Enquête sur les terrains résidentiels vacants en milieu urbain

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Vacant Urban Residential Land Survey

This document monitors the supply of vacant residential land in Ottawa to determine if this supply meets policies in the City of Ottawa Official Plan (2003) and the Provincial Policy Statement. The supply, development potential and planned density of development of vacant residential land in areas inside and outside the Greenbelt is identified in the report. This report can be used as an informational tool for those wishing to have a general overview of the supply of vacant residential land in the urban areas of the City of Ottawa.

The following is only available for sale at the City Hall Client Service Centre:

  • Vacant Urban Residential Land Survey 2013 Update
  • Vacant Urban Residential Land Survey 2013 Update - Detailed Parcel List and Map

2019 Update

Since 1982, the Vacant Urban Residential Land Survey (VURLS) has monitored the supply of vacant urban residential land to determine if it meets policies of the Official Plan and the Provincial Policy Statement.

The survey includes a summary report, plus a map and detailed parcel list which shows unit potential, approval status, ownership, and other information for individual parcels.

Due to its technical nature, this report is available in English only. The City of Ottawa may translate this report or parts thereof on request. Requests for translation should be forwarded to Natalie Pulcine (natalie.pulcine@ottawa.ca).

Final report [ PDF 1.125 MB ]
Parcel listing [ PDF 367 KB ]
Map [ PDF 2.608 MB ]

Key Findings for 2019 include:

Land Supply
As of December 2019, there were 1,799 ha of vacant residential land in the suburban areas of Ottawa, with a total estimated development potential of 77,404 units.

Unit Consumption
In 2019, 4,365 units started construction, higher than the five-year average of 3,750 units and a 0.4 percent increase from 2018. Kanata-Stittsville led all areas with 35 percent units developed, followed by South Nepean at 25 percent. Kanata-Stittsville experience the greater year-over-year increase.

Area Consumption
In 2019, land consumption totalled 112.3 ha. Kanata-Stittsville led all areas with 40 percent of lands developed, followed by Orleans at 18 percent. Leitrim experienced the greatest year-over-year increase to reach 14 percent of lands developed.

Land Demand
Overall, annual unit demand on vacant urban residential land, excluding intensification, is 4,328 units and 87.2 ha of land.

Conclusion
Overall, the supply of land for new housing in Ottawa at the end of 2019 met all policies of the Official Plan and the Provincial Policy Statement for vacant urban residential land. Ottawa’s vacant residential land supply of 1,799 ha at the end of 2019 had an estimated potential for approximately 77,404 housing units.

2018 Update

Since 1982, the Vacant Urban Residential Land Survey (VURLS) has monitored the supply of vacant urban residential land to determine if it meets policies of the Official Plan and the Provincial Policy Statement.

The survey includes a summary report, plus a map and detailed parcel list which shows unit potential, approval status, ownership, and other information for individual parcels.

Due to its technical nature, this report is available in English only. The City of Ottawa may translate this report or parts thereof on request. Requests for translation should be forwarded to Natalie Pulcine (natalie.pulcine@ottawa.ca).

Final report [ PDF 1.281 MB ]
Parcel List [ PDF 297 KB ]
Map [ PDF 1.269 MB ]

Key Findings for 2018 include:

Land Supply
As of December 2018, there were 1,870 ha of vacant residential land in the suburban areas of Ottawa, with a total estimated development potential of 81,287 units.

Unit Consumption
In 2018, 4,348 units started construction, higher than the five-year average of 3,615 units and an 18.7 percent increase from 2017. Kanata-Stittsville led all areas with 43 percent units developed, followed by Orleans at 22 percent. Kanata-Stittsville experience the greater year-over-year increase.

Area Consumption
In 2018, land consumption totalled 114.6 ha. Kanata-Stittsville led all areas with 42 percent of lands developed, followed by Orleans at 23 percent. Riverside South experienced the greatest year-over-year increase to reach 13 percent of lands developed.

Land Demand
Overall, annual unit demand on vacant urban residential land, excluding intensification, is 3,189 units and 91.9 ha of land.

Conclusion
Overall, the supply of land for new housing in Ottawa at the end of 2018 met all policies of the Official Plan and the Provincial Policy Statement for vacant urban residential land. Ottawa’s vacant residential land supply of 1,870 ha at the end of 2018 had an estimated potential for approximately 81,287 housing units.

2017 Update

Since 1982, the Vacant Urban Residential Land Survey (VURLS) has monitored the supply of vacant urban residential land to determine if it meets policies of the Official Plan and Provincial Policy Statement.

The survey includes a summary report, plus a map and detailed parcel list which shows unit potential, approval status, ownership and other information for individual parcels.

Due to its technical nature, this report is available in English only. The City of Ottawa may translate this report or parts thereof on request. Requests for translation should be forwarded to Natalie Pulcine (natalie.pulcine@ottawa.ca).

Final Report [ PDF 1.414 KB ]
Parcel List [ PDF 334 KB ]
Map [ PDF 1.809 MB ]

Key findings for 2017 include:

Land Supply

As of December 2017, there were 2,024 ha of vacant residential land in the suburban areas of Ottawa, with a total estimated development potential of 79,465 units.

Unit Consumption

In 2017, 3,664 units started construction, higher than the five-year average of 3,467 units and a 6.2 percent increase from 2016.  Kanata-Stittsville led all areas with 37 percent of units developed, followed by Orléans at 25 percent. Riverside South experienced the greatest year-over-year increase to reach 10 percent of all units developed.

Area Consumption

In 2017, land consumption totalled 96.0 ha. Kanata-Stittsville led all areas with 40 percent of lands developed, followed by South Nepean at 22 percent. Riverside South experienced the greatest year-over-year increase to reach 11 percent of lands developed.

Land Demand

Overall, annual unit demand on vacant urban residential land, excluding intensification, is for 3,225 units and 93.2 ha of land.

