deviations from the mandatory metrics permitted?

The expectation is for projects to demonstrate full compliance with the HPDS metrics. Where full compliance cannot be achieved, documentation will be required that provides sufficient justification why a deviation from the standard is necessary. Permission to deviate from the HPDS shall be subject to the review and approval of the GM, Planning, Real Estate and Economic Development Department.  Example: A project has several separate roof spaces and is treating most of podium roof area which nearly meets the sustainable roofing requirement of the standard but to become in full compliance would have to treat the entire other roof area, resulting in significant cost.

How is a standard different from a guideline?

A standard is a set of specific measures to which a proponent must implement to the fullest extent.

  • Whereas a guideline is suggestive and general in nature, a standard is prescriptive and mandatory.
  • Whereas the Zoning By-law sets out a separate process to review nonconformity through the Committee of Adjustment, relief from a standard is subject to the review and approval by the Department based on justification provided by the applicant through the development approval process.
Requirements in standards and guidelines

Will the City provide training to the community on the HPDS?

Yes. More details are to be provided on training in Q3 2022. Until that time, specific questions should be directed to: hpds@ottawa.ca

Resources and Links