Conclusion

Overall, the supply of land for new housing in Ottawa at the end of 2017 met all policies of the Official Plan and Provincial Policy Statement for vacant urban residential land. Ottawa’s vacant residential land supply of 2,024 ha at the end of 2017 had an estimated potential for approximately 79,465 housing units.

2016 Update

Since 1982, the Vacant Urban Residential Land Survey (VURLS) has monitored the supply of vacant urban residential land to determine if it meets policies of the Official Plan and Provincial Policy Statement.

The survey includes a summary report, plus a map and detailed parcel list which shows unit potential, approval status, ownership and other information for individual properties. Copies of the report and map with parcel list are available at the City Hall Client Service Centre.

Final report [ PDF 1.527 MB ]
Parcel List [ PDF 306 KB ]
Map [ PDF 1.203 MB ]

Due to its technical nature, this report is available in English only. The City of Ottawa may translate this report or parts thereof on request. Requests for translation should be forwarded to Natalie Pulcine (natalie.pulcine@ottawa.ca(link sends e-mail) ).

Key findings for 2016 include:

Land Supply

As of December 2016, there were 2,121 ha of vacant residential land in the suburban areas of Ottawa, with a total estimated development potential of 82,960 units.

Unit Consumption

In 2016, 3,451 units started construction, higher than the five-year average of 3,359 units and an 18 percent increase from 2015.  Kanata-Stittsville led all areas with 33 percent of units developed, followed by South Nepean at 31 percent. Orleans experienced the greatest year-over-year increase to reach 25 percent of all units developed.

Area Consumption

In 2016, land consumption totalled 95.5 ha. Kanata-Stittsville led all areas with 36 percent of lands developed, followed by South Nepean at 27 percent. Orleans experienced the greatest year-over-year increase to reach 24 percent of lands developed.

Land Demand

Overall, annual unit demand on vacant urban residential land, excluding intensification, is for 3,288 units and 95.8 ha of land.

Conclusion

Overall, the supply of land for new housing in Ottawa at the end of 2016 met all policies of the Official Plan and Provincial Policy Statement for vacant urban residential land. Ottawa’s vacant residential land supply of 2,121 ha at the end of 2016 had an estimated potential for approximately 82,960 housing units.

2015 Update

Since 1982, the Vacant Urban Residential Land Survey (VURLS) has monitored the supply of vacant urban residential land to determine if it meets policies of the Official Plan and Provincial Policy Statement.

The survey includes a summary report, plus a map and detailed parcel list which shows unit potential, approval status, ownership and other information for individual properties. Copies of the report and map with parcel list are available at the City Hall Client Service Centre.

Final report [ PDF 3.016 MB ]
Parcel List [ PDF 373 KB ]
Map [ PDF 1.578 MB ]

Due to its technical nature, this report is available in English only. The City of Ottawa may translate this report or parts thereof on request. Requests for translation should be forwarded
to Stream Shen (stream.shen@ottawa.ca ).

Key findings for 2015 include:

  • The inventoried supply of vacant suburban residential land and its unit potential stood at 2068 net hectares (ha) and 80,711 units at the end of 2015. This provides for well beyond the minimum 10-year requirement of the Provincial Policy Statement (PPS).
  • At projected consumption rates, the total vacant residential land supply is sufficient to approximately 2039.
  • The supply of registered and draft approved vacant land with servicing in 2015 (616 ha) represents a 6.5-year supply based on projected demand. This significantly exceeds the PPS requirement for a three-year supply of serviced registered and draft approved lots.
  • Total serviced land supply (1544 ha) is sufficient for about 16.4 years based on average demand over the past five years. By area, serviced supply is: Riverside South 69 years; Orléans 17.7 years; Kanata-Stittsville 15 years; Leitrim 9.3 years; and South Nepean 5.8 years.
  • Consumption of suburban residential land totalled 85 ha in 2015, below the five year average of 94 ha. Dwellings built on this land totalled 2922 units, below the five-year average of 3428 units.
  • The average density of housing built on land surveyed in 2015 was 34.4 units per net ha (upnh), slightly lower than the five-year average of 36.4 upnh.
  • Vacant land supply shares by area:
    • Kanata-Stittsville: 36 per cent
    • Riverside South: 24 per cent
    • Orléans: 21 per cent
    • South Nepean: 13 per cent
    • Leitrim: 6 per cent
  • The 10 largest landowners held 69 per cent of the residential land supply in 2015. The five largest landowners by area were:
    • Riverside South Development Corporation: 19 per cent
    • Minto Group: 9 per cent
    • Richcraft Homes: 8 per cent
    • Claridge Homes: 8 per cent
    • Mattamy Homes: 7 per cent

2014 Update

Since 1982, the Vacant Urban Residential Land Survey (VURLS) has monitored the supply of vacant urban residential land to determine if it meets policies of the Official Plan and Provincial Policy Statement.

The survey includes a summary report, plus a map and detailed parcel list which shows unit potential, approval status, ownership and other information for individual properties. Copies of the report and map with parcel list are available at the City Hall Client Service Centre.

Final report [ PDF 1.216 MB ]
Parcel List [ PDF 303 KB ]
Map [ PDF 1.892 MB ]

Highlights

The inventoried supply of vacant urban residential land and its unit potential stood at 2,181 net hectares (ha) and approximately 86,900 units at the end of 2014. This provides for well beyond the minimum 10-year requirement of the Provincial Policy Statement (PPS).

At projected consumption rates, the total vacant urban residential land supply is sufficient to at least 2038.

The supply of registered and draft approved vacant land with servicing in 2014 (593 ha) represents a six year supply based on projected demand. This significantly exceeds the PPS requirement for a three-year supply of serviced registered and draft approved lots.

Total serviced land supply is sufficient for about 16.6 years based on average demand over the past five years. By area, serviced supply is:

  • Kanata-Stittsville 16.4 years
  • South Nepean 6.2 years
  • Riverside South 66.7 years
  • Leitrim 10.4 years
  • Orléans 17.3 years.

Consumption of urban residential land totalled 96 net ha in 2014, below the five year average of 100 ha. Dwellings built on this land totalled 3,692 units, slightly above the five-year average of 3,663 units.

The average density of housing built on land surveyed in 2014 was 38.5 units/net ha (upnh). This is higher than the 2012 and 2013 figures of 37.6 and 37.5 upnh, respectively, making it the highest ever recorded by the survey.

Vacant land supply shares by area:

  • Kanata-Stittsville 37%
  • Orléans 22%
  • Riverside South 21%
  • South Nepean 13%
  • Leitrim 6%

The 10 largest landowners held 65% of the residential land supply in 2014:

  • Riverside South Development Corporation (16%)
  • Minto (9%)
  • Mattamy (8%)
  • Richcraft (7%)
  • Taggart (6%)
  • KNL Development (5%)
  • Regional (5%)
  • Claridge (4%)
  • CRT Developments (4%)
  • Tartan (3%)

2013 Update

Introduction

The Vacant Urban Residential Land Survey (VURLS) monitors the supply of vacant land in Ottawa's urban area to assess whether it meets the policies of the Official Plan and the Provincial Policy Statement1. The survey has been undertaken annually since 1982.

Highlights

  • The inventoried supply of vacant urban residential land and its unit potential stood at 2,328 net hectares (ha) and approximately 100,109 units at the end of 2013, compared to 2,478 ha and 103,407 units in December 2012. This provides for significantly more than the 10-year requirement of the Provincial Policy Statement (PPS).
  • The supply of registered and draft approved vacant land with servicing in 2013 (624 ha) represents a 5.7 year supply based on average demand over the past five years. This significantly exceeds the PPS requirement for a three year supply of serviced registered and draft approved lots.
  • Total serviced land supply is sufficient for about 16 years. By area, serviced supply is: Inside the Greenbelt 19.1 years; Kanata-Stittsville 16.0 years; South Nepean 8.6 years; Riverside South 75.9 years; Leitrim 10.7 years; and Orléans 13.5 years.
  • Consumption of urban residential land totalled 100 net ha in 2013, up from 84 ha in 2012 (Figure 1), but below the five year average of 109 ha. Dwellings built on this land totalled 4,293 units, an increase from the 3,291 built in 2012 (Figure 2) and above the five-year average of 4,133 units.
  • The average density of housing built on land surveyed in 2013 was 42.8 units/net ha. This is higher than the 2012 figure of 39.1 units/net ha which at the time was the highest ever recorded by the survey. The density of single-detached houses rose to 24.1 units/net ha from 22.9 units/net ha in 2012, also a record high.
  • Vacant land supply shares by area:
    • Kanata-Stittsville 35%
    • Orléans 21%
    • Riverside South 20%
    • South Nepean 14%
    • Leitrim 6%
    • Inside the Greenbelt 4%

The ten largest landowners held 59.0 per cent of the residential land supply in 2013, up from 56.2% in 2012. Major owners were Riverside South Development Corporation (RSDC) (14.9%), Minto (8.8%), Richcraft (7.2%), Taggart-Tamarack (5.5%), Mattamy (5.0%), Claridge (4.7%), KNL (4.6%), the Regional Group (4.5%), CRT Developments (3.3%), and Tartan (3.2%).

1Note: A detailed parcel list and accompanying map are also available showing unit potential, approval status and other information for each parcel. Contact City Client Service Centre at 580-2400 for copies.

2012 Update

 Introduction

The Vacant Urban Residential Land Survey (VURLS) monitors the supply of vacant land in Ottawa's urban area to assess whether it meets the policies of the Official Plan and the Provincial Policy Statement . The survey has been undertaken annually since 1982.

Highlights

  • The inventoried supply of vacant urban residential land and its unit potential stood at 2,478 net hectares (ha) and approximately 103,407 units at the end of 2012, compared to 2,093 ha and 88,875 units in December 2011. This is sufficient for approximately 22 years based on projected demand, significantly more than the 10-year requirement of the Provincial Policy Statement (PPS). This total includes urban land that was added by the June 2011 OMB decision.
  • The supply of registered and draft approved vacant land with servicing in 2012 (745 ha) represents a 6.5 year supply based on projected demand. This is higher than 2011 (594 ha), and exceeds the PPS requirement for a three year supply of serviced registered and draft approved lots.
  • Total serviced land supply is sufficient for about 15 years. By area, serviced supply is: Inside the Greenbelt 2.3 years; Kanata-Stittsville 16.4 years; South Nepean 8.6 years; Riverside South 79.9 years; Leitrim 13.0 years; and Orléans 9.7 years.
  • Consumption of urban residential land totalled 84 net ha in 2012, down from 116 ha in 2011 (Figure 1), and below the five year average of 119 ha. Dwellings built on this land totalled 3,291 units, a drop from the 4,204 built in 2011 (Figure 2) and below the five-year average of 4,282 units.
  • The average density of housing built on land surveyed in 2012 was 39.1 units/net ha. This is higher than the 2011 figure of 36.1 units/net ha which at the time was the highest ever recorded by the survey. The density of single-detached houses edged up to 22.9 units/net ha after falling slightly to 22.3 units/net ha in 2011.

Vacant land supply shares by area:

    • Kanata-Stittsville 36%
    • Orléans 20%
    • Riverside South 19%
    • South Nepean 15%
    • Leitrim 6%
    • Inside the Greenbelt 4%

The 10 largest landowners held 56.2 percent of the residential land supply in 2012, down from 61.0% in 2011. Major owners were Richcraft (9.7%), Urbandale (9.5%), Minto (8.4%), Taggart-Tamarack (5.4%), Mattamy (5.0%), Claridge (4.9%), KNL (4.6%), Ashcroft (3.1%), CRT Developments (3.1%) and Tartan (2.4%). If partnerships are considered, Richcraft and Urbandale together accounted for about 24% of the land supply.

Note: A detailed parcel list and accompanying map are also available showing unit potential, approval status and other information for each parcel. Contact City Client Service Centre at 580-2400 for copies.

2011 Update

Introduction

The Vacant Urban Residential Land Survey (VURLS) monitors the supply of vacant land in Ottawa’s urban area to assess whether it meets the policies of the Official Plan and the Provincial Policy Statement. The survey has been undertaken annually since 1982.

Highlights

  • The inventoried supply of vacant urban residential land and its unit potential stood at 2,093 net hectares (ha) and approximately 88,875 units at the end of 2011, compared to 2,301 ha and 96,859 units in December 2010. This is sufficient for approximately 19 years based on projected demand, significantly more than the 10-year requirement of the Provincial Policy Statement (PPS). This does not include additional urban land required to be added by the June 2011 OMB decision. 
  • The supply of registered and draft approved vacant land with servicing in 2011 (594 ha) represents a 5.1 year supply based on projected demand. This is slightly lower than 2010 (647 ha), and exceeds the PPS requirement for a three year supply of serviced registered and draft approved lots. 
  • Total serviced land supply is sufficient for about 12 years. By area, serviced supply is: Inside the Greenbelt 10.7 years; Kanata-Stittsville 9.9 years; South Nepean 7.5 years; Riverside South 28.8 years; Leitrim 16.5 years; and Orléans 9.2 years. 
  • Consumption of urban residential land totalled 116 net ha in 2011, down from 118 ha in 2010 (Figure 1), and below the five year average of 134 ha. Dwellings built on this land totalled 4,204 units, a drop from the 4,429 built in 2010 (Figure 2) and below the five-year average of 4,619 units. 
  • The average density of housing built on land surveyed in 2011 was 36.1 units/net ha. This is lower than the 2010 figure of 37.6 units/net ha which was the highest ever recorded by the survey. The density of single-detached houses continued the decline it began in 2010, falling from 22.8 units/net ha to 22.3 units/ha in 2011.
  • Vacant land supply shares by area:
    • Kanata-Stittsville 36.8%
    • Riverside South 22.6%
    • South Nepean 16.5%
    • Orléans 14.0%
    • Leitrim 5.4%
    • Inside the Greenbelt 4.6%
  • The ten largest landowners held 60.9 percent of the residential land supply in 2011, down from 63.4% in 2010. Major owners were Richcraft (11.7%), Urbandale (10.8%), Minto (9.0%), Mattamy (5.9%), KNL (5.4%), Claridge (4.7%), Ashcroft (3.9%), CRT Developments and Taggart-Tamarack (3.6%), and Tartan (2.3%). If partnerships are considered, Richcraft and Urbandale together accounted for about 32% of the land supply.

Note: A detailed parcel list and accompanying map are also available showing unit potential, approval status and other information for each parcel. Contact City Client Service Centre at 580-2400 for copies.

2010 Update

Introduction

The Vacant Urban Residential Land Survey (VURLS) has, since 1982, monitored the supply of vacant land in Ottawa’s urban area to assess whether it meets the policies of the Official Plan and the Provincial Policy Statement .

Highlights

  • The inventoried supply of vacant urban residential land and its unit potential stood at 2,301 net hectares (ha) and approximately 96,859 units at the end of 2010, compared to 2,327 ha and 94,070 units in December 2009. This is sufficient for approximately 18 years based on projected demand, significantly more than the 10-year requirement of the Provincial Policy Statement (PPS). This does not include additional urban land required to be added by the June 2011 OMB decision.
  • The supply of registered and draft approved vacant land with servicing in 2010 (647 ha) represents a 5.4 year supply based on projected demand. This is virtually unchanged from 2009 (652 ha), and exceeds the PPS requirement for a three year supply of serviced registered and draft approved lots.
  • Total serviced land supply is sufficient for 12 years. By area, serviced land supply is: Inside the Greenbelt 8.8 years; Kanata-Stittsville 9.4 years; South Nepean 7.9 years; Riverside South 23.6 years; Leitrim 21.9 years; and Orléans 12.4 years.
  • Consumption of urban residential land totalled 116 net ha in 2010, down from 126 ha in 2009 (Figure 1), and below the five year average of 135 ha. Dwellings built on this land totalled 4,422 units, little changed from 4,427 in 2009.
  • The average density of housing built on land surveyed in 2010, at 38.3 units per net ha, is the highest ever recorded by the survey. However, after five years of steady increase, the density of single-detached houses declined slightly from 23.0 units/net ha in 2009 to 22.8 in 2010.
    • Vacant land supply shares by area:
    • Kanata-Stittsville 35%
    • Riverside South 21%
    • South Nepean 17%
    • Orléans 16%
    • Leitrim 6%
    • Inside the Greenbelt 5%
  • The ten largest landowners held 63.4 percent of the residential land supply in 2010, down from 64.4% in 2009. Major owners were Richcraft (12.8%), Urbandale (10.2%), Minto (9.5%), Mattamy (6.2%), KNL (5.1%), Claridge (4.9%), CRT Developments (3.9%), Ashcroft (3.8%), Taggart-Tamarack (3.6%), and Tartan (3.4%). If partnerships are considered, Richcraft and Urbandale together accounted for about 28% of the land supply.

1Note: A detailed parcel list and accompanying map are also available showing unit potential, approval status and other information for each parcel. Contact City Client Service Centre at 613-580-2400 for copies.

2009 Update

Introduction

The Vacant Urban Residential Land Survey (VURLS) has, since 1982, monitored the supply of vacant land in Ottawa's urban area to assess whether it meets the policies of the Official Plan and the Provincial Policy Statement. 1

Highlights

  • The inventoried supply of vacant urban residential land and its unit potential stood at 2,327 net hectares (ha) and approximately 94,070 units at the end of 2009, compared to 2,441 ha and 96,100 units in December 2008 (these figures include land added to the urban area by Council in June 2009 as part of Official Plan Amendment No. 76.) This is sufficient for significantly more than the 10 year requirement of the 2005 Provincial Policy Statement (PPS) based on projected growth in the next decade.
  • The supply of land serviced with trunk sewers and watermains represents approximately an 11 year supply based on projected demand. This significantly exceeds the requirement of a three year supply of serviced land set out in the PPS.
  • The supply of serviced land by area is: Inside the Greenbelt 3.9 years; Kanata-Stittsville 8.9 years; South Nepean 8.9 years; Riverside South 19.1 years; Leitrim 18.8 years; and Orléans 13.4 years.
  • The supply of registered and draft approved vacant land with servicing in 2009 (654 ha) represents a 5.1 year supply based on projected demand. This is virtually unchanged from 2008 (662 ha), and exceeds the PPS requirement for a three year supply of serviced registered and draft approved lots.
  • Consumption of urban residential land in 2009 totalled 126 net ha, down from 149 ha in 2008 (Figure 1), and below the five year average of 136 ha. Dwelling units constructed on these lands totalled 4,427, down from 5,039 in 2008 (Figure 2).
  • The average density of housing built on land surveyed in 2009, at 35.3 units per net ha, was the highest ever recorded by the survey. In the last two years, the density of single-detached houses has increased by 8%.
  • Vacant land supply shares by area:
    • Kanata-Stittsville 36%
    • Riverside South 22%
    • Orléans 18%
    • South Nepean 17%
    • Leitrim 5%
    • Inside the Greenbelt 2%
  • The ten largest landowners held 64.5 percent of the residential land supply in 2009, down from 72% in 2008. Major owners were Richcraft (15.2%), Urbandale (9.9%), Minto (8.1%), Mattamy (6.6%), Claridge (5.3%), KNL (5.0%), Taggart/Tamarack (4.1%), Ashcroft (3.8%), CRT Developments (3.3%) and Tartan (3.1%). If partner-ships are considered, Richcraft and Urbandale together accounted for about 32% of the land supply.

1Note: A detailed parcel list and accompanying map are also available showing unit potential, approval status and other information for individual parcels. To obtain copies, contact the City Client Service Centre at 580-2400 (refer to publication #13-18).

2008 Update

Introduction

Since 1982, the Vacant Urban Residential Land Survey (VURLS) has monitored the supply of vacant land in Ottawa's urban area to assess whether it meets the policies of the Official Plan and the Provincial Policy Statement. 1

Highlights

  • The inventoried supply of vacant urban residential land and its unit potential stood at 2,441 net hectares (ha) and 96,100 units at the end of 2008, compared to 2,606 ha and 100,490 units in December 2007. (These figures do not include land added to the urban area by Council in June 2009 as part of the OP review.) This is sufficient for significantly more than the 10 year requirement of the Provincial Policy Statement (PPS) based on projected growth in the next decade.
  • The supply of land serviced with trunk sewers and watermains represents a 10.4 year supply based on projected demand. This exceeds the requirement of a three year supply of serviced land set out in the PPS.
  • The supply of serviced land by area is: Inside the Greenbelt 3.8 years; Kanata-Stittsville 10.4 years; South Nepean 9.9 years; Riverside South 6.8 years; Leitrim 20.9 years; and Orléans 12.9 years.
  • The supply of registered and draft approved vacant land with servicing in 2008 (662 ha) represents a 5.2 year supply based on projected demand. This is virtually unchanged from 2007 (672 ha), and is above the PPS requirement for a three year supply of serviced registered and draft approved lots.
  • Consumption of urban residential land in 2008 totalled 149 net ha, down from 154 ha in 2007 (Figure 1), but above the five year average of 145 ha. Dwelling units constructed on these lands totalled 5,039, up from 4,974 units in 2007 (Figure 2).
  • The average density of housing built on land surveyed in 2008, at 33.9 units per net ha, was the highest recorded since the survey began monitoring in 1983. Over the last two years, the density of single detached homes was up by almost 8%. Townhouse densities were nearly 3% higher.
  • Vacant land supply shares by area:
    • Kanata-Stittsville 34%
    • Riverside South 22%
    • South Nepean 18%
    • Orléans 18%
    • Leitrim 6%
    • Inside the Greenbelt 2%
  • Registered and draft approved land inside the Greenbelt fell to 5% of all such land in the survey in 2008, down from 6% in 2007.
  • Ten major landowners held over 70 percent of the residential land supply in 2008. Major owners were Richcraft (14.0%), Urbandale (13.0%), Minto (9.9%), Mattamy (6.1%), Monarch (5.6%), Brookfield (5.4%), Claridge (5.2%), KNL Developments (4.9%), Tartan (3.2%) and the City of Ottawa (3.0%). If partnerships are considered, Richcraft and Urbandale together account for 32% of the land supply.

1Note: A detailed parcel list and accompanying map are also available showing unit potential, approval status and other information for individual parcels. To obtain copies, contact the City Client Service Centre at 580-2400 (refer to publication #13-18).

2007 Update

Introduction

The 2007 survey marks the 25th anniversary of the Vacant Urban Residential Land Survey (VURLS). Since 1982, VURLS has monitored the supply of vacant residential land in Ottawa to determine if this supply meets policies in the Official Plan and the Provincial Policy Statement.1

Highlights

  • The inventoried supply of vacant urban residential land and its unit potential stood at 2,606 net hectares (ha) and 100,490 units at the end of 2007, compared to 2,751 ha and 104,368 units in December 2006. This is sufficient for more than the 10-year requirement of the 2005 Provincial Policy Statement based on average consumption rates over the previous five years. The issue of more precisely how many years the land supply will provide for is currently under review as part of the update of the Official Plan.
  • The supply of land serviced with trunk sewers and watermains represents a 10.4-year supply based on average demand over the last five years. This exceeds the objective of a three-year supply of serviced land set out in the Provincial Policy Statement.
  • The supply of serviced land by area is as follows: Inside the Greenbelt 3.0 years, Kanata-Stittsville 10.7 years, South Nepean 9.6 years, Riverside South 8.0 years, Leitrim 22.2 years, and Orléans 14.3 years.
  • The supply of registered and draft approved vacant land with servicing in December 2007 (672 ha) represents a 4.6-year supply based on average consumption between 2003 and 2007. This is a decrease from 2006 (862 ha), but is above the Provincial Policy requirement for a three-year supply of serviced registered and draft approved lots.
  • Consumption of vacant urban residential land in 2007 totalled 154 net ha, up from 133 ha in 2006 (see Figure 1) and above the five year average of 146 ha. Dwelling units constructed on these lands totalled 4,974, up from 4,108 in 2006 (Figure 2).
  • The overall density of housing built on land surveyed in 2007, at 32.3 units per net ha, was the highest recorded since the survey began monitoring density in 1983. Over the last two years, the density of single detached homes was up by almost 8 per cent and townhouse densities were 13 per cent higher.
  • Vacant land supply shares by area:
    • Kanata: 34 per cent
    • Riverside South: 21 per cent
    • South Nepean: 19 per cent
    • Orléans: 18 per cent
    • Leitrim: 5 per cent
    • Inside the Greenbelt 3 per cent
  • Registered and draft approved land inside the Greenbelt remained steady at 6 per cent of all such land in the survey at the end of 2007.
  • Ten major landowners held 58 per cent of the urban residential land supply in 2007. Major owners were Richcraft (16.0 per cent), Urbandale (9.9 per cent), Minto (6.7 per cent), Brookfield (5.1 per cent), KNL Developments (4.6 per cent), Mattamy (4.2 per cent), Westpark (4.0 per cent), Tartan (3.3 per cent), Claridge (2.1 per cent), and the City of Ottawa (2.0 per cent). If partnerships are considered, Richcraft and Urbandale together account for 30 per cent of the land supply.

1Note: A detailed parcel list and accompanying map are also available showing unit potential, approval status and other information for individual parcels. To obtain copies, contact the City Client Service Centre at 580-2400 (refer to publication #13-18).

2006 Update

Introduction

Since 1982, the Vacant Urban Residential Land Survey has monitored the supply of vacant residential land in Ottawa to determine if this supply meets policies in the Official Plan1 and the Provincial Policy Statement.

Note: A detailed parcel list and accompanying map are also available showing unit potential, approval status and other information for individual parcels. To obtain copies, contact the City Client Service Centre at 3-1-1 (refer to publication #13-18).

Highlights

  • The inventoried supply of vacant urban residential land and its unit potential stood at 2,751 net hectares and 104,368 units at the end of 2006, compared to 2,930 hectares and 106,668 units in December 2005. This supply is sufficient for 23 years at consumption rates based on 2007 draft projections for 2006-2031 and is well above the 10-year requirement of the 2005 Provincial Policy Statement.
  • The supply of land serviced with trunk sewers and watermains represents a 12.3-year supply based on average demand over the last five years or a 15.2-year supply based on projected consumption. This exceeds the objective of a three year supply of serviced land set out in the Provincial Policy Statement.
  • The supply of serviced land by area is as follows: Inside the Greenbelt 3.9 years, Kanata/Stittsville 13.4 years, Orléans 14.9 years, South Nepean 11.4 years, Riverside South 9.6 years and Leitrim 29.2 years.
  • The supply of registered and draft-approved vacant land with servicing in December 2006 (862 hectares) represents a 5.8-year supply, based on average consumption between 2002 and 2006, or 7.1 years based on projected consumption. This is an increase from 2005 (673 hectares), and is above the requirement of the Provincial Policy for a three-year supply of serviced registered and draft-approved lots.
  • C· Consumption of vacant urban residential land in 2006 totalled 133 net hectares, up from 117 net hectares in 2005 (see Figure 1), but below the average of the last five years of 150 ha. Dwelling units constructed on these lands totalled 4,108, up from 3,382 in 2005 (Figure 2).
  • Vacant land supply shares by area:
    • Kanata: 34 per cent
    • Riverside South: 21 per cent
    • South Nepean: 19 per cent
    • Orléans: 18 per cent
    • Leitrim: 5 per cent
    • Inside the Greenbelt 3 per cent
  • Registered and draft-approved land inside the Greenbelt totalled 6 per cent of all such land in the survey at the end of 2006, down from 8 per cent in 2005.
  • Ten major landowners held fifty-four percent of the urban residential land supply in 2006. Major owners were Richcraft (15.4 per cent), Urbandale (10.5 per cent), Brookfield (4.8 per cent), KNL Developments (4.4 per cent), Minto (4.4 per cent), Mattamy (3.9 per cent), Westpark (3.9 per cent), Tartan (3.5 per cent), City of Ottawa (2.2 per cent) and Claridge Homes (2.0 per cent). If partnerships are considered, Richcraft and Urbandale together account for 30.3 per cent of the vacant land supply.

1Refers to the approved City of Ottawa Official Plan (2003) as modified by the Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing on November 10, 2003, as altered by amendments in effect at the end of 2006, and as modified by the Ontario Municipal Board in various decisions up to the end of 2006.

2005 Update

Introduction

Since 1982, the Vacant Urban Residential Land Survey has monitored the supply of vacant residential land in Ottawa to determine if this supply meets policies in the Official Plan1 and the Provincial Policy Statement.

Note: A detailed parcel list and accompanying map are also available showing unit potential, status and other information for individual parcels. To obtain copies, contact the City Client Service Centre at 3-1-1 (refer to publication #13-18).

Highlights

  • The inventoried supply of vacant urban residential land and its unit potential stood at 2,930 net hectares and 106,668 units at the end of 2005, compared to 2,087 hectares and 65,920 units in December 2004. The large increase in supply is due to changing the basis of the survey to the City of Ottawa Official Plan from the 1997 Regional Plan. This supply is sufficient for 24 years at consumption rates projected in the 1997 Official Plan, and is well above the 10-year requirement of the 2005 Provincial Policy Statement.
  • The supply of land serviced with trunk sewers and water mains represents an 11.1-year supply based on projected consumption, or 13.8 years based on average demand over the last five years. This exceeds the objective of a three-year supply of serviced land set out in the Provincial Policy Statement.
  • The supply of serviced land by area is as follows: Inside the Greenbelt 4.1 years, Kanata/Stittsville 13.9 years, Orléans 10.2 years, South Nepean 7.3 years, Riverside South 20.0 years and Leitrim 37.8 years.
  • The supply of registered and draft-approved vacant land in December 2005 (673 hectares) represents a 4.4-year supply, based on average consumption between 2001 and 2005, or 5.5 years based on projected consumption. This is a decrease from 2004 (755 hectares), but still exceeds the requirement of the Provincial Policy for a three-year supply of registered and draft-approved lots.
  • Consumption of vacant urban residential land in 2005 totalled 117 net hectares, down from 172 net hectares in 2004 (see Figure 1). Dwelling units constructed on these lands totalled 3,382, down from 5,002 in 2004 (Figure 2).
  • Vacant land supply shares by area:
    • Kanata: 30 per cent
    • Riverside South: 20 per cent
    • South Nepean: 19 per cent
    • Orléans: 19 per cent
    • Leitrim: five per cent
    • Stittsville: four per cent
    • Inside the Greenbelt: three per cent
  • Registered and draft-approved land inside the Greenbelt totalled eight per cent of all such land in the survey at the end of 2005, down from nine per cent in 2004.
  • Ten major landowners held 48 per cent of the urban residential land supply in 2005. Major owners were Riverside South Development Corporation (13.2 per cent), Brookfield (5.3 per cent), KNL Developments (4.1per cent), Minto (4.0 per cent), Richcraft (3.8 per cent), Westpark (3.6per cent), Tartan (3.3 per cent), Shenkman (3.1per cent), City of Ottawa (2.8 per cent) and Mattamy Development Corporation (2.4 per cent). If partnerships are considered however, Richcraft and Urbandale account for 29 per cent of the vacant land supply.

1Refers to the approved City of Ottawa Official Plan (2003) as modified by the Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing on November 10, 2003, as altered by amendments in effect at the end of 2005, and as modified by the Ontario Municipal Board in various decisions up to the end of 2005. The survey includes lands added to the urban area following from the August 2005 OMB decision on the Del, Brookfield and Westpark lands. Because projections in the new 2003 Official Plan are under appeal, and not legally in effect, this report uses projections contained in the 1997 Regional Plan.

2004 Update

Introduction

Since 1982, the Vacant Urban Residential Land Survey has monitored the supply of vacant residential land in Ottawa to determine if this supply meets policies in the Official Plan1 and the Provincial Policy Statement.

Note: A detailed parcel list and accompanying map are also available showing unit potential, status and other information for individual parcels; to obtain copies, contact the City Client Service Centre at 3-1-1 (refer to publication #13-18).

Highlights

  • The inventoried supply of vacant urban residential land and its unit potential stood at 2,087 net hectares and 65,920 units at the end of 2004, compared to 2,142 hectares and 68,763 units in December 2003. This supply is sufficient for 16.8 years at consumption rates projected in the 1997 Official Plan, and is well above the 10-year requirement of the Provincial Policy Statement.  
  • The supply of land serviced with trunk sewers and watermains represents a 9.8-year supply based on projected consumption, or 7.4 years based on average demand over the last five years. This meets and exceeds the objective of a 5-year supply of serviced land set out in the 1997 Official Plan.
  • The supply of serviced land by area is as follows: Inside the Greenbelt 4.0 years, Kanata/Stittsville 9.7 years, Orléans 5.7 years, South Nepean 3.9 years, South Gloucester 14 years and Leitrim 15.2 years.  
  • The supply of registered and draft-approved vacant land in December 2004 (755 hectares) represents a 4.7-year supply, based on average consumption between 2000 and 2004, or 6.1 years based on projected consumption. This is a significant increase from 2003 (532 hectares), and exceeds the requirement of the Official Plan for a three-year supply of registered and draft-approved lots.  
  • Consumption of vacant urban residential land in 2004 totalled 172 net hectares, up from 155 net hectares in 2003 (see Figure 1). Dwelling units constructed on these lands totalled 5,002, up from 4,385 in 2003 (Figure 2).
  • Vacant land supply shares by area:
    • Orléans 27 per cent
    • South Nepean 17 per cent
    • South Gloucester: 19 per cent
    • Kanata: 21 per cent
    • Stittsville: 7 per cent
    • Leitrim: 6 per cent
    • Inside the Greenbelt: 5 per cent
  • Registered and draft-approved land inside the Greenbelt totalled nine per cent of all such land in the survey at the end of 2004, down from 13 per cent in 2003.  
  • Ten major landowners held 59 percent of the urban residential land supply in 2004. Major owners were Richcraft (15 per cent), Minto (10 per cent), Urbandale (eight per cent), KNL Developments (six per cent), South Nepean Development Corporation (five per cent), City of Ottawa (four per cent), Tartan (three per cent), Claridge (three per cent), Shenkman (two per cent) and Mattamy (two per cent). However, if partnerships are accounted for, 42 per cent of the land supply is controlled by only three owners: Richcraft, Minto, and Urbandale.

1 Refers to the approved 1997 Regional Official Plan as modified by the Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing on October 21, 1997 and by the Ontario Municipal Board on September 28, 1998, March 1, 5, and April 20, 1999 and October 30, 2000. Because the new 2003 Official Plan is under appeal, and not legally in effect, this report uses projections contained in the 1997 Regional Plan.

2003 Update

Introduction

Since 1982, the Vacant Urban Residential Land Survey has monitored the supply of vacant residential land in Ottawa to determine if this supply meets policies in the Official Plan1 and the Provincial Policy Statement.

Note: A detailed parcel list and accompanying map are also available showing unit potential, status and other information for individual parcels; to obtain copies, contact the City Client Service Centre at 580-2400 (refer to publication #13-18).

Highlights

  • The inventoried supply of vacant urban residential land and its unit potential stood at 2,142 net hectares and 68,763 units at the end of 2003, compared to 2,240 hectares and 68,863 units in December 2002. This supply is sufficient for 16.6 years at consumption rates projected in the 1997 Official Plan, and is well above the 10-year requirement of the Provincial Policy Statement.
  • The supply of land serviced with trunk sewers and watermains represents a 10.4-year supply based on projected consumption, or 8.7 years based on average demand over the last five years. This meets and exceeds the objective of a 5-year supply of serviced land set out in the 1997 Official Plan.  
  • The supply of serviced land by area is as follows: Inside the Greenbelt 4.5 years, Kanata/Stittsville 10.2 years, Orléans 8.5 years, South Nepean 4.2 years South Gloucester 22 years and Leitrim 15.7 years.  
  • The supply of registered and draft-approved vacant land in December 2003 (532 hectares) represents a 3.4-year supply, based on average consumption between 1999 and 2003, or 4.0 years based on projected consumption. This is a decrease from 2002 (642 hectares), but still meets the requirement of the Official Plan for a three-year supply of registered and draft-approved lots.
  • Consumption of vacant urban residential land in 2003 totalled 155 net hectares, down from 172 net hectares in 2002.  
  • Vacant land supply shares by area:
    • Orléans: 26 per cent
    • South Nepean: 17 per cent
    • South Gloucester: 20 per cent
    • Kanata: 18 per cent
    • Stittsville: 8 per cent
    • Leitrim: 6 per cent
    • Inside the Greenbelt: 6 per cent
  • Registered and draft-approved land inside the Greenbelt totalled 13 per cent of all such land in the survey at the end of 2003, up from 11 per cent in 2002.  
  • Eight major landowners held 55 percent of the urban residential land supply in 2003. Major owners were Richcraft (14 per cent), Urbandale (9 per cent), Minto (9 per cent), South Nepean Development Corporation (6 per cent), KNL Developments (6 per cent), Tartan (4 per cent), City of Ottawa (4 per cent) and Claridge (3 per cent). However, if partnerships are accounted for, close to 50 per cent of the land supply is controlled by only four owners: Richcraft, Minto, Urbandale and Tartan.

1Refers to the approved 1997 Regional Official Plan as modified by the Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing on October 21, 1997 and by the Ontario Municipal Board on September 28, 1998, March 1, 5, and April 20, 1999 and October 30, 2000. Because the new 2003 Official Plan is under appeal, and not legally in effect, this report uses projections contained in the 1997 Regional Plan.

2002 Update

Introduction 

Since 1982, the Vacant Urban Residential Land Survey has monitored the supply of vacant residential land in Ottawa to determine if this supply meets policies in the Official Plan1 and the Provincial Policy Statement.

Note: A detailed parcel list and accompanying map are also available showing unit potential, status and other information for individual parcels; to obtain copies, contact the City Client Service Centre at 3-1-1 (refer to publication #13-17).

Highlights

  • The inventoried supply of vacant urban residential land and its unit potential stood at 2,232 net hectares and 67,156 units at the end of 2002, compared to 2,316 hectares and 74,737 units in December 2001. This supply is sufficient for 15.9 years at consumption rates projected in the 1997 Official Plan, and is well above the 10-year requirement of the Provincial Policy Statement.  
  • The supply of land serviced with trunk sewers and watermains represents a 9.5 year supply based on projected consumption, or 8.8 years based on average demand over the last five years. This meets the objective of a 5-year supply of serviced land set out in the 1997 Official Plan.  
  • The supply of serviced land by area is as follows: Inside the Greenbelt 3.8 years, Kanata/Stittsville 8.1 years, Orléans 10.5 years, South Nepean 5 years, South Gloucester 18.9 years. Leitrim had 157 ha of serviced land available as of December 2002.  
  • The supply of registered and draft-approved vacant land in December 2002 (642 hectares) represents a 4.2-year supply, based on average consumption between 1998 and 2002, or 4.6 years based on projected consumption. This is a significant increase from 2001 (483 ha), and exceeds the requirement of the Official Plan for a three-year supply of registered and draft-approved lots.  
  • Consumption of vacant urban residential land in 2002 totalled 172 net hectares, up from 152 net hectares in 2001 (see Figure 1).
  • Vacant land supply shares by area:
    • Kanata 16%
    • Orléans 27%
    • South Nepean 19%
    • South Gloucester 19%
    • Leitrim 7%,
    • Stittsville 8%.
    • Inside the Greenbelt 5% 
  • Registered and draft-approved land inside the Greenbelt totalled 11% of all such land in the survey at the end of 2002, down from 12% in 2001.
  • Fifty-six percent of the urban residential land supply was held by eight major landowners in 2002. Major owners were Richcraft (13%), Urbandale (10%), Minto (9%), South Nepean Development Corporation (7%), Tartan (5%), KNL Developments (4%), City of Ottawa (4%) and Claridge/Tenth Line Developments (4%). Both South Nepean Development Corporation and KNL Developments are partnerships of the largest developers. South Nepean Development Corporation includes Minto and Shenkman, while KNL Developments is comprised of Urbandale and Richcraft, so their effective shares are higher.

1 Refers to the approved 1997 Regional Official Plan as modified by the Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing on October 21, 1997 and by the Ontario Municipal Board on September 28, 1998, March 1, 5, and April 20, 1999 and October 30, 2000. Because Council had not adopted the new Official Plan as of December 2002, this report uses projections contained in the 1997 Regional Plan.